login

Author Topic: Video Games= Evil  (Read 15043 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline sarcasm_made_Easy

  • Compsognathus
  • *****
  • Posts: 10320
  • Liked: 15
Re: Video Games= Evil
« Reply #30 on: March 01, 2007, 04:49:15 PM »
I would like to see a study on why pickles dont taste ANYTHING like cucumbers


Offline Variety of Cells

  • Dragon Ryder
  • ***
  • Posts: 6405
  • Liked: 1796
Re: Video Games= Evil
« Reply #31 on: March 01, 2007, 05:28:25 PM »


Offline daltysmilth

  • Bilbo Baggins Balladeer
  • ******
  • Posts: 4006
  • Liked: 45
  • This is MY Enterprise. Eat it, Abrams!
    • My Space
Re: Video Games= Evil
« Reply #32 on: March 01, 2007, 06:14:09 PM »
So having even temporary exposure to violent video games can encourage agressive behavior?  I wonder if this same group would conclude that having even temporary exposure to food can encourage gluttonous behavior, or that being exposed, even for a brief length of time, to erotic imagery can lead to lustful behavior. 
CROW:  (Sinisterly) The Secret Government Eggo Project...
--Mystery Science Theater 3000: The Movie

"Jason, Chess is a game of chance."
-- My friend Shawn to my friend Jason upon being defeated at a game of Chess.

http://gh.ffshrine.org?r=112104


Offline sarcasm_made_Easy

  • Compsognathus
  • *****
  • Posts: 10320
  • Liked: 15
Re: Video Games= Evil
« Reply #33 on: March 01, 2007, 06:18:44 PM »
Quote
I wonder if this same group would conclude that having even temporary exposure to food can encourage gluttonous behavior, or that being exposed, even for a brief length of time, to erotic imagery can lead to lustful behavior. 

well it certainly seems to for me


Offline Pak-Man

  • Global Moderator
  • *****
  • Posts: 18100
  • Liked: 3934
  • Insert $0.25 to Play!
Re: Video Games= Evil
« Reply #34 on: March 01, 2007, 08:20:59 PM »
I'd like to see that same test performed on children who are involved in a football game. It sounds like they're testing for competitive spirit more than agressiveness.


Offline Minnesota

  • Climbed El Capitan
  • *******
  • Posts: 5375
  • Liked: 4
  • Twins Territory
Re: Video Games= Evil
« Reply #35 on: March 01, 2007, 08:25:56 PM »

Quote
the games Mortal Kombat and Grand Theft Auto.


The list courtesy of my previous top ten post, dammit I've always suspected I was Evil this just confirms it ;)
Minnesota's Ten
1. RBI Baseball - immeasurable time spent on this game
2. GTA III - Worth buying 3 ps2's for (these things break alot)
3. Super Mario Bros. 3 - The best of the series
4. Tony Hawk - Hard to choose a specific version but 4 is my fav
5. Super Mario Bros. 1 - simple yet perfect
6. NFL 2k - Randy Moss & Sega used to be tha ****
6. Golden Eye 007 - This should be higher but hey, thats the breaks kid
7. Soul Caliber - dam feels weird rating this above mortal kombat
8. Mortal Kombat 2 - This game is sweet but still should give props to tha 1st mk
9. Pong - Yeah, I said it, you got a problem with that? Grin
10. Tiger Woods 03 Xbox - sorry halo, this got more play man  Wink


Offline Variety of Cells

  • Dragon Ryder
  • ***
  • Posts: 6405
  • Liked: 1796
Re: Video Games= Evil
« Reply #36 on: March 01, 2007, 09:20:22 PM »
I'd like to see that same test performed on children who are involved in a football game. It sounds like they're testing for competitive spirit more than agressiveness.

I don't claim this test to be proof, but I'll defend it a bit.  The test they were put into didn't have anything to do with competition.  They were exposed to a game, then afterward were told they were supposed to help some one learn how to do a simple task by punishing them with a loud sound blast every time they got it wrong.  The people who played the violent video game beforehand gave louder and more painful blasts to the person (who was in on the experiment) than the person who played the non violent game.  There's a direct correlation between violent video games and aggression.

Though the study does not show if there are any long term effects.  All it says is that there is a causal increase in aggression after playing a violent video game.  And not the 'go get em' kind.  The kind where you are more willing to inflict pain on other people.

So having even temporary exposure to violent video games can encourage agressive behavior?  I wonder if this same group would conclude that having even temporary exposure to food can encourage gluttonous behavior, or that being exposed, even for a brief length of time, to erotic imagery can lead to lustful behavior. 

Exposure to food makes you less hungry after you eat it.  Though your porn example works.  Watching sex makes you aware and conscious of sex, and primes your thoughts so you think about sex first, and if the opportunity arises, you act upon it.  Something similar might be happening with violent video games.


Offline Compound

  • Grendel's Mom
  • ***
  • Posts: 9489
  • Liked: 1009
  • Happy 11th Birthday, Synch Issues!
Re: Video Games= Evil
« Reply #37 on: March 01, 2007, 09:24:27 PM »
Has anyone ever played "Super Columbine Massacre RPG!"?  I've read a lot about it and its reception at the Slamdance Independent Games Festival.  I don't think I'm quite brave enough to play it myself, but I'm curious to people's thoughts on it.

Wiki:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Super_Columbine_Massacre

I've played it, or at least a good chunk of it. (I bailed during the second half of the game.) Before I go further, let me note that I live in Littleton,Colorado just a few minutes away from Columbine, and I'm indirectly connected to the event. (I wasn't there, but I do know people who were.) So I've got a bit of a bias.

That being said, the game's awful. If you just stick to the gameplay, and ignore the real life aspects, it plays like what it is: a game cobbled together with a commercial game making program. It's bland, generic in feel and lifeless and if it were called "Ninja Robot Massacre", no one would have paid any attention or probably even played it for longer than a few minutes.

When you add the real life stuff back in, well, it's a good example of a fairly disturbing trend. There's a small subset of people out there whose reaction to the shooting wasn't horror, but rather "Yeah! Good for them!" I've seen stories on Fanfiction.net with Harris and Kleibold turned into dashing, romantic figures. This game's a good example of this trend. The game seems to dwell on the "look at how conflicted these two were" aspect rather than concentrating on the actions that they were performing. It's just a huge waste of time.

As for the folks at Slamdance who were trying to praise the game, the game isn't deep. It isn't ponderous. The only question it raises is, "How could someone have missed the point so badly?" Frankly, I'm more annoyed at these pinheads than I am at the programmer of the game. Sheesh.


Offline Road_Element

  • Big Montana
  • *****
  • Posts: 623
  • Liked: 51
  • The Names Servo, Tom Servo
Re: Video Games= Evil
« Reply #38 on: March 01, 2007, 11:20:52 PM »
This just might be me. But when i play something like Grand Theft Auto. I dont think to myself "Hey wouldnt it be fun to do this in Real Life" and anyone who dose is either retarded or seriously mentally disturbed. Its ture you dont want a kid to get his hands on a GTA type game. But they been saying this kinda stuff about video game going back to the old Atari/Nintendo days. Like Pac-man was going to put demonic thoughts into my head about eating people. That or maybe Ms Pacman would thought into my head about eating fruit. Maybe Mario was going to inspire me into getting a low paying plumbing job. Where i would go nuts from living in a one room apartment with Fran Drescher like person. Where i will be driven insane and become a serial killer. That said todays games are more violent and little kids souldnt get there hands on them. I think alot of the responsibility belongs with the parents to know what there kids are playing. But if you ask me, theres a big difference between Increase Aggression and Killing Someone.
« Last Edit: March 01, 2007, 11:35:26 PM by Road_Element »


Offline Variety of Cells

  • Dragon Ryder
  • ***
  • Posts: 6405
  • Liked: 1796
Re: Video Games= Evil
« Reply #39 on: March 01, 2007, 11:44:21 PM »
Yeup.  So far, everyone here agrees that an increase in aggression does not necessarily lead to killing some one.  However, the increase in aggression in people who are already fairly aggressive is much more than in people who aren't.  You know, the kinda kid that thinks it's fun to shoot squirrels and throw things at passing cars is going to be affected a lot more by violent video games then most kids.  Do you really want to be making that kid more aggressive than he already is?  You can say that it's up to his parents to decide what games he plays, but if he's off shooting paint balls at cars, I have a feeling his parents probably don't care all that much if he plays a video game.

That seems to be the biggest problem.  The people most affected by video games probably don't have that good of a family life.  Their parents probably don't care, and their life is pretty tough.  Yet we are giving them role models like San Andreas.  They are probably more likely to see it as closer to reality than most of us here.  Is there a solution for that?  If something is going to affect a certain group of people negatively, should it be censored?  Is it fair to rely so heavily on a rating system that assumes parents are responsible, when the kids the games affect the most have irresponsible parents?  Do we have the right to call a parent irresponsible if it is statistically proven that the way they raise their child will groom them to be violent?  And if the reason they raise their child in that way is because they are poor, is it right to punish them for something that may not be their fault?  Tough questions, and I'm not sure if they have answers. 



Offline Hobbit

  • Magneto-cent Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 358
  • Liked: 0
Re: Video Games= Evil
« Reply #40 on: March 02, 2007, 07:45:22 AM »
Okay, time to give a serious weight in.

1.  Look at what common sense tells you about aggressive, harmful people and video games.  The guy who's been playing Metal Gear Solid 2 for days straight so he can get the blue wig, or the guy who can destroy anybody in Street Fighter Second Strike with Akuma is not the kind of guy that bullies his classmates.  The guy whose raiding guild was the first to finish Naxxramas in World of Warcraft probably isn't vandalising lockers.  As it has always been among teenagers and some younger children, the jocks and the people whose parents are never around are the bullies.  I'm not denying that exposure to violence doesn't make you more violent (same goes for 24 as it does for Splinter Cell) temporarily, but a look at a high school cross-section will tell you it's not exactly pathological.

2.  Why, when something is found to have adverse effects, is our first reaction to think about using the power of the federal government to violate the tenets of the free market by banning the sale of such things?  First off, it's unconstitutional.  While the Constitution gives the federal government the power to regulate interstate commerce, the act of purchasing a video game is a single transaction between two private individuals, not states, meaning that the federal government, as per the 10th ammendment, has no jurisdiction.  Second, the first ammendment entitles everyone in this country to the right to say whatever they want, whenever they want, unless it poses an immediate threat to other individuals (sedition, yelling 'fire' in a theater, slander).  Currently, the free market is working.  As video games grew more violent in content, a private company invented a ratings system and charged companies to have their games rated, much like the MPAA does.  The government saw this and realized that few people who vote are going to try to defend video games very passionately, so they took the chance to try to grab power, which is what this is all about.  If the government grabs the ESRB, they will bloat the budget, wasting YOUR money, and use the program as yet another way to buy votes, mostly from people who believe that censorship of all things not warm and fuzzy is the only way to protect 'the children.'  Passing an unconstitutional law which puts limits on your civil liberties isn't going to make anybody a better parent, and I doubt it can do much to reduce the estimated 20% of rated 'M' games purchased by minors without parental consent.


Offline sarcasm_made_Easy

  • Compsognathus
  • *****
  • Posts: 10320
  • Liked: 15
Re: Video Games= Evil
« Reply #41 on: March 02, 2007, 08:08:46 AM »
Quote
The guy whose raiding guild was the first to finish Naxxramas in World of Warcraft probably isn't vandalising lockers.  As it has always been among teenagers and some younger children, the jocks and the people whose parents are never around are the bullies

What is this high school in the 80s?  come on these so called sects cross mingle now.  I know lots of so called jocks that play tons of video games, you dont think these  "jocks" go home and study all night do ya?


Offline Variety of Cells

  • Dragon Ryder
  • ***
  • Posts: 6405
  • Liked: 1796
Re: Video Games= Evil
« Reply #42 on: March 02, 2007, 09:14:13 AM »
The main bulk of Hobbit's post makes sense.  But let me post this hypothetical question.  If it is proven that violent video games do have long lasting negative psychological effects on kids, is it morally ok to let children play these games?  If it is proven that these games have a stronger negative affect than we think, isn't allowing them to play it almost destining them to become violent as adults?  You can argue that the government doesn't have the right to interfere in private matters, but then, in this hypothetical situation, you are arguing that children have the right to grow up to be gang members and murderers. 

I generally agree with you, I just wonder if your position would change if this were slightly different.  And you have to remember, we are not valid examples of the effects of violent video games.  The games we all played as children are nothing compared to the games of today in terms of violence. 

I remember when I was around 7 or 8, my friends and I would pretend to be Star Fox.  Well, I'd be Falco usually.  We'd pretend to fly around in our ships and go on adventures, and we'd talk incoherently every now and then, like the characters in the game did.  Kids like to emulate what they are exposed to.  And it's kinda scary knowing that there are kids out there emulating Grand Theft Auto. 


Offline sarcasm_made_Easy

  • Compsognathus
  • *****
  • Posts: 10320
  • Liked: 15
Re: Video Games= Evil
« Reply #43 on: March 02, 2007, 09:20:44 AM »
Quote
I remember when I was around 7 or 8, my friends and I would pretend to be Star Fox.  Well, I'd be Falco usually.  We'd pretend to fly around in our ships and go on adventures, and we'd talk incoherently every now and then, like the characters in the game did.  Kids like to emulate what they are exposed to.  And it's kinda scary knowing that there are kids out there emulating Grand Theft Auto.

So freaken true.  I used to babysit some cousins of mine who were around 6 and 7 or so.  I introduced them to pokemon.  It was amazing how fast they started emulating stuff.  The creepy thing was i could TELL when they recently saw a power ranger episode becuase they would try to punch and kick stuff.  Which is why i let them watch pokemon because they would have to IMAGINE to be something they were not and werent as violent, (in other words they were easier to watch)


Offline Pak-Man

  • Global Moderator
  • *****
  • Posts: 18100
  • Liked: 3934
  • Insert $0.25 to Play!
Re: Video Games= Evil
« Reply #44 on: March 02, 2007, 09:25:40 AM »
But we're living in a world where there's a whole generation that grew up playing these games, and there's nothing that indicates that this generation has grown up any more maladjustedly than any other generation. Kids that were born when Mortal Kombat and Doom came out are holding full time jobs and getting ready for college, and kids who were old enough to play them have graduated. If there were ill effects, we're seeing them, and I don't see them...