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Author Topic: LOC 55: The Top 51 Winter Holiday Characters  (Read 32390 times)

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Offline a pretty girl is like

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Re: LOC 55: The Top 51 Winter Holiday Characters
« Reply #105 on: December 23, 2011, 01:02:23 PM »
Frosty the Snowman shares the same characteristics as dirty dirty hoboes and Pedo-Bear.
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Offline Tripe

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Re: LOC 55: The Top 51 Winter Holiday Characters
« Reply #106 on: December 23, 2011, 03:36:34 PM »
Isn't there anyone who knows all about


#16 - Frank Cross
?


Prof.Linus Van Pelt
Sure,  I can tell you all about Frank Cross

Lights, please: Francis Xavier "Frank" Cross (Bill Murray) is a conceited, cynical television programming executive. He has found great success and wealth but only by becoming cold-hearted and cruel. In the opening scenes, he is seen with his brother who is working out in a room with a border that reads "Cross: (n) A thing they nail people to."

His ruthless concentration on his career has cost him his true love, the warm-hearted Claire Phillips (Karen Allen). It has also alienated him from his family, having only an "at arm's length" relationship with his brother James (John Murray), and ruined any chance of his having a happy and fulfilling life. Frank overworks his assistant Grace Cooley (Alfre Woodard), forcing her to constantly break plans with her family and neglect her mute son Calvin. When a disturbing TV commercial that Frank personally produced is criticized by timid yes man Eliot Loudermilk (Bobcat Goldthwait), Frank responds by firing him on Christmas Eve.

When Cross is given the task of heading up a live Christmas Eve broadcast of A Christmas Carol, his life begins to mirror the story he's producing. The decomposing corpse of his mentor, media mogul Lew Hayward (John Forsythe)—who had died of a heart attack during a golf game—comes back to visit to tell him the error of his ways, and to announce the impending visitation of three Ghosts. Adding to Frank's stress is his boss, Preston Rhinelander (Robert Mitchum) who takes the liberty of hiring him an assistant, weaselly sycophant Brice Cummings (John Glover) who is transparently after Frank's job.

The Ghost of Christmas Past (David Johansen) appears as a New York City cab driver and takes Frank back to his childhood in 1955, to his late teens in 1968 when he had his first job at the TV station, in 1969 for his anniversary with Claire, and 1971 the year in which he chose his job as "Frisbee the Dog" over Claire. The sequence shows how Frank gradually became the man he is in the present.

The Ghost of Christmas Present (Carol Kane) then appears as a life-size pixie who delights in punching and slapping Frank; she shows him how Grace's family lives in poverty because of his stinginess and how much his brother misses him.

After the second ghost's visit, Eliot Loudermilk, drunk and angry, storms the office with a shotgun and tries to murder Frank. The Ghost of Christmas Future, a seven-foot-tall ghoul with a TV screen for a face, appears and shows Frank a future in which Calvin has ended up in a mental hospital, Claire has become as cold and uncaring as he is, and only James and James' wife attend his cremation.

As he feels his body being burned, Frank finally sees the error of his ways and begs for a second chance. He awakens back in his office, right as the live broadcast is wrapping up. The reformed Frank rehires Loudermilk at a considerable salary increase, steps in front of the rolling studio cameras (and enlists Loudermilk to hold the control room hostage), and publicly wishes his viewers a Merry Christmas in a manic, but heartfelt monologue about spending Christmas with the people you care about instead of watching TV at home. Calvin urges him to add Tiny Tim's phrase, "God bless us, everyone", finally breaking free of his mute condition. Claire appears in the studio and Frank reconciles with her, sharing a romantic kiss as Grace and the other television workers start to sing Put a Little Love in Your Heart.

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Festival: Christmas
Total Points: 69
5/12 Lists
Highest Placement: 1 (CJones)


Online Darth Geek

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Re: LOC 55: The Top 51 Winter Holiday Characters
« Reply #107 on: December 23, 2011, 03:44:26 PM »
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/LvS12J4VpHg" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/LvS12J4VpHg</a>
:D Damn I love that movie! Glad I had him on my list.



Offline Tripe

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Re: LOC 55: The Top 51 Winter Holiday Characters
« Reply #108 on: December 23, 2011, 04:12:53 PM »
Isn't there anyone who knows all about


#15 - The Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come
?


Prof.Linus Van Pelt
Sure,  I can tell you all about The Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come

Lights, please:The Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come, A.K.A., The Ghost of Christmas Future, is a fictional character in English novelist Charles Dickens' A Christmas Carol. It is one of the ghosts that haunts the miser Ebenezer Scrooge, in order to prompt him to adopt a more caring attitude in life and avoid the horrid afterlife of his business partner, Marley. Scrooge finds the Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come the most fearsome of the spirits; he appears to Scrooge as a figure entirely muffled in a black hooded robe, except for a single gaunt hand with which he points. Although the character never speaks in the story, Scrooge understands him, usually through assumptions from his previous experiences and rhetorical questions. The Ghost's muteness and undefined features (being always covered by his robe) may also have been intended to represent the uncertainty of the future. He is notable that even in satires and parodies of the tale, this spirit nonetheless retains his original look.
Quote
"The Phantom slowly, gravely, silently approached. When it came near him, Scrooge bent down upon his knee; for in the very air through which this Spirit moved it seemed to scatter gloom and mystery. It was shrouded in a deep black garment, which concealed its head, its face, its form, and left nothing of it visible save one outstretched hand. ... It thrilled him [Scrooge] with a vague uncertain horror, to know that behind the dusky shroud there were ghostly eyes intently fixed upon him, while he, though he stretched his own to the utmost, could see nothing but a spectral hand and one great heap of black."

When the Ghost makes his appearance, the first thing he shows Scrooge is three wealthy gentlemen making light of a recent death, remarking that it will be a cheap funeral, if anyone comes at all. One businessman said he would go only if lunch is provided, while another said he didn't eat lunch or wear black gloves, so there was no reason for him to go at all. Next, Scrooge is shown the same dead person's belongings being stolen and sold to a receiver of stolen goods called Old Joe. He also sees a shrouded corpse, which he implores the ghost not to unmask, and a poor, debtor family rejoicing that someone to whom they owed money is dead. After pleading to the ghost to see some tenderness connected with death, Scrooge is shown Bob Cratchit and his family mourning the passing of Tiny Tim. (In the prior visitation, the Ghost of Christmas Present states that Tiny Tim's illness was not incurable, but implied that the meager income Scrooge provided to Bob Cratchit wasn't enough for him to provide Tim the proper treatment.) Scrooge is then taken to an unkempt graveyard, where he is shown his own grave, and realizes that the dead man of whom the others spoke ill was himself.

This visit sets up the climax of the novella at the end of this stave. Moved to an emotional connection to humanity and chastened by his own avarice and isolation by the visits of the first two spirits, Scrooge is horrified by the prospect of a lonely death and by implication a subsequent damnation. In desperation, he queries the ghost:
Quote
“Before I draw nearer to that stone to which you point,” said Scrooge, “answer me one question. Are these the shadows of the things that Will be, or are they shadows of things that May be, only?”
Still the Ghost pointed downward to the grave by which it stood.
“Men’s courses will foreshadow certain ends, to which, if persevered in, they must lead,” said Scrooge. “But if the courses be departed from, the ends will change. Say it is thus with what you show me!”
And in an epiphany in which he understands the changes that the visits of the three spirits have wrought in him, Scrooge exclaims:
"I am not the man I was. I will not be the man I must have been but for this intercourse. Why show me this, if I am past all hope!...I will honour Christmas in my heart, and try to keep it all the year. I will live in the Past, the Present, and the Future. The Spirits of all Three shall strive within me. I will not shut out the lessons that they teach. Oh, tell me I may sponge away the writing on this stone!”
His transformation complete, Scrooge is ready to re-enter the world of humanity as a changed man as he does in the story's denouement in the final stage.

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Festival: Christmas
Total Points: 70
6/12 Lists
Highest Placement: 7 (Johnny Unusual)



Offline CJones

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Re: LOC 55: The Top 51 Winter Holiday Characters
« Reply #109 on: December 23, 2011, 04:24:38 PM »
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/LvS12J4VpHg" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/LvS12J4VpHg</a>
:D Damn I love that movie! Glad I had him on my list.

Same here. That's why I had him at number one. Favorite Christmas movie ever. Mainly though I'm just glad he beat out George Bailey. I really can't stand that movie.

I am a little disappointed that Kris Kringle (who I had at #3) lost out to John McClane though.


Offline ColeStratton

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Re: LOC 55: The Top 51 Winter Holiday Characters
« Reply #110 on: December 23, 2011, 04:35:39 PM »
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/LvS12J4VpHg" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/LvS12J4VpHg</a>
:D Damn I love that movie! Glad I had him on my list.

Same here. That's why I had him at number one. Favorite Christmas movie ever. Mainly though I'm just glad he beat out George Bailey. I really can't stand that movie.

I am a little disappointed that Kris Kringle (who I had at #3) lost out to John McClane though.

I also had Cross on my list, and went with another Miracle on 34th St. character who I doubt will chart (Susan Walker). Personally, though, It's a Wonderful Life is watched every year along with A Christmas Story and Emmet Otter.

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Offline Tripe

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Re: LOC 55: The Top 51 Winter Holiday Characters
« Reply #111 on: December 23, 2011, 04:49:46 PM »
Isn't there anyone who knows all about


#14 - Ralphie
?


Prof.Linus Van Pelt
Sure,  I can tell you all about Ralphie

Lights, please: A Christmas Story is a 1983 American Christmas comedy film based on the short stories and semi-fictional anecdotes of author and raconteur Jean Shepherd, including material from his books In God We Trust, All Others Pay Cash, and Wanda Hickey's Night of Golden Memories. It was directed by Bob Clark. The film has since become a holiday classic and is shown numerous times on television during the Christmas season on the network TBS, often in a 24-hour marathon.

The film is set in Hohman, Indiana, a fictionalized version of Shepherd's hometown of Hammond. Nine-year-old Ralph "Ralphie" Parker wants only one thing for Christmas: a Red Ryder BB Gun with a compass in the stock, and "this thing which tells time" (a sundial). While using various schemes to convince his parents to get him this gift he continually bumps into objections from others saying, "You'll shoot your eye out."

In each of the film's three acts Ralphie makes his case to another adult and each time receives the same reply. When Ralphie asks his mother for a Red Ryder BB gun for Christmas, she refuses. Next, when Ralphie writes an essay about wanting the BB gun for Miss Shields, his teacher at Warren G. Harding Elementary School, Ralphie gets a C+, and Miss Shields warns him. Later, Ralphie asks a local department store's Santa Claus for a Red Ryder BB gun, and Santa tells him the same thing before pushing Ralphie down a long exit slide with his boot.

One day after he gets the C+ on his composition, Ralphie is hit in the face with a snowball thrown at him by the local bully, Scut Farkus and his sidekick Grover Dill.
Ralphie begins to cry and Farkus teases and taunts him until he snaps. Ralphie charges Farkus and begins to pummel him. During the fight, Ralphie shouts profanity non-stop as he lands blow after blow to the squealing Farkus. When Grover attempts to intervene, Ralphie pushes him away and continues beating Farkus at will. Ralphie's brother, Randy, gets their mother, who pulls her son off the bully, and takes him home. This incident occurs shortly after Ralphie was punished for cursing while helping his father change a flat tire. Ralphie is worried about the cursing and is sure he will again be punished when his father gets home from work. Instead, Ralphie's mother tells his father about the fight casually at the dinner table. She then changes the subject of the conversation to an upcoming Chicago Bears game, distracting his father and getting Ralphie off the hook in the process.

On Christmas morning, Ralphie looks frantically for a box that would hold the BB gun to no avail. He and Randy have quite a few presents, but he is disappointed because he did not get the gun. His disappointment turns to joy as his father points out one last half-hidden present, ostensibly from Santa. As Ralphie unwraps the BB gun, Mr. Parker explains the purchase to his wife, stating that he had one himself when he was 8 years old.

Ralphie goes out to test his new gun, shooting at a paper target perched on top of a metal sign, and predictably gets a ricochet from the metal sign. This ricochet ends up hitting his cheek and glasses, sending them flying and knocking out a lens. While searching for the glasses, Ralphie inadvertently steps on and crushes the other side. When his mother hears him crying, he concocts a story about an icicle falling on him and breaking his glasses, which she believes. She takes him upstairs to dry his face and forgets to close the door. This allows a horde of the Bumpuses' (the Parkers' hillbilly neighbors) dogs, who frequently torment Ralphie's father, enter the house and eat the Christmas turkey that is cooling on the kitchen table. Making a last-minute decision, Mr. Parker takes the family out to a Chinese restaurant where they have a hilarious time dining on duck which adult Ralphie calls "Chinese turkey".

The film ends with Ralphie lying in bed on Christmas night with his gun by his side. Randy is holding the toy Zeppelin he received. The voiceover states that this was the best present he had ever received or would ever receive.

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/YleZvTSDC6s" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/YleZvTSDC6s</a>

Festival: Christmas
Total Points: 74
5/12 Lists
Highest Placement: 2 (ColeStratton & CJones)
« Last Edit: December 23, 2011, 06:01:02 PM by Tripe H. Redux »


Offline CJones

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Re: LOC 55: The Top 51 Winter Holiday Characters
« Reply #112 on: December 23, 2011, 05:51:30 PM »
Just FYI, I also had Ralphie at #2. I'm a little surprised he didn't rank higher than 14th.


Offline Johnny Unusual

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Re: LOC 55: The Top 51 Winter Holiday Characters
« Reply #113 on: December 23, 2011, 06:50:59 PM »
Nobody beats The Old Man.

Yeah, the old man beats Ralphie.  You heard me.

Isn't there anyone who knows all about


#16 - Frank Cross
?


Prof.Linus Van Pelt
Sure,  I can tell you all about Frank Cross
Wish I has thought of him.  Bill Murray makes almost anything watchable and he may be the most charismatic actor of all time, even when a villain.

Isn't there anyone who knows all about


#15 - The Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come
?


Prof.Linus Van Pelt
Sure,  I can tell you all about The Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come
Just watched the Alistair Sim version tonight.  Not my favourite Christmas Ghost, but a damned creepy one.  Out of all of them he is the most visually striking despite (or perhaps because of) his simplicity and when there are A Christmas Carol adaptions, the portrayal of the Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come is the most consistent between movies (again, probably due to simplicity).


Offline Tripe

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Re: LOC 55: The Top 51 Winter Holiday Characters
« Reply #114 on: December 23, 2011, 06:53:43 PM »
Isn't there anyone who knows all about


#13 – Yukon Cornelius
?


Prof.Linus Van Pelt
Sure,  I can tell you all about Yukon Cornelius.

Lights, please: Yukon Cornelius is a protagonistic character from the 1964 Rankin/Bass television special, Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer.
Yukon Cornelius is an arctic prospector who leads the audience to believe that he's searching for either gold or silver, but is actually seeking peppermint as revealed at the end of the original version of the special. His greedy behavior inspires the song "Silver and Gold", sung by Sam the Snowman. (Yukon was originally going to sing the song himself before it was decided that the special should have a narrator.)

Yukon is a blustery but benign character and ends up helping not only Rudolph and Hermey, but the Abominable Snowmonster, or "Bumble" as he refers to him as well. Yukon Cornelius can be seen throughout the special tossing his pick ax into the air, sniffing, then licking the end that contacts the snow or ice. The removal of the scene near the end of the special (for subsequent telecasts) in which Yukon Cornelius discovers a "peppermint mine" by that method near Santa's workshop left audiences assuming that he was attempting to find either silver or gold by taste alone. The scene was returned to the film in 1998 and the DVD in 2002 as well.

Yukon didn't reappear in Rudolph's Shiny New Year or Rudolph and Frosty's Christmas in July, but he reappeared in Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer and the Island of Misfit Toys.

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Festival: Christmas
Total Points: 77
5/12 Lists
Highest Placement: 7 (D.B. Barnes)


Offline wurwolf

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Re: LOC 55: The Top 51 Winter Holiday Characters
« Reply #115 on: December 23, 2011, 07:05:33 PM »
Fucking Yukon Cornelius beat the Bumble? ? ? ? Bull SHIT. What is wrong with you people?
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Offline Tripe

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Re: LOC 55: The Top 51 Winter Holiday Characters
« Reply #116 on: December 23, 2011, 07:13:07 PM »
Isn't there anyone who knows all about


#12 - The Ghost of Christmas Present
?


Prof.Linus Van Pelt
Sure,  I can tell you all about The Ghost of Christmas Present

Lights, please: The Ghost of Christmas Present is a character in one of the best-known works of the English novelist Charles Dickens, A Christmas Carol. The Spirit closely resembles Father Christmas from local folklore.

The Ghost of Christmas Present was the second of the three spirits (after the visitation by Jacob Marley) that haunted the miser Ebenezer Scrooge, in order to prompt him to repent. According to Dickens' novel, the Ghost of Christmas Present appears to Scrooge as "a jolly giant" with dark brown curls. He wears a fur-lined green robe and on his head a holly wreath set with shining icicles. He carries a large torch, made to resemble a cornucopia, and appears accompanied by a great feast. He states that he has had "more than eighteen hundred" brothers (1,842 to be exact, the story being set on Christmas Eve 1843, the year of its publication) and later reveals the ability to change his size to fit into any space. He also bares a scabbard with no sword in it, a representation of peace on Earth and good will toward men.

The spirit transports Scrooge around the city, showing him scenes of festivity and also deprivation that were happening as they watched, sprinkling a little warmth from his torch as he travels. Amongst the visits are Scrooge's nephew, and the family of his clerk, Bob Cratchit.

The spirit also shares a vision of Tiny Tim's crutch, carefully preserved by the fireplace. Scrooge asks if Tim will die. The Ghost first states that "If these shadows remain unaltered by the Future, the child will die" (i.e., Tim's illness is not incurable, but the Cratchits lack the funds for Tim to receive proper treatment, courtesy of Scrooge's miserliness), then – quick to use Scrooge's past unkind comments toward two charitable solicitors against him – suggests he "had better do it, and decrease the surplus population." Scrooge is disgusted at his own words and is concerned for Tiny Tim and his family.

The spirit finally reveals to Scrooge two emaciated children, subhuman in appearance and loathsome to behold, clinging to his robes, and names the boy as Ignorance and the girl as Want. The spirit warns Scrooge, "Beware them both, and all of their degree, but most of all beware this boy, for on his brow I see that written which is Doom, unless the writing be erased.", underscoring the book's social message. The spirit once again quotes Scrooge, who asks if the grotesque children have "no refuge, no resource," and the spirit retorts with more of Scrooge's unkind words, "Are there no prisons, no workhouses?", filling Scrooge with self-loathing.

The Ghost of Christmas Present, having already aged, reveals that he will only exist on Earth for a single year's Christmas holiday. (As the nature of the present is to only exist in the now, this is why this ghost can only exist for one Christmas, and why he has 1842 brothers. Note the year that Charles Dickens' story was published. This would be the 1843rd Ghost of Christmas Present.) He finally disappears at the stroke of midnight on Twelfth Night, and leaves Scrooge to face the Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come, as it approaches "like a mist along the ground".

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Festival: Christmas
Total Points: 80
6/12 Lists
Highest Placement: 5 (Imrahil)


Offline D.B. Barnes

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Re: LOC 55: The Top 51 Winter Holiday Characters
« Reply #117 on: December 23, 2011, 07:17:01 PM »
Fucking Yukon Cornelius beat the Bumble? ? ? ? Bull SHIT. What is wrong with you people?

Oh come on.  The man has a peppermint mine. 

I love both of 'em. Heck, I love everyone from that special. Such a good childhood memory.

Had Ralphie at #11. Classic character from a classic movie.
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Offline Johnny Unusual

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Re: LOC 55: The Top 51 Winter Holiday Characters
« Reply #118 on: December 23, 2011, 07:25:25 PM »

I am a little disappointed that Kris Kringle (who I had at #3) lost out to John McClane though.

Yeah, Kris is my fav.  Susan from that movie is a good choice too, but I'm a Kringle man.  Take that anyway you want to.

Fucking Yukon Cornelius beat the Bumble? ? ? ? Bull SHIT. What is wrong with you people?

Oh come on.  The man has a peppermint mine. 

I love both of 'em. Heck, I love everyone from that special. Such a good childhood memory.

Yukon is great.  Definitely the best character in that special for me.  The Bumble's cute and all, but he didn't make my list.  Also everyone loves a prospector!


Offline wurwolf

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Re: LOC 55: The Top 51 Winter Holiday Characters
« Reply #119 on: December 23, 2011, 07:30:32 PM »
He was always the character I liked the least.
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