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Author Topic: LoC: Top 65 Beverages  (Read 39214 times)

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Offline BBQ Platypus

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Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
« Reply #165 on: September 28, 2011, 11:47:37 PM »
25 – Chocolate Milkshake

35 points    
3 of 16 lists
Top Vote: #4 Johnny Unusual

Was my vote counted among this, or was it considered separate?
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Offline Tripe

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Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
« Reply #166 on: September 29, 2011, 02:20:17 AM »
other than the $200/bottle stuff if you don't mind.
$200/bottle? Oh no no no, that's the price for a measure in coke, you don't wan't to know the price of a bottle  ;D


Offline Johnny Unusual

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Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
« Reply #167 on: September 29, 2011, 05:37:44 AM »
25 – Chocolate Milkshake

35 points    
3 of 16 lists
Top Vote: #4 Johnny Unusual

Was my vote counted among this, or was it considered separate?

That it was, but looking back, your vote merely said Milkshake and I did not count two very low counting "Vanilla Milkshakes"

Hmm...  What do you think people?  Should I have Milkshake shoot up in the rankings?  It wouldn't be too much trouble to change it.  I think that I initially toed with the idea of separate votes for different milkshakes and consolidating them and I think that BBQ's vote was stuck in the middle.
« Last Edit: September 29, 2011, 07:27:40 AM by Johnny Unusual »


Offline Johnny Unusual

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Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
« Reply #168 on: September 29, 2011, 07:14:54 AM »
20 – Ginger Ale

42 points       
3 of 16 lists
Top Vote: #5 Johnny Unusual


Ginger ale is a carbonated soft drink flavored with ginger. Dr. Thomas Cantrell, an American apothecary and surgeon, claimed to have invented ginger ale and marketed it with beverage manufacturer Grattan and Company. Grattan embossed the slogan "The Original Makers of Ginger Ale" on its bottles. Ginger ale was considered the most popular soft drink in the United States between 1860 and 1930.

 Ginger Ale has a storied history in the United States. Ginger ales come in two varieties: "golden" and "dry". Golden ginger ale is dark colored, generally sweet to taste, with a strong ginger spice flavor. It is the older style and there is little or no difference between this and nonalcoholic versions of ginger beer. Many believe golden ginger ale is a form of ginger beer brought into North America by migrants from Eastern Europe, where it had been known for centuries. Golden ginger ale, like ginger beer, is mainly consumed as a soda type drink in its own right.

Dry ginger ale (paler, and with much less of the ginger "kick") became popular in the United States during the Prohibition era, when it was used as a mixer for alcoholic beverages, as the strong flavor of golden ginger ale was undesirable. Dry ginger ale quickly surpassed golden ginger ale in popularity, and today, golden ginger ale is an uncommon, and usually regional, drink. By contrast, dry ginger ale is produced on a vast scale for national and international consumers.

Vernors, Blenheim, A-Treat, Bull's Head, Chelmsford, Buffalo Rock, Sussex and Red Rock are brands of golden ginger ale. Canada Dry, Schweppes and Seagram's are major brands of dry ginger ale. Dry ginger ale, as a mixer for alcoholic beverages, is a staple on supermarket shelves, in bars, and on airlines. Ginger ale is less commonly sold through vending machines or soda fountains alongside other carbonated soft drinks, but is still popular in some countries such as Canada.

    
Drink Recipe – Shirley Temple

Shirley Temple Cocktail Ingredients
•     8-10 cubes (cracked) Ice
•     2 measures lemon juice
•     1/2 measure grenadine
•     1/2 measure sugar syrup
•     to top up, ginger ale
Instructions
•     Put 4-6 ice cubes into shaker. Pour the lemon juice, grenadine and sugar syrup over the ice and shake well. Half fill a small, chilled glass with remaining ice cubes and strain the cocktail over them. Top with ginger ale and decorate with orange slice and cherry.

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Offline Johnny Unusual

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Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
« Reply #169 on: September 29, 2011, 07:27:15 AM »
19 – Soy Milk

42 points       
3 of 16 lists
Top Vote: #3 CJones


Soy milk (also called soya milk, soymilk, soybean milk, or soy juice) and sometimes referred to as soy drink/beverage is a beverage made from soybeans. A stable emulsion of oil, water, and protein, it is produced by soaking dry soybeans and grinding them with water. Soy milk contains about the same proportion of protein as cow's milk: around 3.5%; also 2% fat, 2.9% carbohydrate, and 0.5% ash. Soy milk can be made at home with traditional kitchen tools or with a soy milk machine.

The coagulated protein from soy milk can be made into tofu, just as dairy milk can be made into cheese.

The oldest evidence of soy milk production is from China where a kitchen scene proving use of soy milk is incised on a stone slab dated around AD 25–220. It also appeared in a chapter called Four Taboos (Szu-Hui) in the AD 82 book called Lunheng by Wang Chong, possibly the first written record of soy milk. Evidence of soy milk is rare prior to the 20th century and widespread usage before then is unlikely.

According to popular tradition in China, soy milk was developed by Liu An for medicinal purposes, although there is no historical evidence for this legend. This legend first started in the 12th century and was not clearly stated until late 15th century in Bencao Gangmu, where Li was attributed to the development of tofu with no mention of soy milk. Later writers in Asia and the West additionally attributed development of soy milk to Liu An, assuming that he could not have made tofu without making soy milk. However, it is also likely that Liu An has been falsely attributed to the development of tofu by writers after his time. However, some recent writers attributed Liu An to have developed tofu in 164 BC.


    
Drink-Based Recipe – Soy Milk Pancakes

Ingredients
•   1 cup all-purpose flour
•   1 1/2 tablespoons white sugar
•   2 teaspoons baking powder
•   1/2 teaspoon baking soda
•   1/4 teaspoon salt
•   1 cup vanilla soy milk
•   1 egg, lightly beaten
•   2 teaspoons vegetable oil
•   1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract
•   1/2 teaspoon almond extract

Directions
1.   In a medium bowl, whisk together the flour, sugar, baking powder, baking soda, and salt. In a small bowl, mix the vanilla soy milk, egg, oil, vanilla extract, and almond extract. Pour the soy milk mixture into the bowl with the flour mixture, and whisk together until smooth.

2.   Grease a skillet, and heat over medium low heat. Pour about 1/4 cup batter onto the heated skillet, and cook until bubbly. Flip with a spatula, and continue cooking about 1 minute, until golden brown. Repeat with the remaining batter.

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Offline Johnny Unusual

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Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
« Reply #170 on: September 29, 2011, 07:35:09 AM »
18 – Beer

47 points       
2 of 16 lists
Top Vote: #1 BBQ Platypus


Beer is the world's most widely consumed and probably oldest alcoholic beverage; it is the third most popular drink overall, after water and tea. It is produced by the brewing and fermentation of sugars, mainly derived from malted cereal grains, most commonly malted barley and malted wheat. Sugars derived from maize (corn) and rice are widely used adjuncts because of their lower cost. Most beer is flavoured with hops, which add bitterness and act as a natural preservative, though other flavourings such as herbs or fruit may occasionally be included. Some of humanity's earliest known writings refer to the production and distribution of beer: the Code of Hammurabi included laws regulating beer and beer parlours, and "The Hymn to Ninkasi", a prayer to the Mesopotamian goddess of beer, served as both a prayer and as a method of remembering the recipe for beer in a culture with few literate people. Today, the brewing industry is a global business, consisting of several dominant multinational companies and many thousands of smaller producers ranging from brewpubs to regional breweries.

The strength of beer is usually around 4% to 6% alcohol by volume (abv) though may range from less than 1% abv, to over 20% abv in rare cases.

Beer forms part of the culture of beer-drinking nations and is associated with social traditions such as beer festivals, as well as a rich pub culture involving activities like pub crawling and pub games such as bar billiards.

Beer is one of the world's oldest prepared beverages, possibly dating back to the early Neolithic or 9500 BC, when cereal was first farmed, and is recorded in the written history of ancient Egypt and Mesopotamia. Archaeologists speculate that beer was instrumental in the formation of civilizations.

The earliest known chemical evidence of beer dates to circa 3500–3100 BC from the site of Godin Tepe in the Zagros Mountains of western Iran. Some of the earliest Sumerian writings found in the region contain references to a type of beer; one such example, a prayer to the goddess Ninkasi, known as "The Hymn to Ninkasi", served as both a prayer as well as a method of remembering the recipe for beer in a culture with few literate people. The Ebla tablets, discovered in 1974 in Ebla, Syria and date back to 2500 BC, reveal that the city produced a range of beers, including one that appears to be named "Ebla" after the city. A beer made from rice, which, unlike sake, didn't use the amylolytic process, and was probably prepared for fermentation by mastication or malting, was made in China around 7000 BC.

As almost any substance containing carbohydrates, mainly sugars or starch, can naturally undergo fermentation, it is likely that beer-like beverages were independently invented among various cultures throughout the world. Bread and beer increased prosperity to a level that allowed time for development of other technology and contributed to the building of civilizations.

Beer was spread through Europe by Germanic and Celtic tribes as far back as 3000 BC, and it was mainly brewed on a domestic scale. The product that the early Europeans drank might not be recognized as beer by most people today. Alongside the basic starch source, the early European beers might contain fruits, honey, numerous types of plants, spices and other substances such as narcotic herbs. What they did not contain was hops, as that was a later addition, first mentioned in Europe around 822 by a Carolingian Abbot and again in 1067 by Abbess Hildegard of Bingen.

In 1516, William IV, Duke of Bavaria, adopted the Reinheitsgebot (purity law), perhaps the oldest food-quality regulation still in use in the 21st century, according to which the only allowed ingredients of beer are water, hops and barley-malt. Beer produced before the Industrial Revolution continued to be made and sold on a domestic scale, although by the 7th century AD, beer was also being produced and sold by European monasteries. During the Industrial Revolution, the production of beer moved from artisanal manufacture to industrial manufacture, and domestic manufacture ceased to be significant by the end of the 19th century. The development of hydrometers and thermometers changed brewing by allowing the brewer more control of the process and greater knowledge of the results.

Today, the brewing industry is a global business, consisting of several dominant multinational companies and many thousands of smaller producers ranging from brewpubs to regional breweries. As of 2006, more than 133 billion liters (35 billion gallons), the equivalent of a cube 510 metres on a side, of beer are sold per year, producing total global revenues of $294.5 billion (£147.7 billion).



    
Drink-Based Recipe – Beer Batter Cod

Tartar Sauce:
1 cup mayonnaise
1 tablespoon Dijon mustard
1 scallion, both white and green parts, minced
1 1/2 teaspoons fresh lemon juice
2 tablespoons minced dilled gherkins
1 tablespoon minced drained capers
2 tablespoons snipped fresh parsley
1 pinch each of salt and black pepper

Cod:
cooking oil, for deep-frying ( about 1 quart)
1 cup all-purpose flour
1/4 cup cornstarch
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 large egg, lightly beaten
1 cup beer, or as needed
2 pounds cod, haddock or hake fillets, cut into approximately 1 1/2" x 3" pieces

Combine all the tartar sauce ingredients in a small bowl. Cover and refrigerate.

Preheat the oven to 200°F.

Cover a cookie sheet with paper towels and top with a wire rack.

In a medium pot or deep fryer, heat 3 inches of oil to 350°F (use a deep frying thermometer if you are using a pot).

Meanwhile, mix the flour and cornstarch with the salt. Whisk in the egg. Slowly add the beer while whisking just until the ingredients are incorporated. Dip the fish pieces in the batter and place on a plate or the wire rack you will be using to drain the fried fish. If you have some batter left over, you can dip the fish in the batter again after the first coat of batter dries on the fish awaiting frying.

Place the fish pieces, two at a time, in the oil. Cook until the fish is done and the crust is lightly golden, about 4 minutes for 3/4 inch thick fillets. Remove the fish with tongs and put on the rack to drain. Sprinkle salt over the hot fish and put the baking sheet in the oven while you cook the other batches.

Serve with the tartar sauce and freshly made french fries.

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Offline Johnny Unusual

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Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
« Reply #171 on: September 29, 2011, 07:39:02 AM »
17 – Lemonade

48 points       
3 of 16 lists
Top Vote: #8 Johnny Unusual, Monty

Preferred serving: Pink! (Johnny Unusual, Monty)


Lemonade is a lemon-flavored drink, typically made from lemons, water and sugar.

The term can refer to three different types of beverage:

   "Clear" lemonade: In many western European countries, the term limonade, from which the term "lemonade" is derived, originally applied to unsweetened water or carbonated soda water with lemon juice added, although several versions of sugar sweetened limonade have arrived on store shelves.

   "Cloudy" lemonade (UK term): In the US, Canada, and India lemonade refers to a mixture of lemon juice, sugar, and uncarbonated water, although there are many versions which contain artificial flavors instead of actual lemon juice. In India, it is a common household preparation, made using freshly squeezed lemons, granulated sugar, salt, pepper (and other spices according to personal taste) and is invariably consumed fresh.

   "Fizzy" lemonade: In France, the modern use of the term limonade refers to sweet carbonated lemon soft drinks (the uncarbonated version would be called citronnade). Likewise, in the UK, South Africa, Australia and New Zealand the term "lemonade" refers to a colourless, carbonated, sweet soft drink containing either natural or artificial lemon flavour. (This does not include lemon-lime drinks such as Seven-Up and Sprite.)

The French word limonade, which originally meant an unsweetened lemon-flavored water or carbonated soda, has since come to mean "soft drink", regardless of flavor, in many countries.

In the UK, the suffix '-ade' means a 'carbonated sweet soft drink'; hence limeade, orangeade, cherryade, etc. Brown lemonade exists in the Northern Ireland region of the UK.

In the Republic of Ireland, lemonade refers to the carbonated, lemon-flavored soft drink (as in the UK) but is further sub-divided into white (clear) lemonade and red lemonade. White lemonade equates to the colourless fizzy lemonade common in many countries, while red lemonade is particular to Ireland. Red lemonade differs slightly in taste from white lemonade and is either drunk neat or as part of a whiskey mixer.

American-style lemonade exists in the UK as a "homemade" juice (also called lemonade), but is only rarely sold commercially under that name. A carbonated version is commonly sold commercially as "cloudy" or "traditional" lemonade. There are also similar uncarbonated products, lemon squash and lemon barley water, both of which are usually sold as a syrup which is diluted to taste. Traditional lemonade also comes in powder packages. Variations on this form of lemonade can be found worldwide. In India and Pakistan, where it is commonly known as limbu paani or nimbu paani, lemonade may also contain salt and/or ginger juice. Shikanjvi is a traditional lemonade from the India-Pakistan region and can also be flavored with saffron, garlic and cumin.

In Australia and New Zealand, lemonade can also refer to any clear, carbonated soft drink with a primarily lemon flavor; e.g. a lemon-lime soft drink, such as Sprite. Culturally however, with a drink such as Sprite, the flavor is not recognised as "lemon-lime", but just plain "lemonade", although it is still the same flavor as its international counterpart. Other colored (and flavored) soft drinks are sometimes referred to by their color such as "red lemonade" or "green lemonade", implying that "lemonade" is the clear version of its "flavored" counterparts.


    
Drink-Based Recipe – Lemonade

Ingredients
•   6 lemons
•   1 cup white sugar
•   6 cups cold water
Directions
1.   Juice the lemons to make 1 cup of juice. To make your labor easier, FIRMLY roll the lemons between your hand and counter top before cutting in half and juicing.
2.   In a gallon pitcher combine 1 cup lemon juice, 1 cup sugar, and 6 cups cold water. Stir. Adjust water to taste. Chill and serve over ice.

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Offline Johnny Unusual

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Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
« Reply #172 on: September 29, 2011, 07:48:51 AM »
16 – Earl Grey

51 points          
3 of 16 lists
Top Vote: #3 Imrahil

Preferred serving: Pink! (Johnny Unusual, Monty)


Earl Grey tea is a tea blend with a distinctive flavour and aroma derived from the addition of oil extracted from the rind of the bergamot orange, a fragrant citrus fruit and is commonly known as "regular tea".

Traditionally the term "Earl Grey" was applied only to black tea; however, today the term is used for other teas that contain oil of bergamot, or a flavour.

The Earl Grey blend is named after 2nd Earl Grey, British Prime Minister in the 1830s and author of the Reform Bill of 1832, who reputedly received a gift, probably a diplomatic perquisite, of tea flavoured with bergamot oil, taken from bergamot, a citrus fruit typical of Southeast Asia and grown commercially in Italy.

According to one legend, a grateful Chinese mandarin whose son was rescued from drowning by one of Lord Grey's men first presented the blend to the Earl in 1803. The tale has no basis in fact, as Lord Grey never set foot in China and the use of bergamot oil to scent tea was then unknown in China. However, this tale is subsequently told (and slightly corrected) on the Twinings website, as "having been presented by an envoy on his return from China".

Jacksons of Piccadilly claim they originated Earl Grey's Tea, Lord Grey having given the recipe to Robert Jackson & Co. partner George Charlton in 1830. According to Jacksons, the original recipe has been in constant production and has never left their hands. Theirs has been based on China tea since the beginning.

According to the Grey family, the tea was specially blended by a Chinese mandarin for Lord Grey, to suit the water at Howick Hall, the family seat in Northumberland, using bergamot in particular to offset the preponderance of lime in the local water. Lady Grey used it to entertain in London as a political hostess, and it proved so popular that she was asked if it could be sold to others, which is how Twinings came to market it as a brand.

    
Drink-Based Recipe – Chocolate Earl Grey Cookies

Ingredients
•   1 cup butter, room temperature
•   1 cup white sugar
•   2 1/2 tablespoons Earl Grey tea, finely ground in a coffee grinder
•   1 teaspoon vanilla extract
•   2 eggs
•   2 cups all-purpose flour
•   2/3 cup unsweetened cocoa powder
•   2 teaspoons baking powder
Directions
1.   Preheat oven to 350 degrees F (175 degrees C).
2.   Cream together butter, sugar, and tea. Beat in vanilla, then eggs, one at a time until incorporated. Sift together flour, cocoa powder, and baking powder; fold into egg mixture until just mixed.
3.   Drop cookies by rounded tablespoonfuls onto a ungreased cookie sheets.
4.   Bake in preheated oven for 8 minutes.

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Offline Johnny Unusual

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Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
« Reply #173 on: September 29, 2011, 07:57:33 AM »
15 – Captain Morgan

57 points          
3 of 16 lists
Top Vote: #2 Sarcasm Made Easy


Captain Morgan is a brand of rum produced by alcohol conglomerate Diageo. It is named after the 17th-century, Welsh privateer of theCaribbean, Sir Henry Morgan. Since 2011 the label has used the slogan, "To Life, Love and Loot."

In 1944, the Seagram Company started producing rum under the name Captain Morgan Rum Company.

Seagram CEO Samuel Bronfman purchased a distillery named Long Pond from the Jamaican government. Among the buyers of raw rum from the Long Pond distillery was a Kingston pharmacy named Levy Brothers. The Levy family had been purchasing raw rum, adding medicinal herbs and spices, aging, and bottling it. Bronfman liked the rum product and bought the rights to it.

In the 1950s the governments of both the United States and its Puerto Rico commonwealth territory instituted a number of job-creation programs in Puerto Rico. Taxes on rum entering the contiguous 48 states from Puerto Rico were made lower than those on rum coming from foreign countries. At this time both Seagram's and the Bacardi family built large new plants near San Juan. In 1985, Seagrams sold its rum distillery and manufacturing facilities in Camuy and Arecibo -- and doing business as Puerto Rican Destillers -- to Destilería Serrallés, a Puerto Rican concern that had been producing the Don Q brand in Puerto Rico since 1865. As part of the contract Seagrams also licensed to Serralles the rights to produce and distribute the "Captain Morgan" brand in Puerto Rico and the rest of the Caribbean until in 2012.

In 2001, Seagrams sold the "Captain Morgan" brand to Diageo. Diageo made an announcement on June 24, 2008 that it intends to build and operate a new rum distillery on St. Croix, Virgin Islands beginning in 2010 and to source from it beginning at the end of their current supply contract in 2012.

In 1984, Captain Morgan Original Spiced rum was introduced to the United States. Captain Morgan is, by volume, the second largest brand of spirits in the United States, and the seventh largest worldwide. In 2007, 7.6 million 9-liter cases were sold. Most Captain Morgan rum is sold in the United States, Canada, Great Britain, South Africa, and Global Travel.

Although the pirate Henry Morgan is a figure of Jamaican culture, the Seagram's Captain Morgan Rum is labeled as a product of Puerto Rico, whereas the Captain Morgan Rum produced by J. Wray and Nephew Ltd. is labeled as a "product of Jamaica."

In November 2009, the NFL banned a covert ad campaign, allegedly put on by Diageo. It was understood that for each NFL player striking the "Captain Morgan" pose on camera during a regular season game, Diageo would donate $10,000 to the Gridiron Greats (a non-profit which helps retired NFL players with various hardships after leaving the game). The league made this announcement following such a celebration by Brent Celek of the Philadelphia Eagles.

In 2010 two American territories, Puerto Rico and the United States Virgin Islands bickered over plans for the Captain Morgan to move operations to the U.S.V.I under tax incentives. The matter came to a head when it created a debate in the United States Congress over the USVI's attempt to use tax benefits to lure the company to that territory.

    
Drink-Based Recipe – Long Island Spice Tea

Ok add 0.25 oz. Smirnoff Vodka into a cocktail shaker, add 0.25 oz. Gordon’s Gin to the shaker, 0.25 oz. Jose Cuervo tequila to the shaker, add 0.25 oz. of Grand Marnier to the shaker and the piece de resistance – 0.25 oz. of Captain Morgan ® Original Spiced.

Add 1.0 oz. of equal parts water, sugar, fresh lemon juice & fresh limejuice. Give it a shake. Add Cola and pour over ice into a tall glass.

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Offline D.B. Barnes

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Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
« Reply #174 on: September 29, 2011, 08:00:22 AM »
Hmm...  What do you think people?  Should I have Milkshake shoot up in the rankings?  It wouldn't be too much trouble to change it.  I think that I initially toed with the idea of separate votes for different milkshakes and consolidating them and I think that BBQ's vote was stuck in the middle.

I just want an explanation (preferably in the form of a 72-slide PowerPoint presentation) of the orange soda situation.  ;D
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Offline Johnny Unusual

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Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
« Reply #175 on: September 29, 2011, 08:26:58 AM »
Hmm...  What do you think people?  Should I have Milkshake shoot up in the rankings?  It wouldn't be too much trouble to change it.  I think that I initially toed with the idea of separate votes for different milkshakes and consolidating them and I think that BBQ's vote was stuck in the middle.

I just want an explanation (preferably in the form of a 72-slide PowerPoint presentation) of the orange soda situation.  ;D

I had Orange pop, Orangina, C-Plus and Orange Crush on my list.  Some people gave the names of specific brands, some did not.


Offline Pak-Man

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Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
« Reply #176 on: September 29, 2011, 08:36:27 AM »
Sunkist is the only TRUE orange soda. All the others are just imitators.

Pitch-perfect imitators. :^)


Offline sarcasm_made_Easy

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Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
« Reply #177 on: September 29, 2011, 08:52:07 AM »
WOOO got captain twice on this list :)


Online Darth Geek

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Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
« Reply #178 on: September 29, 2011, 09:20:03 AM »
20 – Ginger Ale
42 points       
3 of 16 lists
Top Vote: #5 Johnny Unusual


I had Ginger Ale (specifically Canada Dry) at #1 on my list. ALthough since mine didn't go to a full 25 items, the #1 slot would have counted less.



Offline Johnny Unusual

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Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
« Reply #179 on: September 29, 2011, 10:03:23 AM »
I didn't include yours since it was SPECIFICALLY Canada Dry.  I know it sounds like I'm being anal, but never underestimate the rabid passion of brand loyalty.