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Offline Petey Wheatstraw

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Re: Future Classics
« Reply #30 on: January 17, 2007, 03:38:09 PM »
Lord of the Rings is probably going to be enjoyed by many families for many many years.

No, it won't. Better better films have come along since the film's release, and better films will come along in the future. It's unfortunate that Jackson's films made so much money, since New Line will likely try to make the upcoming Hobbit film more Jackson-like if they can't have the man himself (since he's suing them for not paying him the money that they "owe" him, even though he's already raked in millions of dollars for these films). Either way, with or without Jackson, it looks like there's another Tolkien turkey coming our way...thank God for RiffTrax.
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Offline Shinigami

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Re: Future Classics
« Reply #31 on: January 17, 2007, 03:44:30 PM »

   We're seeing a strong comicbook movie trend of late, and although many of the recent films won't be remembered as classics, I'd bet my money that Batman Begins and the Spiderman films will definatly be future classics.

With that said, I would add the original 1989 Batman.  Say what you will about it, it's a damn fine movie and absolutely no childhood is complete without it.


Offline Petey Wheatstraw

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Re: Future Classics
« Reply #32 on: January 17, 2007, 03:50:37 PM »
Funny you should mention that -- I just watched that one again this morning after not seeing it in a long time. I still think it's the best superhero movie ever made (and, no, like Tim, I don't read comics).
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Offline davo

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Re: Future Classics
« Reply #33 on: January 17, 2007, 08:04:02 PM »
Modern classics from my most recent top ten of all time list
8. Dark City



WORD.  this movie was very, VERY underrated. best movie of it's type since bladerunner,imo.

-memento.  awesome.
-brick. reinvented the film noir genre.
-LOTR. they have to be.  at least as classic as that lame titanic.
-matrix.  that's an easy pick...
-sin city.  stylistically it's amazing.
-the passion of the christ.  a profound & moving movie.

here's my dark horse candidate:
-world trade center.  why, you ask? people will watch this 10,20,30 years from now to see what is good about the human race, especially during a national tragedy.



Offline Andrew1911

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Re: Future Classics
« Reply #34 on: January 17, 2007, 08:09:32 PM »
Modern classics from my most recent top ten of all time list
8. Dark City



WORD.  this movie was very, VERY underrated. best movie of it's type since bladerunner,imo.

-memento.  awesome.
-brick. reinvented the film noir genre.
-LOTR. they have to be.  at least as classic as that lame titanic.
-matrix.  that's an easy pick...
-sin city.  stylistically it's amazing.
-the passion of the christ.  a profound & moving movie.

here's my dark horse candidate:
-world trade center.  why, you ask? people will watch this 10,20,30 years from now to see what is good about the human race, especially during a national tragedy.



World Trade Center was awful. It wasn't even the best 9/11 film of the year. The Passion was awful, as well. Sin City... God no. Style over substance is never a good thing.


Offline Variety of Cells

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Re: Future Classics
« Reply #35 on: January 17, 2007, 09:20:13 PM »
I'm going to side with Andrew on this one.  Those films caused a big ruckus, but they are pretty hollow and played off of people's superficial emotions without offering anything to go back and appreciate. 

I'm going to go one step further and question Dark City's place as a future classic.  I understand that movies don't have to do well to turn out to be classics, but they have to be available to people.  I don't see how Dark City will ever reach a wide enough audience to be a beloved classic.  I really like the film, a lot, but from my limited vantage point I don't see it turning up as a classic.  I'll give it this, it could, and probably already is, a classic Sci Fi film. 


Offline Tyrant

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Re: Future Classics
« Reply #36 on: January 18, 2007, 10:27:19 AM »

   We're seeing a strong comicbook movie trend of late, and although many of the recent films won't be remembered as classics, I'd bet my money that Batman Begins and the Spiderman films will definatly be future classics.

With that said, I would add the original 1989 Batman.  Say what you will about it, it's a damn fine movie and absolutely no childhood is complete without it.

 

I gotta disagree here. I recently watched it and I thought, "Where exactly is Batman in the Batman movie?" It's a Jack Nicholoson-hamming-for-the-camera movie. Plus, it has Prince music in it.  It really does NOT hold up well.

The only good one of the series is Batman Returns.  I'm old enough that I remember the hype around it, I was excited to see it, and then...blah. Nicholson for 2 hours, and I think there was some other costumed guy in the background or something.

     I actually liked the ,89 Batman movie. I can see what you mean about Jack as the Joker, but being a scene ham and over the top is sort of what the Joker is all about. He contrasts Batman nicely in that movie. I do think every movie thereafter sucked, though. What is it about Batman that causes him to slip so easily from Dark Knight into silly Caped Crusader? Meh.

    I personally think Batman Begins is the best Batman movie ever made. It's nice and subtle with a cool noir feel. It's not over the top and, except for Katie Holmes, the acting cast was fantastic.


Offline daltysmilth

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Re: Future Classics
« Reply #37 on: January 18, 2007, 11:15:41 AM »
As much as I like the Batman movies, it's hard to imagine that any of them could turn out to be classics.  Or any comic book movies, for that matter.  I don't know, though.  Maybe the first Superman movie will still be talked about when our great-grandchildren are growing up, but even that's kind of a stretch. 
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Offline sarcasm_made_Easy

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Re: Future Classics
« Reply #38 on: January 18, 2007, 12:10:20 PM »
i still want this statement verified in some way, cause i cant even come close to agreement.

Quote
Munich will become a future classic.


Offline MrHargett

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Re: Future Classics
« Reply #39 on: January 18, 2007, 01:18:50 PM »
Dark City
Other than movie buffs, what average person in today's age has seen Citizen Kane or Touch of Evil?  Picking up a DVD copy of either film is often difficult and expensive and I hadn't even seen them until a couple of years back.  In spite of this both are clearly classics. 

What looms over DC's legacy is that it was overshadowed by the bombastic effects festival that was The Matrix.  I don't challenge TM's place in culture and its historic significance (not to mention it being THE sci-fi film of 1999 unseating SW:TPM), but I still have to say that TM was far less convoluted (by design) than DC.

Lord of the Rings Trilogy
JRR Tolkien was an excellent linguist and mythologian, but he was not, in my opinion, a great writer.  Enraptured with the themes and history of his fiction he didn't focus on the actual work of writing scenes.  The stories are not as engaging as the idea of the stories.  His pacing was not compelling. 

Given that source material - rich in depth, but lacking in entertainment value, Peter Jackson, a rabid fanboy, decided to put his spin on things and got a chance with New Line's expansive budget.  His team crafted realistic, lived-in looking effects and environments. The performers gave conviction and motivation to characters that really didn't have them. 

The writing team rearranged the stories to make them more cinematic and so that they would fit into three films of approximate equal length; things were looking up.  The problem was that the writing team was sewn in by Tolkien's inability to write an ending, at all.  In the books things just sort of petered out (no pun intended) and what could have ended masterfully through a motivating death or three instead concluded with the entire fellowship surviving through sometimes idiotic plot devices (giant eagles and ghost armies), evil duly punished (all the bad guys are now dead, long live the morally ambiguous guys), and the eternal process of tying up the obvious loose ends while ignoring the more interesting arcs (damned hobbits).

I enjoyed the first two films (particularly the extended cuts) while finding the third to be an absolute bore.  The only reason it made the BO was because it was the third (just like the cinematically inferior SW:ROTJ and  SW:ROTS) and final film in an epic series everybody had heard about.

To take the individual films as classics would be wonderful.  Unfortunately, we don't have that luxury, so I have to say that the series will never achieve classic status in my book (and that's all that counts anyway).

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Offline Variety of Cells

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Re: Future Classics
« Reply #40 on: January 18, 2007, 01:56:53 PM »
Good point about Dark City.  I forgot that Citizen Cane is the classic that no one has seen.  So you're right, maybe Dark City will be a classic.


Offline J-Proof

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Re: Future Classics
« Reply #41 on: January 18, 2007, 02:00:26 PM »
If they ever get aroudn to There and Back Again, it'll probably become an instant classic because universally speaking, it may be the most liked piece of literature ever written =P

The Chronicles of Narnia
The Harry Potter Series
and of course (my fav)
The Lord of the Rings Trilogy

I think will all be regarded as "classics."
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Offline sarcasm_made_Easy

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Re: Future Classics
« Reply #42 on: January 18, 2007, 02:02:14 PM »
tolkein i think was a good writer, its just hes from a different time and culture than we are used to, C.S. lewis chronicles of narnia are paced similarly.  They just sound totally different due to the era they are coming from.  Hell read alice in wonderland, it has the same sense to it.


Offline J-Proof

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Re: Future Classics
« Reply #43 on: January 18, 2007, 02:08:00 PM »
hmmm...."classics"  don't need to be "good" movies to be popularly categorized as classics.... which is a distinction I think many people in this thread are missing.
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Offline Tarantulas

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Re: Future Classics
« Reply #44 on: January 18, 2007, 02:21:21 PM »
Modern classics from my most recent top ten of all time list
8. Dark City


here's my dark horse candidate:
-world trade center.  why, you ask? people will watch this 10,20,30 years from now to see what is good about the human race, especially during a national tragedy.

Yes, stylized melodramatic turds about national tragedies that turn the pain of the American people into profit for huge multinational entertainment conglomerates definitely deserve a place in history... for no other reason than to illustrate America's gross fascination with suffering, loss, and watching any movie with Nicolas Cage's name attached to it.

Idiocracy, here we come!