Author Topic: The Rest of the Best  (Read 47312 times)

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Offline Tripe

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Re: The Rest of the Best (Today's Topic: Favourite 80's Songs)
« Reply #330 on: August 07, 2011, 08:41:06 AM »
LoC Rest of the Best - Day 33 – Favourite 80’s Songs
Ten Pole Tudor - Swords of 1000 Men
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Offline D.B. Barnes

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Re: The Rest of the Best (Today's Topic: Favourite 80's Songs)
« Reply #331 on: August 07, 2011, 09:58:20 AM »
L.O.C. #33 - Top Hit Singles of the 80's

RUSH - Tom Sawyer

Thoughts
I've never had such mixed feelings about a band. From the mid-seventies into the early-eighties, they produced some extraordinary music. Then they went in the toilet for while when they got way too synthed out. They eventually returned to their rock roots and made some good music again. It seems like people either love Rush, hate Rush, or love/hate Rush. I love/hate Rush. For me, they hit their pinnacle with Hemispheres, Permanent Waves, and Moving Pictures. Tom Sawyer is just a great song, both musically and lyrically. Peart is a master, Lee is phenomenal, and Lifeson has his shining moments. There are so many things to appreciate about this song. I could hear it a million times and not get the least bit tired of it.

The Wiki
"Tom Sawyer" is a song by Canadian rock band Rush, named for Mark Twain's literary character. The song was released on Mercury Records and PolyGram in 1981 on the Moving Pictures album and numerous compilations thereafter, such as 1990's Chronicles. It has also appeared on several live albums and bootlegs. Geddy Lee has referred to the track as the band's "defining piece of music...from the early '80s". It is one of Rush's best-known songs and is a staple of classic rock radio. It reached 25 in the UK singles chart in October 1981 and in the US peaked at #44 on the Billboard Hot 100 and at 8 on the Billboard Mainstream Rock chart. In 2009 it was named the 19th greatest hard rock song of all time by VH1. "Tom Sawyer" was one of five Rush songs inducted into the Canadian Songwriters Hall of Fame on March 28, 2010.

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And they can still bring it thirty years later. Lee may have lost a bit vocally, but I think he and Peart have actually improved instrumentally.

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Offline Asbestos Bill

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Re: The Rest of the Best (Today's Topic: Favourite 80's Songs)
« Reply #332 on: August 07, 2011, 03:15:03 PM »
I've never heard of either of those songs.  That's why it was "hits only."

Well, hits usually suck.

[edit]: Alright, not quite, but they're usually not the best thing on the album if the band is any good at all. And I had an opportunity to push something more obscure so I did (although, like I said, O Superman was #2 on UK charts). If I was to pick a hit pop song, it would be by the B-52s, probably Private Idaho.
« Last Edit: August 07, 2011, 03:43:49 PM by Asbestos Bill »


Offline ColeStratton

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Re: The Rest of the Best (Today's Topic: Favourite 80's Songs)
« Reply #333 on: August 07, 2011, 05:20:16 PM »
L.O.C Rest of the Best -- Day 33 -- Favorite 80's Songs

At This Moment -- Billy Vera and the Beaters


The Wiki:

"At This Moment" is a song that was first recorded by Billy Vera & The Beaters in 1981 during a string of performances at the Roxy in West Hollywood (January 15–17) and featured on their self-titled live album, Billy and the Beaters, released that same year.

When it was originally released as a single, as the follow-up to the album's first single, "I Can Take Care of Myself" (which had become the band's first Billboard Top 40 hit, "At this Moment" stalled on the Billboard Hot 100 chart at #79 at the end of 1981. However, the song was included on several episodes of the NBC sitcom Family Ties during the 1985-86 season, where it was the love song associated with Alex P. Keaton (played by Michael J. Fox) and his girlfriend Ellen Reed (played by Tracy Pollan, whom Fox eventually married in real-life) on the show, and this exposure renewed interest in the song. This growing interest prompted reissue label Rhino Records to purchase the track from the band's original record label, Alfa (which was by then inactive), and re-release it in its original version themselves. Upon its re-issue, the tune began a revived chart run, eventually hitting #1 on both the Billboard Hot 100 and Adult Contemporary charts in January 1987. It quickly sold over a million copies in the United States, becoming one of last ever Gold-certified singles in the 45 format. The song also crossed over to the both the R&B and Country formats, reaching #40 on the Country Singles chart.

In an interview with Rachel Ray in 2007, Michael J. Fox good-naturedly said "Tracy and I couldn't get on the dance floor anywhere in the world for like ten years without them playing 'What would you think...' " (These are the opening words of "At This Moment".)

A cover version was recorded by country music singer Neal McCoy on his 1990 debut album, also titled At This Moment. McCoy's version was released as a single, although it did not chart. Another cover version of the song appears on Michael Bublé's 2009 album, Crazy Love.

Personal thoughts: I DESTROY this song in karaoke (in a good way. I can sing, y'all). It's such a great ballad.
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Offline Johnny Unusual

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Re: The Rest of the Best (Today's Topic: Favourite 80's Songs)
« Reply #334 on: August 07, 2011, 05:33:24 PM »
LoC Rest of the Best - Day 33 – Favourite 80’s Songs
Ten Pole Tudor - Swords of 1000 Men
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/mANx3L-N0yU" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/mANx3L-N0yU</a>

If there's ever a movie where Jack Black travels back to Camelot and must lead the Knights of the Round Table to victory and there's a montage of Jack Black training himself to fight and getting his army ready, the creators will probably not use this song.  But in our hearts, we will know this is the one they should have gone with.  Those jerks probably picked "All Star" by Smashmouth.  Jerks.


Offline Tripe

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Re: The Rest of the Best (Today's Topic: Favourite 80's Songs)
« Reply #335 on: August 07, 2011, 05:38:15 PM »
Good call.

I like Ed, or Edward as he prefers these days, his granddad was a fairly important theological philosopher and should enough people kark it, he could concievable claim the british crown ( he's one of those Poles) and he's delightfully dotty. :)


Offline Johnny Unusual

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Re: The Rest of the Best (Today's Topic: Favourite 80's Songs)
« Reply #336 on: August 08, 2011, 05:47:54 AM »
Today's topic is film directors.  Here's the original list:

#52: Milos Forman
#51: Wes Craven   
#50: Brian De Palma
#49: Carol Reed
#48: Don Bluth
#47: Ivan Reitman
#46: Jim Henson
#45: Steven Soderbergh
#44: Sidney Lumet
#43: Robert Altman
#42: David Cronenberg
#41: Woody Allen
#40: Howard Hawks
#39: Robert Zemeckis
#38: Ron Howard
#37: Preston Sturges
#36: John Huston
#35: David Zucker
#34: George Lucas
#33: Joe Dante
#32: Mel Brooks
#31: Paul Thomas Anderson
#30: John Carpenter
#29: Clint Eastwood
#28: Brad Bird
#27: James Cameron
#26: John Ford
#25: David Lynch
#24: John Hughes
#23: Orson Welles
#22: David Fincher
#21: David Lean
#20: Frank Capra
#19: Peter Jackson
#18: Edgar Wright
#17: Hayao Miyazaki
#16: Sergio Leone
#15: Akira Kurosawa
#14: Terry Gilliam
#13: Guillermo del Toro
#12: Wes Anderson
#11: Sam Riami
#10: Tim Burton
#9: Ridley Scott
#8: Francis Ford Coppola
#7: Billy Wilder
#6: Quentin Tarantino
#5: Martin Scorsese
#4: Stanley Kubrick
#3: Steven Spielberg
#2: The Coen Brothers
#1: Alfred Hitchcock   


Offline Johnny Unusual

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Re: The Rest of the Best (Today's Topic: Favourite Film Directors)
« Reply #337 on: August 08, 2011, 06:08:18 AM »
LoC Rest of the Best - Day 34 – Favourite Film Directors
   
Danny Boyle

      

Daniel "Danny" Boyle (born 20 October 1956) is an English filmmaker and producer. He is best known for his work on films such as Slumdog Millionaire, 127 Hours, 28 Days Later, Sunshine and Trainspotting. For Slumdog Millionaire, Boyle won numerous awards in 2008, including the Academy Award for Best Director. Boyle was presented with the Extraordinary Contribution to Filmmaking Award at the 2008 Austin Film Festival, where he also introduced that year's AFF Audience Award Winner Slumdog Millionaire. On 17 June 2010, it was announced that he will be the artistic director for the 2012 Olympic games opening ceremony.

Boyle's love for film began with his first viewing of Apocalypse Now:

“It had eviscerated my brain, completely. I was an impressionable twenty-one-year-old guy from the sticks. My brain had not been fed and watered with great culture, you know, as art is meant to do. It had been sandblasted by the power of cinema. And that’s why cinema, despite everything we try to do, it remains a young man’s medium, really, in terms of audience.”

The first movie Boyle directed was Shallow Grave. The film was the most commercially successful British film of 1995 and led to the production of Trainspotting, based on the novel by Irvine Welsh. Working with writer John Hodge and producer Andrew Macdonald, Shallow Grave earned Boyle the Best Newcomer Award from the 1996 London Film Critics Circle. Shallow Grave and Trainspotting caused critics to claim that Boyle had revitalised British cinema in the early 90's.

He then moved to Hollywood and sought a production deal with a major US studio. He declined an offer to direct the fourth film of the Alien franchise, instead making A Life Less Ordinary using British finance.

\Boyle's next project was an adaptation of the cult novel The Beach. Filmed in Thailand with Leonardo DiCaprio in a starring role, casting of the film led to a feud with Ewan McGregor, star of his first three films. He then collaborated with author Alex Garland on the post-apocalyptic horror film 28 Days Later.

He also directed a short film Alien Love Triangle (starring Kenneth Branagh), and was intended to be one of three shorts within a feature film. However the project was cancelled after the two other shorts were made into feature films: Mimic starring Mira Sorvino and Impostor starring Gary Sinise.

In 2004 Boyle directed Millions, scripted by Frank Cottrell Boyce.[22] His next collaboration with Alex Garland was the science-fiction film Sunshine, starring 28 Days Later star Cillian Murphy, and was released in 2007.

In 2008 he directed Slumdog Millionaire, the story of an impoverished child (Dev Patel) on the streets of Mumbai who competes on India's variant of Who Wants to Be a Millionaire?, for which Boyle won an Academy Award. The film won eight Academy Awards in total. "To be a film-maker...you have to lead. You have to be psychotic in your desire to do something. People always like the easy route. You have to push very hard to get something unusual, something different." Andrew Macdonald, producer of Trainspotting, said "Boyle takes a subject that you've often seen portrayed realistically, in a politically correct way, whether it's junkies or slum orphans, and he has managed to make it realistic but also incredibly uplifting and joyful."
In 2010, Boyle directed the film 127 Hours, starring James Franco, Amber Tamblyn and Kate Mara. It was based on Aron Ralston's autobiography Between a Rock and a Hard Place, which detailed his struggle of being trapped under a boulder while canyoneering alone near Moab, Utah and resorting to desperate measures in order to survive. The film was released on 5 November 2010 to critical acclaim and to which Franco received an Oscar nomination.

In a webchat interview with Empire Magazine, Boyle stated on more than one occasion his enthusiasm to work again with Ewan Mcgregor on his next feature film.
Personal thoughts:

I watched Shallow Grave recently.  If you haven’t seen it, it takes a story that could have been forgettable and has all the expected betrayals one expects from these stories, yet it work because of the arc of the characters, who are unlikable, yet not overtly sinister until the sins they commit take a toll on their souls and it has a completely satisfying ending.  Many movies have tried to copy Tarantino, and Guy Ritchie, but I think this film has had a big influence on crime thriller cinema that is not as widely acknowledged.

Danny Boyle is amazingly versatile.  Not only does he do many different genres, but his works seem to be able to reach many different audiences, which is not easy for a lot of visionary directors.  He’s an auteur, though I must admit, if there are recurring elements or themes in his stories, I’m not sure I see them.  And his projects are always interesting.  His next film is to be a thriller involving a failed heist and a love triangle and as cheesy as that sounds, I have high hopes for it.

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« Last Edit: August 08, 2011, 06:14:49 AM by Johnny Unusual »


Offline Asbestos Bill

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Re: The Rest of the Best (Today's Topic: Favourite Film Directors)
« Reply #338 on: August 08, 2011, 07:49:02 AM »
Satoshi Kon


Satoshi Kon is an anime director known for blurring reality and illusion (dreams, madness, etc). He died just last year, leaving his body of work at only four movies and one short series. He directed his first feature, Perfect Blue, in 1997—a Giallo in the tradition of Dario Argento's Deep Red.

Then came Millennium Actress, which blends the life and roles of a retiring actress so show her lifelong chase of a man she met when she was young.

After that was the award-winning Tokyo Godfathers. From IMDB: "Christmas in Tokyo, Japan. Three homeless friends: a young girl, a transvestite, and a middle-aged bum. While foraging through some trash, they find an abandoned newborn. Hana, the transvestite with delusions of being a mother, convinces the others to keep it overnight. The next day, using a key found with the baby, they start tracking down the parents, with many adventures along the way."

In Paranoia Agent, "Seemingly unconnected citizens of Tokyo are targeted for bludgeoning by a boy with a golden baseball bat. As detectives try to link the victims, they discover that following the assaults, the victims' lives have improved in some way." It's a complicated and psychological series that's very difficult to describe, and there's evidence that it may be cyclical in nature.

Paprika is one of his most famous movies, and probably the most quintessentially his style. It revolves around the use (and misuse) of a device called the DC-Mini to enter people's dreams and the degrading barrier between the dream world and the real world.

Kon died during production of The Dream Machine, which is scheduled to be completed this year and which he did at least finish writing.

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Offline Darth Geek

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Re: The Rest of the Best (Today's Topic: Favourite Film Directors)
« Reply #339 on: August 08, 2011, 09:26:06 AM »
Satoshi Kon

Oh, so apparently Japan has their own Cinema Snob. Cool.



Offline D.B. Barnes

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Re: The Rest of the Best (Today's Topic: Favourite Film Directors)
« Reply #340 on: August 08, 2011, 09:51:12 AM »
L.O.C. #34 - Top Film Directors

Elia Kazan


Thoughts
This was a massive snub. How he didn't make the list and place highly on it is unbelievable. Kazan had an amazing run of classic films and got some extraordinary performances out of actors and actresses. Absolutely deserved to make the top-ten. His influence and legacy is right up there with the all-time greatest.

The Wiki
Elia Kazan (1909 – 2003) was an American director and actor, described by the New York Times as "one of the most honored and influential directors in Broadway and Hollywood history". Born in Constantinople, the capital of the Ottoman Empire, to Greek parents originally from Kayseri in Anatolia, Kazan emigrated to New York when he was four. After two years studying acting at Yale, he acted professionally for eight years before becoming a stage and film director. Kazan co-founded the Group Theater in 1932 and Actors Studio in 1947, and together with Lee Strasberg, introduced Method acting to the American stage and cinema as a new form of self-expression and psychological "realism". Having been an actor himself for eight years, he brought sensitivity and understanding of the acting process, and was later considered the ideal "actor's director". Kazan only acted in a few films, including City for Conquest (1940), alongside James Cagney. He also produced, and wrote screenplays and novels.

Kazan introduced a new generation of unknown young actors to the movie audiences, including Marlon Brando and James Dean. Most noted for drawing out the best dramatic performances from his actors, he directed 21 different actors to Oscar nominations, resulting in nine wins. He became "one of the consummate filmmakers of the 20th century", after directing a continual string of successful films, including, A Streetcar Named Desire, On the Waterfront, and East of Eden. During his career, he won two Oscars as Best Director and received an Honorary Oscar, won three Tony Awards, and four Golden Globes. Among the other new actors he introduced to movie audiences for the first time, were Warren Beatty, Carroll Baker, Julie Harris, Andy Griffith, Lee Remick, Rip Torn, Eli Wallach, Eva Marie Saint, Martin Balsam, Fred Gwynne, and Pat Hingle. He also elicited some of the best performances in the careers of actors like Natalie Wood and James Dunn. Producer George Stevens, Jr. concludes that Kazan's films and new actors have "changed American moviemaking".

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Offline Asbestos Bill

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Re: The Rest of the Best (Today's Topic: Favourite Film Directors)
« Reply #341 on: August 08, 2011, 10:32:52 AM »
Oh, and Charlie Chaplin. He should be on there.


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Re: The Rest of the Best: A LoC Funtime Supplement
« Reply #342 on: August 08, 2011, 07:38:28 PM »
LoC Rest of the Best - Day 31 - Top Songs of the '80s
Missed some of this since I have been busy, I wanted to make sure I included 2 of my fave '80s songs.  Both really catchy bits of '80s pop.

Live it Up by Mental As Anything


The Wiki:
Mental As Anything (or Mentals to fans) are an Australian New Wave–rock music band formed at an art school in Sydney in 1976. Their most popular line-up was Martin Plaza (real name Martin Murphy) on vocals and guitar; Reg Mombassa (real name Chris O'Doherty) on lead guitar and vocals; his brother Peter "Yoga Dog" O'Doherty on bass guitar and vocals; Wayne "Bird" Delisle (real name David Twohill) on drums; and Andrew "Greedy" Smith on vocals, keyboards and harmonica. Their hit songs were generated by Mombassa, O'Doherty, Plaza and Smith, either individually or collectively.

Their top ten Australian singles are, "If You Leave Me, Can I Come Too?" and "Too Many Times" in 1981, "Live it Up" in 1985 and "Rock and Roll Music" in 1988. While their top ten albums are, Cats & Dogs in 1981, Creatures of Leisure in 1983, Fundamental in 1985 and Greatest Hits Vol. 1 in 1986. They had top 50 chart success with "Too Many Times" and its album, Cats & Dogs in Canada, which followed touring North America in support of Men At Work. "Live it Up" reached the top 50 in European charts including peaking at #3 in UK, #4 in Norway, and #6 in Germany, after it featured in the 1986 Australian film "Crocodile" Dundee.

 
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/eThl2OayKRw?version=3&amp;amp;hl=en_US&amp;amp;rel=0" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/eThl2OayKRw?version=3&amp;amp;hl=en_US&amp;amp;rel=0</a>
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


Hanging On A Heart Attack by Device


The Wiki:
Holly Knight is a songwriter, vocalist and musician of pop and rock music.  She had a second band called Device in the mid 1980s, who had a hit with "Hanging on a Heart Attack" off their 22B3 album.

 
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/kykts8xH8q4?version=3&amp;amp;hl=en_US&amp;amp;rel=0" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/kykts8xH8q4?version=3&amp;amp;hl=en_US&amp;amp;rel=0</a>
« Last Edit: August 08, 2011, 07:46:49 PM by Monty »


Offline Johnny Unusual

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Re: The Rest of the Best (Today's Topic: Favourite Rifftrax)
« Reply #343 on: August 09, 2011, 05:42:06 AM »
Hey, it's the top 50 Rifftrax.  What are your favourite? Here's the original list:

#50: Red Dawn
#50: Saw
#49: Star Trek IV: The Undiscovered Country
#48: Cocktail
#48: X2: X-Men United
#47: Grey's Anatomy
#47: A Visit to Santa
#47: The Tale of Moosebaby   
#46: Beowulf
#45: Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull
#44: Next
#44: Independence Day
#43: The Day After Tomorrow
#43: Star Wars Episode III - The Revenge of the Sith
#43: Casion Royale
#42: The Wicker Man
#41: Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer   
#41: The Flying Stewardess
#41: Jaws
#41: Spider-Man 3
#40: The Two Towers
#40: Eragon
#40: Point Break
#39: Safety - Harm Hides at Home
#39: Star Wars Episode I - The Phantom Menace
#38: Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope
#37: Lord of the Rings The Fellowship of the Kings
#36: Over the Top
#36: Firewall
#35: Why Doesn't Cathy Eat Breakfast? Petaluma Chicken
#35: Crossroads
#34: The Dark Knight
#33: Missile to the Moon
#32: Plan Nine from Outer Space - Live Version
#32: Fantastic Four
#31: D-War: Dragon Wars
#30: Dirty Dancing
#29: Cloverfield
#28: Batman & Robin
#28: Daredevil
#27: The Matrix: Reloaded
#26: X-Files: Fight the Future
#25: Glitter
#24: Spider-Man
#23: Troll 2
#22: Iron Man
#21: Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets
#20: Planet of the Dinosaurs
#20: Star Trek V: The Final Frontier
#19: Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban
#18: The Twilight Saga: New Moon
#17: One Got Fat
#16: The Matrix
#15: Plan Nine From Outer Space - Three Riffer Edition
#14: X-Men
#13: 300
#12: Harry Potter and the Sorceror's Stone
#11: Titanic
#10: Battlefield Earth: A Saga of the Year 3000
#9: Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory
#8: The Happening
#7: Drugs Are Like That
#6: Jurassic Park
#5: Transformers
#4: Road House
#3: The Room
#2: Twilight
#1: The Star Wars Holiday Special


Offline Johnny Unusual

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Re: The Rest of the Best (Today's Topic: Favourite Rifftrax)
« Reply #344 on: August 09, 2011, 07:47:43 AM »
LoC Rest of the Best - Day 35 – Favourite Rifftrax
   
Your Chance to Live: Technological Failures

      

What happens when a public television studio realizes that it has to spend $2,000 of government grant money before Wednesday in order to qualify for full funding for the next fiscal year?  You get Your Chance to Live: Technological Failures!  Obviously thrown together in a matter of hours, Your Chance to Live rails against modern man's dependence on technology with the vibrant coherency of a raving street corner derelict.  This may have something to do with the fact that the producers hired an actual street corner derelict to do the raving, or as they refer to it, the "narration."  Among the pearls of wisdom he imparts along the way? "Without electricity, there could be no electrical fires."  The point is emphasized by showing stock footage of "Pioneers" baling hay.

Surely, the producers of this film were on a higher plane of consciousness, or maybe just really wanted to get off work in time to catch the tail end of happy hour.  The whole thing makes for an experience that is as surreal as it is hilarious.  Mike, Kevin and Bill seize Their Chance to Riff!

 Personal thoughts:

Not much to say beyond the fact that it is a very good short.  I guess I’m attracted to the sheer randomness of it, as it’s message is horribly unclear and it’s attempts at humour are bizarrely awkward.

« Last Edit: August 09, 2011, 07:49:38 AM by Johnny Unusual »