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Author Topic: Future Classics  (Read 10481 times)

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acoletterose

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Re: Future Classics
« Reply #15 on: January 17, 2007, 10:04:13 AM »
I think The Sixth Sense would be. I know, that damn line. It drives me nuts whenever I hear it, but I still like it.
I can forsee Forrest Gump becoming a classic as well. Hell, any Tom Hanks movie. He'll probably have achieved godlike status by the year 2200.

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Offline mrbasehart

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Re: Future Classics
« Reply #16 on: January 17, 2007, 10:09:30 AM »
I agree with Dalty that Toy Story will probably be a classic, as it's a) a Disney movie and b) the first feature-length CGI movie.  It's also pretty darn good.  Lord of the Rings is a shoe-in.  I think Clint Eastwood's Iwo Jiwo films could make it, because of the director's stature, the quality of the movies and the accolades they'll probably pick up at the Oscars (yet again beating Scorsese out).  

I'm not entirely sure that the Matrix will make it.  It's so about being "cool" that I can see it dropping out of fashion in the next 10 or 15 years or so.  It also has the stigma of two lousy sequels.

I don't think a film has to be financially successful to become a classic: Citzen Kane and Wizard of Oz both underperformed when they were first released.  I'm not entirely sure, but I think Gone with the Wind only made it's money back because of repeated releases that did well.



Offline Variety of Cells

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Re: Future Classics
« Reply #17 on: January 17, 2007, 10:28:46 AM »
Rocky had a whole slew of bad sequels but it's still a classic.


Offline Pak-Man

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Re: Future Classics
« Reply #18 on: January 17, 2007, 10:28:53 AM »
Matrix could make it based on its historical value. Good or bad, it reflects the concerns and tastes of its day. It could be the next Flashdance.


Offline Nunyerbiz

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Re: Future Classics
« Reply #19 on: January 17, 2007, 10:43:35 AM »
Matrix is the next Flashdance?!? I actually like that analogy.

Anthough while Flashdance, on it's own merits as a movie, was relevant for probably a good decade or so.. I would suggest that it's only lasting impact today is based on a couple of monster hits from the soundtrack. I don't know if it will be remembered as a 'classic' movie twenty years from now.



Offline Andrew1911

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Re: Future Classics
« Reply #20 on: January 17, 2007, 12:46:13 PM »
Well, even though a lot of people don't like them, I don't think the Star Wars prequels have much of a chance of being forgotten.  (And I do like them as a whole.)  I think you could already consider Toy Story somewhat of a classic, given that it was the first of its kind, and it's been at least 10 years since it was first released.

The prequels will more than likely become infamous, not classics. The first Toy Story will most likely become a classic. The second one better.


Offline Andrew1911

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Re: Future Classics
« Reply #21 on: January 17, 2007, 12:46:58 PM »
I agree with Dalty that Toy Story will probably be a classic, as it's a) a Disney movie and b) the first feature-length CGI movie.  It's also pretty darn good.  Lord of the Rings is a shoe-in.  I think Clint Eastwood's Iwo Jiwo films could make it, because of the director's stature, the quality of the movies and the accolades they'll probably pick up at the Oscars (yet again beating Scorsese out).  

I'm not entirely sure that the Matrix will make it.  It's so about being "cool" that I can see it dropping out of fashion in the next 10 or 15 years or so.  It also has the stigma of two lousy sequels.

I don't think a film has to be financially successful to become a classic: Citzen Kane and Wizard of Oz both underperformed when they were first released.  I'm not entirely sure, but I think Gone with the Wind only made it's money back because of repeated releases that did well.



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Offline Andrew1911

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Re: Future Classics
« Reply #22 on: January 17, 2007, 12:47:35 PM »
Tommy Boy? Happy Gilmour? It's not happening. Ever. Stop dreaming. It's never ever going to happen. Ever. Ghostbusters could be classified as a classic.

Au Contraire, while Tommy Boy might not make the grade in the long run, I think Happy Gilmore will. With classic sports films like Slap Shot and The Bad News Bears, Happy's a no-brainer. Honestly, how many Golf movies have this type of mentality? A hockey wannabe plays golf? Genius.   ;D

It's not. Ever.


Offline Pak-Man

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Re: Future Classics
« Reply #23 on: January 17, 2007, 12:55:37 PM »
Given another 20 years, the prequels might be viewed just as fondly by the youngsters of then as the OT is by the 20-30 somethings of today. That's where generation gaps come from.. :^)


Offline Andrew1911

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Re: Future Classics
« Reply #24 on: January 17, 2007, 01:18:49 PM »
Given another 20 years, the prequels might be viewed just as fondly by the youngsters of then as the OT is by the 20-30 somethings of today. That's where generation gaps come from.. :^)

If we somehow have a world like Idiocracy, than, the prequels will become classics.


Offline Minnesota

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Re: Future Classics
« Reply #25 on: January 17, 2007, 01:40:54 PM »
Modern classics from my most recent top ten of all time list
1. Matrix
2. LOTR trilogy
4. Black Sheep
8. Dark City

A few other that I can think of are
Pulp Fiction (how 90's are we willing to make the list?)
Tommy Boy,
Happy Gilmour,
Waynes Wold
Young guns (how 80's are we willing to make this list?)
Ghost Busters




Although I was hesitant originally, I'd have to say I'm willing to stand by my choices Matrix and Happy Gilmor are classics. You have to remember that Happy Gilmor was made before Tiger Woods changed the public perception of golf and you also have to remember that the matrix wasnt just  "cool" it was the coolest muthaFn film of our generation.

Tommy Boy & Black Sheep are classics in the same sence that Candy / Belushi movies are classics.

And Dark City is one of the most under rated sci fi movies ever. Doubters should listen to the Roger Ebert commentary track.

I think we can agree to ignor 80's movies on this thread as they arent recent enough for argument.


Offline kodiakthejuggler

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Re: Future Classics
« Reply #26 on: January 17, 2007, 01:50:23 PM »
Given another 20 years, the prequels might be viewed just as fondly by the youngsters of then as the OT is by the 20-30 somethings of today. That's where generation gaps come from.. :^)

Yeah, but the technology of modern times has changed so drastically since the Original Trilogy came out. Movies are made so differently now. It's been a Hollywood trend for years to put all the good stuff into the movie trailers, so there's no wow factor, plus everything's so flashy. The definitions of a classic will be much different in 20 years then what was considered classic years ago. In fact, who knows if there will even be movie houses and cineplexes in 20 years??


Offline Pak-Man

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Re: Future Classics
« Reply #27 on: January 17, 2007, 01:51:54 PM »
Given another 20 years, the prequels might be viewed just as fondly by the youngsters of then as the OT is by the 20-30 somethings of today. That's where generation gaps come from.. :^)

Yeah, but the technology of modern times has changed so drastically since the Original Trilogy came out. Movies are made so differently now. It's been a Hollywood trend for years to put all the good stuff into the movie trailers, so there's no wow factor, plus everything's so flashy. The definitions of a classic will be much different in 20 years then what was considered classic years ago. In fact, who knows if there will even be movie houses and cineplexes in 20 years??
Didn't Spielburg have some secret plan a while back that was going to keep the Cinaplex alive? Has anyone heard anything more about that?


Offline kodiakthejuggler

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Re: Future Classics
« Reply #28 on: January 17, 2007, 01:53:31 PM »
Tommy Boy? Happy Gilmour? It's not happening. Ever. Stop dreaming. It's never ever going to happen. Ever. Ghostbusters could be classified as a classic.

Au Contraire, while Tommy Boy might not make the grade in the long run, I think Happy Gilmore will. With classic sports films like Slap Shot and The Bad News Bears, Happy's a no-brainer. Honestly, how many Golf movies have this type of mentality? A hockey wannabe plays golf? Genius.   ;D

It's not. Ever.

I certainly believe that Happy Gilmore will be viewed as a classic sports movie in the same way that Slap Shot is viewed as a classic sports movie. I'm not talking Hoosiers or Rudy here, but a definite "classic" of the genre.


Offline Tyrant

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Re: Future Classics
« Reply #29 on: January 17, 2007, 02:23:38 PM »

   We're seeing a strong comicbook movie trend of late, and although many of the recent films won't be remembered as classics, I'd bet my money that Batman Begins and the Spiderman films will definatly be future classics.