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Author Topic: Concert movies  (Read 9695 times)

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Offline 6079SmithW

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Concert movies
« on: December 04, 2006, 12:03:12 PM »
I don't know if everyone is familiar with this sub-genre, but when done well, they're some of the most clear masterpieces of moviemaking. My favorites, and the ones generally held to be the classics, are Scorsese's film of the Band, The Last Waltz, and Jonathan Demme's of the Talking Heads, Stop Making Sense. Honestly, if you've ever had a hard time understanding how a director, as opposed to the writer, is the author of a film, just listen to the album for one of these, then watch the movie; the music is great, but the director has created something completely amazing.

Anyway, is anyone else as into these as I am? Demme released another one recently, Neil Young's Heart of Gold, and it too is damned impressive. Anything else I'm missing?


Offline SecretAgentSuperDragon

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Re: Concert movies
« Reply #1 on: December 04, 2006, 02:14:16 PM »
Your missing Pulse (even though it isn't a "film" per say, but a really awesome concert) and my personal favorite:

Pink Floyd Live In Pompeii. The camerawork and everything was just magnificent.

I never really liked The Wall. Too bleak and dark for me.
Song Remains the Same was kinda dumb too.

There was also that Bob Dylan one. I don't remember what it was called, but it was the one with the cue cards to Subterranean Homesick Blues.


Offline pyro

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Re: Concert movies
« Reply #2 on: December 04, 2006, 02:23:25 PM »
my dad does them

http://robertmugge.com


Offline 6079SmithW

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Re: Concert movies
« Reply #3 on: December 04, 2006, 02:26:09 PM »
Your missing Pulse (even though it isn't a "film" per say, but a really awesome concert) and my personal favorite:

Pink Floyd Live In Pompeii. The camerawork and everything was just magnificent.

I never really liked The Wall. Too bleak and dark for me.
Song Remains the Same was kinda dumb too.

There was also that Bob Dylan one. I don't remember what it was called, but it was the one with the cue cards to Subterranean Homesick Blues.
The Dylan one you're thinking of is Don't Look Back; it's an amazing film, like most of Pennebaker's work, but it's more behind the scenes stuff than a concert movie. It really does let you see young Dylan's simultaneous vulnerability and arrogance, though.

I liked the Wall quite a lot, but it was more of an extended music video than a normal movie of any kind. But me, I can't get too much bleak and dark, when it's appropriate.

Song Remains the Same was unremarkable for its concert footage (and the other stuff was a bit dumb) as with the Concert for Bangladesh- fantastic music, uninspired filmmaking. The How the West Was Won dvd actually looks and flows considerably better.

Live in Pompeii (wow, I actually own every single movie you named) looks exactly as it should: spaced the hell out. It's early Pink Floyd (as in Barret influenced stuff,) and it represents early Floyd perfectly.

Has anyone seen the Criterion of Pennebaker's Monterey Pop footage? I've been wanting that for years, but never managed to pick it up.

edit: Reread your post, and realized I don't own Pulse. That's post-Waters Floyd, right? I'm not too into that era.
« Last Edit: December 04, 2006, 02:36:38 PM by 6079SmithW »


Offline 6079SmithW

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Re: Concert movies
« Reply #4 on: December 04, 2006, 02:40:10 PM »
my dad does them

http://robertmugge.com
Damn. I've never seen any of those, but looking at his catalogue, it's the kind of music that needs desperately to be preserved in some form- Blues and Zydeco and underground Americana- since it seems like it's being drowned out by all the utterly crap pop and Clear Channel stuff that's unavoidable... well, ok, it's pretty much been around since before I was born, but you know what I mean.

Tell your father I friggin' salute his work.


Offline SecretAgentSuperDragon

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Re: Concert movies
« Reply #5 on: December 04, 2006, 02:55:39 PM »
[Reread your post, and realized I don't own Pulse. That's post-Waters Floyd, right? I'm not too into that era.

Really? Its good stuff. When it comes to Waters vs Gilmour, I've always sided with Dave. Even though Waters is an awesome lyricist, Gilmour just has more soul to his songs. Pulse does feature a lot of Old Floyd too, Including Dark Side Of The Moon done entirely live without break.


Offline 6079SmithW

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Re: Concert movies
« Reply #6 on: December 04, 2006, 03:02:13 PM »
[Reread your post, and realized I don't own Pulse. That's post-Waters Floyd, right? I'm not too into that era.

Really? Its good stuff. When it comes to Waters vs Gilmour, I've always sided with Dave. Even though Waters is an awesome lyricist, Gilmour just has more soul to his songs. Pulse does feature a lot of Old Floyd too, Including Dark Side Of The Moon done entirely live without break.
I like Gilmour (and Mason) better as a person (and another person) if only because they were friends of Douglas Adams, but as much of a dick as Waters apparently is, I think his work is just a lot stronger. Everything Floyd put out after him is either too poppy or not worth hearing, whereas some of his solo work is still quite good (The Pros and Cons of Hitchhiking). And those '20 years later' sorts of concerts always seem a bit icky to me- I didn't watch the Cream one, or the Velvet Underground one, and I'm not going to watch this one. It's a matter of pointless principle.

I did watch that charity performance of The Wall, but if it helps, I thought it was dumb.


Offline SecretAgentSuperDragon

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Re: Concert movies
« Reply #7 on: December 04, 2006, 04:57:42 PM »
Another good DVD I own is David Gilmour In Concert. Even nearing 60 years old in that film, he still has a fantastic voice. The same can't be said for Robert Plant or Mick Jagger or Burton Cummings, or even Roger Waters for that instance. (David's version of DSOTM was a lot better than Roger's when I saw him at the Key Arena recently)


Offline Sharktopus

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Re: Concert movies
« Reply #8 on: December 04, 2006, 07:34:51 PM »
Don't forget U2's Rattle & Hum. I love them, and the movie made for a great album, but man, what an overconsciously artsy waste of celluloid. "U2 Go Home, Live from Slane Castle," on the other hand is amazing.


Offline mrbasehart

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Re: Concert movies
« Reply #9 on: December 04, 2006, 07:39:56 PM »
It's not especially artful as a movie, but Metallica's S&M concert with the San Francisco Harmonic features some beautiful music and I don't think Hetfield has ever sounded better live.


Offline 6079SmithW

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Re: Concert movies
« Reply #10 on: December 04, 2006, 07:45:19 PM »
Seriously, though, has everyone here seen Stop Making Sense? I didn't even really know anything about the Talking Heads when I first saw it, and it quickly became one of my favorite movies and they became one of my favorite bands. If you haven't seen it, find it and do so. It's really, really, really good.

Also the Last Waltz, but that one couldn't help being good with the bands lined up in it.


Offline Sharktopus

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Re: Concert movies
« Reply #11 on: December 04, 2006, 07:49:13 PM »
It's not especially artful as a movie, but Metallica's S&M concert with the San Francisco Harmonic features some beautiful music and I don't think Hetfield has ever sounded better live.

Ah, S&M. An idea so goofy that it could only turn out horrible or brilliant. Metallica's best recording, although most metalheads will tell you different.

Also, The Who movie The Kids Are Alright is pretty damn good. Recorded just weeks before Keith Moon's untimely demise. (Why do the best drummer's have to die? I mean, let's face it, would the Beatles have missed Ringo that much? Or the Stones Charlie Watts?)


Offline 6079SmithW

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Re: Concert movies
« Reply #12 on: December 04, 2006, 07:56:23 PM »
It's not especially artful as a movie, but Metallica's S&M concert with the San Francisco Harmonic features some beautiful music and I don't think Hetfield has ever sounded better live.

Ah, S&M. An idea so goofy that it could only turn out horrible or brilliant. Metallica's best recording, although most metalheads will tell you different.

Also, The Who movie The Kids Are Alright is pretty damn good. Recorded just weeks before Keith Moon's untimely demise. (Why do the best drummer's have to die? I mean, let's face it, would the Beatles have missed Ringo that much? Or the Stones Charlie Watts?)
He died right before he was to have cameoed in Life of Brian, too. Oh, well.
I have that movie also, but in away it's more a great editing job than a movie unto itself. Very worth watching, though, probably more so than Quadrophenia or Tommy (great albums, weak movies.)


Offline Sharktopus

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Re: Concert movies
« Reply #13 on: December 04, 2006, 08:02:46 PM »
It's not especially artful as a movie, but Metallica's S&M concert with the San Francisco Harmonic features some beautiful music and I don't think Hetfield has ever sounded better live.

Ah, S&M. An idea so goofy that it could only turn out horrible or brilliant. Metallica's best recording, although most metalheads will tell you different.

Also, The Who movie The Kids Are Alright is pretty damn good. Recorded just weeks before Keith Moon's untimely demise. (Why do the best drummer's have to die? I mean, let's face it, would the Beatles have missed Ringo that much? Or the Stones Charlie Watts?)
He died right before he was to have cameoed in Life of Brian, too. Oh, well.
I have that movie also, but in away it's more a great editing job than a movie unto itself. Very worth watching, though, probably more so than Quadrophenia or Tommy (great albums, weak movies.)

Yeah, I would've appreciated some more interviews (serious interviews - not Pete and Keith screwing around), especially knowing now what little time Keith had left.


Offline 6079SmithW

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Re: Concert movies
« Reply #14 on: December 04, 2006, 08:10:20 PM »
It's not especially artful as a movie, but Metallica's S&M concert with the San Francisco Harmonic features some beautiful music and I don't think Hetfield has ever sounded better live.

Ah, S&M. An idea so goofy that it could only turn out horrible or brilliant. Metallica's best recording, although most metalheads will tell you different.

Also, The Who movie The Kids Are Alright is pretty damn good. Recorded just weeks before Keith Moon's untimely demise. (Why do the best drummer's have to die? I mean, let's face it, would the Beatles have missed Ringo that much? Or the Stones Charlie Watts?)
He died right before he was to have cameoed in Life of Brian, too. Oh, well.
I have that movie also, but in away it's more a great editing job than a movie unto itself. Very worth watching, though, probably more so than Quadrophenia or Tommy (great albums, weak movies.)

Yeah, I would've appreciated some more interviews (serious interviews - not Pete and Keith screwing around), especially knowing now what little time Keith had left.
I liked what interviews were there, and the new recording and performing footage was great, but that movie was like 75% clip show. On the other hand, they were clips I'd never otherwise see, and it worked wonderfully, so who am I to complain?