Author Topic: List of Crap 54: Top 63 Second Bananas Countdown  (Read 39839 times)

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Russell

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Re: List of Crap 54: Top 63 Second Bananas Countdown
« Reply #75 on: November 25, 2011, 07:13:11 PM »
35 – Tuco Ramirez

31 points             
2 of 15 lists   
Top Vote: #4 Gunflyer
But if you miss, you had better miss very well. Whoever double-crosses me and leaves me alive, he understands nothing about Tuco. Nothing!


Russell

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Re: List of Crap 54: Top 63 Second Bananas Countdown
« Reply #76 on: November 25, 2011, 08:05:51 PM »
Didn't include R2 for pretty much the  so much reasons I didn't include Silent Bob. Just because you don't talk so much, doesn't make you a second banana.
True. And he really was the more dominant one when paired with C3PO. Granted, R2D2 does qualify because he does work for Luke and others at various times. But he isn't that much of a sycophant, he has a good motivator.
:D
The Hyperdrive Motivator?


Offline Darth Geek

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Re: List of Crap 54: Top 63 Second Bananas Countdown
« Reply #77 on: November 25, 2011, 08:22:44 PM »
Didn't include R2 for pretty much the  so much reasons I didn't include Silent Bob. Just because you don't talk so much, doesn't make you a second banana.
True. And he really was the more dominant one when paired with C3PO. Granted, R2D2 does qualify because he does work for Luke and others at various times. But he isn't that much of a sycophant, he has a good motivator.

:D
Unlike the lazy bastard on the couch here



Russell

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Re: List of Crap 54: Top 63 Second Bananas Countdown
« Reply #78 on: November 25, 2011, 09:53:34 PM »
Unlike the lazy bastard on the couch here

R5-D4 was always a lazy little shit.


Watchman

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Re: List of Crap 54: Top 63 Second Bananas Countdown
« Reply #79 on: November 26, 2011, 12:16:30 AM »
Didn't include R2 for pretty much the  so much reasons I didn't include Silent Bob. Just because you don't talk so much, doesn't make you a second banana.

R2 is second banana to his ability to fly.

35 – Tuco Ramirez

31 points             
2 of 15 lists   
Top Vote: #4 Gunflyer
But if you miss, you had better miss very well. Whoever double-crosses me and leaves me alive, he understands nothing about Tuco. Nothing!

The beating Tuco takes from Angel Eyes has to be one of the most savage beatings in cinematic history.
« Last Edit: November 26, 2011, 12:24:42 AM by Sutter Cane »


Johnny Unusual

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Re: List of Crap 54: Top 63 Second Bananas Countdown
« Reply #80 on: November 26, 2011, 01:08:45 AM »
30 – Alfred Pennyworth

34 points             
2 of 15 lists   
Top Vote: #1 Johnny Unusual
   
Sycophancy Level: 7/10
Alfred Pennyworth is a fictional character that appears throughout the DC Comics franchise. The character first appears in Batman #16 (April–May 1943), and was created by writer Bob Kane and artist Jerry Robinson. Alfred serves as Batman’s (and Bruce Wayne's) tireless butler, assistant, confidant, and surrogate father figure. In modern interpretations, this has gone to the point where Alfred was Bruce's legal guardian following the death of his parents. He has sometimes been called "Batman's batman.” Alfred also provides comic relief, as his sometimes sarcastic and cynical attitude often adds humor to dialogue occurring between himself and Batman. Alfred is a vital part of the Batman mythos, and appears in most other media adaptations of the character.

The character has been consistently popular over the years, having received a nomination for the R.A.C. Squiddy Award for Favorite Supporting Character in 1994 and for Best Character in 2001. Alfred was also nominated for the Wizard Fan Award for Favorite Supporting Male Character in 1994.

In non-comics media, the character has been portrayed by noted actors Alan Napier, Michael Gough, Efrem Zimbalist, Jr., and Sir Michael Caine.

When Alfred first appeared, he was overweight and clean-shaven; however, when the 1943 Batman serial was released, William Austin, the actor who played Alfred, was trim and sported a thin moustache. DC editors wanted the comic Alfred to resemble his cinematic counterpart, so in Detective Comics #83 (January 1944), Alfred vacationed at a health resort, where he slimmed down and grew a mustache. This look has remained with the character ever since, even surviving his "death" and resurrection.

Alfred was originally conceived as a comedic foil for Batman and Robin. In most early tales, he made bungling attempts to be a detective on a par with the young masters. He was given a four-page feature of his own, and the feature lasted thirteen issues, skipping Batman#35, with the last story in Batman #36. The stories followed a simple formula with Alfred somehow managing to solve a crime and catch the culprits entirely by accident. After that, the comedic aspects of the character were downplayed.

In the Post-Crisis comics' continuity, Alfred has been the Wayne family butler all of Bruce's life, and had helped his master establish his superhero career from the beginning. In addition he was Bruce's legal guardian following the deaths of his parents. Alfred's history has been modified several times over the years, creating assorted versions. In one such version Alfred was hired away from the British Royal Family by Bruce's parents, and he virtually raised Bruce after they were murdered.

Meanwhile another version of Alfred's Post-Crisis life was slightly more closely linked to his pre-Crisis counterpart. In this version Alfred was an actor on the English stage, who agreed to become the Waynes' butler, only so as to honor the dying wish of his father. At the time he begins working for the Waynes, Bruce is but a young child. After several months, Alfred voices the desire to quit and return home to continue his life as an actor. However, these plans are momentarily forgotten when young Bruce returns home, after getting into a fight with a school bully. Alfred teaches Bruce to handle the bully strategically, rather than using brute force. Following Alfred's advice, Bruce manages to take care of his bully problem. Upon returning home, Bruce requests that Alfred stays, and Alfred agrees without a second thought. After the Waynes' murders, Alfred raises Bruce.

Alfred would later aid Bruce in raising Dick Grayson, Jason Todd, and Tim Drake, all of whom would be adopted by Bruce Wayne and become his partner Robin. He also had close friendships with other members of the Bat-Clan including Barbara Gordon and Cassandra Cain. Alfred often acts as a father-figure to Bruce, and a grandfather to Dick, Jason, and Tim. He is also highly respected by those heroes who are aware of his existence, including Superman, Wonder Woman, Green Lantern, and the original Teen Titans.

Alfred has also been romantically linked to Dr. Leslie Thompkins, though his relationship with her never came to anything, particularly after she apparently allowed Stephanie Brown to die from neglect. He also developed feelings for Tim Drake's stepmother, but again, nothing came of it.


 Torgo the White’s Annual Progress Report

He’s doing very good, sir.

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Johnny Unusual

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Re: List of Crap 54: Top 63 Second Bananas Countdown
« Reply #81 on: November 26, 2011, 01:34:24 AM »
29 – Ford Prefect

34 points             
3 of 15 lists   
Top Vote: #12 CJones
   
Sycophancy Level: 3/10
Ford Prefect (also called Ix) is a fictional character in The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy by the British author Douglas Adams. He is the only character other than the protagonist, Arthur Dent, to appear throughout the entire Hitchhiker's saga.

Although Ford had taken great care to blend into Earth society, he had "skimped a bit on his preparatory research," and thought that the name "Ford Prefect" would be "nicely inconspicuous." Adams later clarified in an interview that Ford "had simply mistaken the dominant life form." The Ford Prefect was, in fact, a British car manufactured from 1938 to 1961. This was expanded on somewhat in the film version, where Ford is almost run over while attempting to greet a blue Ford Prefect. He is saved by Arthur and, in the film version of events at least, this is how the pair meet. The graphics in the TV series provide a similar explanation by listing director John Ford, psychic Arthur Ford, news reader Anna Ford, carmaker Henry Ford, the Ford Anglia, the Ford Consul and finally Ford Prefect.

Adams later observed that this joke was lost on U.S. audiences who assumed it was a typing error for "perfect." In some versions, such as the French (Le Guide Galactique) and the Greek, Ford's name was changed to "Ford Escort." Nowadays, the joke is largely lost on younger audiences in Britain as well, since the Ford Prefect is now a rare sight on British roads. In the film adaptation, his last name was never actually stated on-screen, but it is given in the film's credits as "Prefect."

Prior art for Adams' satirical point – that humans attach such importance to their automobiles that a visiting extraterrestrial might reasonably mistake them for the planet's dominant life form – can be found in a widely reprinted article from The Rockefeller Institute Review titled Life on Earth (by a Martian) by Paul Weiss. The idea was also expounded by Carl Sagan, though this may have postdated Adams' creation of the character of Ford. The 1967 Oscar-nominated animated film What on Earth! from the National Film Board of Canada is also based on this premise.



 Torgo the White’s Annual Progress Report

He actually considers Arthur Dent to be his sidekick, but he certainly didn’t turn down the offer since it provides fresh new material for the Hitchhiker’s Guide.  Also, there’s going to be a lot of theological fall out from this revelation and he thinks it would be pretty cool to be responsible.  You can’t spell revelation without revel.

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Offline D.B. Barnes

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Re: List of Crap 54: Top 63 Second Bananas Countdown
« Reply #82 on: November 26, 2011, 01:40:19 AM »
33 – Donny Kerbatsos

32 points             
2 of 15 lists   
Top Vote: #4 Sutter Cane


This dude's top banana best be showing up on this list.



29 – Ford Prefect

34 points             
3 of 15 lists   
Top Vote: #12 CJones
   

Oh, hell yeah! Had Ford at #18.
VIVA IL ESORDIO DEL DIABETE ADULTO DUCE!!!


Johnny Unusual

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Re: List of Crap 54: Top 63 Second Bananas Countdown
« Reply #83 on: November 26, 2011, 01:47:12 AM »
28 – K-9

34 points             
3 of 15 lists   
Top Vote: #7 Imrahil
   
Sycophancy Level: 7/10
K-9, or K9, is the name of several fictional robotic canines (the name being a pun on that word) in the long-running British science fiction television series, Doctor Who, first appearing in 1977. K-9 has also been a central character in three of the series television spin-offs: the unsuccessful K-9 and Company (1981), The Sarah Jane Adventures (2007–2011) and K-9 (2009–present). Although not originally intended to be a recurring character in the series, K-9 was kept in the show following his first appearance because he was expected to be popular with younger audiences. There have been at least four separate K-9 units in the series, with the first two being companions of the Fourth Doctor. Voice actor John Leeson has provided the character's voice in most of his appearances, except during Season 17 of Doctor Who, in which David Brierley temporarily provided the character's voice. The character was created by Bob Baker and Dave Martin, to whom rights to the character still belong; consequently, Baker's spin-off series K-9, which is not BBC-produced, cannot directly reference events or characters from Doctor Who, though it attempts to be a part of that continuity.

Within the series' narrative, K-9 is a robot dog acquired by Doctor Who's title character in the 1977 serial The Invisible Enemy. The first two incarnations of the character travelled alongside the Doctor, then in his fourth incarnation (portrayed by Tom Baker) until 1981. In these stories, K-9 proved useful for the powerful laser weapon concealed in his nose, his encyclopaedic knowledge and his vast computer intelligence. By 1981, each of the two models of K-9 which travelled alongside the Doctor had been left with one of the Doctor's female companions. The character subsequently transitioned into spin-off territory. Producers hoped K-9's popularity with children would launch the series K-9 and Company, led by actress Elisabeth Sladen in the role of companion Sarah Jane Smith alongside a new K-9. In 2006, K-9 reappeared in the revived series of Doctor Who. Although the character's appearances in the 2007 spin-off The Sarah Jane Adventures were hampered by the concurrent development of the K-9 spin-off, the character began to appear full-time in both K-9 and The Sarah Jane Adventures, depicting adventures of the original K-9 Mark I and of Mark IV, respectively.

K-9 was the brainchild of writers Bob Baker and Dave Martin. Its purpose was to have a character that could narrate while the miniaturised clones of the Doctor and Leela were inside the Doctor's body during the events of The Invisible Enemy. Martin's own dog had also been recently run over by a car, and K-9 was a car-proof tribute to it.

K-9 was not originally intended to be a companion, but producer Graham Williams liked the concept so much that the decision was made to retain him as a regular character, in order to appeal to the younger members of the audience. The original name for the character was "FIDO" — apparently from "Phenomenal [sic] Indication Data Observation" unit — but it was eventually named K-9


 Torgo the White’s Annual Progress Report

Enjoys a pleasant retirement at the Second Banana Heaven Petting Zoo and often challenges other animals to games of chess.

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Offline Asbestos Bill

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Re: List of Crap 54: Top 63 Second Bananas Countdown
« Reply #84 on: November 26, 2011, 07:43:50 AM »
Nice, two of mine in a row.  Thanks for putting that Ford in; I felt that Mos Def's Ford didn't really fit with my conception of the character. He wasn't terrible, just not quite right.  Sorta like that movie as a whole, really.

Agreed


Russell

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Re: List of Crap 54: Top 63 Second Bananas Countdown
« Reply #85 on: November 26, 2011, 07:44:22 AM »
The beating Tuco takes from Angel Eyes has to be one of the most savage beatings in cinematic history.
Yeah, hey that sounds like a good idea for an LOC, the top 50 most savage beatings in cinematic history. I think in some ways though the scene where Shep Proudfoot beats the shit out of Carl Showalter in Fargo was more savage, but not as prolonged, and it was funny too. As much as we hate Tuco for being a bastard, I don't think anybody liked to see that poor guy getting beaten into Tuco puffs.


Johnny Unusual

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Re: List of Crap 54: Top 63 Second Bananas Countdown
« Reply #86 on: November 26, 2011, 11:39:53 AM »
27 – Willow Rosenberg

35 points             
2 of 15 lists   
Top Vote: #4 Johnny Unusual
   
Sycophancy Level: 6/10 (though constantly sliding downwards.  These days it’s probably a 2)
Willow Danielle Rosenberg is a fictional character created for the fantasy television series Buffy the Vampire Slayer (1997–2003). She was developed by Joss Whedon and portrayed throughout the TV series by Alyson Hannigan. Willow plays an integral role within the inner circle of friends—called the Scooby Gang—who support Buffy Summers, a teenager gifted with superhuman powers to defeat vampires, demons, and other evil in the fictional town of Sunnydale. The series begins as Buffy, Willow, and their friend Xander are in 10th grade and Willow is a shy and nerdy girl with little confidence. Occasionally, Willow would take the role as a leader of the gang during Buffy and Giles's absences or incapacitations. She has inherent magical abilities and begins to study witchcraft; as the series progresses, Willow becomes more sure of herself and her magical powers become significant if inconsistent. Her dependence on magic becomes so consuming that it develops into a dark force that takes her on a redemptive journey in a major story arc when she becomes the sixth season's main villain, threatening to destroy the world in a fit of grief and rage.

The Buffy series became extremely popular and earned a devoted fanbase; Willow's intelligence, shy nature, and vulnerability often resounded strongly with viewers in early seasons. Of the core characters, Willow changes the most, becoming a complex portrayal of a woman whose powers force her to seek balance between what is best for the people she loves and what she is capable of doing. Her character stood out as a positive portrayal of a Jewish woman and at the height of her popularity, she fell in love with another woman, a witch named Tara Maclay. They became one of the first lesbian couples on U.S. television and one of the most positive relationships of the series. Willow appears in every Buffy episode (making her the only character besides Buffy herself to do so), is featured in three episodes of the spinoff Angel, an animated series and video game—both of which use Hannigan's voice, and the comic Buffy the Vampire Slayer Season Eight (2007–2011), which uses Hannigan's likeness and continues Willow's storyline following the television series.



 Torgo the White’s Annual Progress Report

She’s made the choice to… walk away from Second Banana Heaven.  I wish her the best.  Oh, and she’s the only person who got that I was suppose to be a satyr.  Not even Patroclus got that one.

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Offline D.B. Barnes

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Re: List of Crap 54: Top 63 Second Bananas Countdown
« Reply #87 on: November 26, 2011, 01:08:32 PM »
27 – Willow Rosenberg

35 points             
2 of 15 lists   
Top Vote: #4 Johnny Unusual


I'd like to put my penis in her vagina, if you catch my drift.
VIVA IL ESORDIO DEL DIABETE ADULTO DUCE!!!


Russell

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Re: List of Crap 54: Top 63 Second Bananas Countdown
« Reply #88 on: November 26, 2011, 01:21:06 PM »
27 – Willow Rosenberg

35 points             
2 of 15 lists   
Top Vote: #4 Johnny Unusual

I'd like to put my penis in her vagina, if you catch my drift.
Yup, and the talent show is tomorrow night. Wasn't that the chick from American Pie?
« Last Edit: November 26, 2011, 02:02:57 PM by Gunflyer »


Johnny Unusual

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Re: List of Crap 54: Top 63 Second Bananas Countdown
« Reply #89 on: November 26, 2011, 03:31:29 PM »
26 – Ed McMahon

36 points             
3 of 15 lists   
Top Vote: #4 Monty
   
Sycophancy Level: THAT IS CORRECT SIR!  HOHOHO!
Edward Peter "Ed" McMahon, Jr. (March 6, 1923 – June 23, 2009) was an American comedian, game show host and announcer. He is most famous for his work on television as Johnny Carson's sidekick and announcer on The Tonight Show from 1962 to 1992. He also hosted the original version of the talent show Star Search from 1983 to 1995. He co-hosted TV's Bloopers and Practical Jokes with Dick Clark from 1982 to 1998. He also presented sweepstakes for the direct marketing company American Family Publishers (not, as is commonly believed, its main rival Publishers Clearing House).
 
McMahon annually co-hosted the Jerry Lewis Labor Day Telethon. He performed in numerous television commercials, most notably for Budweiser. In the 1970s and 1980s, he anchored the team of NBC personalities conducting the network's coverage of the Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade. McMahon appeared in several films, including The Incident, Fun With Dick and Jane, Full Moon High, and Butterfly, as well as briefly in the film version of Bewitched. According to Entertainment Weekly, McMahon is considered one of the greatest "sidekicks"

McMahon and Johnny Carson first worked together as announcer and host on the daytime game show Who Do You Trust? (1957–1962). McMahon and Carson left the show to join The Tonight Show in 1962. He describes what happened when the pair first met, the whole meeting being "... about as exciting as watching a traffic light change". For more than 30 years, McMahon introduced the Tonight Show with a drawn-out "Here's Johnny!" His booming voice and constant laughter alongside the "King of Late Night" earned McMahon the nickname the "Human Laugh Track" and "Toymaker to the King". As part of the introductory patter to The Tonight Show, McMahon would state his name out loud, pronouncing it as /mɨkˈmeɪ.ən/, but neither long-time cohort Johnny Carson nor anyone else who interviewed him ever seemed to pick up on that subtlety, usually pronouncing his name /mɨkˈmæn/.
 
The extroverted McMahon served as a counter to the notoriously shy Carson. Nonetheless, McMahon once told an interviewer that after his many decades as an emcee, he would still get "butterflies" in his stomach every time he would walk onto a stage, and would use that nervousness as a source of energy.



 Torgo the White’s Annual Progress Report

YES SIR!  THAT IS CORRECT!

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(I wish I could find a video of Phil Hartman playing Ed getting married).