Author Topic: Grammar and other English Language Questions  (Read 1563 times)

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anais.jude

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Grammar and other English Language Questions
« on: March 26, 2012, 05:42:23 AM »
This is a thread for you to ask about grammar and stuff.

Is the correct phrase "In his own right"?


Offline D.B. Barnes

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Re: Grammar and other English Language Questions
« Reply #1 on: March 26, 2012, 06:16:39 AM »
Is the correct phrase "In his own right"?

Yes.

For future reference, dictionary.com is an excellent source for phrase definitions. For example, "in his own right" returns the following:

Quote
in his own right

adverb
by reason of one's own ability or ownership etc.; "she's a rich woman in her own right rather than by inheritance"; "an excellent novel in its own right" [syn: in one's own right]
VIVA IL ESORDIO DEL DIABETE ADULTO DUCE!!!


anais.jude

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Re: Grammar and other English Language Questions
« Reply #2 on: March 26, 2012, 06:18:33 AM »
Would that be preferred to discussing it on a forum? I always feel that people are being really snotty when they tell me to look it up...but Barnes is nice guy....me confused.

PS: I am being serious. It felt a little like Barnes was trying to tell me not to bother him by asking the questions but Barnes is a nice guy and would not react that way...I think...




Offline D.B. Barnes

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Re: Grammar and other English Language Questions
« Reply #3 on: March 26, 2012, 06:25:11 AM »
Would that be preferred to discussing it on a forum? I always feel that people are being really snotty when they tell me to look it up...but Barnes is nice guy....me confused.

PS: I am being serious. It felt a little like Barnes was trying to tell me not to bother him by asking the questions but Barnes is a nice guy and would not react that way...I think...

I just thought I'd share what I consider a very valuable reference tool.  :-\
VIVA IL ESORDIO DEL DIABETE ADULTO DUCE!!!


anais.jude

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Re: Grammar and other English Language Questions
« Reply #4 on: March 26, 2012, 06:30:02 AM »
Ok, that is correct. Sorry Barnes. I know it makes no sense, but sometimes I really don't know what people are trying to communicate and I react wierdly. It's something I am working on. I would rather ask than assume


Offline RVR II

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Re: Grammar and other English Language Questions
« Reply #5 on: March 26, 2012, 07:44:44 AM »
So if they're there, what's their reason?? :o


Offline goflyblind

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Re: Grammar and other English Language Questions
« Reply #6 on: March 26, 2012, 07:47:12 AM »
So if they're there, what's their reason?? :o

they were following the chicken.
dF = 0
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Offline RVR II

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Re: Grammar and other English Language Questions
« Reply #7 on: March 26, 2012, 08:39:30 AM »
So if they're there, what's their reason?? :o

they were following the chicken.
Your chicken or you're stealing one? :-X


anais.jude

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Re: Grammar and other English Language Questions
« Reply #8 on: March 26, 2012, 10:53:45 AM »
I'm just as interested in what people think are the right answers, but aren't, and usually why they think that.  What did you think it was, if not "In his own right?"



In his own Write...which is also a book by John Lennon


anais.jude

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Re: Grammar and other English Language Questions
« Reply #9 on: March 27, 2012, 05:26:06 AM »
My rationale was I have seen it both ways, and I am not sure I ever knew which way was correct. I suppose now that I use my english degree havin brain, I leaned toward "own right" because that is the correct form of "right" for the phrase presented....but my linguist studies are always there to remind me language has its own chaotic elements.


Offline wurwolf

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Re: Grammar and other English Language Questions
« Reply #10 on: March 27, 2012, 06:25:23 AM »
It makes sense to me. There have been plenty of times when I've seen something written as a play on words and then it gets stuck that way in my brain and I'm never sure which is the correct version.

When I was a kid I had Edward Lear's Book of Nonsense, and in it there's the story of Violet and Lionel and an elderly Quangle Wangle who eat pudding with a long-handled runcible spoon. Now "runcible" is a word that Mr. Lear made up (and evidently is the original spork) but for some reason I used to get it confused with the word "municipal" all the time, to the point where I thought that "municipal" and "munciple" were similar but two separate entities.

This carried on into my adult life when, at the age of 19 or 20, I went into a municipal building down the shore for beach tags and asked if I was in the munciple building. The woman at the counter was like, Huh?? and it was then I learned that there was no such thing as munciple it's just municipal and thanks a lot, Edward Lear.

True story.
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Offline wurwolf

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Re: Grammar and other English Language Questions
« Reply #11 on: March 27, 2012, 06:27:08 AM »
There was a restaurant in Bloomington called the Runcible Spoon. I had no idea that they didn't make that up.

Nope, that's Edward Lear. I actually still have that book, it's one of my childhood treasures.
« Last Edit: April 04, 2012, 04:50:04 AM by wurwolf »
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Offline Tripe

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Re: Grammar and other English Language Questions
« Reply #12 on: March 27, 2012, 06:38:41 AM »
I'm just as interested in what people think are the right answers, but aren't, and usually why they think that.  What did you think it was, if not "In his own right?"



In his own Write...which is also a book by John Lennon
Well, yes, that would be a pun on Lennon's part. However sometimes people don't recognise a pun and that pun can enter the language, but Lennon's the originator of that formation.


Offline wurwolf

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Re: Grammar and other English Language Questions
« Reply #13 on: March 27, 2012, 07:30:33 AM »
This is helpful; the fewer/less rule and the historic/historical rule have always been confusing to me. This clears it up.
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Offline RVR II

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Re: Grammar and other English Language Questions
« Reply #14 on: March 27, 2012, 07:39:35 AM »
I still Should've, Could've, & Would've been wrong :P