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Author Topic: The Rest of the Best  (Read 47442 times)

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Offline Johnny Unusual

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Re: The Rest of the Best (Today's Topic: Favourite TV Themes)
« Reply #270 on: July 31, 2011, 01:11:20 PM »
Was that for the show originally?  Because I've heard it other places used as background music for wacky goings on and humourous digressions.


Offline Asbestos Bill

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Re: The Rest of the Best (Today's Topic: Favourite TV Themes)
« Reply #271 on: July 31, 2011, 01:13:06 PM »
The first season had this great quirky guitar song which fit the intro credits and the character perfectly. It was catchy, upbeat, etc.

Then came motherfucking mushmouthed Randy Newman, who shat all over it.

Enough of the fans bitched about it that they made a minor story point about it in one ep.  Ah well.  I stopped watching when Sharona left anyway.


I agree that Randy Newman sucks and that the first theme was better, but I hated Sharona.


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Re: The Rest of the Best (Today's Topic: Favourite TV Themes)
« Reply #272 on: July 31, 2011, 08:56:58 PM »
 <a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/RRrQSGD2e14?version=3&amp;amp;hl=en_US&amp;amp;rel=0" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/RRrQSGD2e14?version=3&amp;amp;hl=en_US&amp;amp;rel=0</a>



Offline D.B. Barnes

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Re: The Rest of the Best (Today's Topic: Favourite TV Themes)
« Reply #273 on: July 31, 2011, 11:24:08 PM »
I love the Powerderpuff, er, Powerpuff theme! They got the perfect band.

Parks and Rec is a nice pick. It's the perfect little midwestern ditty.

Never heard of Baccano!, but the theme is pretty groovy.

That Monk theme is cool. The same guy did the Carnivale theme, which is awesome.

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/U-Onb-FqR74?version=3&amp;amp;hl=en_US" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/U-Onb-FqR74?version=3&amp;amp;hl=en_US</a>

The Sealab theme is so appropriately quirky. I would have never heard of calamine if it weren't for this show. Thank you Sealab!

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/CiTbEE3tzPM?version=3&amp;amp;hl=en_US" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/CiTbEE3tzPM?version=3&amp;amp;hl=en_US</a>


I'm gonna go a bit off-script and add a few more, seeing as how we're pretty much done for the day.

I thought somebody might pick this so I didn't. Mad Men not only has one of the coolest themes, but also one of the coolest credit sequences. (Embedding disabled for an incredibly inane reason.)

http://youtu.be/NJ5-sdHP0YQ

I also figured somebody might pick the True Blood theme song, another cool song and great credit sequence.

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/vxINMuOgAu8?version=3&amp;amp;hl=en_US" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/vxINMuOgAu8?version=3&amp;amp;hl=en_US</a>

Speaking of awesome credit sequences...

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/53c8reh_uh0?version=3&amp;amp;hl=en_US" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/53c8reh_uh0?version=3&amp;amp;hl=en_US</a>

And finally, some loveable cheese to make the palette all mucousy and gross.

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/ZmUlKPthrag?version=3&amp;amp;hl=en_US" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/ZmUlKPthrag?version=3&amp;amp;hl=en_US</a>
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Offline Johnny Unusual

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Re: The Rest of the Best (Today's Topic: Favourite TV Themes)
« Reply #274 on: August 01, 2011, 05:14:41 AM »
Whenever I hear the Love Boat theme, I want to finish the line "It's an open smile" with "It's an open sooooooooooore!"
« Last Edit: August 01, 2011, 05:27:50 AM by Johnny Unusual »


Offline Johnny Unusual

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Re: The Rest of the Best (Today's Topic: Favourite Fictional Places)
« Reply #275 on: August 01, 2011, 05:29:30 AM »
Where do you want to go today?  To a fictional place!  Here's the original list:

#56: Toon Town
#55: Swiss Family Robinson Treehouse
#54: The Stratford Inn
#53: Neopolis
#52: Melonville
#51: Druggachusssetes
#50: Diskworld
#49: Carcer City
#48: Bedford Falls
#47: Apeture Science
#46: Mount Olympus
#45: The Axiom
#44: Dinotopia
#43: Santa�s Workshop
#42: Sudden Valley Show Home
#41: UHF Channel U62
#40: Tatooine
#39: Camp Crystal Lake
#38: Middle Earth
#37: Muppet Theatre
#36: Ankh-Morpork
#35: Monach�s cocoon
#34: Atlantis
#33: The Venture Compound
#32: Fraggle Rock
#31: City 17
#30: The City
#29: Halloween Town
#28: The Dreaming
#27: Monkey Island
#26: Narnia
#25: Shermer, Illinois
#24: Hobbiton
#23: Buy More
#22: Freedonia
#21: Serenity
#20: Wonderland
#19: Red Dwarf
#18: South Park, Colorado
#17: The Tardis
#16: The Land of Oz
#15: The Island
#14: Jurassic Park
#13: New New York
#12: The Death Star
#11: Corusant
#10: Cybertron
#9: Deep 13
#8: Hyrule
#7: Willy Wonka�s Chocolate Factory
#6: The Mushroom Kingdom
#5: USS Enterprise
#4: Gotham City
#3: Springfield
#2: Hogwarts School of Wizardry
#1: The Satellite of Love


Offline Johnny Unusual

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Re: The Rest of the Best (Today's Topic: Favourite Fictional Places)
« Reply #276 on: August 01, 2011, 05:30:17 AM »
 
LoC Rest of the Best - Day 27 – Favourite Fictional Places
The Village

   

The Village is the fictional setting of the 1960s UK television series The Prisoner where the main character, Number Six, is held with other former spies and operatives. The theme of the series is his captors' attempts to extract information from him and his attempts to learn the identity of Number One and escape.
The location of the Village is unknown; clues in the series as to its whereabouts are contradictory. In "Many Happy Returns", it is said to be on the coast of Morocco or southern Portugal, possibly an island, and is located by Number Six in this area while making reconnaissance passes in an aircraft. Prior to this, in "The Chimes of Big Ben", it is claimed to be located in the vicinity of Lithuania and Poland, on the Baltic Sea, though this may be part of an elaborate plot by whoever controls the Village. (The episode states "in Lithuania, 30 miles from the Polish border." In the unbroadcast version of the episode "The Chimes of Big Ben", Number Six constructs a device that allows him to work out the Village's location; this scene was cut presumably to remove the reference to navigation by stars which would have allowed an estimation of the Village's region, at the least. This version of the episode is not considered part of the series canon.
Finally, the series finale episode, "Fall Out", strongly suggests that it is located in England near London, and shows a sign for a road which is in Kent. Number Six and other characters are able to drive from the Village (or at least the Degree Absolute interrogation facility which may or may not be attached to The Village) to central London, indicating a location in Great Britain. Although a line of dialogue in "Many Happy Returns" has a character speculating that the Village is on an island, this is never confirmed in the series, and in fact all given locations (save for that in "Fall Out") should be considered unreliable evidence given the fact they are mentioned as part of a deception aimed at getting Number Six to reveal why he resigned from his secret British government job.
The Italianate architecture of the Village is somewhat deceptive as the interiors of the buildings are frequently Georgian, 1960s 'Mod', or in a number of instances, an oddly sparse kind of 'ultra modern' design. Throughout the Village, music plays in the background, nearly all of it alternating between rousing marching band music and lullabies, periodically interrupted by public announcements. The media and signage consistently incorporate sailing and resort themes.
The Village has a logo in the form of a canopied penny-farthing bicycle which appears on almost everything, including the daily newspaper called the Tally Ho. Exactly who operates the Village is deliberately obscured. Ostensibly, the Village is run by a democratically elected council, with a popularly-elected executive officer known as "Number Two" presiding over it and the Village itself, although internal dialogue indicates that the entire process is rigged. "Work units" or "credits" serve as currency in its shops, and are kept track of with a hole-punched credit card.
The exact size of the environs of the Village is never established on screen. Besides the townsite, which is known to include a hospital building, there are forested, mountainous and coastal areas. The Village is large enough that one episode ("Living in Harmony") established that an entire Old West town was built somewhere in the vicinity. In "Arrival" (and other episodes) Number Six views the Village from the air, yet is apparently unable to spot any surrounding towns or cities. In other episodes (depending upon the camera angle), buildings can clearly be seen on the far side of the bay. Nevertheless, all maps of the Village seen in the series display little beyond the central townsite.
Scenes of the Village were filmed in the grounds of Clough Williams-Ellis' Italianate Hotel Portmeirion, a resort near Penrhyndeudraeth in North Wales. Principal location shooting took place over four weeks in September 1966, with a return visit for additional, second unit-style shots for later episodes in March 1967. Sections of the resort (such as Number 6's residence interior with exterior) were replicated at MGM Borehamwood Studios in England. Later episodes were shot almost entirely on the sets on MGM's sound stages and backlot and locations within easy reach of the studio at Borehamwood, (e.g., in "It's Your Funeral", "A Change of Mind", "Living in Harmony", and "The Girl Who Was Death"), and by reusing Portmeirion footage from earlier episodes the production company was able to save a great deal of money that further principal photography at Portmeirion would have cost.
 
Personal thoughts:
Most places I chose were based on my wanting to live or visit there, but the Village is a fascinating nightmare and a place where the most paranoid person would feel a healthy sense of validation.  It is a paradise that feels like what would happen if the body snatchers had a nasty sense of humour.  I almost put in New Venice from Seaguy on the list, but that city is clearly based on this place, where you can be happy.  All that you need to do is… submit.

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/zalndXdxriI" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/zalndXdxriI</a>
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/ato5NS9dW0A" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/ato5NS9dW0A</a>
« Last Edit: August 01, 2011, 05:32:21 AM by Johnny Unusual »


Offline Asbestos Bill

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Re: The Rest of the Best (Today's Topic: Favourite Fictional Places)
« Reply #277 on: August 01, 2011, 09:23:20 AM »
The Citadel



An imposing monolith that looms over City 17, the citadel is the Combine headquarters, as well as a communication beacon and portal to the Combine's dimension. In terms of gameplay, this is the final gauntlet in Half-Life 2 and is most notable for being the only chapter of the game in which you get to manipulate soldiers themselves with the gravity gun.


Offline Pak-Man

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Re: The Rest of the Best (Today's Topic: Favourite Fictional Places)
« Reply #278 on: August 01, 2011, 09:28:29 AM »
My Citadel could beat up your citadel. ;^)


Offline Kete

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Re: The Rest of the Best (Today's Topic: Favourite Fictional Places)
« Reply #279 on: August 01, 2011, 10:28:08 AM »
 
LoC Rest of the Best - Day 27 – Favourite Fictional Places
Rapture


   

Rapture is an underwater city that is the setting for the games BioShock and BioShock 2. The game's back-story describes the city as envisioned by business tycoon Andrew Ryan in the mid-1940s as a means to create a utopia for mankind's greatest thinkers to prosper in a laissez-faire environment outside of increasing oppression by the worlds' governments. However, these ideals would not hold up, turning into a dystopia, and on the eve of 1959, a class war broke out, leaving much of Rapture's population dead. The remaining citizens either become psychotic "Splicers" due to the effects of ADAM, a substance that can alter genetic material, or have barricaded themselves from the Splicers to protect themselves, leaving the city to fail and fall apart around them.
The player first experiences Rapture in BioShock, in the year 1960, a year after the fateful riots, as a man named Jack that has come to Rapture after a plane accident over the Atlantic Ocean where the city was located; during this, they come to learn more about Ryan's motives and those that he struggled against to keep the city's ideals until the very end. In BioShock 2, the player takes the role of a "Big Daddy", a heavily-modified human in an armored diving suit designed to protect the Little Sisters as they collect ADAM from Rapture's dead; this takes place eight years after the events of the first game, and while Ryan has been killed, there remain those that vie for the vacuum left in his position of power.


Offline D.B. Barnes

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Re: The Rest of the Best (Today's Topic: Favourite Fictional Places)
« Reply #280 on: August 01, 2011, 11:18:28 AM »
L.O.C. #27 - Top Fictional Places

Dark City


Thoughts
Awesome movie and an awesome city. Kinda dark, though.

The Wiki
The city in Dark City is described as a "murky, nightmarish German expressionist film noir depiction of urban repression and mechanism". The city has a World War II dreariness reminiscent of Edward Hopper's works and has details from different eras and architectures that are changed by the Strangers; "buildings collapse as others emerge and battle with one another at the end". The round window in Dark City is concave like a fishbowl and is a frequently seen element throughout the city. The inhabitants do not live at the top of the city; the main characters' homes are dwarfed by the bricolage of buildings.

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/jSpowoKqSzc?version=3&amp;amp;hl=en_US" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/jSpowoKqSzc?version=3&amp;amp;hl=en_US</a>
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Offline D.B. Barnes

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Re: The Rest of the Best (Today's Topic: Favourite TV Themes)
« Reply #281 on: August 01, 2011, 11:43:10 AM »
Whenever I hear the Love Boat theme, I want to finish the line "It's an open smile" with "It's an open sooooooooooore!"



The herpes boat, soon will be spreading to one you love
The herpes boat, promises blisters for everyone
And love, will burn evermore...

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Offline Tripe

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Re: The Rest of the Best (Today's Topic: Favourite Fictional Places)
« Reply #282 on: August 01, 2011, 01:49:33 PM »
This is the second time I'm doing something Frank Herbert derived, the writs from Kev and Bri should be arriving any time now.

L.O.C. #27 - Top Fictional Places

Arrakis


The Wiki
Arrakis (pronounced /əˈrækɨs/Arabic:Yeah that's not going to show up‎, ar-rāqiṣ, "the dancer")  – informally known as Dune and later called Rakis  – is a fictional desert planet featured in the Dune series of novels by Frank Herbert. Herbert's first novel in the series, 1965's Dune, is popularly considered one of the greatest science fiction novels of all time, and it is sometimes cited as the best-selling science fiction novel in history. On April 5, 2010, a real-world plain of Saturn's moon Titan was named Arrakis Planitia after Herbert's fictional planet.

In Dune, the planet is the home of the Fremen (Zensunni wanderers), and subsequently is the Imperial Capital of the Atreides Empire. Arrakis is the third planet orbiting the star Canopus, and it in turn is orbited by two moons, one of which has the image of the desert kangaroo mouse, Muad'Dib, on it; the other moon possesses the image of a human hand.

Quote
Arrakis ... Dune ... wasteland of the Empire, and the most valuable planet in the universe. Because it is here — and only here — where spice is found. The spice. Without it there is no commerce in the Empire, there is no civilization. Arrakis ... Dune ... home of the spice, greatest of treasure in the universe. And he who controls it, controls our destiny.

A desert planet with no natural precipitation, in Dune it is established that Arrakis had been "His Imperial Majesty's Desert Botanical Testing Station" before the discovery of melange, for which it is the only natural source in the universe. Melange (or, "the spice") is the most essential and valuable commodity in the universe, as it extends life and makes safe interstellar travel possible (among other uses). The planet has no surface water bodies, but open canals called qanats are used "for carrying irrigation water under controlled conditions" through the desert. The Fremen collect water in underground reservoirs to fulfill their dream of someday terraforming the planet, and pay the Spacing Guild exorbitant fees in melange to keep the skies over Arrakis free of any satellites which might observe their efforts. As indicated by its large salt flats, Arrakis once had lakes and oceans; Lady Jessica also notes in Dune that wells drilled in the sinks and basins initially produce a "trickle" of water which soon stops, as if "something plugs it." Paul Atreides recalls that the few plants and animals on the planet include "saguaro, burro bush, date palm, sand verbena, evening primrose, barrel cactus, incense bush, smoke tree, creosote bush . . . kit fox, desert hawk, kangaroo mouse ... many to be found now nowhere else in the universe except here on Arrakis." The most notable life forms on the planet are the giant sandworms and their immature forms of sandtrout and sandplankton. Sandtrout encyst any water deposits; predator fish are placed in the qanats and other water storage areas to protect them from the sandtrout. In Children of Dune (1976), Leto Atreides II explains to his twin sister Ghanima:

Quote
The sandtrout ... was introduced here from some other place. This was a wet planet then. They proliferated beyond the capability of existing ecosystems to deal with them. Sandtrout encysted the available free water, made this a desert planet ... and they did it to survive. In a planet sufficiently dry, they could move to their sandworm phase.

The Dune Encyclopedia
The non-canon Dune Encyclopedia (1984) theorizes that the depletion of the oceans (the primary result of which was desertification) was probably caused by the impact or near miss of a comet or other quasi-planetary body. This event caused the loss of much of the atmosphere of Arrakis, allowing most of the oxygen and water to escape into space. This is thought to have occurred approximately 50 million years before the Imperium's creation. This catastrophic loss of oxygen led to the extinction of nearly all native fauna and then therefore the flora.

The Encyclopedia also explains that one of the few forms to survive were tiny worms of the phylum Protochordata. One of these forms was Shaihuludata, a genus of anaerobic burrowing worm that was the basal species from which the giant sandworms (Geonemotodium arraknis or Shaihuludata gigantica) evolved. Rather than sandworm creating desert, it was desert that created sandworm. The mass extinction of all of its predators and competitors for food allowed the animal, in a manner somewhat analogous to the evolution of unique faunal forms on isolated Terran islands, to take the evolutionary path that would not only re-oxygenate the Arrakeen atmosphere, but also create the spice melange with all of its immense consequences for humanity.

Finally, the Encyclopedia notes that early in the history of Arrakis, the Imperium made several attempts to terraform the planet, which resulted in an abundance of Terran desert life on the planet (such as kangaroo mice and hawks), but failed to otherwise change the environment, as the local sandtrout "encyst" any open water on the planet.

Frank Herbert's own Children of Dune, however, establishes that the sandtrout were brought to Arrakis from elsewhere. In the 1985 novel Chapterhouse: Dune, Chapterhouse is turned into a desert planet by transplanting sandtrout there.

Thoughts
OK so Arraqkis is one of my favourite fictional planets, it's a planet that makes no sense yet Herbert actually takes time to fix the problems that might occur with precipitation free planet (the whole oxygen production problem for example) there is something appealing about the idea of endless desserts, at least to me, somebody whose father worked a ton in the ME when I was little and was always bringing back dessert things.

The books are a mix of planitery romance and space(or hey, spice) opera, but it's the former that's compelling, the reason they become less interesting is because the latter element comes to the fore and really Herbert wrote far more interestingly about strange worlds than political/spiritual machinations.

Oh and that thing about "informally known as Dune" is patent bollocks, almost never do people refer to it as Dune it's almost always Arakis (kind of like how Conan Doyle has Watson say that Holms never refers to Irene Adler by name and then never has an instance when Holmes does anything but refer to Irene Adler by name) I know they're all aristos or the retainers of such but you'd expect some of them to use the informal name more than the official one.

Still good stuff.

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/2B6jgkcANRE?version=3&amp;amp;hl=en_US" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/2B6jgkcANRE?version=3&amp;amp;hl=en_US</a>

Have I mentioned that I think the Lynch version is pants?
« Last Edit: August 01, 2011, 04:31:50 PM by Tripe H. Redux »


spaceforarent

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Re: The Rest of the Best (Today's Topic: Favourite Fictional Places)
« Reply #283 on: August 01, 2011, 03:11:00 PM »
I'm not sure if this counts since it's more a "time" instead of "place" but I do love the world of Futurama. Like they said in a commentary, it's not a future utopia or dystopia. It's basically like modern day with future technology that still doesn't quite work right. Also, robots built for essentially useless purposes is a plus.


Offline D.B. Barnes

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Re: The Rest of the Best (Today's Topic: Favourite Fictional Places)
« Reply #284 on: August 01, 2011, 03:40:28 PM »
I wouldn't like Arrakis at all.  No sir.  

Also not a fan...

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