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Author Topic: Lovecraft vs. Blackwood!  (Read 2201 times)

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Offline Fuzzy Necromancer

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Lovecraft vs. Blackwood!
« on: August 14, 2010, 12:20:19 PM »
In this corner, H. P. Lovecraft, author of The Dunwich Horror,  The Color Out of Space, and other tales of the Cthulhu mythos. His trademark words include "cyclopean," "eldritch," and "cthonic."

In this corner, Algernon Blackwood, author of The Wendigo and Ancient Sorceries, with such memorable phrases as "because of the cats and the sleep" and "my burning feet of fire!"

Which is the better writer of weird fiction, and why? Have you even heard of both individuals? What similarities do they have in style, tone, and subject? How do they contrast?

What do you, the audience at home, think?
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Offline Tripe

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Re: Lovecraft vs. Blackwood!
« Reply #1 on: August 14, 2010, 12:23:22 PM »
Which is the better writer of weird fiction, and why?

Arthur Machen.

Actually, of the two options I'd go with Lovecraft, I find he does atmosphere better than Blackwood.


Offline Darth Geek

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Re: Lovecraft vs. Blackwood!
« Reply #2 on: August 14, 2010, 12:23:40 PM »
I think you're trying to get us to write a class paper for you.



Offline Tripe

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Re: Lovecraft vs. Blackwood!
« Reply #3 on: August 14, 2010, 12:24:55 PM »
If that's the case I'll do it, for some fee, I love weird fiction.  ;D


Offline Fuzzy Necromancer

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Re: Lovecraft vs. Blackwood!
« Reply #4 on: August 15, 2010, 12:21:46 AM »
I think you're trying to get us to write a class paper for you.

Naaah. I'm on summer break. :P
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Offline Rick (of Ralph and)

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Re: Lovecraft vs. Blackwood!
« Reply #5 on: November 28, 2010, 04:27:09 PM »
L
In this corner, H. P. Lovecraft, author of The Dunwich Horror,  The Color Out of Space, and other tales of the Cthulhu mythos. His trademark words include "cyclopean," "eldritch," and "cthonic."
What does  "trademark" mean in this case? He didn't invent these words. He can't even be said to have popularized them, as none of them are popular. Does using a word several times make it a trademark?
Quote
In this corner, Algernon Blackwood, author of The Wendigo and Ancient Sorceries, with such memorable phrases as "because of the cats and the sleep" and "my burning feet of fire!"
Those phrases may be memorable if read in context, but just hanging out there on their own they seem pretty forgettable, and a bit silly.
Quote
Which is the better writer of weird fiction, and why?
Don't know.
Quote
Have you even heard of both individuals?
I have now. When I read the subject the only person by that name I could think of was the villain in the recent Sherlock Holmes movie.
Quote
What similarities do they have in style, tone, and subject?
I'm going to go out on a limb and say they are/were both purveyors of weird fiction.[/quote]
Quote
How do they contrast?
One is very well known, at least by name. The other, less so.


Offline Tripe

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Re: Lovecraft vs. Blackwood!
« Reply #6 on: November 28, 2010, 05:52:47 PM »
Quote
Have you even heard of both individuals?
I have now. When I read the subject the only person by that name I could think of was the villain in the recent Sherlock Holmes movie.
Whose name was probably chosen as an allusion to Algernon Blackwood, which in turn was an oblique reference to a more famous initiate in The Order of the Golden Dawn.