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Author Topic: What's the last Television show you watched on DVD/VHS/youtube/Netflix?  (Read 256169 times)

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Offline BathTub

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Re: What's the last Television show you watched on DVD/VHS/youtube/Netflix?
« Reply #2415 on: January 10, 2018, 04:06:44 PM »
Gilmore Girls: A Year in the Life. Well that was really disappointing. Starts off pretty good then goes downhill. It's pretty amazing to see how many of the cast return, and how easily they slip into the old roles and it's great to see all that old stuff again. But then it just sort of craps out. The third episode spends like 15 minutes on a bloody musical! Which doesn't feature any of the main cast, and is really meh. Rory comes off as a total bitch with her running boyfriend gag. Sookie needed to be in the show a lot more, especially the end. So yeah, a bit meh.

Now I'm not sure what to pick up next.

Right there with you. Rory's love life was a real bummer to watch.

Oh and Dipper had a cameo! That was the funniest moment it was...how do I know that person.... Ohhhhhhhhh.


Offline Johnny Unusual

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Re: What's the last Television show you watched on DVD/VHS/youtube/Netflix?
« Reply #2416 on: January 10, 2018, 04:10:26 PM »
It's always fun when you recognize a voice actor.  At least, it is for me.


Offline Edward J Grug III

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Re: What's the last Television show you watched on DVD/VHS/youtube/Netflix?
« Reply #2417 on: January 10, 2018, 04:25:49 PM »
Now I'm not sure what to pick up next.

Ever watched Fringe? That's an incredible series, especially once it gets rolling.
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Offline Edward J Grug III

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Re: What's the last Television show you watched on DVD/VHS/youtube/Netflix?
« Reply #2418 on: January 10, 2018, 04:26:49 PM »
We've been watching the original Twilight Zone. We're about halfway through the first season. Almost all of it is great. There was one goofy one about gambling in Vegas that was a dud.
Twilight Zone is pretty good, but there are definitely some stinkers in there.

Wait until you get to the season where they decided to do hour long episodes.  Mostly not good.

Just finished classic Star Trek.  Good cast but I feel like there's more weak episodes than there are good ones.

Still, silly as it is, the Space Lincoln episode is pretty fun.

We got towards the end of the first season of TOS. Will pick it up again at some point. It's so great and so bad at the same time.
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Offline Johnny Unusual

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Re: What's the last Television show you watched on DVD/VHS/youtube/Netflix?
« Reply #2419 on: January 10, 2018, 04:41:39 PM »
It's also a frustrating show.  It really tries to address a lot of issues, but has a bad habit of being wrong-headed about it a lot of the time, particularly with how it approaches women.


Offline RoninFox

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Re: What's the last Television show you watched on DVD/VHS/youtube/Netflix?
« Reply #2420 on: January 10, 2018, 05:04:09 PM »
It's also a frustrating show.  It really tries to address a lot of issues, but has a bad habit of being wrong-headed about it a lot of the time, particularly with how it approaches women.

That became an interesting thread to keep pulling at while watching and listening to the Mission Log podcast. Eventually hearing versions of "a product of its time" became a running joke.
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Offline BathTub

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Re: What's the last Television show you watched on DVD/VHS/youtube/Netflix?
« Reply #2421 on: January 10, 2018, 05:40:32 PM »
Now I'm not sure what to pick up next.

Ever watched Fringe? That's an incredible series, especially once it gets rolling.

I got like 2/3rds of the way through, sort of fell away with the Son powered machine across both worlds story. I should just finish it up I guess.


Offline Jesse412

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Re: What's the last Television show you watched on DVD/VHS/youtube/Netflix?
« Reply #2422 on: January 11, 2018, 02:01:21 PM »
Fresh Off the Boat on ABC On Demand
"It is wrong to assume that art needs the spectator in order to be. The film runs on without any eyes. The spectator cannot exist without it. It ensures his existence." -- James Douglas Morrison


Offline BathTub

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Re: What's the last Television show you watched on DVD/VHS/youtube/Netflix?
« Reply #2423 on: January 11, 2018, 07:26:06 PM »
John Noble really is one of the best things about Fringe, but the white they used for Walternate's hair is terrible!


Online MartyS (Gromit)

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Re: What's the last Television show you watched on DVD/VHS/youtube/Netflix?
« Reply #2424 on: January 17, 2018, 10:28:23 PM »
The End of the Fxxxing World

That is the title, it's a Netflix show, 8 episodes, and I thought it was really good up until the last 5 seconds, then it was FU show......


Offline BathTub

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Re: What's the last Television show you watched on DVD/VHS/youtube/Netflix?
« Reply #2425 on: January 18, 2018, 05:17:54 PM »
Robot Wars International UK vs Rest of the World

Oooof, if the season finals were Robot Wars at it's best, this is Robot Wars at it's worst. Unfortunately the Rest of World robots were all a class below the UK competitors, and it just made for a terrible one sided, and worst of all boring series. The idea is great, the execution is terrible.


Offline Johnny Unusual

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Re: What's the last Television show you watched on DVD/VHS/youtube/Netflix?
« Reply #2426 on: January 18, 2018, 05:52:17 PM »
Just finished Children's Hospital as my breakfast watch.  It's largely a dumb funny show.  The last episode is a cute idea but you basically have to sit through a long, unfunny set up to a joke about what a piece of crap the last episode is.  There are some funny lines in the last scene, but in parodying final episodes that disappoint the audience, they felt they had to eject a lot of jokes in order to prepare for the big one and it isn't really worth it.  Still, it's a pretty funny series with a good cast.

Now moving into the 70's animated Star Trek series.  No fair adding a crazy alien to the cast and never, ever acknowledging him or giving him a speaking role in the first episode.


Online MartyS (Gromit)

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Re: What's the last Television show you watched on DVD/VHS/youtube/Netflix?
« Reply #2427 on: January 18, 2018, 06:26:08 PM »
Now moving into the 70's animated Star Trek series.  No fair adding a crazy alien to the cast and never, ever acknowledging him or giving him a speaking role in the first episode.


Most of those are fairly painful to watch, even as a 9 year old watching them as they aired I thought they were bad.


I think the only one that is actually good is when Spock goes back in time to meet himself when he was a kid.


Offline Johnny Unusual

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Re: What's the last Television show you watched on DVD/VHS/youtube/Netflix?
« Reply #2428 on: January 19, 2018, 04:47:09 AM »
Just watched that one.  It was surprisingly good for a Filmation cartoon.  I mean, not in terms of animation, but still.


Offline stethacantus

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Re: What's the last Television show you watched on DVD/VHS/youtube/Netflix?
« Reply #2429 on: January 21, 2018, 10:34:49 PM »
Martial Law

Ever since Bruce Lee did Enter the Dragon, stars of the Hong Kong film industry tried to break into Hollywood and become stars in America. Originally the furthest they got was some renown in the African American communities and on the Grindhouse movie circuit. Stars including Jimmy Wang Yu, Angela Mao, Bruce Li, Gordon Liu, Bolo Yeung, David Chaing, Ti Lung, Carter Wong and  Lo Lieh who peaked in America with Five Fingers of Death in 1973. Even Jackie Chan, who in the 80s starred in two Warner Bros. films The Big Brawl and The Protector, as well as being among the cast in the first two Cannonball Run films, got no further than grindhouse status. Even Chuck Norris, who began his career in the Hong Kong movie industry getting his ass kicked by Bruce Lee and other Hong Kong stars, struggled for mainstream status in the United States, occasionally getting notoriety in films such as Missing in Action and Firewalker, didn't really become a household name until his television series Walker: Texas Ranger in the 90s. He was more successful than another American actor, Jim Kelly, who not only costarred in Enter the Dragon, but followed it up with two Warner Bros produced blaxploitation films Blackbelt Jones and it's sequel [/i]Hot Potato[/i], as well as the ultimate 70s blaxploitation film Three The Hard Way, yet never made it into the mainstream.

Then suddenly in the 90s, success. Hong Kong action director John Woo reached #1 at the box office with his second Hollywood film Broken Arrow, which had Tom Cruise offering him the second Mission Impossible movie. Around the same time Jackie Chan finally broke into the mainstream when one of his Hong Kong films, Rumble in the Bronx, was dubbed into English and given a fully promoted mass release by New Line Cinema, and ended up #1 at the box office. There was a bidding war between New Line Cinemas and Dimension Films for the rest of the films Jackie made for Hong Kong studio Golden Harvest, and Chan was in negotiations to star in major Hollywood films. One of the dubbed Jackie Chan films given a major Hollywood release was Supercop, part of the Police Story franchise, which costarred Michelle Yeoh. Like many Hong Kong actresses, she had gone into retirement after becoming a wife, and Jackie had to beg her to come out of retirement for his film. didn't just resurrect Michelle's career in the Hong Kong film industry, but when it became a hit in America Michelle was offered the female lead in the latest James Bond film. Soon after, Jet Li would break into the American mainstream in Lethal Weapon 4, fight choreographer and director Yuen Woo Ping with The Matrix, actor Chow Yun Fat with Replacement Killers, director Ronny Yu with Bride of Chucky, director/producer Tsui Hark with Double Team, and many others. Meanwhile, their films, along with many other Hong Kong films, were getting dubbed and released via the major DVD labels. What had been a secret in mainstream America for many years, that Hong Kong produced the world's best action films, and some of the world's best fantasy films, was suddenly no longer a secret. Hong Kong was popular, and whenever anything becomes popular, Hollywood is there to exploit it.

Martial Law began as an attempt by CBS to get Jackie Chan to star in a television series on their Saturday Night block, which included Walker: Texas Ranger. They turned to producer Carlton Cuse who had previously created The Adventures of Brisco County Jr. for FOX, and was at the time producing Nash Bridges for their Friday night lineup. Cuse brought in Stanley Tong, director of Rumble in the Bronx to help develop a series about a Hong Kong cop transferring to the Los Angeles Police Department as a vehicle for Jackie. However, Jackie had to many films in production and had to turn the offer down. Stanley then suggested that Cuse cast Hong Kong martial arts star Sammo Hung instead. The final obstacle was coming up with a title for the series. Cuse went with the typical double pun title Martial Law, requesting the lead character be called Sammo Law for the title to work. The shows would be split between Cuse and Tong. Cuse would act as show runner while Tong was in charge of staging the action scenes. CBS ordered a six episode run which would be expanded to the full 22 should the show get ratings. And by that I mean that CBS needed the show to have huge ratings to succeed. This was due to the controversy that preceded it's debut.

Dr. Quinn, Medicine Woman, a western series starring Jane Seymour as a frontier doctor, had been on the air for five years and did almost as well as Walker: Texas Ranger in the ratings. The initial game plan CBS had for their Saturday Night schedule was family programming. The show in between Quinn and Walker was Touched by an Angel, starring Roma Downey and Della Reese as, well,  angels. After a couple of years Touched by an Angel was moved to Sundays, and it's slot replaced with  another family show called Early Edition, which starred Kyle Chandler as a nice guy who one day begins receiving a magic newspaper every morning with tomorrows headlines, which he uses to prevent tragedies from happening. In 1998 CBS shocked everyone when they cancelled Dr. Quinn despite it still being a hit show. The reason given by CBS was that the series demographics had shifted. While the ratings were stronger than ever, the audience was mostly women over 40. Most of the audience of Walker:Texas Ranger was males under 25. CBS wanted to expand on that audience by changing their Saturday Night lineup to all martial arts. So Quinn was cancelled, while the cheaper to produce Early Edition was on the bubble, waiting to be replaced with a spinoff series from Walker: Texas Ranger called Sons of Thunder. The viewer backlash against the cancellation of Dr. Quinn was the greatest since NBC cancelled Star Trek back in the 60s. Critics blasted CBS for the cancellation. CBS knew that whatever replaced Dr. Quinn in it's time slot could not just draw better demographics, but to save face, had to do far better than Dr. Quinn in the ratings.

Martial Law was an instant hit, and drew in exactly the demographics CBS had been hoping for. However, it's ratings were about the same as Dr. Quinn, which many critics picked up on immediately. CBS needed the face saving increase in ratings, which effected the series as it went through one retool after another, both major and minor,  for it's entire run. Another problem CBS had with Martial Law  was it's expense. The fight scenes Stanley Tong and his hired team of stunt coordinators took longer to shoot than normal action scenes in other television series. Both Tong and Cuse insisted the elaborate fight scenes were essential to the success of the show. The battle over the budget would eventually result in CBS firing Cuse from his own series. Tong, however, was a package deal with Sammo. If Tong was fired then Sammo would leave the series as well.  Adding to the behind the scenes chaos, midway through Martial Law's first season CBS put Walker: Texas Ranger on hiatus for six week so hey could try out the spinoff series Sons of Thunder in it's time slot. While Sons of Thunder did well in the ratings, it's budget was out of controll. This was due to everyone working on the spinoff insisting that Martial Law had raised the bar when it came to action and fight scenes, and they needed to at least match them. Even Walker showed a spike in the budget when it returned from hiatus due to more elaborate action scenes. Because of this Sons of Thunder was never picked up for the fall season, giving Early Edition a fourth and final season.

In the first episode of Martial Law, Hong Kong detective Sammo Law has been roughing up thugs, trying to find information on the whereabouts of crime lord Lee Hei. Discovering that Lee Hei has moved his base of operations to Los Angeles, Sammo makes an arrangement to be attached to the LAPD as a consultant. At the precinct, Captain Benjamin Winship ( Tom Wright ) orders two of his detectives, Louis Malone ( Louis Mandylor ) and the precinct's resident maverick Dana Dickson ( Tammy Lauren ) to be Sammo's escort for the duration of his visit. At first they resent having to babysit Sammo, but soon enough have nothing but respect for him after seeing his fighting abilities. Sammo tells them his reason for persuing Lee Hei is that a fellow HK detective and his former student, Chen Pei Pei ( Kelly Hu ) had gone undercover in Lee Hei's gang, but has since gone silent for months with Sammo having no idea if she is safe. Sammo soon catches up with Lee Hei, discovering that Chen Pei Pei is now his personal bodyguard. For a few episodes it is questionable if she has turned, or is simply trying to preserve her deep cover. When the LAPD finally closes in on Lee Hei her cover is blown. Lee Hei is arrested, but soon after his people break him out and he goes on the run. Deciding to stay with the LAPD until Lee Hei is captured, Sammo and Chen Pei Pei ( who would eventually go by the name Grace as the series progressed ) are both made official members of the LAPD.

Well, that was the first six episodes. In episode 6 Tammy Lauren was suddenly missing from the opening credit sequence. Even the bit with the entire cast awkwardly walking side by side was reshot without Lauren. It was not until the 7th episode that her absence was addressed. While driving in a car with Louis, Sammo asks if he has heard from Dana. Louis responds that she had just made her first arrest as the sheriff of Black Creek, Missouri. When Sammo wonders why she decided to move back to her home town, Louis responds that she was homesick and missed her mom. And that is the last time detective Dana Dickson is ever mentioned. Tammy had not left the show. CBS had ordered only six episodes, which meant the actors were all only contracted to six episodes. When CBS expanded the order to the full season, every actor was offered a full season contract, except for Tammy. Writing her character out of the series seemed to make no sense. She was basically the female lead, and got second billing in the opening credits. Her character was the maverick cop of the precinct who was quick to jump into action whenever criminals were about. Episode five was written around her character where her ex-husband becomes a witness to a crime and has to stay in protective custody in Dana's apartment. Tammy's character served an important function on the show. Sammo Hung was still learning English, so would only get limited dialogue. That meant they needed other characters to do most of the talking for him, which meant Dana and Louis were the ones who questioned witnesses and interrogated suspects.

So why was such an important character dumped? A clue can be seen in her final episode, which ends with Sammo driving around Hollywood in his new convertable. He drives past Grauman's Chinese Theater where Rush Hour is on the marquee. And there is your answer. Sammo and Tong had deliberately put the marquee in one of the shots as a tribute to their friend Jackie Chan. Meanwhile, by the time that episode had been shot, Rush Hour had already come in at #1 on it's opening weekend, and was on track to earning over $100 million at the box office. CBS realized that Martial Law was very similar to Rush Hour. It had the Hong Kong detective who joins the LAPD. All it was missing was a Chris Tucker style character to partner with Sammo. And as I said, while Martial Law was a hit from day one, CBS was desperate for it to do better to save face on cancelling Dr Quinn. So for the first of many times in the series run, it was retooled. Carlton Cuse insisted that he had always wanted Sammo to partner with an African American detective, and that CBS was against it until Rush Hour became a hit. But it is more likely that CBS insisted on the retooling of the show before they expanded the order to a full 22 episodes. The big problem being that they were only giving Cuse a budget for five cast members, which meant that in order to bring in a new cast member, one of the old ones would have to be let go. CBS insisted on keeping Kelly Hu, who had become the sex symbol of the series. They also insisted on Tom Wright, because it would have looked bad if they fired the only African American actor in the series, even if it was to bring in another African American cast member. Stanley Tong insisted on keeping Louis Mandylor, as he was the only other cast member with martial arts training. That left Tammy Lauren as the only expendable cast member, even if her character was the second most important in the series.


There was still the matter of casting Sammo's partner, which meant they would be shooting another months worth of episodes until a comedian was found. Many black comedians were offered the role, allegedly including most if not all of the Wayans Brothers, Chris Rock, Dave Chappelle, Martin Lawrence, Will Smith, Bernie Mac and even Chris Tucker himself. Eventually they worked their way down to Arsenio Hall who's career was on the skids ever since he walked away from his talk show. At the time Arsenio was the best that Cuse could get, but still wanted to keep his options open in case one of the other comedians they were trying to cast changed their minds. So for Arsenio's first dozen episodes he was given guest star status, meaning he was not signed on as part of the cast. Arsenio played Terrell Parker, a press agent for the LAPD who talks his superiors into allowing him to be a detective and join Sammo's precinct, eventually becoming Sammo's partner while Louis would become Grace's partner.

But despite retooling Martial Law as a ripoff of Rush Hour, there was no bump in the ratings. CBS did everything to promote the series. Cast members were sent to any talk show that would interview them. Submissions were made to all the award shows, but the only two nominations Martial Law earned were "Best New Actor" and "Best New Series" for the first and only annual TV Guide Awards. While most series ignored that award show, CBS sent the entire cast of Martial Law, all who stood on stage when they won the "Best New Series" category. Sammo was asked to appear on other CBS shows. In March of 1999 he played himself on L.A.Doctors, a medical series that ran for a single season. For May Sweeps he appeared as Detective Sammo Law on Early Edition. Not exactly sure what CBS expected by the crossover when Early Edition was already the lead in show on Saturday nights. But one thing it did not do was bump any ratings. Tensions were already high with producer Cuse over the budget when CBS decided they wanted him off the show. He could continue collecting money from the show through his production company, but CBS would not give Martial Law a second season unless he handed over the show to producers that CBS hand picked. They chose Lee Goldberg and William Rabkin who at the time were producing for CBS the Jake & the Fat Man spin-off Diagnosis Murder, a series starring Dick Van Dyke as a doctor who in his spare time solved murders for the police.

As far as Goldberg and Rabkin were concerned, Martila Law was now their series, and as such they wanted it completely rebooted. The first thing they needed to do was bring down production costs. And the first idea they came up with was reducing the cast from five to four. Of course if you are going to be handing out pink slips then you may as well hand it out to everyone. The new producers wanted to fire everyone but Sammo by having his character assigned to a different precinct. CBS insisted that both Arsenio Hall ( who they were still hoping would bring in Rush Hour fans ) and Kelly Hu ( who was the series sex symbol, who by the second season was almost always wearing slutty outfits ) remain in the cast. But everyone else was expendable. Fans of the series were shocked at how much it was changed. The set of the precinct was different. The Mike Post theme song was replaced with a different theme song. But perhaps the most obvious change was the Red Wedding style purging of the cast. Both Louis Mandylor and Tom Wright were gone. The purging even went as far as the recurring cast. Among those written out of the series were Melanie George ( Julia Campbell ), Sammo's girlfriend who by the end of the first season was very close to becoming his wife, and Terrelle's mother ( Marla Gibbs ), and perhaps the biggest loss to the series, Tiz Ma who played the series bad guy and Sammo's nemesis Lee Hei.

But the biggest shock of all was Goldberg and Rabkin's decision to abandon the cliffhanger from season 1. In that cliffhanger, Captain Winship had taken multiple gunshots to the chest and was near death. Grace was tied up in the back of a helicopter being kidnapped by Lee Hei and his men. As they took off, Sammo ran after and caught the runners of the helicopter, climbing up to the door where he and Lee Hei engaged in a fight. A fight which ended with both Sammo and Lee falling off while they were hundreds of feet above the ground. Since Tom Wright, Louis Mandylor ( who's character was holding Wright's chest and trying to keep him alive after he was shot ) and Tiz Ma would be needed to complete the cliffhanger, Goldberg and Rabkin didn't want to go through the trouble of hiring them for a single episode. So instead, the first episode ignored the cliffhanger. It opens with Sammo, Terrelle and Grace sneaking into an oil refinery where some terrorists are planting bombs. While there they run into a swat team who are also after the terrorists, headed by Lt. Amy Dylan ( Gretchen Egolf ) who chastises Sammo and his fellow detectives for interfering. One of the terrorists spots Terrelle, and the element of suprise is gone, so everyone goes into attack mode. The terrorists are captured and the bombs are defused. Sammo, Terrelle and Grace return to the precinct where they discover their latest Captain walking out with a box of his stuff. Sammo and his fellow detectives are looked upon as out of control mavericks who have in the past year cost the city millions in damage. As such their precinct has gone through five captains, all who were fired for not keeping the detectives in line. As the latest captain leaves the precinct, Terrelle and Grace have a good laugh. That is until their new captain walks into the precinct. It is Amy Dylan, who's punishment for the oil refinery operation turning into a melee is assigned to be the captain of Sammo's precinct and is given a month to bring the maverick detectives in line. As for the cliffhanger? Viewers had to make due with a few random lines of dialogue. Someone in the bomb disposal unit mentions that Sammo fell from a helicopter and lived. Grace mentions that Captain Winship is alive and has retired, and that Louis had moved to New York. A couple of other times it is mentioned that Lee Hei is dead. No explanation is given as to how Grace escaped fro the helicopter she was tied up in, or how Sammo managed to survive his plunge.

« Last Edit: January 21, 2018, 10:37:05 PM by stethacantus »