Author Topic: LoC 50 - Top Video Games of the '80s (And before!) - Today's High Scores  (Read 37241 times)

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Johnny Unusual

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Forgot about Bomberman.  Great game.  I would have put Megaman 2 on my list, but I forgot about it when rewriting my list.


Russell

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#42 - Ghostbusters

(42 Points) 2 of 18 Lists - Highest Ranking - #4 - Pak-Man
Who ya gonna call?
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I.... I don't believe this.... Ghostbusters, one of the worst goddamn games of
all time let alone on the NES got voted ABOVE Mega Man?! I'm not a hardcore
gamer like I used to be, but even I think that is blasphemy.
« Last Edit: July 20, 2011, 07:50:12 AM by Gunflyer »


Offline sarcasm_made_Easy

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Fun gaming fact- one (several actually) of the quests in World of Warcraft involve the player playing Joust and defeating enemies complete with lance and flying ostrich thing. The unbeatable pterodactyl does not appear in game, but is referred to in the quest text.

But the unbeatable pterodactyl is beatable.  You know that right?  its just obnoxiously hard to hit him just right.


Offline Compound

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Fun gaming fact- one (several actually) of the quests in World of Warcraft involve the player playing Joust and defeating enemies complete with lance and flying ostrich thing. The unbeatable pterodactyl does not appear in game, but is referred to in the quest text.

But the unbeatable pterodactyl is beatable.  You know that right?  its just obnoxiously hard to hit him just right.

Actually, it means that the quest text refers to the 'Unbeatable?" Pterodactyl as did the arcade version of Joust. I just wasn't specific enough with my punctuation.


Offline Pak-Man

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#40 - Spy Hunter

(43 Points) 2 of 18 Lists - Highest Ranking - #1 - RVR II


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Release Date:  1983

Just the facts/Stuff I wiki'd:

Spy Hunter is a 1983 arcade game developed and released by Bally Midway. It has also been ported to various home computers and video game systems.
 
As a cabinet-style arcade game, Spy Hunter was produced in both sit-down and standard upright versions with the latter being more common. The game's controls consist of a steering wheel in the form of a futuristic aircraft-style yoke with several special-purpose buttons, a two-position stick shift (offering 'low' and 'high' gears), and a pedal used for acceleration. It is a single-player game.

Spy Hunter is an action/driving game with the player in the role of a spy driving an armed sportscar. The object of the game is to travel the freeway destroying as many enemy vehicles as possible while protecting civilian vehicles. The game is a top-down vertical scroller.
 
Early versions of the game used the James Bond theme by Monty Norman, but the inability to obtain the rights to use the music forced Midway to change this theme. As a result, an arrangement of Henry Mancini's theme to Peter Gunn plays throughout.
 
The game begins with the player driving the fictitious G-6155 Interceptor. Enemy vehicles try to destroy the player's car or to force it off the road. Points are scored for distance traveled (a counter increments the score while the car is moving) and for destroying enemy vehicles. There is an initial lead-in time during which the player has an unlimited supply of cars. After the lead-in time expires the player must earn extra cars by obtaining high scores. The first extra car is generally earned at a default value of 30,000 points, but this value can vary depending on settings for a given machine. Up to 3 additional cars are awarded at similar increments.
 
The player must be cautious to avoid harming innocent civilian vehicles. There are three types of such vehicles: two automobiles (one pink in color, the other light blue) and a motorcycle. Destroying these vehicles causes the score meter to halt for a few seconds (in effect subtracting points from the player's score) and will result in the Weapons Van arriving only once instead of twice in that sequence. It is also possible to destroy the Weapons Van itself. Doing so produces the same consequences as destroying a civilian vehicle. A very hard, direct crash with a civilian vehicle can result in the player losing a car. If the player survives long enough (several minutes), eventually civilian vehicles stop appearing and the only other vehicles on the road are the player's enemies.
 
The player's car starts the game with two front-mounted machine guns with an endless supply of ammunition. The machine guns and the player's driving skill (opponents can be sideswiped off the road) are the only means of defense against the enemy vehicles in the beginning stages of the game. At regular intervals, following a fork in the road, the player will enter a new 'territory' also marked by a change in the environment, such as addition of snow and ice, a transition to or from water, or merely a change in the color of the terrain and vegetation alongside the road. In each new road territory, the player will pass a red tractor-trailer parked on the shoulder—the Weapons Van. The player receives additional weapons by entering the Van, which will accelerate until it reaches a point directly in front of the player's vehicle, at which time it will extend a ramp allowing the player to drive in. Three special weapons are available: oil slicks, smoke screens, and surface-to-air missiles. The type of weapon provided by the Weapons Van is displayed on the Van's roof rack. The Van subsequently stops briefly at the side of the road for the player's vehicle to exit. The Weapons Van can appear twice in each territory; after entering the Van the first time, the button in the middle of the steering yoke will be lit steadily as long as the player does not destroy any civilian vehicles. When the middle button is thus lit, the Van can be manually summoned by pressing it, or if the player loses a car the Weapons Van will reappear (with the same weapon) automatically.
 
All three special weapons can be equipped simultaneously, although this state of play is difficult to achieve. Each special weapon has a limited number of uses. For example, the smokescreen can be used only four times (three times in some game versions). The special weapons are activated via dedicated buttons on the steering yoke. In most game versions entering the Weapons Van twice in the same territory will refill the player's ammunition supply. If the player's car is destroyed, either by being forced off the road or shot, it will reappear with only machine guns. The game's dashboard shows which weapons are available, when lit.

A version of Spy Hunter is included as an Easter egg in the first release of Microsoft Excel 2000. It requires DirectX to work. Shortly after Excel 2000's release, Microsoft officially banned Easter eggs from its non-game software.

Pak's Thoughts - I could never make it to the boat level. I always have a blast trying, but I always get too speed-happy and plow into a car and die. It's a testiment to this game's awesomeness that I still think of it as one of the best games ever made when I could never really play it. :^)


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#39 - Psychic 5

(44 Points) 2 of 18 Lists - Highest Ranking - #4 - Invader Quirk, Asbestos Bill


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Release Date:  1987

Just the facts/Stuff I wiki'd:

Psychic 5 is the third game developed by Nihon Maicom Kaihatsu (NMK) for Jaleco (after Argus and Valtric), and was released in 1987. While it did not have huge success, it nevertheless became a 'cult game' for many players thanks to the brilliant gameplay, hard-to-find secret bonuses and anime-like plot. The inspiration for the design of the five ESPers comes from several Japanese cartoons of the '70s where the physical aspect of main characters was strongly stereotyped to suit their psychological profile/fighting ability.
 
The game was never ported to any home system. However, portions of the gameplay, including the cast of characters, did serve as the basis for the Jaleco published Famicom game, Esper Boukentai.

The player starts the game with 2 Espers, Naoki and Akiko. The remainders are found inside magic jars.
 
Normally, the player gets Bunta in scene 1, Makoto in scene 3, and Genzoh in scene 5. However, when certain conditions are fulfilled, you'll find the last 2 Espers sooner. To get Makoto in scene 1, you need to get the Secret Bonus in scene 1 (before opening the magic jar). To get Makoto (or Bunta if you have got Makoto already) in scene 2, you need to get All Gold Bonus in scene 1. To get Genzoh in scene 3, you need to get both Bunta and Makoto in scenes 1 and 2, and get the Secret Bonus in scene 3. To get Genzoh in scene 4, you need to get All Gold Bonus in scene 3.
 
Because Genzoh is incredibly powerful against Satan the devil, it is advantageous to get him as early as possible. Therefore, it is advisible for intermediate players to at least try to get All Gold Bonus in scene 1 and Secret Bonus in scene 3, even if they are just trying to clear the game rather than going for a high score.

Pak's Thoughts And that's about all the info I can scrounge. Before this list is over, I'll try to find a means by which to experience this game and I'll report on my findings. For right now, maybe one of the two voters can elaborate on this one. :^)


Offline Pak-Man

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#38 - Maniac Mansion

(44 Points) 3 of 18 Lists - Highest Ranking - #2 (out of 12) - James of LinHood

Bernard! Don't be a tunahead.

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Release Date:  October 1987

Just the facts/Stuff I wiki'd:

Maniac Mansion is a 1987 graphic adventure game developed and published by Lucasfilm Games. A comedy horror parody of B movies, the game's plot follows teenager Dave Miller as he attempts to rescue his girlfriend from the mansion of an evil mad scientist. The player uses a point-and-click control system to guide Dave and two of his friends through the mansion while avoiding its dangerous inhabitants and solving puzzles.
 
The game was conceived in 1985 by Ron Gilbert and Gary Winnick. Its point-and-click interface was borne out of the designers' desire to improve on contemporary text parser-based graphical adventure games. Gilbert implemented a game engine, SCUMM, to decrease the effort required for the envisioned game. This engine and its accompanying scripting language were later re-used for many other games.
 
Maniac Mansion was the first video game published by Lucasfilm, who initially released it for the Commodore 64 and Apple II, to critical acclaim; reviewers lauded its graphics (especially its cutscenes and other animation) and humor. Later it was ported to several other platforms, to a largely positive critical reception; its Nintendo Entertainment System (NES) version had to be considerably modified to comply with Nintendo of America's policies. Fans created remakes with enhanced visuals. The game influenced numerous other titles, and it was later placed on several "hall of fame" lists. In 1993 the sequel, Day of the Tentacle, was released, also to critical acclaim.

The game's story takes place in the mansion of the fictional Edison family: Dr. Fred, Nurse Edna, and their son Weird Ed. Living with the Edisons are two large, disembodied tentacles—one purple and the other green. The player prepares the game after startup by selecting two out of six characters to accompany protagonist Dave Miller. The game's intro sequence shows that a meteor crashed near the mansion 20 years earlier; it later turns out that the meteor is sentient, took control of the family, and caused Dr. Fred to begin performing human experiments while plotting to take over the world. After the introduction, the player begins the game as Dave and his two companions prepare to enter the mansion to rescue his cheeerleader girlfriend, Sandy Pantz, who was kidnapped by Dr. Fred.
 
Maniac Mansion is a graphic adventure game; the player uses a point-and-click interface to guide characters through a two-dimensional (2D) game world and solve puzzles. The game contains fifteen commands that are selected with the point-and-click control scheme. The commands include "Walk to", which the player uses to navigate the characters; "New kid", which allows the player to switch between the three characters; and "Pick up", which the player uses to collect objects. Each character that the player can select possesses unique abilities; for example, Syd and Razor can play musical instruments, while Bernard can repair appliances. The game may be completed with any combination of characters, but, because many puzzles can be solved only with specific skills, players must use different methods to finish the game depending on the characters they select.
 
The gameplay is regularly interrupted by cutscenes (a term coined by Ron Gilbert); they advance the story and inform the player about the non-player characters' actions. Aside from the green tentacle, most of the mansion's inhabitants pose a threat and will throw the player characters into the dungeon—or, in some situations, kill them—if they see them. If one character dies, a replacement must be chosen from those that were unselected at the game's start, and the game ends if all characters die. Maniac Mansion has five possible successful endings, and each ending depends on which characters the player uses, which ones survive, and what those characters do.

Pak's Thoughts I was really raised on Adventure Games. I started with Scott Adams' (No, not THAT Scott Adams) Adventureland on my ol' Commodore Vic-20 and graduated to the Space Quest and Kings Quest games later in my youth. When maniac mansion came out, I saw it as something of a blasphemy. How could it be an adventure game without a text parser? Where was the fun (Yeah, it's fun for me) of going through countless synonyms, trying to figure out the right combination of words to get your character to do what you wanted? I finally gave it a shot years later when it hit the NES and I realized what I had been missing. There was still challenge to be had. The puzzles are all fiendishly clever and you don't die unless you pretty much ask for it. Then I had to play it again and again to get all the endings with the various character combinations you could pick. There's a lot of game in this game.


Offline Pak-Man

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#37 - Defender

(45 Points) 3 of 18 Lists - Highest Ranking - #5 - RVR II


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Release Date:  1980

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Defender is an arcade video game developed released by Williams Electronics in 1980. A shooting game featuring two-dimensional (2D) graphics, the game is set on a fictional planet where the player must defeat waves of invading aliens while protecting astronauts. Development was led by Eugene Jarvis, a pinball programmer at Williams; Defender was Jarvis's first video game project, and drew inspiration from Space Invaders and Asteroids. Williams planned to display the game at the Amusement & Music Operators Association (AMOA) trade show, though development delays resulted in the team working on the game up until the show started.
 
Defender was commercially successful, selling over 55,000 units to become the company's best selling arcade game. Praise among critics focused on the game's audio-visuals and gameplay. It is frequently listed as one of Jarvis's best contributions to the video game industry, as well as one of the most difficult video games. Defender was ported to numerous platforms, inspired the development of other games, and was followed by sequels and many imitations.

Defender is a two-dimensional, side-scrolling shooting game set on the surface of an unnamed planet. The player controls a space ship as it navigates the terrain, flying either to the left or right. A joystick controls the ship's elevation, and five buttons control its horizontal direction and weapons. The object is to destroy alien invaders, while protecting astronauts on the landscape from abduction. Humans that are successfully abducted return as mutants that attack the ship. Defeating the aliens allows the player to progress to the next level. Failing to protect the astronauts, however, causes the planet to explode and the level to become populated with mutants. Surviving the waves of mutants results in the restoration of the planet. Players are allotted three chances (lives) to progress through the game and are able to earn more by reaching certain scoring benchmarks. A life is lost if the ship comes into contact with an enemy or its projectiles. After exhausting all lives, the game ends.

Defender is often described as one of the most difficult games in the industry. GameDaily rated Defender the ninth most difficult game, citing the attack and rescue gameplay. Author Steven L. Kent called it "one of the toughest games in arcade history". He also stated that novice players typically are able to play only a few seconds, and that enthusiasts saw proficiency at the game as a "badge of honor". GameSpy's David Cuciz echoed similar comments. Sellers described Defender's difficulty as "humbling", saying that few could play it with proficiency. He further stated, however, that players would continue to play despite the difficulty. Author David Ellis attributes the game's success to its challenging design. Its difficulty is often attributed to its complex control scheme. Edge magazine called Defender "one of the most difficult-to-master" games, describing its controls as "daunting". Retro Gamer editor Craig Grannell called the game and controls "ruthless" and "complex" respectively.

Pak's Thoughts: I'll be honest here. I'm one of the gamers who can't last more than about a minute playing Defender. At least in its original Arcade format. I was pretty good on the Apple II version, but I'm pretty sure the difficulty is toned down a couple notches. Watching someone play Defender who CAN play Defender is a sight to behold. I wasn't paying attention at the time, but I have to assume that the guy in the arcade who could spend a solid hour playing Defender got like- ALL the babes. :^)


Offline Pak-Man

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#36 – Ninja Gaiden

(45 Points) 3 of 18 Lists - Highest Ranking - #2 - Gunflyer


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Release Date:  December 1988

Just the facts/Stuff I wiki'd:

Ninja Gaiden, known in Japan as Ninja Ryūkenden (literally "Legend of the Ninja Dragon Sword") and as Shadow Warriors in Europe, is a side-scrolling platforming video game. It was developed and published by Tecmo for the Nintendo Entertainment System (NES); its development and release coincided with the beat 'em up arcade version of the same name. It was released in December 1988 in Japan, in March 1989 in North America, and in September 1991 in Europe. It was ported to the PC Engine in Japan in 1992, to the Super NES as part of the Ninja Gaiden Trilogy compilation in 1995, and to mobile phones in four planned episodic installments in 2004. It was released on the Wii's Virtual Console service for all regions in 2007.
 
The story follows a ninja named Ryu Hayabusa as he journeys to America to avenge his murdered father. There, he learns that a person named "the Jaquio" plans to take control of the world by unleashing an ancient demon through the power contained in two statues. Featuring platforming gameplay similar to Castlevania and the NES version of Batman, players control Ryu through six "Acts" that comprise 20 levels; they encounter enemies that must be dispatched with Ryu's katana and other secondary weapons.
 
Ninja Gaiden has been renowned for its elaborate story and usage of anime-like cinematic cutscenes. It received extensive coverage and won several awards from video gaming magazines, while criticism focused on its high and unforgiving difficulty, particularly in the later levels. Over fifteen years after its release, the game continued to receive acclaim from print and online publications. It was novelized as part of the Worlds of Power NES game adaptations written by Seth Godin and Peter Lerangis, and it spawned a soundtrack CD. On the NES, Ninja Gaiden has been described as one of the best arcade-style games, and the best ninja-related game.

Ninja Gaiden is a side-scrolling platform game in which the player takes control of the player character, Ryu Hayabusa, and guides him through six "Acts" that comprise 20 levels. Ryu's physical strength is represented by a life meter, which decreases when he is hit by an enemy or projectile. A "life" is lost when the life meter depletes entirely, when Ryu falls off of the screen, or when the timer runs out. A game over screen appears when all lives are lost; however, the player may restart the level on which this occurred by continuing. At the end of every act, the player fights a boss; bosses have life meters that the player depletes with attacks. A boss is defeated when its life meter is depleted entirely. Each boss is one of the "Malice Four" – evil underlings of the Jaquio, the game's main antagonist. The Malice Four consist of Barbarian, Bomberhead, Basaquer, and their leader Bloody Malth.
 
Players attack enemies by thrusting at them with Ryu's Dragon Sword – a katana-like sword passed down from the Hayabusa clan for generations. They can also use "secondary" weapons that consume Ryu's "spiritual strength". Secondary weapons include throwing stars, "windmill throwing stars" which cut through enemies and return like boomerangs, a series of twirling fireballs named "the art of the fire wheel", and a mid-air slashing technique called the "jump & slash". When Ryu's spiritual strength meter becomes too low, the player cannot use secondary weapons. Players can replenish Ryu's spiritual strength by collecting red and blue "spiritual strength" items found in lamps and lanterns. Other items found along the way include hourglasses that freeze all enemies and projectiles for five seconds, bonus point containers, potions that restore six units of physical strength, "invincible fire wheels" that make Ryu temporarily invincible to attacks, and 1-ups.
 
Ryu has the ability to jump on and off ladders and walls, and by using the directional pad, he can climb up or down ladders. Ryu can spring off walls by holding the directional pad in the opposite direction he is facing and pressing the jump button. He cannot attack while on walls or ladders. Players can use this technique to get Ryu to climb up spaces between walls and columns by holding down the jump button and alternating between left and right on the directional pad. Ryu can also vertically climb a single wall by springing off it and then quickly pressing the directional pad back towards the wall.

Pak's Thoughts: Here's another one for the video game massochist. Every couple years, I pop Ninja Gaiden into my ol' NES and see if I have what it takes to beat it yet. I'm up to Level 4 now. Back on the ol' Schoolyard, I heard tale of a kid who went to game shows and could play through the entire game blindfolded. I don't know whether that was just playground talk, or if this person exists, but maybe someday, I'll be able to beat this game with my eyes open. :^)

And we’re all caught up with our 5 for the day. Tune in tomorrow for the next 5!
« Last Edit: July 20, 2011, 10:06:41 AM by Pak-Man »


Johnny Unusual

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Spy Hunter is a fun game.  I forgot about it, and though I doubt it would make my list, it was pretty cool.

Never heard of Psychic 5.

Only 2 votes for Maniac Mansion?  For shame!  This is one of the greatest games of all time.  It might have gotten higher in my list with the exception that when you are stuck on an adventure game (I mean really stuck), then fun comes to a dead stop.  And hey, I liked the Maniac Mansion TV series.  It just had the misfortune of having very little to do with the game beyond a few character names and the meteor under the house.  I loves me some Joe Flaherty and the various other SCTV cast types they could scrounge up.  It really had an SCTV tinge to it in terms of humour (though there were the more obvious jokes, it also had a lot of subtle acting stuff in it.)

Defender is OK.

Ninja Gaiden was one of the biggest games of my childhood.  My folks used to go to this gym, which was boring for me and my sister, so we were always in the play room, which had an NES and Ninja Gaiden (and later Mario 2).  We loved that game to death.  Also, GO TO HELL BIRDS!



Offline sarcasm_made_Easy

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Fun gaming fact- one (several actually) of the quests in World of Warcraft involve the player playing Joust and defeating enemies complete with lance and flying ostrich thing. The unbeatable pterodactyl does not appear in game, but is referred to in the quest text.

But the unbeatable pterodactyl is beatable.  You know that right?  its just obnoxiously hard to hit him just right.

Actually, it means that the quest text refers to the 'Unbeatable?" Pterodactyl as did the arcade version of Joust. I just wasn't specific enough with my punctuation.

No i sure didn't sorry about that.


Offline RVR II

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#40 - Spy Hunter

(43 Points) 2 of 18 Lists - Highest Ranking - #1 - RVR II


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Release Date:  1983

Just the facts/Stuff I wiki'd:

Spy Hunter is a 1983 arcade game developed and released by Bally Midway. It has also been ported to various home computers and video game systems.
 
As a cabinet-style arcade game, Spy Hunter was produced in both sit-down and standard upright versions with the latter being more common. The game's controls consist of a steering wheel in the form of a futuristic aircraft-style yoke with several special-purpose buttons, a two-position stick shift (offering 'low' and 'high' gears), and a pedal used for acceleration. It is a single-player game.

Spy Hunter is an action/driving game with the player in the role of a spy driving an armed sportscar. The object of the game is to travel the freeway destroying as many enemy vehicles as possible while protecting civilian vehicles. The game is a top-down vertical scroller.
 
Early versions of the game used the James Bond theme by Monty Norman, but the inability to obtain the rights to use the music forced Midway to change this theme. As a result, an arrangement of Henry Mancini's theme to Peter Gunn plays throughout.
 
The game begins with the player driving the fictitious G-6155 Interceptor. Enemy vehicles try to destroy the player's car or to force it off the road. Points are scored for distance traveled (a counter increments the score while the car is moving) and for destroying enemy vehicles. There is an initial lead-in time during which the player has an unlimited supply of cars. After the lead-in time expires the player must earn extra cars by obtaining high scores. The first extra car is generally earned at a default value of 30,000 points, but this value can vary depending on settings for a given machine. Up to 3 additional cars are awarded at similar increments.
 
The player must be cautious to avoid harming innocent civilian vehicles. There are three types of such vehicles: two automobiles (one pink in color, the other light blue) and a motorcycle. Destroying these vehicles causes the score meter to halt for a few seconds (in effect subtracting points from the player's score) and will result in the Weapons Van arriving only once instead of twice in that sequence. It is also possible to destroy the Weapons Van itself. Doing so produces the same consequences as destroying a civilian vehicle. A very hard, direct crash with a civilian vehicle can result in the player losing a car. If the player survives long enough (several minutes), eventually civilian vehicles stop appearing and the only other vehicles on the road are the player's enemies.
 
The player's car starts the game with two front-mounted machine guns with an endless supply of ammunition. The machine guns and the player's driving skill (opponents can be sideswiped off the road) are the only means of defense against the enemy vehicles in the beginning stages of the game. At regular intervals, following a fork in the road, the player will enter a new 'territory' also marked by a change in the environment, such as addition of snow and ice, a transition to or from water, or merely a change in the color of the terrain and vegetation alongside the road. In each new road territory, the player will pass a red tractor-trailer parked on the shoulder—the Weapons Van. The player receives additional weapons by entering the Van, which will accelerate until it reaches a point directly in front of the player's vehicle, at which time it will extend a ramp allowing the player to drive in. Three special weapons are available: oil slicks, smoke screens, and surface-to-air missiles. The type of weapon provided by the Weapons Van is displayed on the Van's roof rack. The Van subsequently stops briefly at the side of the road for the player's vehicle to exit. The Weapons Van can appear twice in each territory; after entering the Van the first time, the button in the middle of the steering yoke will be lit steadily as long as the player does not destroy any civilian vehicles. When the middle button is thus lit, the Van can be manually summoned by pressing it, or if the player loses a car the Weapons Van will reappear (with the same weapon) automatically.
 
All three special weapons can be equipped simultaneously, although this state of play is difficult to achieve. Each special weapon has a limited number of uses. For example, the smokescreen can be used only four times (three times in some game versions). The special weapons are activated via dedicated buttons on the steering yoke. In most game versions entering the Weapons Van twice in the same territory will refill the player's ammunition supply. If the player's car is destroyed, either by being forced off the road or shot, it will reappear with only machine guns. The game's dashboard shows which weapons are available, when lit.

A version of Spy Hunter is included as an Easter egg in the first release of Microsoft Excel 2000. It requires DirectX to work. Shortly after Excel 2000's release, Microsoft officially banned Easter eggs from its non-game software.

Pak's Thoughts - I could never make it to the boat level. I always have a blast trying, but I always get too speed-happy and plow into a car and die. It's a testiment to this game's awesomeness that I still think of it as one of the best games ever made when I could never really play it. :^)
I RULED at this game back in the day!!
I had the Top Score for 3 years straight at the arcade in Garden City/Surfside Beach (south of Myrtle Beach) when our family took our summer vacations there back then!
Ah those were the days.. 8)


Offline Tyrant

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#40 - Spy Hunter


This sucker got me through tons of boring school field trips to the bowling alley (yes, our school took us to the bowling alley. And yes, bowling bored the snot out of me). I was a poor kid, however, so I had reasons to get good at it to make those few coins last as long as possible until it was time to get herded back onto the bus.


Offline D.B. Barnes

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#40 - Spy Hunter

(43 Points) 2 of 18 Lists - Highest Ranking - #1 - RVR II

Nice! Had it at #8.

Many an hour was whittled away at the 7/11 playing Spy Hunter. It was a stand-up machine. I imagine if it had been a sit-down machine, I would've died there. Just looking at the screenshot makes me wanna go get a Slurpee.
VIVA IL ESORDIO DEL DIABETE ADULTO DUCE!!!


Offline gojikranz

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whatever version of bomberman i was playing had multiplayer so perhaps i didnt have the 80s version.  oh well the beginning of the dream right?  i played it at my friends house which is why i dont really know what version they had.  i still think its one of the best multiplayer games around.
MICROPHONE MANIAC COMING SOON!!
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