Author Topic: LoC: Top 65 Beverages  (Read 40760 times)

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Offline sarcasm_made_Easy

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Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
« Reply #135 on: September 28, 2011, 01:00:27 PM »
Half way between those two, with the declaration being all hoarse.

He and his brother spent most of the Vietnam, whatever that was, blitzed on gin in Okinawa (I actually want to do a film about their experiences).

Actually i would love to do this movie, but base it vaguely on my experiences in korea and make it a modern time frame.  The drinking stories would be fun but the whole, there is two wars going on that you joined to help but your overhear nice and safe, angle i think would be interesting.  Granted that would probably be because it was a thought i often had.


Offline Tripe

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Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
« Reply #136 on: September 28, 2011, 01:06:14 PM »
Actually that was exactly it, he, not sure about his brother so much, but he joined up to go to Vietnam but ended up doing administrative stuff in Japan instead.

So, when not doing that he and his brother spent their time hanging out in tea houses and drinking and pawning each others possessions for money to keep doing the other things.

His Japanese was fairly decent so, when he was due to go home he was able to reply to the Anti US protester who chanted "Yankee go home" in Japanese during a rally outside the base with "Next Week Friday". Which would be one of the last scenes I think.

 


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Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
« Reply #137 on: September 28, 2011, 01:10:32 PM »
26 – Wine

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Top Vote: #5 Monty


Wine is an alcoholic beverage, made of fermented fruit juice, usually from grapes. The natural chemical balance of grapes lets them ferment without the addition of sugars, acids, enzymes, or other nutrients. Grape wine is produced by fermenting crushed grapes using various types of yeast. Yeast consumes the sugars in the grapes and converts them into alcohol. Different varieties of grapes and strains of yeasts produce different types of wine.

Wines made from other fruits, such as apples and berries, are normally named after the fruit from which they are produced (for example, apple wine or elderberry wine) and are generically called fruit wine or country wine (not to be confused with the French term vin de pays). Others, such as barley wine and rice wine (i.e., sake), are made from starch-based materials and resemble beer and spirit more than wine, while ginger wine is fortified with brandy. In these cases, the term "wine" refers to the higher alcohol content rather than the production process. The commercial use of the English word "wine" (and its equivalent in other languages) is protected by law in many jurisdictions.

Wine has a rich history dating back thousands of years, with the earliest known production occurring around 8,000 years ago on the territory of modern-day Georgia. It first appeared in the Balkans at about 4500 BC and was very common in ancient Greece, Thrace and Rome. Wine has also played an important role in religion throughout history. The Greek god Dionysus and the Roman equivalent Bacchus represented wine, and the drink is also used in Christian Eucharist ceremonies and the Jewish Kiddush.

Archaeological evidence suggests that the earliest known production of wine, made by fermenting grapes, took place as early as 8,000 years ago in Georgia and 6,100 years ago in Armenia. These locations are all within the natural area of the European grapevine Vitis vinifera.

Through an extensive gene-mapping project in 2006, Dr. McGovern and his colleagues analyzed the heritage of more than 110 modern grape cultivars, and narrowed their origin to a region in Georgia, where also wine residues were discovered on the inner surfaces of 8,000-year-old ceramic storage jars in Shulavari, Georgia. Other notable areas of wine production have been discovered in Greece and date back to 4500 BC. The same sites also contain the world's earliest evidence of crushed grapes. On January 11, 2011 in one of Armenia's Vayots Dzor province cave was found a wine making press dating to approximately 6,000 years ago. Literary references to wine are abundant in Homer (9th century BC, but possibly composed even earlier), Alkman (7th century BC), and others. In Ancient Egypt, six of 36 wine amphoras were found in the tomb of King Tutankhamun bearing the name "Kha'y", a royal chief vintner. Five of these amphoras were designated as from the King's personal estate with the sixth listed as from the estate of the royal house of Aten. Traces of wine have also been found in central Asian Xinjiang, dating from the second and first millennia BC.

The first known mentioning of grape-based wines in India was in the late 4th century BC writings of Chanakya who was the chief minister of Emperor Chandragupta Maurya. In his writings, Chanakya condemns the use of alcohol while chronicling the emperor and his court's frequent indulgence of a style of grape wine known as Madhu.

A 2003 report by archaeologists indicates a possibility that grapes were mixed with rice to produce mixed fermented beverages in China in the early years of the seventh millennium BC. Pottery jars from the Neolithic site of Jiahu, Henan contained traces of tartaric acid and other organic compounds commonly found in wine. However, other fruits indigenous to the region, such as hawthorn, cannot be ruled out. If these beverages, which seem to be the precursors of rice wine, included grapes rather than other fruits, these grapes were of any of the several dozen indigenous wild species of grape in China, rather than from Vitis vinifera, which were introduced into China some 6000 years later.

One of the lasting legacies of the ancient Roman Empire was the viticulture foundation the Romans laid in the lands that today are world renowned wine regions. Areas with Roman garrison towns, like Bordeaux, Trier, and Colchester, the Romans planted vineyards to supply local needs and limit the cost of long distance trading. In medieval Europe, the Roman Catholic Church staunchly supported wine, since they required it for the Mass. Monks in France made wine for years, aging it in caves. An old English recipe that survived in various forms until the 19th century calls for refining white wine from bastard—bad or tainted bastardo wine.

    
Drink Recipe – Red Wine Cooler

4 oz red wine
2 oz lemon-lime soda
2 oz ginger ale

Pour the wine, lemon-lime soda and ginger ale into a highball glass almost filled with ice cubes. Stir well. Garnish with a twist of lemon and a slice of orange, and serve.

 
 
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Offline gojikranz

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Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
« Reply #138 on: September 28, 2011, 02:37:12 PM »

28 – Red Bull

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Top Vote: #2 Team RAD


A company I worked for a few years back had Red Bull fridge. I've always been a caffeine lover addict, but always got my fix with coffee or tea. Working late one night, needing a quick boost, and fresh outta meth, I decided to give Red Bull a shot. I'd seen the commercials and knew what it was about, but had never thought to try it. Didn't much care for the taste at first, but that boost! Soon I was slamming cans left and right and even grew to like the taste. My next job lacked the dedicated Red Bull fridge, and since I only ever got them that way, I just stopped drinking it. Never once paid for a single can!



similarly for me i worked on a low budget movie on canada and red bull was drunk liberally for 24 hour shoot days and what not.  its not a great memory of red bull so its not on my list but it did work.  and i have also never bought a can!  i prefer monster or juice mixed energy drinks usually if im looking for that sorta thing.
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Offline sarcasm_made_Easy

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Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
« Reply #139 on: September 28, 2011, 02:40:59 PM »
Actually that was exactly it, he, not sure about his brother so much, but he joined up to go to Vietnam but ended up doing administrative stuff in Japan instead.

So, when not doing that he and his brother spent their time hanging out in tea houses and drinking and pawning each others possessions for money to keep doing the other things.

His Japanese was fairly decent so, when he was due to go home he was able to reply to the Anti US protester who chanted "Yankee go home" in Japanese during a rally outside the base with "Next Week Friday". Which would be one of the last scenes I think.

 

That sounds cool but different than my experience.  No one really had a problem with us.  And when they had a problem with the US it was never for reasons Americans would first think of, like the Beef protests. 


Offline Tripe

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Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
« Reply #140 on: September 28, 2011, 02:44:23 PM »
Bear in mind though this was a) the '60s and b)Okinawa where tensions have always run high amongst a fair numbers of the locals.


Offline D.B. Barnes

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Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
« Reply #141 on: September 28, 2011, 02:44:37 PM »

28 – Red Bull
33 points    
3 of 16 lists
Top Vote: #2 Team RAD


A company I worked for a few years back had Red Bull fridge. I've always been a caffeine lover addict, but always got my fix with coffee or tea. Working late one night, needing a quick boost, and fresh outta meth, I decided to give Red Bull a shot. I'd seen the commercials and knew what it was about, but had never thought to try it. Didn't much care for the taste at first, but that boost! Soon I was slamming cans left and right and even grew to like the taste. My next job lacked the dedicated Red Bull fridge, and since I only ever got them that way, I just stopped drinking it. Never once paid for a single can!

similarly for me i worked on a low budget movie on canada and red bull was drunk liberally for 24 hour shoot days and what not.  its not a great memory of red bull so its not on my list but it did work.  and i have also never bought a can!  i prefer monster or juice mixed energy drinks usually if im looking for that sorta thing.

Oh, it works likes a charm. I imagine it's a staple on all movie sets. That shit powered me me through the most ridiculous working situations I've ever been in. I'm talking 60-70 hour weeks, including weekends for what seemed like an eternity. I have some pretty crazed memories associated with that magical crank-in-a-can, including some epic crashes.

Anyway, here's to free Red Bull!   :cheers:
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Offline sarcasm_made_Easy

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Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
« Reply #142 on: September 28, 2011, 02:47:08 PM »
Bear in mind though this was a) the '60s and b)Okinawa where tensions have always run high amongst a fair numbers of the locals.


Actually depending on your branch of service you get treated differently.  My cousin spent a large amount of time there and was treated quite good.  The marines are pertty damned unpopular there right now for various reasons. 


Offline Tripe

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Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
« Reply #143 on: September 28, 2011, 02:48:36 PM »
Go back to a) though, it's was much more common to see marching and protests.


Offline ColeStratton

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Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
« Reply #144 on: September 28, 2011, 03:04:33 PM »
heh the dirty martini, good choice. 

also looking at coles choices i cant help but think of him as a 50s guy from madmen or something. 

I have no idea what you are talking about.

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Offline sarcasm_made_Easy

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Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
« Reply #145 on: September 28, 2011, 03:12:33 PM »
Go back to a) though, it's was much more common to see marching and protests.

No i know what your saying man, i was in asia after all lol.  But if you have been following the news recently the Japan prime minister (ex i think now i would have to check) was having serious issues over a marine base there in okinawa that the locals just did not want.  It was a fairly large issue there, not including the rapes that happened a few years before that. 


Johnny Unusual

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Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
« Reply #146 on: September 28, 2011, 03:51:43 PM »
25 – Chocolate Milkshake

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Top Vote: #4 Johnny Unusual


A milkshake is a sweet, cold beverage which is made from milk, ice cream or iced milk, and flavorings or sweeteners such as fruit syrup or chocolate sauce.

Full-service restaurants, soda fountains, and diners usually prepare and mix the shake "by hand" from scoops of ice cream and milk in ablender or drink mixer using a stainless steel cup. Most fast food outlets do not make shakes by hand with ice cream. Instead, they make shakes in automatic milkshake machines which freeze and serve a premade milkshake mixture consisting of milk, a sweetened flavoring agent, and a thickening agent. There are exceptions such as the US chains Back Yard Burgers, Jack in the Box, Long John Silvers, Hardees,Chick-fil-A, Carl's Jr., and more which do make the shakes by hand with ice cream. Some fast-food restaurants such as Dairy Queen serve milkshakes which are prepared by blending soft-serve ice cream (or ice milk) with sweetened, flavored syrups such as chocolate syrup and fruit-flavored syrup and milk.

When the term "milkshake" was first used in print in 1885, milkshakes were an alcoholic whiskey drink that has been described as a "sturdy, healthful eggnog type of drink, with eggs, whiskey, etc., served as a tonic as well as a treat". However, by 1900, the term referred to "wholesome drinks made with chocolate, strawberry, or vanilla syrups." By the "early 1900s people were asking for the new treat, often with ice cream." By the 1930s, milkshakes were a popular drink atmalt shops, which were the "typical soda fountain of the period... used by students as a meeting place or hangout."

The history of the electric blender, malted milk drinks and milkshakes are interconnected. Before the widespread availability of electric blenders, milkshake-type drinks were more like eggnog, or they were a hand-shaken mixture of crushed ice and milk, sugar, and flavorings.[8]Hamilton Beach's drink mixers began being used at soda fountains in 1911 and the electric blender or drink mixer was invented by Steven Poplawski in 1922. With the invention of the blender, milkshakes began to take their modern, whipped, aerated, and frothy form. Malted milk drinks are made with malted milk powder, which contains dried milk, malted barley and wheat flour. Malted milk powder was invented in 1897 by William Horlick as an easily digested restorative health drink for invalids and children, and as an infant's food.

The use of malted milk powder in milkshakes was popularized in the USA by the Chicago drugstore chain Walgreens. In 1922, Walgreens' employee Ivar "Pop" Coulson made a milkshake by adding two scoops of vanilla ice cream to the standard malted milk drink recipe (milk, chocolate syrup and malt powder). This item, under the name "Horlick's Malted Milk," was featured by the Walgreen drugstore chain as part of a chocolate milk shake, which itself became known as a "malted" or "malt" and became one of the most popular soda-fountain drinks.

The automation of milkshakes developed in the 1930s, after the invention of freon-cooled refrigerators provided a safe, reliable way of automatically making and dispensing ice cream. In 1936, inventor Earl Prince used the basic concept behind the freon-cooled automated ice cream machine to develop the Multimixer, a "five-spindled mixer that could produce five milkshakes at once, all automatically, and dispense them at the pull of a lever into awaiting paper cups."

In the late 1930s, several newspaper articles show that the term "frosted" was used to refer to milkshakes made with ice cream. In 1937, the Denton Journal in Maryland stated that "For a 'frosted' shake, add a dash of your favorite ice cream." In 1939, the Mansfield News in Ohio stated that "A frosted beverage, in the vernacular, is something good to which ice cream has been added. Example par excellence is frosted coffee—that hot, tasty beverage made chilly with ice and frosty with ice cream."
 
By the 1950s, popular places to drink milkshakes were Woolworth's "5 & 10" lunch counters, diners, burger joints, and drugstore soda fountains. These establishments often had neon light signs, checkerboard-patterned linoleum floor tiles, chrome barstools, vinyl booths, formica counter-tops with coin-operated jukeboxes, a board of daily specials, a counter top donut display case, and prominently displayed behind the counter, a shining chrome or stainless steel milkshake mixing machine.
 
These establishments made milkshakes in Hamilton Beach or similar styles of drink mixers, which had spindles and agitators that folded air into the drinks for "smooth, fluffy results" and served them in 12½-ounce tall, "y"-shaped glasses. Soda fountain staff had their own jargon, such as "Burn One All the Way" (chocolate malted with chocolate ice cream), "Twist It, Choke It, and Make It Cackle" (chocolate malted with an egg) "Shake One in the Hay" (a strawberry shake) and a "White Cow" (a vanilla milkshake). In the 1950s, a milkshake machine salesman named Ray Kroc bought exclusive rights to the 1930s-era Multimixer milkshake maker from inventor Earl Prince, and went on to use automated milkshake machines to speed up production at McDonald's restaurants.

In the 1950s, milkshakes were called "frappes", "velvets," "frosted [drinks]", or "cabinets" in different parts of the US. A specialty style of milkshake, the "concrete" was "...a milk shake so thick that the server hands it out the order window upside down, demonstrating that not a drop will drip." In 1952, the Newport Daily News in Rhode Island contained a "Guide For Top Quality ICE CREAM SODAS CABINETS MILK SHAKES", which shows the use of the term "cabinet" in print. An article from 1953 in the Salisbury Times (in the state of Maryland) suggests that shakes can be made in a jar by shaking well. The article states that by adding four large tablespoons of ice cream, the drink becomes a "frosted shake.”

    
Drink Recipe – Banana Chocolate Milkshake

1 cup skim milk
2 tablespoons cocoa
1/3 cup sugar
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
1 medium ripe banana, sliced
8 large ice cubes

Directions

In blender container pour milk. Add cocoa. Cover, blend on low speed until well mixed. Add sugar, vanilla and banana. Cover, blend until smooth.

Add ice cubes, one at a time, blending until thick.

 
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Johnny Unusual

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Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
« Reply #147 on: September 28, 2011, 03:57:47 PM »
24 – Jägermeister

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Jägermeister  is a German 70-proof digestif made with 56 different herbs and spices. It is the flagship product of Mast-Jägermeister SE, headquartered inWolfenbüttel, south of Braunschweig, Lower Saxony, Germany.

The term Jägermeister was introduced in Germany in 1934 in the new Reichsjagdgesetz (Reich hunting law). The term was applied to senior foresters and gamekeepers in the German civil service. Thus, when the liquor was introduced in 1935, the name was already familiar to Germans. Curt Mast, the original distiller of Jägermeister, was an enthusiastic hunter.

Translated literally, Jägermeister means "hunt-master", combining Jäger (hunter) and Meister (master, in the sense of an accomplished professional). A possible free translation might be gamekeeper.

In parts of Germany (Lower Saxony), it is often humorously called Leberkleister (“liver glue”). The humor plays upon the fact thatLeberkleister is an exact rhyme with Jägermeister. A satirical advertisement which mocks Jägermeister as Leberkleister appeared on the back cover of issue number 70 of the German edition of Mad magazine in February, 1975, under the rubric “Advertisements we’d like to see.”

The Jägermeister logo, which shows the head of a stag with a glowing Christian cross between its antlers, is a reference to the stories of Saint Hubertus and Saint Eustace, patron saints of hunters.

    
Drink Recipe – Jaygo

10 oz strawberry soda
2 oz Jagermeister® herbal liqueur

Stir ingredients together well in a tall glass or cup, and serve.
5% (10 proof)
Serve in: Highball Glass
 
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Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
« Reply #148 on: September 28, 2011, 04:05:25 PM »
24 – Absinthe

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Absinthe is historically described as a distilled, highly alcoholic (45–74% ABV / 90-148proof) beverage. It is an anise-flavoured spirit derived from herbs, including the flowers and leaves of the herb Artemisia absinthium, commonly referred to as "grande wormwood", together with green anise and sweet fennel. Absinthe traditionally has a natural green colour but can also be colourless. It is commonly referred to in historical literature as "la fée verte" (the "green fairy" in French).

Although it is sometimes mistakenly called a liqueur, absinthe is not bottled with added sugar and is therefore classified as a spirit. Absinthe has a very high level of alcohol by volume but is normally diluted with water when consumed.

Absinthe originated in the canton of Neuchâtel in Switzerland. It achieved great popularity as an alcoholic drink in late 19th- and early 20th-century France, particularly among Parisian artists and writers. Owing in part to its association with bohemian culture, consumption of absinthe was opposed by social conservatives and prohibitionists. Charles Baudelaire, Paul Verlaine, Arthur Rimbaud, Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec, Amedeo Modigliani, Vincent van Gogh, Oscar Wilde, Aleister Crowley and Alfred Jarry were all known drinkers of absinthe.

Absinthe has been portrayed as a dangerously addictive psychoactive drug. The chemical thujone, present in small quantities, was blamed for its alleged harmful effects. By 1915, absinthe had been banned in the United States and in most European countries including France, the Netherlands, Belgium, Switzerland and the Austro-Hungarian Empire. Although absinthe was vilified, it has not been shown that it is any more dangerous than ordinary spirits. Its psychoactive properties, apart from those of alcohol, have been much exaggerated.

A revival of absinthe began in the 1990s, when countries in the European Union began to reauthorize its manufacture and sale. As of February 2008, nearly 200 brands of absinthe were being produced in a dozen countries, most notably in France, Switzerland, Spain, and the Czech Republic.

    
Drink Recipe – ABC

Ingredients
•     1/3 absinthe
•     1/3 Bacardi 151
•     1/3 chartreuse
Instructions
•     Add all ingredients into a shot glass with green Chartreuse last and enjoy.

 
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Offline Tripe

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Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
« Reply #149 on: September 28, 2011, 04:13:42 PM »
Off to the gym will comment on this later. :)