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General Discussion => General (Off-Topic) Discussion => Topic started by: Pak-Man on September 08, 2014, 08:14:40 PM

Title: LoC #81 - Top 50 Video Games of the Oughts
Post by: Pak-Man on September 08, 2014, 08:14:40 PM
OK. Enough ado! Let's get it on!

Top 50 Video Games of the '00s

Here's the ol' Cut n' Paste!

Participants were asked to send a list of their 25 Favorite video games from January 1st 2000 to December 31st 2009. 11 ballots were received with 200 unique entries, and those were ranked on a point system allowing 25 points for a #1 choice, 24 for a #2, and all the way down to 1 point for #25. The points were added up, and what follows are the selections.

Tiebreakers work like such: If two games have equal pointage, the game that appeared on the most lists ranks higher. If those games appeared on the same amount of lists, then the game ranked higher on the individual list got the higher spot. A game that was someone's #4 beats another person's #6, for example. If there was still a tie, then the one with more top votes got the bump (2 #3 votes beat out 1 #3 vote). And then if the game was still tied, alphabetical order reigned supreme. Since there was a tie at the bottom of the list, the top 51 choices were represented.

Incidentally, this has been done twice before!
If you would like to stroll down memory lane, you can see the top games of the ‘80s (And before!) here: http://forum.rifftrax.com/index.php?topic=22337
And the Top games of the ‘90s here:
http://forum.rifftrax.com/index.php?topic=27562

Without further ado, enjoy the top 50 games of the ‘00s!
Title: Re: LoC #81 - Top 50 Video Games of the Oughts
Post by: Pak-Man on September 08, 2014, 08:15:41 PM
#51 –World of Warcraft

(23 Points) 1 of 11 Lists - Highest Ranking - #3 – Compound
(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/9/91/WoW_Box_Art1.jpg)
The drums of war thunder once again.
Release Date:  November 23, 2004
Just the facts/Stuff I wiki'd:
World of Warcraft (WoW) is a massively multiplayer online role-playing game (MMORPG) created in 2004 by Blizzard Entertainment. It is the fourth released game set in the fantasy Warcraft universe, which was first introduced by Warcraft: Orcs & Humans in 1994. World of Warcraft takes place within the Warcraft world of Azeroth, approximately four years after the events at the conclusion of Blizzard's previous Warcraft release, Warcraft III: The Frozen Throne. Blizzard Entertainment announced World of Warcraft on September 2, 2001. The game was released on November 23, 2004, on the 10th anniversary of the Warcraft franchise.
 
With almost seven million subscribers as of August 2014, World of Warcraft is currently the world's most-subscribed MMORPG, and holds the Guinness World Record for the most popular MMORPG by subscribers. Having grossed over 10 billion dollars USD as of July 2012, it is also the highest grossing video game of all time. In January 2014 it was announced that more than 100 million accounts had been created over the game's lifetime.

Much of World of Warcraft play involves the completion of quests. These quests, also called "tasks" or "missions", are usually available from NPCs. Quests usually reward the player with some combination of experience points, items, and in-game money. Quests allow characters to gain access to new skills and abilities, and explore new areas. It is through quests that much of the game's story is told, both through the quest's text and through scripted NPC actions. Quests are linked by a common theme, with each consecutive quest triggered by the completion of the previous, forming a quest chain. Quests commonly involve killing a number of creatures, gathering a certain number of resources, finding a difficult to locate object, speaking to various NPCs, visiting specific locations, interacting with objects in the world, or delivering an item from one place to another.

 Pak's Thoughts – While I’ve been to Azeroth to fight the occasional Real-Time Strategy war, I’ve never dipped my toes into the MMORPG.  It seems like fun, with the raiding and the questing for epic loot and all that, but unless the other players are sitting on a couch with me, I’m not big on multiplayer gaming. Whenever I DO play an MMORPG, I just end up playing it like a single-player game, which is missing the point of the first three letters in the acronym.
Title: Re: LoC #81 - Top 50 Video Games of the Oughts
Post by: Pak-Man on September 08, 2014, 08:15:57 PM
#50 –The Simpsons: Hit and Run

(23 Points) 1 of 11 Lists - Highest Ranking - #3 – ColeStratton
(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/5/5f/The_Simpsons_Hit_and_Run_cover.png)
If only kids would play more video games about sharing.
Release Date:  September 16, 2003
Just the facts/Stuff I wiki'd:
The Simpsons: Hit & Run is an action-adventure video game based on the animated sitcom The Simpsons. It was released for the PlayStation 2, Xbox, GameCube and Microsoft Windows in North America on September 16, 2003, in Europe on October 31, 2003 and in Japan on December 25, 2003. The story and dialogue were crafted by writers from The Simpsons, with all character voices supplied by the actual cast.
 
The game follows the Simpson family and the citizens of Springfield, who witness many strange incidents that occur in Springfield. When several of the citizens take matters into their own hands, they discover that two aliens Kang and Kodos are filming a reality television series about the populace. To make the show more interesting, the aliens release a new version of the popular soft drink Buzz Cola into Springfield's water supply—however, this particular version causes insanity. With help from Professor Frink, Homer is able to destroy the aliens' spaceship, and Springfield and its inhabitants are returned to normal.
 
The game received generally favorable reviews from video game critics. Praise focused on the interpretation of the Simpsons television series as a video game and its parodical take on Grand Theft Auto III, while criticism mostly surrounded some aspects of gameplay. The game received the award for Fave Video Game at the 2004 Nickelodeon Australian Kids' Choice Awards. As of June 2007, over three million copies of the game had been sold.

 Pak's Thoughts – The Simpsons’ trademark humor mixes well with sandbox style gaming. I rented this one weekend and thought it had a lot of potential, but it never made it onto my video game shelf, so I never got too far into it to see if it holds up.
Title: Re: LoC #81 - Top 50 Video Games of the Oughts
Post by: Pak-Man on September 08, 2014, 08:16:28 PM
#49 –Resident Evil: Code Veronica

(23 Points) 1 of 11 Lists - Highest Ranking - #3 – Tyrant
(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/4/44/RECV_boxart.jpg)
Let's just say I am just a ghost to haunt your dear brother. 
Release Date:  February 3, 2000
Just the facts/Stuff I wiki'd:
Resident Evil Code: Veronica is a 2000 survival horror video game, originally released for the Dreamcast. It was the first Resident Evil title to debut on a non-Sony platform, in contrast to the first three installments, which were originally PlayStation games and then ported to other platforms.
 
The story focuses on Claire Redfield and Steve Burnside during a T-virus outbreak on an island and are confronted by the Ashford family members. Besides controlling Claire and Steve, the player also has control over Chris Redfield, Claire's brother who tries to save his sister. The game retains the survival horror elements from previous installments in the series such as the use of puzzles and guns. The traditional pre-rendered backgrounds have been replaced with 3D backgrounds.

Code: Veronica is the first Resident Evil game in the main series to use 3D backgrounds instead of the traditional pre-rendered ones. Despite this, the camera does not follow the player around, but swings between semi-fixed angles and the skyboxes are pre-rendered. However, two weapons in the game can be fired from the character's point of view (the Sniper Rifle and the Linear Launcher) First person view mode is also available in the game's unlockable Battle Game minigame.
 
Gameplay remained largely unchanged from Resident Evil 3: Nemesis (which was developed in tandem with Code: Veronica); features such as explosive oil drums and a 180-degree turn having been carried over to this game, though the dodge feature was removed. Items from Resident Evil 2, such as upgradeable handgun parts and "side packs" to increase carrying capacity are included, as well as new weapons such as crossbow arrows mixed with gunpowder and anti-B.O.W. rounds for the grenade launcher. A feature of Code: Veronica is the inclusion of various dual-wielding pistols, allowing the player to target two enemies at the same time. Some of the more subtle improvements include the addition of continues, allowing the player to retry a scene after a game over, and the ability to pick up and use a healing herb when the character's inventory is full.
 
Code: Veronica features two protagonists, Claire Redfield and her brother Chris. In Code: Veronica the player controls Claire for the first half of the game and Chris for the second half. All of Claire's weapons and items in the item box are available for Chris to pick up in his half of the game. In addition, a third character, Steve Burnside, is briefly playable during the game's first half and Claire herself is playable during a short portion of Chris' scenario.

 Pak's Thoughts – This was the first Resident Evil game I ever sunk any time into. The combination of my first decent-paying job, my Dreamcast ownership, and the fact that my then-girlfriend (now-wife) was/is pretty crazy about the series prompted me to give this one the old college try. Being an adventure gamer, I love the puzzles, but the “Survival” part of survival horror has never been my strong suit. I tend to unload about half of my ammunition into the scenery, and every shot that actually lands tends to hit the worst part of the zombie possible. Still, this game delivers on the heebie-jeebies.
Title: Re: LoC #81 - Top 50 Video Games of the Oughts
Post by: Pak-Man on September 08, 2014, 08:16:46 PM
#48 –New Super Mario Bros.

(23 Points) 1 of 11 Lists - Highest Ranking - #3 – Sugar Ray Dodge
(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/d/db/NewSuperMarioBrothers.jpg)
Here I go! 
Release Date:  May 15, 2006
Just the facts/Stuff I wiki'd:
New Super Mario Bros. is a 2006 side-scrolling platform video game published and developed by Nintendo for the Nintendo DS handheld game console. The game was released in North America and Japan in May 2006 and in Australia and Europe in June 2006. It was the first original side-scrolling platform game starring Mario since Super Mario Land 2: 6 Golden Coins in 1992, and the first game to be a part of the main Super Mario series of video games since Super Mario Sunshine in 2002.
 
The game's plot is similar to those of other side-scrolling Mario games. New Super Mario Bros. follows Mario as he fights his way through Bowser's henchmen to rescue Princess Peach. Mario has access to several power-ups that help him complete his quest, including the Super Mushroom, the Fire Flower, and the Starman, each giving him unique abilities. While traveling through eight worlds with a total of 80 levels, Mario must defeat Bowser Jr. and Bowser before finally saving Princess Peach.

Hidden throughout each of the levels are three Star Coins. By collecting these Star Coins, Mario is able to purchase access to Toad Houses to gain items or lives. Mario can also use these Star Coins to unlock special backgrounds and paths on the World Map. Players will also come across Star Coin Signs. Paying the number of Star Coins shown on these signs will open new paths that in turn allow you to save your game.
 
There are six power-ups available in New Super Mario Bros. Three power-ups from Super Mario Bros. return: the Super Mushroom makes Mario grow in size, the Fire Flower lets Mario throw fireballs, and the Starman makes Mario invincible temporarily. The Starman also gives him a boost of speed and more jump height, a first for the game. Three more power-ups are introduced in New Super Mario Bros.:  the Blue Koopa Shell lets Mario withdraw into a shell to protect himself, run and then withdraw into the shell to attack enemies, and swim faster,  the Mega Mushroom grows Mario to an incredible size for a short time (the amount of damage inflicted as Mega-Mario corresponds to extra lives received after returning to normal size). The Mega Mushroom provides complete invincibility, and is capable of destroying many enemies (excluding boss enemies) with one hit. It even grants Mario the power to kick down the flagpole at the end of any given level, and the Mini-Mushroom makes Mario very small and able to run across water. He can also jump higher and enter small pipes.

Pak's Thoughts – Man, it felt good to be playing Mario in 2D again. Those Star Coins are an awesome addition to the game, and also the reason I still haven’t played all the way through. I’ve played through many Mario games and have all the skills it takes to beat this one, but there’s always a coin hiding somewhere that I haven’t found, and I feel compelled to find them all before moving on. This drives me to explore every inch of every level to find every secret, which has always been one of the most fun aspects of Mario games, but it also exhausts me and I can only play a few levels at a time before getting burned out .
Title: Re: LoC #81 - Top 50 Video Games of the Oughts
Post by: Pak-Man on September 08, 2014, 08:17:12 PM
#47 –Metal Gear Solid 4: Guns of the Patriots

(23 Points) 1 of 11 Lists - Highest Ranking - #3 – PsychoGoatee
(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/4/4b/Mgs4us_cover_small.jpg)
War has changed. 
Release Date:  June 12, 2008
Just the facts/Stuff I wiki'd:
Metal Gear Solid 4: Guns of the Patriots is an action-adventure stealth video game developed by Kojima Productions exclusively for the PlayStation 3 console. It was the sixth Metal Gear game directed by Hideo Kojima and is set nine years after the events of Metal Gear Solid and five years after the events of Metal Gear Solid 2: Sons of Liberty. Guns of the Patriots made its worldwide release on June 12, 2008.
 
Guns of the Patriots received widespread critical acclaim, garnering perfect reviews and Game of the Year awards from several major gaming publications, including GameSpot, which claimed that the game is "technically flawless". The game has been a financial success, selling 6 million copies worldwide. The game is a direct sequel to Metal Gear Solid and Metal Gear Solid 2, and concludes the story of both the Patriots and Solid Snake.

In MGS4, players assume the role of an aged Solid Snake (colloquially referred to as Old Snake), using stealth, close quarters combat, and traditional Metal Gear combat. The overhead third-person camera of earlier games has been replaced by a streamlined view and over-the-shoulder camera for aiming a weapon, with an optional first-person view at the toggle of a button.

Metal Gear Solid 4 started development due to fan demand. Series creator Hideo Kojima had previously directed the prequel Metal Gear Solid 3: Snake Eater which was meant to end the series. However, people's demand to have a sequel to Metal Gear Solid 2: Sons of Liberty and clear the mysteries Kojima wanted to leave to the players' interpretations resulted in the making of Metal Gear Solid 4. Kojima announced that he would be retiring as director of the Metal Gear series after Snake Eater, and would leave his position open to another person for Metal Gear Solid 4. As a joke, the new director was announced as "Alan Smithee", but in R, a 400-page book bundled with Metal Gear Solid 3's Japanese "Premium Package", the director was revealed to be Shuyo Murata, co-writer of MGS3 and director of Zone of the Enders: The 2nd Runner. He also contributed easter eggs to Metal Gear Solid 2: Sons of Liberty and Metal Gear: Ghost Babel. However, it was announced that Kojima would be co-directing the game with Murata after substantial negative fan reaction, including death threats.

 Pak's Thoughts – I’m sure these games deserve every bit of the praise that they get, but I just don’t do stealth games. It’s too easy to make a wrong move and ruin everything. I know that’s supposed to be what makes it so much fun, but it’s just tedious and stressful to me.
Title: Re: LoC #81 - Top 50 Video Games of the Oughts
Post by: Pak-Man on September 08, 2014, 08:17:52 PM
#46 –The Legend of Zelda: Twilight Princess

(23 Points) 1 of 11 Lists - Highest Ranking - #3 – lassieface
(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/0/0e/The_Legend_of_Zelda_Twilight_Princess_Game_Cover.jpg)
You don't have to look so sad! We actually find it to be quite livable! I mean, is perpetual twilight really all that bad?
Release Date:  November 19, 2006
Just the facts/Stuff I wiki'd:
The Legend of Zelda: Twilight Princess is an action-adventure game developed by Nintendo Entertainment Analysis and Development, and published by Nintendo for the GameCube and Wii video game consoles. It is the thirteenth installment in The Legend of Zelda series. The Wii version was also released alongside the Wii console on November 19, 2006, in North America, and in December 2006 in Japan, Europe, and Australia. This made Twilight Princess the first Zelda game released at the launch of a Nintendo console. The GameCube version was released in December 2006, and was the last Nintendo-published game for the console, as well as the final official GameCube game released in Asia.
 
The story focuses on series protagonist Link, who tries to prevent Hyrule from being engulfed by a corrupted parallel dimension known as the Twilight Realm. To do so, he takes the forms of both a Hylian and a wolf, and is assisted by a mysterious creature named Midna. The game takes place approximately 100 years after Ocarina of Time and Majora's Mask, in an alternate timeline from The Wind Waker.
 
Twilight Princess is the first game in The Legend of Zelda series to receive a T (Teen) rating from the Entertainment Software Rating Board (ESRB), which cited fantasy violence and animated blood as reasons for the more mature rating. At the time of its release, Twilight Princess was considered to be the greatest Zelda game ever made by many critics, including writers for 1UP.com, CVG, Electronic Gaming Monthly, Game Informer, GamesRadar, IGN and The Washington Post.

 Pak's Thoughts – What a great way to kick off the Wii. I never quite completed Twilight Princess, but I intend to. I say that a lot in these write-ups. I suppose someday, I’ll be a retired old man, and I’ll be able to just sit back and play all the games I never had time for. A lot of people have that dream with books, but for me it’s always been video games.


That's all for today. I'll be back with another bundle of list tomorrow!
Title: Re: LoC #81 - Top 50 Video Games of the Oughts
Post by: Relaxing Dragon on September 08, 2014, 11:37:36 PM
Solid start. Somehow I never got around to playing Twilight Princess, something I probably should change (of course, I never got more than an hour or more into Wind Waker, so maybe it's just me).

And then there's WoW, a game I almost lost friends to back in high school (in the sense of "Want to do something tonight?" "Can't, got a raid", with me being the one who wanted to do something).

Meanwhile, I just remembered a game that would've been in my Top 10, had I not completely spaced on it. Hopefully it shows up.
Title: Re: LoC #81 - Top 50 Video Games of the Oughts
Post by: Quantum Vagina on September 09, 2014, 05:53:52 PM
Wooo! Looking forward to this! :D
Title: Re: LoC #81 - Top 50 Video Games of the Oughts
Post by: Johnny Unusual on September 09, 2014, 06:28:43 PM
Yeah, it's gonna be fun on a bun.  Never been interested in getting into WoW.  If it is anything like DOTA 2, I don't think it's my kind of thing.
Title: Re: LoC #81 - Top 50 Video Games of the Oughts
Post by: Quantum Vagina on September 09, 2014, 07:34:14 PM
Yeah, it's gonna be fun on a bun.  Never been interested in getting into WoW.  If it is anything like DOTA 2, I don't think it's my kind of thing.

WoW is NOTHING like DotA 2. I don't think they're great, but they're entirely different types of games.
Title: Re: LoC #81 - Top 50 Video Games of the Oughts
Post by: Pak-Man on September 09, 2014, 09:14:06 PM
#45 –The Legend of Zelda: Majora’s Mask

(23 Points) 1 of 11 Lists - Highest Ranking - #3 – Relaxing Dragon
(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/6/60/The_Legend_of_Zelda_-_Majora%27s_Mask_Box_Art.jpg)
I... I shall consume. Consume... consume everything...
Release Date:  April 27, 2000
Just the facts/Stuff I wiki'd:
The Legend of Zelda: Majora's Mask is an action-adventure video game developed by Nintendo's Entertainment Analysis and Development division for the Nintendo 64. It was released in Japan on April 27, 2000, North America on October 26, 2000, and Europe on November 17, 2000. The game sold approximately 314,000 copies during its first week in Japan, and has sold three million copies worldwide.
 
Majora's Mask is the sixth installment in The Legend of Zelda series and the second using 3D graphics, the first being The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time, the game's predecessor. Considered by critics to be "darker" among the Zelda games franchise, Majora's Mask is set in Termina, an alternate version of the usual series setting of Hyrule, where the Skull Kid has stolen Majora's Mask, a powerful ancient artifact. Under its influence, the Skull Kid causes the land's moon to slowly fall towards Termina, where it crashes after three days. The main protagonist Link repeatedly travels back in time to the beginning of the three days to find a way to stop the moon from destroying the world.
 
The gameplay is centered on the perpetually repeating three-day cycle and the use of various masks, some of which allow Link to transform into different beings. Link learns to play several melodies on his ocarina, which have a variety of effects like controlling the flow of time or opening passages to four temples, which house challenges Link must overcome. Unlike Ocarina of Time, Majora's Mask requires the Expansion Pak, which provides additional memory for enhanced graphics and more on-screen characters. Majora's Mask was acclaimed by critics, who praised the graphics and complex story.

The gameplay of Majora's Mask expands on that of Ocarina of Time; it retains the concept of dungeon puzzles and ocarina songs, and introduces character transformations and the restriction of a three-day cycle. As in previous installments, Link can perform basic actions such as walking, running and limited jumping, and must use items to battle enemies and solve puzzles. Link's main weapon is the sword, which can be upgraded throughout the game. Other weapons and items are available—Link can block or reflect attacks with a shield, stun enemies by throwing Deku Nuts, attack from a distance with a bow and arrows, destroy obstacles and damage enemies with bombs. He can also latch onto objects or paralyze enemies with the Hookshot. Magic power allows attacks such as magical arrows or spin attacks, and the use of special items.

Pak's Thoughts – I have this sort of OCD hang-up where I don’t like to play direct sequels until I’ve conquered the first game.  This goes double for story-heavy titles like Zelda. So even though the story seems isolated from Ocarina of Time, I don’t want to dig into Majora’s Mask until I complete Ocarina. I’ll beat that water temple someday… Still, the concept behind this one seems fascinating, and I have one of those elusive Gamecube remakes sitting on my shelf. Maybe I should just dive in..
Title: Re: LoC #81 - Top 50 Video Games of the Oughts
Post by: Pak-Man on September 09, 2014, 09:14:31 PM
#44 –Mario Kart: Double Dash!!

(23 Points) 2 of 11 Lists - Highest Ranking - #5 – Sugar Ray Dodge
(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/7/78/Mario_Kart_Double_Dash.jpg)
HI! I’M DAISY!
Release Date:  November 17, 2003
Just the facts/Stuff I wiki'd:
Mario Kart: Double Dash!! is a racing game developed by Nintendo Entertainment Analysis and Development and published by Nintendo for the Nintendo GameCube in 2003. The game is the fourth installment in the Mario Kart series, following Mario Kart: Super Circuit from 2001. It was succeeded by the handheld game Mario Kart DS, which was released for the Nintendo DS in 2005.
 
Similar to previous titles, Double Dash!! incorporates characters from the Mario series and pits them against each other as they race on different, Mario-themed tracks. The game introduced a number of new gameplay features, most notably the inclusion of two riders per kart. Double Dash!! supports LAN play using the Nintendo GameCube Broadband Adapter, allowing 16 players to compete simultaneously. There are 20 characters to select from in total, with eleven of them being new to the series. A special item for each character has also been implemented.
 
Double Dash!! is a kart racing video game in which the player races in a kart against other teams in different courses. The game screen indicates the current standings in a race, the current speed of the player's kart and incoming weapons. Like in the previous installments, players can pick up item boxes to receive a randomly selected item and use it to impede the opposition and gain the advantage. Some items, such as shells and bananas, allow the player to hit others to slow them down, while other items, such as the star power-up, render them temporarily invincible to attacks. This is the only game in the series in which instead of one character per kart, there are two: one to drive, and one to use items; and is also the first in the series where players drop their items when hit by a weapon. The powerslide technique, an action that allows the player to drift around turns, has been improved; players can tilt the control stick while drifting to make sparks appear around their kart. If tilted enough, the sparks turn blue, and the player gains a speed boost known as a "mini-turbo". The rocket start technique, an action that allows the player to gain a speed boost when a race begins is also improved as the Double Dash!!, which can only be done as a team.

Players can choose from a cast of twenty playable drivers. All of the characters have their own special items which are unique to them, like Mario and Luigi with Fireballs, Donkey Kong and Diddy Kong with Giant Bananas, Bowser and Bowser Jr. with Bowser Shells, Yoshi and Birdo with Eggs, Peach and Daisy with Hearts, Wario and Waluigi with Bob-ombs, Koopa and Paratroopa with Triple Shells, Toad and Toadette with Golden Mushrooms, and Baby Mario and Baby Luigi with Chain Chomps. Petey Piranha and King Boo have the unique ability to use any of the other characters' special items excluding Luigi's Green Fireball and Birdo's Pink Egg.[5] There are 21 karts in all and the character's weight class (light, middle, or heavy) determines the kart in which they can ride as well as their speed, acceleration, and weight attributes.
 
In addition to the playable drivers, other characters have supporting roles in this game as well. Lakitu reprises his role as the referee, helping racers in various situations such as announcing laps, giving the signal to drive with its traffic lights hanging on a fishing pole, and taking teams back on track in case they fall off course. Other supporting characters appearing in this game include Shy Guys, Goombas, Nokis, Toadsworth, Piantas, Chain Chomps, Piranha Plants and more. It should also be noted that this is the very first time that Toadette has appeared in the Mario franchise.

Pak's Thoughts – Mario Kart is one of those series where you just get it when it comes out. You know exactly what you’re getting with a Mario Kart game, and if you like it, you want more. No need for deliberation. I never quite understood why Nintendo ditched the 2-driver thing. I assumed that feature would be here to stay. It was all cosmetic, really, but I liked the chaotic look of having everyone hunched down in the same kart.
Title: Re: LoC #81 - Top 50 Video Games of the Oughts
Post by: Pak-Man on September 09, 2014, 09:14:48 PM
#43 –WWF: No Mercy

(24 Points) 1 of 11 Lists - Highest Ranking - #2 – Sugar Ray Dodge
(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/9/90/NoMercyGameBox.jpg)
Release Date:  November 17, 2000
Just the facts/Stuff I wiki'd:
WWF No Mercy is a professional wrestling video game released in 2000 on the Nintendo 64 console and published by THQ. It is named after the World Wrestling Federation annual pay-per-view event of the same name. No Mercy is the follow-up to 1999's WWF WrestleMania 2000, and the last WWF game released for the Nintendo 64. No Mercy was well received by players and critics alike.

Some of the features included in WrestleMania 2000 were removed from No Mercy. First, wrestlers' entrances were cut short to showing the wrestler only appear on the stage/entrance ramp, and players never see wrestlers actually enter the ring (despite early screen shots showing full ring entrances). For example, Triple H is shown spitting water at the crowd upon entering the ring. The belt options were also changed; rather than creating a belt from scratch, players now have to complete a story mode to win a title.
 
However, No Mercy features a much more extensive Create-a-Wrestler mode with more moves, more customizable body attributes, better-organized clothing options (No Mercy utilizes descriptive categories and titles for each clothing item, whereas WrestleMania 2000 simply numbers items), and the ability to create female wrestlers, which is nearly impossible in WrestleMania 2000. Each wrestler in the game has four different ring attires that could be independently edited, and each attire can be completely changed including name, height and weight, body parts, and music, technically allowing four different wrestlers per slot, although they must share a common moveset. Several of the game's unlockable wrestlers used this feature, such as Taka Michinoku who has his partner Funaki in two attire slots. The graphics also were improved significantly over the game's predecessor, and various match types made their Nintendo 64 debut in this game, including ladder matches and special referee matches. The game also marked the first time on the system in a WWF game that players could fight backstage and also the first time moves can be done on the announcer's table. Many parts of the backstage environment are usable, such as being able to hit the opponent with a pool stick and driving them through the pool table in the bar/lounge.
 
The Championship mode is more extensive, compared to WrestleMania's career/Road to Wrestlemania mode. Each WWF title features a unique story. For the WWF Championship, players can choose any wrestler to reenact the classic feud between Mankind and Triple H that dominated the WWF in early to mid-2000. Other angles include Stone Cold Steve Austin's feud and The Rock's temporary alliance with Vince McMahon. After winning a title, the player can replay the story mode and defend the newly acquired belt in a variety of new storylines. Also, unlike future wrestling games, players are allowed to fight for and defend any championship in the exhibition mode, a feature that was not included again until Smackdown Vs RAW 2006.
 
The story mode's depth is due in part to its branching storylines that develop based on the outcomes of the player's matches. In WrestleMania 2000, if the player lost a match in the career mode, the game only allowed the player to retry the match, rather than adjusting the storyline accordingly. No Mercy's story mode offers branching storylines based on the outcomes of matches. The player has to actually play through each story several times and lose matches in order to achieve a 100% completion rating.
 
Another notable feature that was added to the game is the "SmackDown! Mall." With money earned from winning matches in story mode and playing the Survival mode, players can purchase unlockable characters, clothing, wrestling moves, props, tattoos, weapons, and venues.

Pak's Thoughts – I’m not much of a wrestling fan, which means I don’t play a lot of wrestling games, but I always enjoy them when I try one out. I’ve never tried this one, so maybe Sugar Ray Dodge can fill in for nostalgic memories. :^)
Title: Re: LoC #81 - Top 50 Video Games of the Oughts
Post by: Pak-Man on September 09, 2014, 09:15:14 PM
#42 –Metroid Prime

(24 Points) 1 of 11 Lists - Highest Ranking - #2 – Tyrant
(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/b/ba/MetroidPrimebox.jpg)
In the vast universe, the history of humanity is but a flash of light from a lone star.
Release Date:  November 17, 2002
Just the facts/Stuff I wiki'd:
Metroid Prime is a video game developed by Retro Studios and Nintendo for the GameCube console. It was released in North America on November 17, 2002, and in Japan and Europe the following year. Metroid Prime is the fifth main installment and the first 3D game in the Metroid series. Because exploration takes precedence over combat, Nintendo classifies Metroid Prime as a first-person adventure rather than a first-person shooter.
 
Metroid Prime is the first of the three-part Prime storyline, which takes place between the original Metroid and Metroid II: Return of Samus. Like previous games in the series, Metroid Prime has a science fiction setting in which players control the bounty hunter Samus Aran. The story follows Samus as she battles the Space Pirates and their biological experiments on the planet Tallon IV.
 
The game was a collaboration between Retro's staff in Austin, Texas and Japanese Nintendo employees, including producer Shigeru Miyamoto, who suggested the project after visiting Retro's headquarters in 2000. Despite initial backlash against the game's first-person perspective, the game garnered universal acclaim and commercial success, selling more than a million units in North America alone. It won a number of Game of the Year awards, and it is considered by many critics and gamers to be one of the greatest video games ever made, remaining one of the highest-rated games on Metacritic

As in previous Metroid games, Metroid Prime takes place in a large, open-ended world in which regions are connected by elevators. Each region has a set of rooms separated by doors that can be opened with a shot from the correct beam. The gameplay involves solving puzzles to reveal secrets, platform jumping, and shooting foes with the help of a "lock-on" mechanism that allows circle strafing while staying aimed at the enemy. Metroid Prime is the first game in the Metroid series to use a first-person view instead of side-scrolling, except in Morph Ball mode, when Samus' suit transforms into an armored ball and the game uses a third-person camera.
 
The protagonist, Samus Aran, must travel through the world of Tallon IV searching for twelve Chozo Artifacts that will open the path to the Phazon meteor impact crater, while collecting power-ups that enable the player to reach previously inaccessible areas. The Varia Suit, for example, protects Samus' armor against dangerously high temperatures, allowing her to enter volcanic regions. Some of the items are obtained after boss and mini-boss fights, which are encountered in all regions except Magmoor Caverns. Items must be collected in a specific order so that the player may progress. For example, players cannot access certain areas until they find a certain Beam to open doors, or discover new ordnance with which to beat bosses. In common with previous games in the series, the player must return to areas already explored to retrieve items that were previously inaccessible.
 
The heads-up display, which simulates the inside of Samus' helmet, features a radar display, a map, ammunition for missiles, a health meter, a danger meter for negotiating hazardous landscape or materials, and a health bar and name display for bosses. The display can be altered by exchanging visors; one uses thermal imaging, another has x-ray vision, and another features a scanner that searches for enemy weaknesses and interfaces with mechanisms such as force fields and elevators. Metroid Prime introduces a hint system that provides the player with clues about ways to progress through the game.

Pak's Thoughts – Making Metroid into a first person shooter should have been a total disaster. I remember hearing all about it in the previews and being completely unable to comprehend how Metroid’s 2D platforming could possibly translate into 3D. Boy did they pull it off, though. It took an already-immersive franchise and cranked the immersion up to 11. This game and its sequels have also resulted in the most frustrating, controller-throwing frenzies since childhood.

Fun Fact! The last 3 items on this list have all been released on the same date in different years. Must be something magical about the 17th of November…
Title: Re: LoC #81 - Top 50 Video Games of the Oughts
Post by: Pak-Man on September 09, 2014, 09:15:33 PM
#41 –Max Payne

(24 Points) 1 of 11 Lists - Highest Ranking - #2 – PsychoGoatee
(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/4/4c/Maxpaynebox.jpg)
Life was good. The Sun was setting on a sweet Summer's day. A house on the Jersey side across the river. The smell of freshly cut lawns. The sounds of children playing. A beautiful wife and a baby girl. The American dream come true. But dreams have a nasty habit of going bad when you're not looking.
Release Date:  July 23, 2001
Just the facts/Stuff I wiki'd:
Max Payne is a third-person shooter video game developed by Remedy Entertainment and published by Gathering of Developers on July 2001 for Microsoft Windows.
 
The game centers around the NYPD Detective Max Payne, who attempts to avenge the murder of his family. It features a gritty neo-noir style and uses graphic novel panels (with voice-overs) in place of animated cutscenes to narrate the game, as it draws inspiration from hard-boiled detective novels by authors like Mickey Spillane. The game contains many allusions to Norse mythology, particularly the myth of Ragnarök, and several of the names used in the game are those of the Norse gods and mythos. The gameplay is heavily influenced by the Hong Kong action cinema genre, particularly the work of director John Woo, and it was the first game to feature the bullet time effect popularized by The Matrix.
 
Max Payne is a third-person shooter in which the player assumes the role of its titular character, Max Payne. Almost all the gameplay involves bullet time-based gun-fights and levels are generally straightforward, occasionally incorporating platforming and puzzle-solving elements. The game's storyline is advanced by the player following Max's internal monologue as the character determines what his next steps should be. Several of the game's levels involve surrealistic nightmares and drug-related hallucinations of Payne.
 
Initially, the player's only weapon is a semi-automatic pistol. As the player progresses, access to other firearms is given, including melee and hand-thrown weapons. Some of the game's weapons can be dual wielded. Max regains health by taking painkillers, which the player collects. The game's AI is heavily dependent on pre-scripted commands: most of the apparently intelligent behavior exhibited by enemies (such as taking cover, retreating from the player, or throwing grenades) actually is pre-scripted.
 
The gameplay of Max Payne revolves around bullet time, a form of slow motion — when triggered, the passage of time is slowed down to such extent that the movements of bullets can be seen by the naked eye and enables Max to perform special moves. Although Payne's movement is also slowed, the player is still able to position the aiming reticle and react in real time, providing an advantage over enemies. Occasionally, when the last character of an enemy group is killed, the viewpoint switches to a third-person view circling a falling body. Likewise, the camera may follow the path of a bullet fired from a sniper rifle.

Pak's Thoughts – I never gave this one a fair shot. I took one look at the title, rolled my eyes, and never payed much attention to it. Then sequels started coming out and I got the feeling I missed out on something I shouldn’t have.

That’ll do it for tonight. The list continues tomorrow!
Title: Re: LoC #81 - Top 50 Video Games of the Oughts
Post by: Compound on September 09, 2014, 11:15:42 PM

Pak's Thoughts – I never gave this one a fair shot. I took one look at the title, rolled my eyes, and never payed much attention to it. Then sequels started coming out and I got the feeling I missed out on something I shouldn’t have.


You should watch the movie.  That'll catch you up on the plot.

Heh, heh, heh. Step into that trap foolish pac-dot eater....
Title: Re: LoC #81 - Top 50 Video Games of the Oughts
Post by: Relaxing Dragon on September 09, 2014, 11:19:12 PM
I'm going to chalk Majora's Mask's super-early-2000s release date for the reason of its omission from everyone else's list (it wasn't on my first draft because I thought it was a 90s game). Because for real, that one gets my vote for Best Zelda Game Ever, and that's a category that's got some of the steepest competition in gaming. Majora's a remarkably different outing when compared to the rest of the series, in everything from story (which is considerably darker) to play mechanics (the mask switching/collecting plays off in a number of cool ways, and then there's the whole Three Days time limit that plays out over and over and over again) to everything in between. The music, the characters, the dungeons, the side-stories (that damn Sun Mask...), it's all pretty pitch-perfect. This is easily my favorite game of the N64 era, and that I haven't yet tracked down the GC remake just to play it one last time is a serious mistake on my part that needs rectifying.

Pak, just dive right in. Story-wise it really doesn't relate to any of the other games (it's kinda-sorta-maybe a sequel to Ocarina of Time, or maybe it's all just a dream...), and it still holds up great.

And I'm actually pleased to see WWF: No Mercy on the list. I'm not a wrestling fan either, but for whatever reason my brother and I really took to that game back in our Blockbuster rental days. I think it was the super-extensive Create-A-Wrestler thing that pulled me in (for real, games back then went all-out on customization options compared to now), and we spent far more time than I would've thought possible on the likes of Royal Rumbles and the like. In fact, this may have been the first game I saved up for to actually buy, which was a big deal back when I was in middle school and N64 cartridges were $75 a pop.
Title: Re: LoC #81 - Top 50 Video Games of the Oughts
Post by: Johnny Unusual on September 10, 2014, 07:14:29 AM
Double Dash was a lot of fun.  It's a great game if you got at least four people around.
Title: Re: LoC #81 - Top 50 Video Games of the Oughts
Post by: CJones on September 10, 2014, 01:47:07 PM
Woo-hoo, my #1 is guaranteed, even if it is due to a technicality. Seriously, it is one of the best games I've ever played.
Title: Re: LoC #81 - Top 50 Video Games of the Oughts
Post by: lassieface on September 10, 2014, 10:14:33 PM
I remember being really, really bad at Max Payne.
Title: Re: LoC #81 - Top 50 Video Games of the Oughts
Post by: Pak-Man on September 10, 2014, 10:40:52 PM
#40 –Manhunt

(24 Points) 1 of 11 Lists - Highest Ranking - #2 – Relaxing Dragon
(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/2/21/Manhuntbox.jpg)
You're getting a second chance, another throw of the dice.
Release Date:  November 18, 2003
Just the facts/Stuff I wiki'd:
Manhunt is a stealth-based psychological horror video game developed by Rockstar North and published by Rockstar Games. It was released in North America on November 18, 2003, for the PlayStation 2 and on April 20, 2004, for Xbox and PC, and in Europe on November 21 for the PS2 and on April 23 for the Xbox and PC. The game's story follows a supposedly executed death row inmate who is forced to participate in a series of snuff films for former film producer and now underground snuff director, Lionel Starkweather (voiced by Brian Cox).
 
Although it received positive reviews by critics, Manhunt is well known for controversy, due to the level of graphic violence in the game. It was banned in several countries, and implicated in a murder by the UK media, although this implication was later rejected by the police and courts.

Manhunt is a stealth-based psychological horror game played from a third-person perspective. The game consists of twenty levels, called "scenes", as well as four unlockable bonus levels. Players survive the scenes by dispatching enemy gang members, known as "Hunters", occasionally with firearms, but primarily by stealthily executing them.
 
At the end of each scene, the player is graded based on their performance, and awarded one to five stars. Unlockable content becomes available only when the player achieves three or more stars on a certain number of levels. On normal difficulty (called "Fetish"), the player can earn only four stars; one is awarded for completing the scene under a certain amount of time, and one to three stars are awarded based on the brutality of the executions carried out during the scene. On hard difficulty (called "Hardcore"), the player is graded out of five stars; one for speed, one to three for brutality and one for simply completing the scene. To gain the maximum number of stars, a set number of brutal executions must be carried out over the course of each scene; face-to-face fighting does not award stars.
 
In order to carry out executions, the player must approach a hunter from behind, undetected. To facilitate this, each scene is full of "dark spots" (shadows where the player can hide). Hunters cannot see into the shadows (unless they see the player actually entering the area). A standard technique in the game is to hide in the shadows and tap a wall to attract the attention of a nearby hunter. When he has examined the area and is moving away, the player can emerge from the shadows behind him, and execute him.
 
The game has three 'levels' of execution, with each level progressively more violent and graphic than the last. Level 1 executions are quick and not very bloody, Level 2 are considerably more gory, and Level 3 are over-the-top blood-soaked murders. The player is entirely in control of which level they use; once the player has locked onto an enemy, the lock-on reticule changes color over time to indicate the level; white (level 1), yellow (level 2), and, finally, red (level 3).  As an example, if using a plastic bag, a level 1 kill involves Cash simply using the bag to suffocate the hunter. A level 2 kill involves Cash placing the bag over the hunter's head and kneeing them repeatedly in the face. A level 3 kill sees Cash strangle the hunter and turn them around to punch them in the face, whilst the hunter struggles to free himself and gasps for air. Eventually, Cash snaps the hunter's neck.
 
Over the course of the game, the player can use a wide variety of weapons, including plastic bags, baseball bats, crowbars and a variety of bladed items. Later in the game, firearms become available (which cannot be used for executions). If the player is running low on health, painkillers are available throughout each scene. The player also has a stamina meter which depletes as he sprints, but automatically replenishes when he stands still.
 
Manhunt also makes use of the PlayStation 2's optional USB Microphone and the Xbox Live microphone feature on the Xbox in their respective versions of the game. When such a device is connected, the player can use the sound of his or her own voice to distract in-game enemies. This in turn adds an extra element to the stealth aspect of the game, as the player must refrain from making noises such as coughing, as these sounds too can attract the attention of any nearby hunters.
 
The game is set in the Grand Theft Auto universe, with Carcer City being mentioned through the series of GTA and apparently being a crime-filled city which is located north of Liberty City. It occurs in the late 90's, as one of the characters was mentioned in Grand Theft Auto III.

The controversy surrounding the game stems primarily from the graphic manner in which the player executes enemies. In 2007, former Rockstar employee Jeff Williams revealed that even the game's staff were somewhat uncomfortable about the level of violence; "there was almost a mutiny at the company over that game." Williams explained that the game "just made us all feel icky. It was all about the violence, and it was realistic violence. We all knew there was no way we could explain away that game. There was no way to rationalize it. We were crossing a line."
 
The violence in the game drew the attention of U.S. Representative Joe Baca, who was the sponsor of a legislation to fine those who sell adult-themed games to players younger than 17. Baca said of Manhunt, "it's telling kids how to kill someone, and it uses vicious, sadistic and cruel methods to kill." The media was also drawn into the debate. For example, The Globe and Mail wrote "Manhunt is a venal disconnect for the genre. There's no challenge, just assembly-line, ritualistic slaughter. It's less a video game and more a weapon of personal destruction. This is about stacking bodies. Perhaps the scariest fact of all: Manhunt is so user-friendly that any sharp 12-year-old could navigate through the entire game in one sitting."

Pak's Thoughts – A psychologically disturbing stealth game, you say? There just aren’t enough nopes in the world… Can’t stand stealth, can’t stand psychological terror. The concept behind it is fairly fascinating, but not even close to my cup of tea. Still, it’s not every game that gets cited as evidence in a murder trial…
Title: Re: LoC #81 - Top 50 Video Games of the Oughts
Post by: Pak-Man on September 10, 2014, 10:41:13 PM
#39 –Left 4 Dead

(24 Points) 1 of 11 Lists - Highest Ranking - #2 – Quantum Vagina
(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/5/5b/Left4Dead_Windows_cover.jpg)
Look on the bright side, if you don't make it out, I'll still be incredibly handsome.
Release Date:  November  17, 2008 (There’s that date again!)
Just the facts/Stuff I wiki'd:
Left 4 Dead (abbreviated as L4D) is a cooperative first-person shooter arcade-style video game. It was developed by Turtle Rock Studios, which was purchased by Valve Corporation during development. The game uses Valve's proprietary Source engine, and is available for Microsoft Windows, Xbox 360 and Mac OS X. Development on the game was completed on November 13, 2008, and two versions were released digitally: A downloadable digital version, released on November 17, 2008, and a digital retail disc version, with a release date determined by region. The digital retail disc version was released in North America and Australia on November 18, 2008; and in Europe and Japan on November 21, 2008.
 
Set during the aftermath of an apocalyptic pandemic, the game pits its four protagonists—dubbed the "Survivors"—against hordes of the infected. There are four game modes: a single-player mode in which allied characters are controlled by AI; a four-player, co-op campaign mode; an eight-player online versus mode; and a four-player survival mode. In all modes, an artificial intelligence (AI), dubbed the "Director", controls level pacing and item placements, in an attempt to create a dynamic experience and increase replay value.
 
Left 4 Dead is a first-person shooter. In campaign mode, the player takes control of one of the survivors; if four human players are not available, then the remaining survivors are AI-controlled bots. They play through the levels fighting off the infected—living humans who have been infected with a rabies-like virus that causes psychosis. The survivors are carriers of the disease, so they do not show signs of any symptoms.
 
The game is focused on cooperation and team play and thus eschews some "realism" conventions usual in most FPS games of the wider genre; colored outlines of teammates are visible through walls to help players stick together and coordinate their movement. If a survivor falls off a ledge, then they may automatically hang onto it and can only be helped up by another survivor. If a survivor's health is depleted, then they become incapacitated and can only be revived by another survivor, at which point they continue playing with a low amount of health that decreases over time. If a survivor has been incapacitated and revived twice without tending to their wounds, then they will experience distorted black-and-white vision, and the next incapacitation will kill the character. If a survivor takes enough damage while incapacitated, or is not eventually helped up by teammates, then the incapacitated character will die. During "Campaign" mode, if a survivor is killed, then they will respawn in a closet or other enclosed space after a period of time (except during key points in the scenario), but must be freed by another survivor to rejoin the team. Otherwise, the player must wait until the next level.[6] However, if all human player survivors are killed or incapacitated, players will have to restart from the last checkpoint. Survivors can share first-aid kits and pain pills and help each other heal. Left 4 Dead has friendly fire (which causes no damage on the easy difficulty mode), increasing the need for caution around other survivors.

Pak's Thoughts – This one looks like fun. I got Tyrant a copy for Christmas many years ago, but somehow it’s never made its way into the Xbox. This one is added to the great big list of games I’ll play when I get time.
Title: Re: LoC #81 - Top 50 Video Games of the Oughts
Post by: Pak-Man on September 10, 2014, 10:42:20 PM
#38–Romancing SaGa: Minstrel Song

(24 Points) 1 of 11 Lists - Highest Ranking - #2 – CJones
(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51RT08GXY5L.jpg)
We might not be as strong as you giants, but we’ve got to fight!
Release Date:  October 11, 2005
Just the facts/Stuff I wiki'd:
Romancing SaGa is a role-playing video game originally developed and published by Square as the fourth game of their SaGa series. Initially made available in January 1992 for the Super Famicom, the game was later ported to the WonderSwan Color handheld system in December 2002, with both releases being exclusive to Japanese players. In April 2005, an enhanced remake of the title for the PlayStation 2 called Romancing SaGa: Minstrel Song was released in April 2005 in Japan, and in English for the first time in North America the following October simply under the title Romancing SaGa. The game was designed by Akitoshi Kawazu who had served as head developer for the previous SaGa titles, with fellow series veteran Kenji Ito providing the game's soundtrack.
 
Set in the fictional world of Mardias, Romancing SaGa allows players to assume the role of one of eight main characters who must journey across the world to prevent the resurrection of an evil god named Saruin who was sealed away a millennium previous. The original Super Famicom version sold over a million copies worldwide and was voted by readers of Japanese Famitsu magazine as the 53rd greatest game of all time in a 2006 poll. Conversely, the PlayStation 2 remake received largely low to average reviews in North America due to the game's high difficulty, steep learning curve, and questionable character design.

Romancing SaGa is a traditional role-playing video game set in a fantasy world where players must navigate their characters through towns, dungeons, and other environments while taking part in the game's story by interacting with non-player characters. At the start of the game, the player is given the option of assuming the role of one of eight main characters, each with their own strengths, weaknesses, and starting points throughout the game's world. In addition, the player must select the profession of the character's parents from a list of eight choices each, which go towards determining their strengths. As a staple of the SaGa series, both gameplay and story are largely open-ended, giving the player the ability to play through scenarios in a number of different orders, with some areas and portions of the narrative only becoming available once they have spoken to specific characters or performed certain tasks. By completing story objectives and meeting new characters, the player is brought closer to the game's end, leading to the final confrontation where they must use all of their acquired skills to succeed.
 
While traveling through dangerous environments, the player's party can do battle with enemy monsters which roam around the screen and will enter combat when touched. Using a turn-based approach to combat, battle scenes are played out by having the player input commands for each individual party member at the start of each round, with the selected actions taking place in accordance with a character's "speed" statistic. A player may choose to attack an enemy, use a special weapon skill, cast a magic spell, defend themselves, or flee from battle entirely. Parties can consist of up to five characters that the player will recruit automatically as part of the story, or after they have completed certain story scenarios. As characters take part in more battle, they will randomly learn new weapon skills by attacking normally, as well as randomly gain increased statistics at the end of every few battles, thereby becoming stronger. All characters may become equipped with up to two different kinds of weapons, as well as become outfitted in protective gear that increases their defense against attacks.

Pak's Thoughts – I swear I’ve played some of the games on this list! While I never picked up Romancing SaGa, I did enjoy its predecessors, the SaGa Frontier games. I loved that it was broken down into several shorter RPGs with a different strategyfor each character. I also spent a long road trip to Kansas in the back seat playing Final Fantasy Legend once upon a time, so there's that!
Title: Re: LoC #81 - Top 50 Video Games of the Oughts
Post by: Pak-Man on September 10, 2014, 10:43:22 PM
#37–The Ur-Quan Masters

(25 Points) 1 of 11 Lists - Highest Ranking - #1 – CJones
(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/c/c3/Star_Control_II_cover.jpg)
It just isn’t a right thing to kill you, human!
Release Date:  2002 sometime…
Just the facts/Stuff I wiki'd:
The Ur-Quan Masters (or UQM) project aims to port Star Control II to modern operating systems including Windows, Linux, Mac OS X, and BSD. The project began in 2002 when the original creators Fred Ford and Paul Reiche III released the source code of the 3DO version as open source under the GPL. Its latest version, 0.7.0, was released on 4 July 2011. The game media is only free to use in non-commercial context as it was released under the Creative Commons BY-NC-SA 2.5 license. It has also added the option of online multiplayer Melee play, something which was not available in the original game. A variety of modifications to the melee have been released by fans, including versions with superpowered ships and numerous planets. As of version 0.4, the long-missing intro and ending movies were finally added, as was an in-game setup menu. The ability to mod the game is one of the project's goals.
 
The project was renamed The Ur-Quan Masters because the trademark Star Control was registered by Accolade in 1997, acquired in 1999 by Atari (then known as Infogrames), along with the rest of Accolade's assets.
 
While development on the UQM codebase continues, a second group of semi-professional musicians called The Precursors have created new musical tracks and remixes of the originals. They are an optional package that can be listened to in-game, replacing the original music, or just played with an audio player. The group's main members are Jouni Airaksinen (alias Mark Vera), Tore Aune Fjellstad (alias VOiD), Espen Gätzschmann (alias TiLT) and Riku Nuottajärvi (an original composer for the 1992 release). The Precursors have released four remix packs, and the project is now considered done.
 
 Pak's Thoughts – This entry is a bit of a stretch. This was CJones’ justification for inclusion:

Quote from: CJones
Yes I know this is kind of cheating, but The Ur-Quan Masters was a remake of one of the best games I've ever played, Star Control 2. It was ported to the 3DO. When that failed, the source code was made open source in 2002. It's been updated several times since. Now better than the original (mostly), and it's FREE! For legal reasons they couldn't use the original title.

Well, it says they added multiplayer, so it’s a remake that added new features. It passes! Next up: a game I’ve actually played!
Title: Re: LoC #81 - Top 50 Video Games of the Oughts
Post by: Pak-Man on September 10, 2014, 10:43:53 PM
#36–Resident Evil: Rebirth

(25 Points) 1 of 11 Lists - Highest Ranking - #1 – Tyrant
(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/a/ab/Resident_Evil_2002_cover.jpg)
That was too close! You were almost a Jill sandwich!
Release Date:  March 22, 2002
Just the facts/Stuff I wiki'd:
Resident Evil is a survival horror video game developed by Capcom Production Studio 4, published by Capcom, and released for the GameCube in 2002. It is a remake of the 1996 game Resident Evil, featuring vastly improved presentation as well as a variety of new gameplay elements, environments and story details, and is also known under the informal titles of Resident Evil: Remake or Resident Evil: Rebirth (abbreviated REmake and REbirth, respectively).
    
The game was released to critical acclaim, in which it was often described as the best title in the Resident Evil series so far as well as one of the most visually impressive video games overall. Since its release it has sold over one million copies. Several publications have also included it on their lists of most scary and best-looking games ever made.
 
The remake features all-new graphics and sound, and also incorporates gameplay elements from the later installments such as the use of body language to indicate the main character's health and the 180-degree turn. In addition, it introduced a new running style that was also used in Resident Evil Zero, and several new areas were added to the game (some of them were originally cut from the 1996 game during its development, such as the graveyard and a path through the woods).
 
Gameplay mechanics are largely the same although most of the puzzles have been changed and the player can equip a defensive weapon that can be used when seized by an enemy. These defensive weapons include a dagger which can be used by both playable characters, whilst they also each have their own defensive weapon exclusive to them. Jill Valentine uses a taser, while Chris Redfield is able to shove stun grenades into the zombies' mouths to detonate them with a pistol shot. These weapons can be set to either automatic or manual use by the player, saving them from taking damage, although they are not unlimited, and they can only be used when grabbed by a monster. The zombies that are defeated but not destroyed (decapitated or burned) mutate later in the game into the fast and deadly Crimson Heads.
Pak's Thoughts – Back in 2002, Tyrant and I were still doing the long-distance relationship thing, and when we got together, we’d always do some gaming in the hotel room. So I have many fond memories of  passing the controller back and forth and making it through REbirth. These are the fires under which a life-long relationship was forged. Remember: The couple that splatters brains together REMAINS together!

That’s all for tonight, folks! Tune in tomorrow as I post the last of the single-list entries!
Title: Re: LoC #81 - Top 50 Video Games of the Oughts
Post by: CJones on September 11, 2014, 12:50:55 PM
Thank you for accepting The Ur-Quan Masters Pak. I never played the original PC game, even though I played SC1. It wasn't until tUQM that I found out just how awesome this game is. I even had the Ur-Quan at #1 on the fictional races/species list. The Ur-Quan are, without a doubt, the best villains in any video game ever. Because when you find out their back story, you realize they are totally justified in their actions. To be clear, this isn't a 4X game. It's very story driven. But at the same time, you can go anywhere at any time. Just don't run out of fuel.

The game, and the Precursors remixed soundtrack, can be found here: http://sc2.sourceforge.net/
Title: Re: LoC #81 - Top 50 Video Games of the Oughts
Post by: Pak-Man on September 11, 2014, 03:56:35 PM
#35–Paper Mario: The Thousand Year Door

(25 Points) 1 of 11 Lists - Highest Ranking - #1 – Pak-Man
(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/e/ea/Ttydbox.jpg)
These guys are old school. They've been around since you were in Super Mario Bros. 
Release Date:  July 22, 2004
Just the facts/Stuff I wiki'd:
Paper Mario: The Thousand-Year Door is a role-playing video game developed by Intelligent Systems and published by Nintendo for the Nintendo GameCube. The Thousand-Year Door is the second game in the Paper Mario series.
 
The Thousand-Year Door borrows many gameplay elements from its predecessor, such as a paper-themed universe and a turn-based battle system with an emphasis on action. For the majority of the game the player controls Mario, although Bowser and Princess Peach are playable at certain points. The plot follows Mario's quest as he tries to retrieve the seven Crystal Stars and rescue Peach from the X-Nauts.

The Thousand-Year Door has a unique visual style. The graphics consist of a mixture of three-dimensional environments and two-dimensional characters who look as if they are made of paper. At different points in the game, Mario is "cursed" with abilities that enable special moves in the overworld, all of which are based on the paper theme. Mario can fold into a boat or a paper airplane by standing on a special activation panel, and roll up into a scroll of paper or become paper-thin. The game's environments also follow this theme; for example, illusory objects that conceal secret items or switches can be blown away by a gust of wind due to the environment's paper-like qualities. In certain parts of the game, the player controls Bowser in multiple side-scrolling levels based on Super Mario Bros. Additionally, the player controls Peach in the X-Naut Fortress at the completion of most game chapters.
 
Battles in The Thousand-Year Door borrow elements from the original Paper Mario and Super Mario RPG: Legend of the Seven Stars. The turn-based system, in which players select an attack, defense, or item from a menu, is augmented by timed button presses that can result in substantial attack or defence bonuses when performed correctly. A similar "action command" was also used in all released Mario role-playing games. In The Thousand-Year Door, each of Mario's party members now have their own heart points (HP) and may receive any attack that Mario can receive. When a partner's heart points are reduced to zero, the partner becomes inactive for the rest of that battle and later battles until recovery. If Mario's Heart Points are reduced to zero, however, the game ends. Flower Points—which are required for special moves—are shared among Mario and his party members. Defeating enemies awards various numbers of Star Points to Mario; for every 100 Star Points, Mario is able to level up. Mario can choose to upgrade his heart points (HP), flower points (FP), or his badge points (BP). The battles take place on a stage in front of an audience; if the player performs well in a battle, the audience can assist Mario by replenishing star power, throwing helpful items on-stage, or inflicting damage on the opponent. Conversely, the audience may throw damage-causing items at the player or leave if the player performs poorly in a battle. For every ten levels, the stage will increase by fifty audience members for a total of 200 after level 30.
 
Outside of battle, the game contains some strong role-playing video game traditions. For example, Mario's strength is determined by multiple statistical fields and status-boosting items that can be used in and outside of combat. The effects of these items range from healing Mario or his partner to damaging the opponent. Mario can also purchase badges from non-player characters or occasionally obtain them from defeated enemies; when equipped, these badges can permanently enhance a particular skill or aspect, or, in some cases, give Mario new moves, including Sleepy Stomp and Quake Hammer. Throughout the game, Mario is permanently assisted by a party member. Each party member has a specialized skill, some of which are required to solve puzzles to advance progression in the game. More party members are gained as the player advances through the game.

Pak's Thoughts – OK. At least one or two of you have to be smacking your heads right about now. How am I the only one to vote for this? Paper Mario is my favorite RPG series, and Thousand Year Door is the crown jewel of that series. The goofy humor, the beautiful visuals, the interactive RPG fights, the compelling story- everything about this game just works.
Title: Re: LoC #81 - Top 50 Video Games of the Oughts
Post by: Pak-Man on September 11, 2014, 03:56:52 PM
#34–Final Fantasy IX

(25 Points) 1 of 11 Lists - Highest Ranking - #1 –Sugar Ray Dodge
(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/5/51/Ffixbox.jpg)
Yeah...I promised Garnet I'd kidnap her. 
Release Date:  July 7, 2000
Just the facts/Stuff I wiki'd:
Final Fantasy IX is a role-playing video game developed and published by Squaresoft (now Square Enix) for the Sony PlayStation video game console. Originally released in 2000, it is the ninth title in the Final Fantasy series and last to debut on the original PlayStation console. In 2010 it was re-released as a PSone Classics title on the PlayStation Network. The game introduced new features to the series like the 'Active Time Event', 'Mognet', and a unique equipment and skill system.
 
Final Fantasy IX's plot centers on a war between nations. Players follow a young thief named Zidane Tribal, who joins with others to defeat Queen Brahne of Alexandria, the one responsible for starting the war. The plot shifts, however, when the characters realise that Brahne is working with an even more threatening person called Kuja.
 
Final Fantasy IX was developed alongside Final Fantasy VIII, but took a different approach by returning to the more traditional style of the early Final Fantasy games. Consequently, Final Fantasy IX was influenced significantly by the original Final Fantasy game, and features allusions to other titles in the series. It was released to critical acclaim and holds the highest Metacritic score of all Final Fantasy installments. Final Fantasy IX was commercially successful, selling 5.30 million units worldwide as of March 31, 2003.

In Final Fantasy IX, the player navigates a character throughout the game world, exploring areas and interacting with non-player characters. Most of the game occurs in towns and dungeons which are referred to as "field screens". To aid exploration on the field screen, Final Fantasy IX introduces the "field icon", an exclamation mark appearing over their lead character's head, signalling an item or sign is nearby. Players speak with moogles to record their progress, restore life energy with a tent and purchase items—a deviation from previous installments, which used a save point to perform these functions. Moogles may request the playable character deliver letters to other Moogles via Mognet, playable characters might also receive letters from non-playable characters.
 
Players journey between field screen locations on the world map, a three dimensional, downsized representation of Final Fantasy IX's world presented from a top-down perspective. Players can freely navigate around the world map screen unless restricted by terrain like bodies of water or mountain ranges. To overcome geographical limitations, players can ride chocobos, sail on a boat or pilot airships. Like previous Final Fantasy installments, travel across the world map screen and hostile field screen locations is interrupted by random enemy encounters.
 
Final Fantasy IX offers a new approach to town exploration with the introduction of Active Time Events (ATE). These allow the player to view events unfolding at different locations, providing character development, special items and prompts for key story-altering decisions. ATE are occasionally used to simultaneously control two teams when the party is divided to solve puzzles and navigate mazes.

Pak's Thoughts – Now it’s MY turn to smack my head. This is one of my favorite Final Fantasy games. I always like my Final Fantasy heavy on the fantasy, and it’s always nice to play one where the fate of the whole world isn’t at stake. I love all four of the main characters. The story has a nice Disney-esque feel to it. It’s just a darn good game. Why hasn’t Squeenix targeted this one for an HD remake yet?
Title: Re: LoC #81 - Top 50 Video Games of the Oughts
Post by: Pak-Man on September 11, 2014, 03:57:08 PM
#33–The Elder Scrolls III: Morrowind

(25 Points) 1 of 11 Lists - Highest Ranking - #1 –Quantum Vagina
(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/5/53/MorrowindCOVER.jpg)
Good God, it smells like Grandpa Goat's garlic factory in here! 
Release Date:  May 1, 2002
Just the facts/Stuff I wiki'd:
The Elder Scrolls III: Morrowind is an open world fantasy action role-playing video game developed by Bethesda Game Studios, and published by Bethesda Softworks and Ubisoft. It is the third installment in The Elder Scrolls series of games, following The Elder Scrolls II: Daggerfall, and preceding The Elder Scrolls IV: Oblivion. It was released in North America in 2002 for Microsoft Windows and the Xbox.
 
The main story takes place on Vvardenfell, an island in the Dunmer province of Morrowind, which lies in the empire of Tamriel and is far from the more civilized lands to the west and south that typified Daggerfall and Arena. The central quests concern the deity Dagoth Ur, housed within the volcanic Red Mountain, who seeks to gain power and break Morrowind free from Imperial reign. Morrowind was designed with an open-ended free-form style of gameplay in mind, with less of an emphasis on the game's main plot than its predecessors. This choice received mixed reviews in the gaming press, though such feelings were tempered by reviewers' appreciation of Morrowind's expansive and detailed game world.

Morrowind begins with the player's character, having been imprisoned, arriving in Morrowind by boat in order to be pardoned. This is a common introductory segment throughout the main installments of the series. A well-received tutorial depicting the prisoner's release moves the player through the process of character creation. The player is successively asked questions by a fellow prisoner, an officer, and a bureaucrat as the player is registered as a free citizen; choosing, in the process, the player character's name, race, gender, class, and birthsign. These affect the player's starting attributes, skills, and abilities. In a throwback to the Ultima series, the player has an opportunity to answer a series of moral questions to determine his class.

Pak's Thoughts – Morrowind taught me something about myself: I love creating characters! I found myself going through character creation, making it through the tutorial, saving, then creating another character. I might have actually spent more time creating Morrowind characters than I did exploring Vvardenfell. Not that the game wasn’t awesome too. It’s almost overwhelming how much there is to do and see. And it’s all punctuated nicely by the wonderful background music and beautiful visuals.
Title: Re: LoC #81 - Top 50 Video Games of the Oughts
Post by: Pak-Man on September 11, 2014, 03:57:24 PM
#32–Dead Rising

(25 Points) 2 of 11 Lists - Highest Ranking - #12 –Compound
(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/c/c8/Deadrising_boxart.jpg)
I mean, all they do is eat, and eat, and eat. Growing in number... just like you red, white, and blue Americans.   
Release Date:  August 8, 2006
Just the facts/Stuff I wiki'd:
Dead Rising is a 2006 open world survival horror video game. It is developed and published by Capcom and produced by Keiji Inafune. It was released on August 8, 2006 exclusively for the Xbox 360 video game console.
 
Dead Rising's story centers on Frank West, a photojournalist who ends up trapped in a shopping mall in the fictional town of Willamette, Colorado, that is infested with zombies. Frank must defend himself from zombie attacks, rescue survivors, contend with crazed psychopaths, and stay alive while still attempting to uncover the truth behind the incident. The player controls Frank as he explores the mall, using any available object as a weapon. The player can complete several main and optional missions to earn Prestige Points (PP) and gain special abilities. The game is designed as a sandbox game and features several endings, depending on the decisions the player makes along the way.
 
The player character is Frank West, a photojournalist who sneaks into the fictional town of Willamette, Colorado, which has been quarantined by the military. The main objective of the game is to investigate the Willamette Parkview Mall and complete "Case Files", missions that advance the storyline and reveal the cause of the zombie outbreak. The player has three days to do this, at which point a helicopter will arrive to retrieve him. Time passes twelve times faster in-game (i.e. one day in-game is two hours in real time); therefore, the game automatically concludes after six hours of gameplay. If a player fails a mission, it does not end the game, but different actions result in different endings at the end of the 72-hour period. In addition to the Case Files, the player is offered the opportunity to rescue other survivors of the zombie outbreak, either from the zombies themselves, or from "psychopaths", boss characters who have either been driven insane by the zombie attacks, or are using the outbreak as cover for their own purposes. Alternately, the player can ignore all missions and play as a sandbox game; wandering though the mall (modeled on stereotypical American shopping malls), trying outfits and food, and killing zombies with a variety of objects.
 
A counter at the bottom right corner of the screen helps the player keep track of how many zombies have been killed. Electronic Gaming Monthly reported that there can be up to 800 zombies on screen at once. During the day, the zombies are sluggish and weak, but at night they become more active, tougher, and more numerous.
 
Dead Rising is notable for the hundreds of weapons that the player can find in the mall and use against the zombies. There are over 250 items that can be used as weapons, ranging from powerful to near-useless. Weapons will break down or run out of ammunition with use, and will break or be discarded (some of which break into usable pieces). Others can be changed by the environment, such as frying pans, which can be heated on a stove to both increase damage and gain access to a special move. Large items, such as benches or cash registers, can be used, but are not stored in the player's inventory and are dropped if they pick up or switch to another item. Many of the more useless weapons exist purely for humorous effect, such as a toy Megabuster, from Capcom's Mega Man, that shoots tennis balls, or a glowing light sword toy. Other comical weapons, such as traffic cones and Servbot novelty masks, can be placed on zombies' heads, causing them to stumble about blindly.

Pak's Thoughts – Leave it to Capcom to add some fun to the Zombie Apocalypse. Improvising weapons to mow down mobs of Zombies is just a good time. I always get a little bit bummed that I’m so bad at completing the rescue missions, but then I find a riding lawnmower and a field of Zombies and everything’s fun again.
Title: Re: LoC #81 - Top 50 Video Games of the Oughts
Post by: Pak-Man on September 11, 2014, 03:57:43 PM
#31–The Sims 3

(25 Points) 3 of 11 Lists - Highest Ranking - #14 –Quantum Vagina
(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/6/6f/Sims3cover.jpg)
Reticulating Splines.
Release Date:  June 2, 2009
Just the facts/Stuff I wiki'd:
The Sims 3 is a 2009 life simulation video game developed by Maxis and published by Electronic Arts. It is the sequel to the best-selling computer game, The Sims 2. It was first released on June 2, 2009 simultaneously for OS X and Microsoft Windows – both versions on the same disc.

The Sims 3 is built upon the same concept as its predecessors. Players control their own Sims' activities and relationships in a manner similar to real life. The gameplay is open-ended and does not have a defined goal. Challenges occur randomly based on aspects of each Sim's lifestyle, such as relationships, skills and job. Career opportunities such as working overtime or completing special tasks can yield a pay raise, cash bonus, or relationship boost. Skill opportunities are requests by neighbors or community members for Sims to solve problems using their acquired skills for cash or relationship rewards.
 
The all new reward system Wishes replaces the Wants And Fears system in its predecessor The Sims 2. Fulfilling a Sim's wish contributes to the Sim's Lifetime Happiness score, allowing players to purchase lifetime rewards for the cost of those Lifetime Happiness points. Moodlets can be inspired by physical events, such as having a good meal or comfort from sitting in a good chair, as well as emotional events like a first kiss or a break-up.
 
The game includes an optional feature called "Story Progression" which allows all Sims in the neighborhood to autonomously continue free will as if the player were controlling them, such as get married, get jobs and promotions, have children, move into their dream house or move out of the neighbourhood while the player isn't playing, etc. Sims live for a set duration of time that is adjustable by the player and advance through several life stages (baby, toddler, child, teen, young adult, adult, and elder). Sims can die of old age or they can die prematurely from causes such as fire, starvation, drowning, electrocution, (as of the World Adventures expansion pack) Mummy's curse, (as of the Ambitions expansion pack) a meteor, (as of the Late Night expansion pack) by thirst (vampires only), (as of the Showtime expansion pack) by failing a trick as a magician (drowning in water/being buried), (as of the Supernatural expansion pack) by failing Haunting Curse (witches only), eating a poisoned jelly bean and transmuting into gold, (as of the Seasons expansion pack) by freezing, (as of the University Life expansion pack) by being crushed by murphy bed/vending machines, (as of the Island Paradise expansion pack) by shark, drowning while scuba diving and dehydratation (mermaids only) and (as of the Into the Future expansion pack) by falling from the sky with jetpack and by time paradox.

Pak's Thoughts – Now here’s a game that fed that desire I mentioned to create characters. You don’t even have to worry about a Sim after you create them. Just move them into a random house and let them live their life. It’s fun letting my Sim wander around a neighborhood full of other Sims that I’ve created. People criticize The Sims series for the numerous expansion packs. They’re absolutely right, and one of these days I’ll stop buying them and show EA a thing or two…

That’s all for today. There will be more tomorrow!
Title: Re: LoC #81 - Top 50 Video Games of the Oughts
Post by: CJones on September 11, 2014, 07:23:00 PM
I was a huge fan of SaGa Frontier (not so much the second one). I wanted to include it, but it was released in the late 90's. Romancing SaGa isn't as good, but it's the best recent SaGa game. I even have the Japanese guide for SF, which details all the stuff they intended to do, but couldn't due to time and/or money, including an entire eighth quest with Fuse and the other IRPO characters.
Title: Re: LoC #81 - Top 50 Video Games of the Oughts
Post by: Relaxing Dragon on September 11, 2014, 07:43:25 PM
#40 –Manhunt

(24 Points) 1 of 11 Lists - Highest Ranking - #2 – Relaxing Dragon

By the technicality that is a small voting pool, my controversial choice breaks through. And yeah, this is not a game for everyone. It's a brutal, mean, remarkably violent little game. As only a game about starring in a snuff film could be. But the thing is, it also had an incredible amount of TLC put into all that brutality, meanness, and violence. The world of Carcer City is very well crafted, both graphically and in terms of overall history and structure. The character designs are remarkably varied, and the amount of dialogue (like, just random, in-game lines) is rather staggering. The entire concept of the execution system brings a heck of a lot of variety to the proceedings. And that tone... it's the sort of twisted tone you just don't see very often in gaming, ever. It walks that line of being insanely dark without being over-the-top, and manages to stay a grisly experience throughout. So, not everyone's cup of tea, but for the semi-twisted person like me... well, let's just say I cosplayed as one of the hunters at Comic Con one year.

As a side anecdote to all of the above, a Manhunt fan forum was my first real forray onto the internet back in 2007. As in, first time joining a forum, actually making online friends, and developing into the persona that I am today. I've come a heck of a long way, sure, but one can never forget your roots.

#36–Resident Evil: Rebirth

(25 Points) 1 of 11 Lists - Highest Ranking - #1 – Tyrant

This one was almost on my list, and is a high runner-up. It was both my first experience with the Resident Evil series, and my first genuine horror game ever. And wow did it ever manage to scare the piss out of me as a youngin'. Things weren't so bad by the time I got to the Residence, but throughout those first few hours in the Mansion... my palms were sweaty pretty much the whole time, even when I was playing it in broad daylight surrounded by friends. Alone at night in my room... that was something else. How 12-year-old me got ahold of this, that's another matter (thank goodness for inattentive Gamestop clerks, I suppose).

#35–Paper Mario: The Thousand Year Door

(25 Points) 1 of 11 Lists - Highest Ranking - #1 – Pak-Man

Pak's Thoughts – OK. At least one or two of you have to be smacking your heads right about now. How am I the only one to vote for this? Paper Mario is my favorite RPG series, and Thousand Year Door is the crown jewel of that series. The goofy humor, the beautiful visuals, the interactive RPG fights, the compelling story- everything about this game just works.

Yeah, I'm smacking my head right now. This is the one I forgot, and it would've been in my Top 5 for sure, because it's easily one of my favorite RPGs ever. Just the perfect blend of play mechanics, story, writing, humor, graphics (which integrate into the world so well)... you're right, everything about it works. In fact, I just started replaying it the other night, and it's like meeting an old friend again. Such a fantastic game.
Title: Re: LoC #81 - Top 50 Video Games of the Oughts
Post by: Sugar Ray Dodge on September 12, 2014, 10:11:12 PM
#43 –WWF: No Mercy

(24 Points) 1 of 11 Lists - Highest Ranking - #2 – Sugar Ray Dodge
(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/9/90/NoMercyGameBox.jpg)
Release Date:  November 17, 2000
Just the facts/Stuff I wiki'd:
WWF No Mercy is a professional wrestling video game released in 2000 on the Nintendo 64 console and published by THQ. It is named after the World Wrestling Federation annual pay-per-view event of the same name. No Mercy is the follow-up to 1999's WWF WrestleMania 2000, and the last WWF game released for the Nintendo 64. No Mercy was well received by players and critics alike.

Pak's Thoughts – I’m not much of a wrestling fan, which means I don’t play a lot of wrestling games, but I always enjoy them when I try one out. I’ve never tried this one, so maybe Sugar Ray Dodge can fill in for nostalgic memories. :^)

It really is hard to explain what No Mercy was like to non-Wrestling Game fans. This was truly a game of skill. No button mashing, no cinematics, none of that. You had to know your wrestler's moves. You had to practice. You had to know your opponent. And the controls and gameplay were fast and sharp as hell. The CAW feature was also out of this world. You could probably build the entire current WWE roster in it. It's also very closely associated with a very magical time in WWF history. The Rock and Triple H were burning up the ring at every event, along with Kurt Angle, Chris Jericho, Chris Benoit, Taker, Eddie Guerrero, the Hardys, Edge and Christian, the Dudleys, Mick Foley's commissionership, to say NOTHING of probably the best storyline in the history of the business: The return of Stone Cold Steve Austin, which was happening as the game came out and it's culmination at WrestleMania 17, an event that brought a close to the Attitude Era. And we were playing this game through all of that. If it had been a lesser game, it would have been forgotten, but it wasn't, and the fact that it was part of that whole experience makes it extremely special.
Title: Re: LoC #81 - Top 50 Video Games of the Oughts
Post by: PsychoGoatee on September 12, 2014, 10:57:46 PM
Diggin' the game list action! I did play WoW for a while, up to level 50 and the content before the expansions, had fun. Glad to see Double Dash made it, I got the Gamecube that came with Double Dash, good times.

Title: Re: LoC #81 - Top 50 Video Games of the Oughts
Post by: Pak-Man on September 13, 2014, 12:52:46 AM
#30–Lego Star Wars: The Complete Saga

(25 Points) 3 of 11 Lists - Highest Ranking - #6 –Sugar Ray Dodge (Voted for the Prequel Trilogy. Merged with this entry)
(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/5/56/Lego_Star_Wars-The_Complete_Saga.jpg)
Roger, Roger.
Release Date:  March 29, 2005 (Prequel Trilogy) September 11, 2006 (Original Trilogy) November 6, 2007 (Complete Saga)
Just the facts/Stuff I wiki'd:
Lego Star Wars: The Complete Saga is a video game based on the Star Wars-themed toy line by the Lego Group. It is a combination of the game Lego Star Wars: The Video Game and its sequel, Lego Star Wars II: The Original Trilogy, which includes all episodes, one through six. The game was announced by LucasArts on May 25, 2007 at Celebration IV and was released for the Xbox 360, PlayStation 3, Wii, and Nintendo DS on November 6, 2007 in North America. The compilation title was released for the PC on October 13, 2009 in the US.

The aim of the game is to successfully make it through the entire story and collect the gold pieces while progressing through the game. In the Wii, PlayStation 3 and Xbox 360 versions there are 160 to collect; 120 of these are for the main levels. There are three for each of the levels. One is for completing the level in story mode, the second is for collecting a set amount of studs/coins to achieve a "True Jedi" status and the third is by collecting the 10 LEGO canisters, called "minikits," which are hidden around the level. There are 20 gold bricks for completing the Bounty Hunter missions which involve finding key members of the Republic and Rebellion for Jabba the Hutt's capture and subsequent ransom. There are 6 gold bricks for completing the bonus missions and 14 to buy at the Cantina. There are 36 story levels, 20 bounty hunter missions, and six bonus levels (two Lego Cities, two story levels, and the original pod race and gunship levels). Most of the story levels are the same as those found in the original games.[11] A level involving the pursuit of bounty hunter Zam Wesell has been added (this was a deleted level from LEGO Star Wars: The Video Game), while another level that was cut from the first game (Anakin's starship battle from Episode I) is included as a bonus level. This level utilizes vehicle free-roam from the second game. The game takes place from "the Trade Federation's negotiations" above Naboo in Star Wars Episode I: The Phantom Menace to the space battle above Endor in Episode VI: Return of the Jedi. The "Gunship Cavalry" and "Mos Espa Podrace" levels have been redesigned although the original versions are still in the game as bonus levels. However, "Battle over Coruscant" remains the same except that players can change vehicles in free-play. A brand new 2-player Battle Arena mode has been added, called "arcade mode", new vehicle bonus missions, the red power bricks from Lego Star Wars II, and 10 additional bounty hunter missions add new challenges to the Prequel Trilogy portions originally seen in Lego Star Wars: The Video Game. The Episodes I-II-III levels have been updated so that characters can build and ride vehicles, wear helmets and gain access to bounty hunter and stormtrooper areas, and those characters now have the ability to dodge blaster fire and have their own special melee attack (for example, Chewbacca rips off arms). New Force moves are included (force lightning and force choke). New characters have also been added, bringing the total up to 160. Indiana Jones is an unlockable playable character (to foreshadow Lego Indiana Jones: The Original Adventures).[12] One error that occurred is that Luke is no longer shown screaming in the cutscene where Ben Kenobi is killed.

Pak's Thoughts – This should have been a disaster. They took the Star Wars brand (Which was batting a million at the time for sloppy cash-grab games) and made it into an obvious commercial for Legos . Darned if the end result isn’t pure joy, though. What is it about the lego brand that just disarms every cynical thought you have about the licensing they do. This one spawned an ocean of other Lego games and while they all have their own takes on the series, they never stray too far from the original.
Title: Re: LoC #81 - Top 50 Video Games of the Oughts
Post by: Pak-Man on September 13, 2014, 12:53:09 AM
#29–Borderlands

(27 Points) 2 of 11 Lists - Highest Ranking - #8-Quantum Vagina
(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/0/01/Borderlandscover.jpg)
You’re still alive!?
Release Date:  October 20, 2009
Just the facts/Stuff I wiki'd:
Borderlands is an action role-playing first-person shooter video game that was developed by Gearbox Software for PlayStation 3, Xbox 360, Microsoft Windows and Mac OS X. It is the first game in the Borderlands series.
 
Borderlands includes character-building elements found in role-playing games, leading Gearbox to call the game a "role-playing shooter". At the start of the game, players select one of four characters, each with a unique special skill and with proficiencies with certain weapons. The four characters are: Roland the Soldier, Mordecai the Hunter, Lilith the Siren, and Brick, the Berserker. From then on, players take on missions assigned through non-player characters or from bounty boards, each typically rewarding the player with experience points, money, and sometimes a reward item. Players earn experience by killing both human and non-human foes and completing in-game challenges (such as getting a certain number of kills using a specific type of weapon). As they gain levels from experience growth, players can then allocate skill points into a skill tree that features three distinct specializations of the base character; for example, Mordecai can become specialized in sniping, gunslinging with revolvers, or using his pet Bloodwing to assist in kills and health boosting. Players can distribute points among any of the specializations, and can also spend a small amount of in-game money to redistribute their skill points.
 
Borderlands is set on the planet of Pandora. Lured by its apparent vast deposits of minerals, several colonization ships sponsored by the Dahl Corporation (one of several diversified mega-corporations that appear to control and govern entire planets) journey to the planet and build settlements there. The mining operations are cost-effectively manned by large amounts of convict labor brought to the planet by Dahl.
 
Prior to the events of the game, one of the other mega-corporations, the Atlas Corporation, found an ancient vault on nearby planet Prometheus, filled with advanced alien weapons technology that allowed them to rapidly overtake their competitors. The presence of similar alien ruins scattered across Pandora spurred Atlas to settle the planet in hopes of finding more alien technology. However Atlas failed to realize that Pandora was in its winter cycle, and the arrival of spring unleashes hordes of dangerous alien wildlife coming out of hibernation. Unable to find any alien technology, Atlas abandoned the planet. The Dahl Corporation then settled on Pandora, starting massive industrial mining operations while undertaking their own search for a vault, headed by Patricia Tannis, a respected xeno-archeologist. Despite all of her colleagues being killed by the planet's wildlife, and being driven partially insane herself, Tannis managed to find proof of a vault on Pandora. News of her discovery reached Atlas, who sent their private military force, the Crimson Lance, to capture Tannis and get the vault's location from her.
 
Faced with an invasion, those who are rich and important enough leave the planet, with Dahl abandoning the rest of the population to scavenge for their living in isolated settlements in the barren wastelands and industrial trash heaps across the planet. To make matters worse, the Dahl Corporation simply opened the gates of the prison labor camps during their departure, and gangs of bandits terrorize the populace. Despite Dahl's failure to find it, "The Vault" lives on in legends, attracting mercenary "Vault Hunters" to the planet.

Pak's Thoughts – I haven’t played much Borderlands. I just got it a couple months ago as part of a Humble Bundle. I like what I’ve played, and I can see the charm. The setting is very immersive and there’s nothing  more fun than corpse looting. The upcoming Telltale adventure game will probably motivate me to put some time into these games, because Telltale controls my life.
Title: Re: LoC #81 - Top 50 Video Games of the Oughts
Post by: Pak-Man on September 13, 2014, 12:53:45 AM
#28–Kingdom Hearts

(27 Points) 4 of 11 Lists - Highest Ranking - #16 - ColeStratton
(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/8/85/Kingdom_Hearts.jpg)
I've been having these weird thoughts lately.... Like, is any of this for real... or not?
Release Date:  March 28. 2002
Just the facts/Stuff I wiki'd:
Kingdom Hearts is an action role-playing game developed and published by Square (now Square Enix) in 2002 for the PlayStation 2 video game console. It's the first game in the Kingdom Hearts series, and is the result of a collaboration between Squaresoft and The Walt Disney Company. The game combines characters and settings from Disney animated features with those from Square's Final Fantasy series. The story follows a young boy, Sora, as he is thrown into an epic battle against the forces of darkness. He is joined by Donald Duck, Goofy, and other classic Disney characters who help him on his quest.
 
The game was a departure from Square's standard role-playing games, introducing a substantial action-adventure element to the gameplay. Kingdom Hearts has an all-star voice cast and includes many of the Disney characters' official voice actors. It was longtime Square character designer Tetsuya Nomura's first time in a directorial position.
 
Kingdom Hearts was praised for its unusual combination of action and role-playing, as well as its unexpectedly harmonious mix of Square and Disney elements.

Kingdom Hearts is influenced by its parent franchise, Final Fantasy,] and carries gameplay elements over into its own action-based, hack and slash system. The main battle party consists of three characters: Sora, Goofy, and Donald Duck. Sora is directly controlled by the player from a third person camera angle. All other party members are computer-controlled, though the player can customize their behavior to an extent through the pause menu. Donald and Goofy comprise the party in most areas but nearly every level features a character who may replace them. For instance, Jack Skellington can join the player's party in Halloween Town, but cannot accompany the player elsewhere. In some worlds, the party changes its appearance, has abilities unique to that world, or both; the party can fly in Neverland, acquire aquatic forms in Atlantica, which enable them to survive underwater, and gain Halloween costumes in Halloween Town to blend in with the locals.

The initial idea for Kingdom Hearts began with a discussion between Shinji Hashimoto and Hironobu Sakaguchi about Super Mario 64. They were planning to make a game with freedom of movement in three dimensions like Super Mario 64 but lamented that only characters as popular as Disney's could rival a Mario game. Tetsuya Nomura, overhearing their conversation, volunteered to lead the project and the two producers agreed to let him direct. A chance meeting between Hashimoto and a Disney executive in an elevator—Square and Disney had previously worked in the same building in Japan—allowed Hashimoto to pitch the idea directly to Disney. Nomura struck down a number of proposals from Disney in order to pursue his own concept featuring an original character not based on a Disney property. The production team consisted of over one hundred members from both Square and Disney Interactive. The game began development in February 2000 and originally focused more on the gameplay with a simple story to appeal to Disney's target age range. After executive producer Hironobu Sakaguchi told director Tetsuya Nomura the game would be a failure if it did not aim for the same level as the Final Fantasy series, Nomura began to develop the story further. When choosing the Disney worlds to include in the game, Nomura and his team tried to pick worlds that had distinctively different looks. They also tried to take into account worlds with Disney characters that would be interesting. Thanks to support from Disney's then-president and current chairman and chief executive Bob Iger, the team had few restrictions on which worlds they could use from the Disney franchises. However, they tried to remain within each character's boundaries set by their respective Disney films. In June 2013, Nomura stated the name of the game came from him thinking about Disney Theme Parks, especially Animal Kingdom. However, Nomura could not get the IP with just "Kingdom", so the development team began to think about "heart" as a core part of the story, so they decided to combine the two to form "Kingdom Hearts".

Pak's Thoughts – Here’s another game that was just crazy enough to work. I find the action-RPG elements to be a little bit tedious, but I love the setting and the whole concept. I haven’t picked one up since the original, but if I understand correctly, I can pick up the HD remakes and be completely caught up.
Title: Re: LoC #81 - Top 50 Video Games of the Oughts
Post by: Pak-Man on September 13, 2014, 12:54:16 AM
#27–Batman: Arkham Asylum

(28 Points) 2 of 11 Lists - Highest Ranking - #11 – Johnny Unusual
(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/4/42/Batman_Arkham_Asylum_Videogame_Cover.jpg)
Welcome to the madhouse, Batman! I set a trap and you sprang it gloriously! Now let's get this party started.
Release Date:  August 25, 2009
Just the facts/Stuff I wiki'd:
Batman: Arkham Asylum is a 2009 action-adventure video game based on the DC Comics superhero, Batman. It was developed by Rocksteady Studios and published by Eidos Interactive in conjunction with Warner Bros. Interactive Entertainment for the PlayStation 3 and Xbox 360 video game consoles, and Microsoft Windows. It was released worldwide for consoles, beginning in North America on August 25, 2009, with a Microsoft Windows version following on September 15.
 
Written by veteran Batman writer Paul Dini, Arkham Asylum is based on the long-running comic book mythos. In the game's main storyline, Batman's archenemy, the Joker, instigates an elaborate plot to seize control of Arkham Asylum and trap Batman inside with many of his incarcerated foes. With Joker threatening to detonate hidden bombs around fictional Gotham City, Batman is forced to fight his way through the asylum's inmates and put an end to the Joker's plans. Most of the game's leading characters are voiced by actors who have appeared in other media based on the DC Animated Universe; Kevin Conroy, Mark Hamill, and Arleen Sorkin reprised their roles as Batman, the Joker, and his sidekick Harley Quinn respectively. The game is presented from the third-person perspective with a primary focus on Batman's combat and stealth abilities, detective skills, and gadgets that can be used in combat and exploration.

 Batman: Arkham Asylum is an action-adventure game viewed from the third-person perspective. The playable character is visible on the screen and the camera can be freely rotated around him. The player controls Batman as he traverses Arkham Asylum, a secure facility for the criminally insane located off the coast of Gotham City. The opening areas of the game are linear, serving as a tutorial for the moves and approaches available to the player. Once the player emerges onto the island he can freely explore the game world, although some areas remain inaccessible until certain milestones in the main story. Batman can run, jump, climb, crouch, glide from heights using his cape, and use his grapple gun to climb low structures or escape to higher ledges.

The player can use "Detective Vision"—a visual mode which provides contextual information, tinting the game world blue and highlighting interactive objects like destructible walls and removable grates, the number of enemies in an area and their status—such as their awareness of Batman's presence—and shows civilians and corpses. The mode is also used to follow footprints, investigate odors, and solve puzzles.

Pak's Thoughts – Batman has had better luck than most superheroes when it comes to video games, but none of the games ever made you feel like Batman himself until this one came along. You’re sneaking along scaffolding, taking out bad guys before they even know you’re there, and solving mysteries left and right. It set a new standard for licensed games.
Title: Re: LoC #81 - Top 50 Video Games of the Oughts
Post by: Pak-Man on September 13, 2014, 12:55:18 AM
#26–Super Mario Sunshine

(28 Points) 2 of 11 Lists - Highest Ranking - #10 –lassieface
(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/7/78/Super_mario_sunshine.jpg)
Leave my mama alone, you bad man! I won't let you take Mama Peach away! 
Release Date:  July 19, 2002
Just the facts/Stuff I wiki'd:
Super Mario Sunshine is a platform video game developed by Nintendo Entertainment Analysis and Development and published by Nintendo for the GameCube. It was released in Japan in July 2002, in North America in August 2002, and in Europe and Australia in October 2002. It is the second 3D Mario platformer, following Super Mario 64 in 1996.
 
The game takes place on the tropical Isle Delfino, where Mario, Toadsworth, Princess Peach, and five Toads are taking a vacation. A villain resembling Mario, known as Shadow Mario, vandalizes the entire island with graffiti and Mario gets blamed for the mess. Later on, Mario is ordered to clean up Isle Delfino, while saving Princess Peach from Shadow Mario. Mario cleans up the island with a device called FLUDD (Flash Liquidizer Ultra Dousing Device).
 
Super Mario Sunshine shares many similar gameplay elements with its predecessor, Super Mario 64, whilst introducing various new gameplay features. Players control Mario as he tries to obtain 120 Shine Sprites in order to bring light back to Isle Defino and prove his innocence after an imposter steals the Shine Sprites and covers the island in toxic slime. Players start off in the hub world of Isle Delfino and access various worlds via portals which become available as the game progresses. Similar to collecting Stars in Super Mario 64, players obtain Shine Sprites by clearing various objectives given to Mario upon entering each stage, with more objectives unlocked in each level after clearing an existing one. There are also various hidden areas and challenges across Isle Delfino where more Shine Sprites can be obtained. Throughout the game, players may also find Blue Coins, which can be exchanged for more Shine Sprites.
 
In this game, Mario is joined by a robotic backpack named FLUDD (Flash Liquidizing Ultra Dousing Device), which uses the power of water to clean away slime and help Mario reach new places. Mario starts with two default nozzles for FLUDD, Spray and Hover, which he can quickly switch between. The Spray nozzle lets Mario squirt a stream of water which he can use to clean slime, attack enemies, and activate certain mechanisms. The Hover nozzle lets Mario hover in the air for a short period of time, allowing him to cross large gaps while simultaneously spraying things directly below him. As the game progresses, Mario unlocks two additional nozzles for FLUDD which can substituted with the Hover nozzle; the Rocket nozzle, which shoots Mario high up into the air; and the Turbo nozzle, which moves Mario at high speeds, allowing him to run across water and break into certain areas. Each of FLUDD's nozzles use water from its reserves, which can be refilled via water sources such as rivers or fountains. There are also some areas where FLUDD is taken away from Mario, forcing him to rely on his natural platforming abilities. At certain points in the game, Mario may come across an egg which hatches into a Yoshi after being brought a fruit it asks for. Yoshi can be ridden upon and can attack by spitting juice, which can clear certain obstacles that water cannot. Yoshi can also use its tongue to eat enemies or other pieces of fruit which change its color, depending on the type of fruit. Yoshi will disappear if it runs out of juice, which can be replenished by eating more fruit, or falls into deep water.

Pak's Thoughts – If I could vacation inside of a video game, I’d want to kick back on Isle Delfino. There’s something about the wonderful soundtrack in this game that makes everything feel just a little bit more laid back. Mario’s got evil to thwart, sure, but he’s on vacation, too. Kick back, take in the sights, and enjoy the ride.

So does anyone else find it odd that
Spoiler (click to show/hide)

That’s it for now. I’ll be taking the weekend off and will post the top 25 next week. Be there!
Title: Re: LoC #81 - Top 50 Video Games of the Oughts
Post by: Johnny Unusual on September 13, 2014, 07:09:16 AM
Borderlands started fun... then just kept going.  And going.  And it all felt the same, so me and my friend just gave up on it.
Title: Re: LoC #81 - Top 50 Video Games of the Oughts
Post by: Quantum Vagina on September 13, 2014, 08:39:55 AM
Borderlands started fun... then just kept going.  And going.  And it all felt the same, so me and my friend just gave up on it.

As much as I love Borderlands, I can see how some people wouldn't. Its a very interesting game, but if everything in it doesn't suit you, it's just not gonna be for you.there's hundreds of hour of gameplay if you do, though. BL2 has a stronger story and is more interesting to play, but it couldn't be on my list.
Title: Re: LoC #81 - Top 50 Video Games of the Oughts
Post by: CJones on September 14, 2014, 01:10:26 PM
I can't believe I forgot to vote for Arkham Asylum. Though I liked Arkham City better, it was released too recently. Both games kick ass.

Also, I'm coming to regret not buying a Gamecube. I have a PS1 and a PS2, a Saturn and a Dreamcast, but I pretty much ditched Nintendo after the SNES. As a result I've missed out on every Zelda, Metroid and Mario game since the SNES era.
Title: Re: LoC #81 - Top 50 Video Games of the Oughts
Post by: Relaxing Dragon on September 14, 2014, 11:56:38 PM
I can't believe I forgot to vote for Arkham Asylum. Though I liked Arkham City better, it was released too recently. Both games kick ass.

Also, I'm coming to regret not buying a Gamecube. I have a PS1 and a PS2, a Saturn and a Dreamcast, but I pretty much ditched Nintendo after the SNES. As a result I've missed out on every Zelda, Metroid and Mario game since the SNES era.

Arkham Asylum is a game that I kind of keep forgetting is as amazing as it is. Seriously, licensed games have no business being that good, to the point that it's just one of the best stealth games of the decade. I haven't gotten around to Arkham City yet, but if it's even half as good it'll be an achievement.

And the Gamecube is a wonderful little system. It had a lower volume of really good games, as do most Nintendo products (such as it is when you make things so hard for so many third party developers), but the ones that are good tend to be some of the best ever. Still great from a hardware aspect as well, seeing as my system is 12+ years old and still runs like a dream.
Title: Re: LoC #81 - Top 50 Video Games of the Oughts
Post by: lassieface on September 15, 2014, 04:33:12 PM
I can't believe I forgot to vote for Arkham Asylum. Though I liked Arkham City better, it was released too recently. Both games kick ass.

I guess I'm kind of weird. I played Arkham Asylum for several hours before getting board. I just couldn't get into it.
Title: Re: LoC #81 - Top 50 Video Games of the Oughts
Post by: CJones on September 15, 2014, 05:12:52 PM
I can't believe I forgot to vote for Arkham Asylum. Though I liked Arkham City better, it was released too recently. Both games kick ass.

I guess I'm kind of weird. I played Arkham Asylum for several hours before getting board. I just couldn't get into it.

You should at least try Arkham City. It's much more open world. And the fight against
Spoiler (click to show/hide)
. Absolutely brilliant.
Title: Re: LoC #81 - Top 50 Video Games of the Oughts
Post by: Johnny Unusual on September 15, 2014, 05:44:58 PM
I can't believe I forgot to vote for Arkham Asylum. Though I liked Arkham City better, it was released too recently. Both games kick ass.

I guess I'm kind of weird. I played Arkham Asylum for several hours before getting board. I just couldn't get into it.

That was my complaint about the Silver Surfer game.
Title: Re: LoC #81 - Top 50 Video Games of the Oughts
Post by: Quantum Vagina on September 15, 2014, 08:35:03 PM
I can't believe I forgot to vote for Arkham Asylum. Though I liked Arkham City better, it was released too recently. Both games kick ass.

I guess I'm kind of weird. I played Arkham Asylum for several hours before getting board. I just couldn't get into it.

You should at least try Arkham City. It's much more open world. And the fight against
Spoiler (click to show/hide)
. Absolutely brilliant.

That fight pissed me off more than anything. It was awesome but there were only like 3 ways to hit the guy and you had to use 4.
Title: Re: LoC #81 - Top 50 Video Games of the Oughts
Post by: Pak-Man on September 15, 2014, 10:41:31 PM
#25–Soulcalibur II

(28 Points) 3 of 11 Lists - Highest Ranking - #12 –Quantum Vagina
(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/3/37/Soulcalibur_II_flyer.png)
Transcending history, and the world, a tale of souls and swords, eternally retold.
Release Date:  July 5, 2002
Just the facts/Stuff I wiki'd:
Soulcalibur II is a 2002 video game developed by Project Soul and published by Namco and the third installment in the Soul series of weapon-based fighting games. It was originally released for the arcades, before being ported to the GameCube, PlayStation 2, and Xbox in 2003. The game's plot revolves around an assortment of characters, each with the goal of either destroying Soul Edge or obtaining it to achieve personal goals. Compared to Soulcalibur, Soulcalibur II had improvements in graphics and the game system and introduced several new and guest characters.
 
Key game system improvements include an easier "step" and "avoid" systems, arena walls (rather than ring-out ability on all sides) and wall-specific moves, a three-step Soul Charge system, a clash system that is used when two attacks would hit each other resulting in a white flash, Guard Break attacks which put a blocking player into a post guard-impact state, just frame moves awarding additional hits to players who could time their command inputs well, and a revised Guard Impact system that removed height-based Impact moves and instead used a more unified system (high and mid attacks are countered using Repels, mid and low attacks are countered using Parries).

Four new playable characters were introduced in Soulcalibur II: Cassandra (fighting styles derived from Sophitia), Raphael (unique fighting style), Talim (unique fighting style), and Yun-seong (fighting style derived from Hwang).
 
A new unlockable character Charade, like his predecessors Edge Master and Inferno, switches his style to match existing characters' move lists with each individual round of fighting. The home versions of the game feature Necrid, a new character created by Todd McFarlane, and one of three platform-exclusive characters: Heihachi Mishima from Tekken on the PlayStation 2, Link from The Legend of Zelda on the GameCube and Spawn from the comic book series by McFarlane on the Xbox. The HD version includes both Heihachi and Spawn.
 
Fully returning as playable characters are Astaroth, Cervantes, Ivy, Kilik, Maxi, Mitsurugi, Nightmare, Seung Mina, Sophitia, Taki, Voldo, Xianghua, and Yoshimitsu. Inferno is in the game, but he is not a playable character. Nightmare's third costume is Siegfried (though he is still referred to as Nightmare), while Assassin and Berserker play extremely similar to Hwang and Rock, who did not return from Soulcalibur. Lizardman returns, but is only playable in VS Mode and certain portions of Weapon Master.

Pak's Thoughts – How cool was it to play as Link in a Soulcalibur game? I’m sure Heihachi and Spawn were a blast, too, but I bought the GameCube version and never looked back. Talim is my jam, though. Her two-handed whatever-they-are- sword-glove-thingies- are awesome, and I can dominate my opponents with her.
Title: Re: LoC #81 - Top 50 Video Games of the Oughts
Post by: Pak-Man on September 15, 2014, 10:42:40 PM
#24–Deus Ex

(29 Points) 2 of 11 Lists - Highest Ranking - #9 - CJones
(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/4/42/Dxcover.jpg)
When due process fails us, we really do live in a world of terror.
Release Date:  June 26, 2000
Just the facts/Stuff I wiki'd:
Deus Ex is a cyberpunk-themed action-role playing video game—combining first-person shooter, stealth and role-playing elements—developed by Ion Storm and published by Eidos Interactive in 2000. First published for personal computers running Windows, Deus Ex was later ported to Macintosh systems, as well as the PlayStation 2 game console. Set in a dystopian world during the year 2052, the central plot follows rookie United Nations Anti-Terrorist Coalition agent JC Denton, as he sets out to combat terrorist forces, which have become increasingly prevalent in a world slipping ever further into chaos. As the plot unfolds, Denton becomes entangled in a deep and ancient conspiracy, encountering organizations such as Majestic 12, the Illuminati, and the Hong Kong Triads through his journey.
 
Deus Ex incorporates elements from four video game genres: role-playing, first-person shooter, adventure, and "immersive simulation", the last of which being a game where "nothing reminds you that you're just playing a game". For example, the game uses a first-person camera during gameplay and includes exploration and character interaction as primary features.

Gameplay in Deus Ex emphasizes player choice. Objectives can be completed in numerous ways, including stealth, sniping, heavy frontal assault, dialogue, or engineering and computer hacking. This level of freedom requires that levels, characters, and puzzles be designed with significant redundancy, as a single play-through of the game will miss large sections of dialogue, areas, and other content. In some missions the player is encouraged to avoid using deadly force, and certain aspects of the story may change depending on how violent or non-violent the player chooses to be. The game is also unusual in that two of its boss villains can be killed off early in the game, or left alive to be defeated later, and this too affects how other characters interact with the player.

The player assumes the role of JC Denton, a nanotech-augmented operative of the United Nations Anti-Terrorist Coalition (UNATCO). This nanotechnology is a central gameplay mechanism, and allows players to perform superhuman feats.

Pak's Thoughts – I like Deus Ex in theory, but I’ve never been able to get too far past the intro. The idea of mixing some RPG peanut butter into shooter chocolate is promising, and the conspiracy theory thing is always fun, but I’m not very good at playing it. Maybe I just haven’t quite figured out the right play-style.
Title: Re: LoC #81 - Top 50 Video Games of the Oughts
Post by: Pak-Man on September 15, 2014, 10:42:58 PM
#23–New Super Mario Bros. Wii

(31 Points) 2 of 11 Lists - Highest Ranking - #8 – ColeStratton
(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/8/8f/NewSuperMarioBrosWiiBoxart.png)
It’s Mario Time!
Release Date:  November 11, 2009
Just the facts/Stuff I wiki'd:
New Super Mario Bros. Wii is a 2009 side-scrolling platform video game published and developed by Nintendo for the Wii video game console. The game was released on November 11, 2009, in Australia, November 15, 2009, in North America, November 20, 2009, in Europe and December 3, 2009, in Japan. It is the first game in the Mario main series since Mario Bros. to feature simultaneous multiplayer gameplay, and the first title to include Nintendo's new "Super Guide" feature. To highlight the uniqueness of the title, Nintendo chose to use a red keep case instead of the traditional white. The game is also the first Mario sidescroller to have up to four player multiplayer.
 
The game’s plot is similar to those of other side-scrolling Mario games. New Super Mario Bros. Wii follows Mario as he fights his way through Bowser's henchmen to rescue Princess Peach. Mario has access to several power-ups that help him complete his quest, including the Ice Flower, the Fire Flower, and the Starman, each giving him unique abilities. While traveling through up to nine worlds with a total of 80 levels, Mario must defeat Bowser's children (the Koopalings and Bowser Jr.), Kamek, and Bowser himself before finally saving Princess Peach.
 
While New Super Mario Bros. Wii is a 2D platformer, some of the characters and objects are 3D polygonal renderings on 2D backgrounds, resulting in a 2.5D effect (also seen in New Super Mario Bros.) that visually simulates 3D computer graphics. Players can play as either Mario, his brother Luigi, or two Toad characters: one blue and one yellow (with the first player always as Mario). Controls are similar to those of New Super Mario Bros., albeit with the added abilities of spinning in mid-air by shaking the Wii Remote; and picking up, carrying, and throwing other players. In multiplayer mode, there can be up to four players simultaneously. If players lose a life but have at least one life in reserve, they will re-emerge encased inside a bubble, and can resume play once another player frees them by touching the bubble or a fire/ice ball (the player can shake the Wii Remote to move their bubble closer to an active player, but they cannot free themselves). If players lose a life and do not have any more lives, they must use a Continue and start all over with 5 lives. Players can also encase themselves inside the bubble by pressing the A button while a more skilled player traverses a difficult segment. If every character in a co-op session enters a bubble at the same time (whether through death or by pressing the A button), they will lose the level and must restart.

The game is the first on the Wii to feature "Super Guide", a new system devised by Mario creator Shigeru Miyamoto. During singleplayer mode, if a player dies eight times in a row in any level, a green "!" Block appears, allowing a computer-controlled Luigi to show the player a safe path through the level. The player may interrupt the guide at anytime and take control. After Luigi completes it, the player has the option to try the level again, or skip it completely. However, Luigi will not reveal any Star Coin locations or secret exits.

The game was created in response to Nintendo's head game developer Shigeru Miyamoto's desire to recreate the Mario series's single-player gameplay experience for multiple players, as he was unable to bring these ideas to fruition in previous installments. The idea had specifically been proposed for the original prototype of Super Mario Bros. 2 on the NES/Famicom, but the system was found to be not strong enough to handle the multiple sprites required, and the game was redeveloped at that time. The release of the Wii, in 2006, finally gave Miyamoto a chance to revive this idea, as the hardware finally allowed the smooth display of enough enemies and items on the screen at once, and allowed a camera that could dynamically adapt to the players' movements, ensuring they constantly know what the situation of their character is. Miyamoto said Princess Peach was not a playable character because of her dress, since it would require "special processing and programming to handle how her skirt is handled within the gameplay."

Pak's Thoughts – Get a group of friends/family together to play this and you’re in for a good time. I was thrilled to death that they brought back the Koopalings. Anything that evokes Super Mario 3 is awesome in my book.
Title: Re: LoC #81 - Top 50 Video Games of the Oughts
Post by: Pak-Man on September 15, 2014, 10:43:37 PM
#22–Animal Crossing

(31 Points) 2 of 11 Lists - Highest Ranking - #4 – Sugar Ray Dodge
(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/8/82/Animal_Crossing_Coverart.png)
Ye can't go wrong
With me cucumber song
Cucumbers, Cucumbers
They make me strong

They're the best ripe an' cold
Long before they gets old
They're so good, no one good
Let them grow mold
Release Date:  April 14, 2001
Just the facts/Stuff I wiki'd:
Animal Crossing is a life simulation video game developed by Nintendo EAD and published by Nintendo. It was released for the Nintendo 64 in Japan on April 14, 2001 and the Nintendo GameCube the following December as Animal Forest+. It was later released in other countries in 2002-2004. Animal Crossing is an open-ended game in which the player character moves into a village populated with anthropomorphic animals. Throughout the game, the player can interact with the animals as well as other players through the GameCube's memory card. The game is synced with the Nintendo GameCube's internal clock and calendar, allowing the game to be played in real-time, which also follows seasons and holidays. It is one of the best-selling Nintendo GameCube games.

This game is a social simulator that has been dubbed a "communication game" by Nintendo. It is open-ended, and the player's character can live a separate life with little preset plot or mandatory tasks. Players assume the role of a new resident to the town. The gender and looks of the character depend on answers given to a cat named Rover, whom the player meets on the train the character takes to the town. There are also tasks that players can complete and goals they can achieve. The game is played in real-time, observing days, weeks, months and years using the GameCube's internal clock. Many real-life events and holidays span the year, including Independence Day, Halloween, the Harvest Festival (Thanksgiving), and Toy Day (Christmas). Other activities such as fishing tournaments and early-morning fitness classes occur on a regular schedule. When players stop playing, they can talk to their Gyroid, a creature next to their house, to save their progress. If the player turns off the game or resets the GameCube without saving first, a mole called Resetti appears in front of the player's house the next time they play to scold them for resetting; what they achieved during the previous unsaved game is lost, but everything else is kept.
 
One of the main goals of the game, given to the player during the game's opening cut scenes, is to increase the size of the player's character's house. This house is the repository for furniture and other items acquired during the course of the game. It can be customized in several ways, such as roof color, furniture, music, wallpaper and flooring. These customizations are judged by the Happy Room Academy (HRA) every Sunday. Players are given the choice to receive HRA letters at the start of the game; however, the HRA letters are mandatory later in the game.
 
Tom Nook, a tanuki in the Japanese versions and a raccoon in the American and European versions, runs the local store. At the beginning of the game, he gives the player their first house with a mortgage of 19,800 Bells (the in-game currency). After paying the debt, part of which is done through a part-time job with Nook, the house is expanded, prompting another debt from Nook. The house is expanded several times during the course of the game. Players can sell basically anything to Nook in exchange for Bells.
 
The village initially contains six villagers, and more villagers move in or out depending on the player's actions. All villagers are animals and each has a home that the player can visit. There are many possible interactions between the player and the villagers, including talking, trading items, completing tasks, writing letters, and, in e+, buying medicine for when they get sick. Villagers also interact with each other independent of player control.

Fifteen Nintendo Entertainment System (NES) games are normally available to collect in Animal Crossing. North American releases are packaged with a memory card that automatically gives the player two games upon creating a game file. Others are acquired in various ways.

Pak's Thoughts – No matter what type of neurotic tendencies you have, Animal Crossing is there to exploit it and keep you playing. Feel the need to customize things obsessively? You can plaster your own artwork all over town. Always feel a need to have something bigger and better than what you currently have? Your ol’ pal Tom Nook will keep you in upgrades for a good long time. Love to collect items in a set? How does a massive set of bugs, fossils, and fish, available at various times of the year, and sometimes only on special occasions sound?

I especially loved the built-in Nintendo games. Long before Virtual Console was a thing, and before Nintendo even started to consider selling their classic library, Animal Crossing let you play and collect the classics right in the middle of your Animal Crossing game.
Title: Re: LoC #81 - Top 50 Video Games of the Oughts
Post by: Sugar Ray Dodge on September 15, 2014, 10:43:46 PM
#25–Soulcalibur II

(28 Points) 3 of 11 Lists - Highest Ranking - #12 –Quantum Vagina
(http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Soulcalibur_2#mediaviewer/File:Soulcalibur_II_flyer.png)
Transcending history, and the world, a tale of souls and swords, eternally retold.
Release Date:  July 5, 2002

I very seriously considered including this, but I couldn't justify it as my list was crowded enough as it was with titles I felt were indispensible. I still have lots of fond memories from SC2, though.
Title: Re: LoC #81 - Top 50 Video Games of the Oughts
Post by: Pak-Man on September 15, 2014, 10:43:59 PM
#21–Fallout 3

(32 Points) 2 of 11 Lists - Highest Ranking - #8 – Johnny Unusual
(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/8/83/Fallout_3_cover_art.PNG)
War… War never changes.
Release Date:  October 28, 2008
Just the facts/Stuff I wiki'd:
Fallout 3 is a post-apocalyptic sci-fi action role-playing open world video game developed by Bethesda Game Studios, the third major installment in the Fallout series. The game was released in North America, Europe and Australia in October 2008, and in Japan in December 2008 for Microsoft Windows, PlayStation 3 and Xbox 360.
 
Fallout 3 takes place in the year 2277, 36 years after the setting of Fallout 2 and 200 years after the nuclear apocalypse that devastated the game's world in a future where international conflicts between the United States and China culminated in a Sino-American war in 2077, due to the scarcity of petroleum reserves that ran the economies of both countries. The player character is an inhabitant of Vault 101, a survival shelter designed to protect up to 1,000 humans from the nuclear fallout. When the player character's father disappears under mysterious circumstances, the Overseer, or the leader of the vault, initiates martial law, and sends security forces after the player, who is forced to escape from the Vault and journey into the ruins of Washington, D.C. to track him down. Along the way the player is assisted by a number of human survivors and must battle a myriad of enemies that inhabit the area now known as the "Capital Wasteland".
 
The game received controversy upon release, including the use of and the ability to be addicted to morphine and other drugs including alcohol in the game for Australia, religious and cultural sentiments in India over the cattle in the game being called Brahmin, and sensitivity in Japan due to a weapon that launches mini nuclear bombs called the "Fat Man" and a quest involving the detonation/disarming of an atomic bomb.

The game starts with the main character as a newborn, whereupon the player determines the race, the gender, and the general appearance of their character. As a one year-old baby, the infant reads a child's book titled You're SPECIAL, where the player can set the character's starting S.P.E.C.I.A.L. primary attributes: Strength, Perception, Endurance, Charisma, Intelligence, Agility, and Luck. The character gains a set of Skills with base levels determined by these attributes. At age 10, the player obtains a Pip-Boy, a computerized wristwatch which allows the player to access a menu with stats, maps, data and items. The player also obtains their first weapon, a BB gun. At age 16, the player takes the Generalized Occupational Aptitude Test (G.O.A.T.) to determine the three Skills they wish the character to focus on.
 
As the character progresses through the game, experience points are earned that are used to achieve levels of accomplishment. Upon achieving a new level, the player receives a set of skill points that can be assigned to improve any of the Skill percentages. For instance, increasing the lock pick skill grants the player the ability to pick harder locks to unlock doors and supply crates. A Perk is granted at each level, which offers advantages of varying quality and form. Many Perks have a set of prerequisites that must be satisfied, and new Perks are unlocked every two levels.
 
An important statistic tracked in the game is karma. Each character has an aggregate amount of karma that can be affected by the decisions and actions made in the game. Positive karmic actions include freeing captives and helping others. Negative karmic actions include killing good characters and stealing. Beyond acting as flavor for the game's events, karma can have tangible effects to the player, primarily affecting the game's ending. Other effects include altered dialogue with non-player characters (NPCs), or unique reactions from other characters. Actions vary in the level of karma change they cause; thus, pickpocketing produces less negative karma than the killing of a good character. However, the player's relationships with the game's factions are distinct, so any two groups or settlements may view the player in contrasting ways, depending on the player's conduct. Some Perks require specific karma levels.

Pak's Thoughts – I grabbed this one at a Gamestop midnight release. Someone was passing out samples of Axe, which is all you need to know about the type of person who shows up to a midnight release for a post-apocalyptic RPG.

That moment when you step outside the Vault for the first time, and everything’s so bright you have to wait for your eyes to adjust in-game, is huge. Already, at that point in the game, you’ve played through your character’s childhood. You know who he/she is and you know what you want to do with him/her. The Elder Scrolls series might be a more pure RPG, but in Fallout, you really feel like you’re playing a role.

That’ll do it for tonight. More tomorrow!
Title: Re: LoC #81 - Top 50 Video Games of the Oughts
Post by: Sugar Ray Dodge on September 15, 2014, 10:45:44 PM
#23–New Super Mario Bros. Wii

(31 Points) 2 of 11 Lists - Highest Ranking - #8 – ColeStratton
(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/8/8f/NewSuperMarioBrosWiiBoxart.png)
It’s Mario Time!
Release Date:  November 11, 2009

Yet another that Cole has one upped me on, the first being Rugby on the Muppet list, but I'll let it slide because he just did me a HUGE favor. You'll all find out what that is on Friday ;)
Title: Re: LoC #81 - Top 50 Video Games of the Oughts
Post by: Sugar Ray Dodge on September 15, 2014, 10:47:06 PM
#22–Animal Crossing

(31 Points) 2 of 11 Lists - Highest Ranking - #4 – Sugar Ray Dodge
(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/8/82/Animal_Crossing_Coverart.png)

YES! I was so hoping I'd "win" this one! I was an Animal Crossing ADDICT in late 2002.

Edited to correct title. No idea why I called this Animal Farm...
Title: Re: LoC #81 - Top 50 Video Games of the Oughts
Post by: Pak-Man on September 16, 2014, 05:21:22 AM
By the way, now's the time to start submitting list ideas if you want to run one yourself. You should all know the drill by now. Just PM me a list of no more than 2 ideas for the next list and we'll set up a poll. If your idea wins, you host the list.
Title: Re: LoC #81 - Top 50 Video Games of the Oughts
Post by: Relaxing Dragon on September 16, 2014, 09:58:09 AM
Fallout is a series I kinda wished I got into, but, much like Elder Scrolls, there's something about it that always keeps me away. I think it's just the shear scale of the games, and how they just drop you in to do whatever. Which is a great thing that makes for amazing game play, but at the same time, personally, I felt almost too intimidated to go on. I think I got about ten hours into Oblivion before I gave up because I hadn't the faintest idea if I'd progressed anywhere or not.

 That and first-person never melded for me when it comes to RPGs.
Title: Re: LoC #81 - Top 50 Video Games of the Oughts
Post by: Quantum Vagina on September 16, 2014, 10:29:32 AM
Fallout is a series I kinda wished I got into, but, much like Elder Scrolls, there's something about it that always keeps me away. I think it's just the shear scale of the games, and how they just drop you in to do whatever. Which is a great thing that makes for amazing game play, but at the same time, personally, I felt almost too intimidated to go on. I think I got about ten hours into Oblivion before I gave up because I hadn't the faintest idea if I'd progressed anywhere or not.

 That and first-person never melded for me when it comes to RPGs.

The thing I love about the ES games is that "progress" is something you make up entirely by yourself. You can literally play that game for 800 hours and find things you didn't know about. It's all about discovery and writing your own story.

Unless you're someone who power games. Then it just gets boring.
Title: Re: LoC #81 - Top 50 Video Games of the Oughts
Post by: Relaxing Dragon on September 16, 2014, 10:51:49 AM
Fallout is a series I kinda wished I got into, but, much like Elder Scrolls, there's something about it that always keeps me away. I think it's just the shear scale of the games, and how they just drop you in to do whatever. Which is a great thing that makes for amazing game play, but at the same time, personally, I felt almost too intimidated to go on. I think I got about ten hours into Oblivion before I gave up because I hadn't the faintest idea if I'd progressed anywhere or not.

 That and first-person never melded for me when it comes to RPGs.

The thing I love about the ES games is that "progress" is something you make up entirely by yourself. You can literally play that game for 800 hours and find things you didn't know about. It's all about discovery and writing your own story.

Unless you're someone who power games. Then it just gets boring.

I think it's more the general feeling of being lost, like I'm adrift in some great ocean. I can actually totally see the appeal, and were I to get into just the right mindset I'd probably be all over it, but as it stands it still seems like just too much for me. Or something like that, since it's all kind of hard to describe.

One of these days I'll pick up New Vegas (it's dirt cheap at this point) and give it a go, though. Assuming I can also spare the many, many necessary hours along with it.
Title: Re: LoC #81 - Top 50 Video Games of the Oughts
Post by: Pak-Man on September 16, 2014, 10:38:32 PM
#20–Final Fantasy X

(32 Points) 3 of 11 Lists - Highest Ranking - #11 – Sugar Ray Dodge
(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/a/a7/Ffxboxart.jpg)
Listen to my story. This...may be our last chance.
Release Date:  July 19, 2001
Just the facts/Stuff I wiki'd:
Final Fantasy X is a role-playing video game developed and published by Square (now Square Enix) as the tenth entry in the Final Fantasy series. Originally released in 2001 for Sony's PlayStation 2, the game was re-released as a high-definition port for the PlayStation 3 and PlayStation Vita on March 18, 2014, under the name Final Fantasy X/X-2 HD Remaster. The game marks the Final Fantasy series transition from entirely pre-rendered backdrops to fully three-dimensional areas, and is also the first in the series to feature voice acting. Final Fantasy X replaces the Active Time Battle (ATB) system with the "Conditional Turn-Based Battle" (CTB) system, and uses a new leveling system called the "Sphere Grid".
 
Set in the fantasy world of Spira, the game's story revolves around a group of adventurers and their quest to defeat a rampaging monster known as Sin. The player character is Tidus, a blitzball star who finds himself in Spira after his home city of Zanarkand is destroyed by Sin. Shortly after arriving to Spira, Tidus joins the summoner Yuna on her pilgrimage to destroy Sin.

Like previous games in the series, Final Fantasy X is presented in a third-person perspective, with players directly navigating the main character, Tidus, around the world to interact with objects and people. Unlike previous games, however, the world and town maps have been fully integrated, with terrain outside of cities rendered to scale. When an enemy is encountered, the environment switches to a turn-based battle area where characters and enemies await their turn to attack.
 
The gameplay of Final Fantasy X differs from that of previous Final Fantasy games in its lack of a top-down perspective world map. Earlier games featured a miniature representation of the expansive areas between towns and other distinct locations, used for long-distance traveling. In Final Fantasy X, almost all the locations are essentially continuous and never fade out to a world map. Regional connections are mostly linear, forming a single path through the game's locations, though an airship becomes available late in the game, giving the player the ability to navigate Spira faster. Like previous games in the series, Final Fantasy X features numerous minigames, most notably the fictional underwater sport "blitzball".

Pak's Thoughts – I was immediately intrigued by the story in Final Fantasy X. I made it about 2 hours in, and that was about the time I got married and life got very, very busy. I really need to go back and dig in.
Title: Re: LoC #81 - Top 50 Video Games of the Oughts
Post by: Pak-Man on September 16, 2014, 10:39:41 PM
#19–F-Zero GX

(32 Points) 3 of 11 Lists - Highest Ranking - #8 - Tyrant
(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/6/66/F-Zero_GX_box_artwork.png)
Welcome to the World of 2200KM/H+!
Release Date:  July 25, 2003
Just the facts/Stuff I wiki'd:
F-Zero GX is a futuristic racing video game for the Nintendo GameCube console. Developed by Sega's Amusement Vision department and supervised and published by Nintendo, it was released in Japan, North America and Europe in 2003. F-Zero GX runs on an enhanced version of the engine used in Super Monkey Ball. F-Zero AX, the arcade counterpart of GX, uses the Triforce arcade system board conceived from a business alliance between Nintendo, Namco and Sega.
 
F-Zero GX is the successor to F-Zero X and continues the series' difficult, high-speed racing style, retaining the basic gameplay and control system from the Nintendo 64 game. A heavy emphasis is placed on track memorization and reflexes, which aids in completing the game. GX introduces a "story mode" element, where the player assumes the role of F-Zero pilot Captain Falcon through nine chapters while completing various missions.
 
F-Zero GX and AX was the first significant video game collaboration between Nintendo and Sega. The game received critical acclaim as one of the best racers of its time and the greatest racer on the GameCube platform. Overall, the game was well received by critics for its visuals, intense action, high sense of speed, and track design. Complaints centered on its sharp increase in difficulty that may alienate players.

F-Zero GX is a futuristic racing game where up to thirty competitors race on massive circuits inside plasma-powered machines in an intergalactic Grand Prix. Tracks include enclosed tubes, cylinders, tricky jumps, and rollercoaster-esque paths. Some courses are littered with innate obstacles like dirt patches and mines. Each machine handles differently and has a grip, boost, and durability trait graded on an A to E scale. Before a race, the player is able to adjust a vehicle's balance between maximum acceleration and maximum top speed. Every machine has an energy meter, which serves two purposes. First, it is a measurement of the machine's health and is decreased, for example, when the machine hits another racer or the side of the track. Second, the player is usually given the ability to boost after the first lap. Boosting greatly increases the racer's speed for a few seconds, but also drains their energy. Pit areas and dash plates are located at various points around the track for vehicles to drive over. The former replenishes energy, while the latter gives a speed boost without using up any energy. The less time spent in the pit area, the less energy will regenerate. Courses may also have jump plates, which launch vehicles into the air enabling them to cut corners.

Pak's Thoughts – This is the F-Zero by which all others will be judged. The graphics were beautiful, the control was perfect and the courses were insane in the best ways possible.

I’ve had the rare honor of playing this game’s arcade sister, F-Zero AX in Vegas. The sit-down machine tilts with the action and things get really intense. Then after you play, it prints out a “Driver’s License” with a random picture of one of the racers that you can insert later on to save your high scores. Since the game’s been out for over a decade and since arcades are pretty much dead, you probably can’t get the driver’s licenses anymore, but if you find a machine, you owe it to yourself to give it a whirl.
Title: Re: LoC #81 - Top 50 Video Games of the Oughts
Post by: Pak-Man on September 16, 2014, 10:40:02 PM
#18–Dragon Age: Origins

(33 Points) 2 of 11 Lists - Highest Ranking - #7 - PsychoGoatee
(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/8/89/Dragon_Age_Origins_cover.png)
Join us, brothers and sisters. Join us in the shadows where we stand vigilant. Join us as we carry the duty that cannot be forsworn. And should you perish, know that your sacrifice will not be forgotten... and that one day, we shall join you. 
Release Date:  November 3, 2009
Just the facts/Stuff I wiki'd:
Dragon Age: Origins is a role-playing video game developed by BioWare's Edmonton studio and published by Electronic Arts. It is the first game in the Dragon Age franchise. The game was released for Microsoft Windows, PlayStation 3 and Xbox 360 on November 3, 2009, and for Mac OS X on December 21, 2009.
 
Set in the fictional kingdom of Ferelden during a period of civil strife, the player assumes the role of a warrior, mage or rogue coming from an elven, human, or dwarven background who must unite the kingdom to fight an impending invasion by demonic forces. BioWare describes Dragon Age: Origins as a "dark heroic fantasy set in a unique world," and a spiritual successor to their Baldur's Gate series of games, which took place in the Forgotten Realms Campaign Setting of the Dungeons & Dragons franchise

The game incorporates 6 "Origin Stories", the choice depending on the race and class chosen. Dwarven nobles begin the game as part of the Dwarven royal family, whereas in the Dwarf commoner origin, the player starts as a "lowborn" living in poverty. Elven commoners begin their story in a segregated area in the capital city of Ferelden. In the human noble origin, the player begins as a Cousland, one of the human noble families in Ferelden. Elven and human mages start their story off in the Ferelden's Circle of Magi, and the Dalish Elf story begins with the player living in the forest amongst their clan. Origin stories determine the background of the player's character prior to the main events of the game's story, forming an introduction to the world, and a gameplay tutorial, while also comprising hours of play. Events of an individual Origin are reflected in the game story and characters. Characters that the player meets during the Origin story may reappear throughout the game, some as adversaries.
 
There is no tracking of moral alignment, just party favor. The player can give party members gifts and their dialogue choices can gain favour or displeasure with the group but the moral choices of the player will still affect the story throughout the game. The player will accomplish different goals depending on if they choose to be good or evil, but the decisions that the player makes in the process will change the game world accordingly – deciding who will become king, for example, and affecting nations, races and their places in the world. These decisions will also influence the companion NPCs, possibly causing an NPC to leave the party or even attack the player if they disagree strongly with his or her actions.

Pak's Thoughts – While this game didn’t grab me the way certain other BioWare games that may show up later on this list did, they did a lot of cool things with it. I liked being able to choose my origin story, and I really liked that instead of tracking your actions as good or evil, it all boils down to how much respect you’ll get/lose from your companions for behaving a certain way. Some characters don’t WANT you to do the “right” thing. You have to decide what’s more important. Doing what you feel is right, or impressing the scantily clad Morrigan. (My character is always goodie-goodie. Virtue must prevail!)
Title: Re: LoC #81 - Top 50 Video Games of the Oughts
Post by: Pak-Man on September 16, 2014, 10:40:25 PM
#17–Disgaea: Hour of Darkness

(33 Points) 2 of 11 Lists - Highest Ranking - #1 - Compound
(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/d/d2/Disgaea_Hour_of_Darkness.jpg)
To show my appreciation, I'll only beat them half to death. 
Release Date:  January 30, 2003
Just the facts/Stuff I wiki'd:
Disgaea: Hour of Darkness is a tactical role-playing video game developed and published by Nippon Ichi Software for the Sony PlayStation 2 video game console.

Disgaea is a tactical role playing game. Battle gameplay takes place on a map divided into a square grid. The player controls a squad of humanoid units and monsters, which each occupy a single square of the grid and do combat with a group of enemies. Depending on the character and attack selected, the player will be able to deal damage to a specific enemy unit or a designated region of the map. Combat ends when all enemy units or all of the player's units are destroyed.
 
Humanoid characters may lift and throw other units across the map in order to allow allies to move further or force enemies to keep their distance. This even allows the player to capture enemies by throwing them into the base panel; these enemies then become allies, and can be used on subsequent maps. The chance of capturing an enemy in this manner depends on several factors. Failure to capture the enemy will result in the death of all characters inside the base panel, and the enemy will survive.

Pak's Thoughts – I’ve heard good things, and I love a good tactical RPG, but I never gave this one a shot. Looks like fun, though.
Title: Re: LoC #81 - Top 50 Video Games of the Oughts
Post by: Pak-Man on September 16, 2014, 10:40:54 PM
#16–Star Wars: Knights of the Old Republic

(34 Points) 3 of 11 Lists - Highest Ranking - #7 – Pak-Man
(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/1/11/Kotorbox.jpg)
Explanation: It's just that... you have all these squishy parts, master. And all that water! How the constant sloshing doesn't drive you mad, I have no idea... 
Release Date:  July 15, 2003
Just the facts/Stuff I wiki'd:
Star Wars: Knights of the Old Republic is a role-playing video game developed by BioWare and published by LucasArts. Written by Drew Karpyshyn, the soundtrack for the game was composed by Jeremy Soule. It was released for the Xbox on July 15, 2003.

The game's system is based on Wizards of the Coast's Star Wars Roleplaying Game, which is based on the d20 role-playing game system derived from the Third Edition Dungeons & Dragons (D&D) rules. Players choose from three basic character classes at the beginning of the game, and later choose from three Jedi subclasses. Beyond class, a character has "skills" stats, tiered "feats", and later on, tiered Force powers, similar to magic spells in fantasy games. Feats and Force powers are unlocked every few level-ups, while the player is given skill points to distribute among their skills every level.
 
Combat is round-based; time is divided into discrete rounds, and combatants attack and react simultaneously, although these actions are presented sequentially on-screen. The number of actions a combatant may perform each round is limited. While each round's duration is a fixed short interval of real time, the player can configure the combat system to pause at specific events or at the end of each round, or set the combat system to never automatically pause, giving the illusion of real-time combat. Combat actions are calculated using DnD rules. While these are not displayed directly on the screen, the full breakdown for each action (including die rolls and modifiers) are accessible from a menu.
 
For much of the game, the player can have up to two companions in their party. These companions will participate in combat; they can be manually controlled by the player, or act autonomously if the player does not give them any input. Outside of combat, the companions will randomly engage the player or each other in dialogue, sometimes unlocking additional quests. They will also participate in conversations the player has with other non-player characters.
 
Non-combat interaction with other characters in the game world is based upon a dialogue menu system. Following each statement, the player can select from a list of menu responses. The dialogue varies based on the gender and skills of the main character.
 
The alignment system tracks actions and speech—from simple word choices to major plot decisions—to determine whether the player's character aligns with the light or dark side of the Force. Generosity and altruism lead to the light side, while selfish or violent actions will lead the player's character to the dark side, which will alter the character's appearance, turning their eyes yellow and their skin pale.
 
In addition to the standard role-playing gameplay, there are several minigame events that come up over the course of the game. The player can engage in swoop racing to gain money, and sometimes interplanetary travel will be interrupted by enemy starfighters, which begins a minigame where the player controls a turret to shoot down the opposing starcraft. The player can also engage in a card game known as pazaak, which is similar to the game of blackjack, to gamble money.

Pak's Thoughts – Now here’s a role that’s worth playing! I played this from start to finish and loved every minute of it. Who wouldn’t want to be a Jedi Knight (Or Sith Lord, I suppose) and travel around all the hot spots in the Star Wars Universe? You can see the DNA for the next decade of BioWare games right here. Plus, the game gifted us with HK-47, who may be my favorite droid in any Star Wars continuity.

The list continues tomorrow!
Title: Re: LoC #81 - Top 50 Video Games of the Oughts
Post by: Johnny Unusual on September 17, 2014, 07:21:16 AM
#19–Final Fantasy X

(32 Points) 3 of 11 Lists - Highest Ranking - #8 - Tyrant
(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/6/66/F-Zero_GX_box_artwork.png)

Whahuh?
Title: Re: LoC #81 - Top 50 Video Games of the Oughts
Post by: CJones on September 17, 2014, 12:23:21 PM
I think you've got a typo there on #19.

Also, KotOR is game I really need to try out. I've heard almost nothing but good things about it.
Title: Re: LoC #81 - Top 50 Video Games of the Oughts
Post by: Johnny Unusual on September 17, 2014, 12:27:29 PM
I made the mistake of playing KOTOR on the 360.  It's a great game, but there's a glitch that basically halts the game on the 360 if you don't do things in just the right order.
Title: Re: LoC #81 - Top 50 Video Games of the Oughts
Post by: Pak-Man on September 17, 2014, 12:43:26 PM
Well I got the first and last letters right... Fixed #19. :^)
Title: Re: LoC #81 - Top 50 Video Games of the Oughts
Post by: Sugar Ray Dodge on September 17, 2014, 03:18:56 PM
I LOVE F-Zero GX, and it was on my list, but I think its biggest flaw (without taking away from its many, many excellent elements) is that its learning curve is steep as hell. You get it, but it takes hours of crashing into walls to get it right. But once you got it, you got it.
Title: Re: LoC #81 - Top 50 Video Games of the Oughts
Post by: PsychoGoatee on September 17, 2014, 06:03:39 PM
Fun gamery! Love me some Dragon Age. The kooky Leliana was my fav companion in that one.
Title: Re: LoC #81 - Top 50 Video Games of the Oughts
Post by: Quantum Vagina on September 17, 2014, 06:25:45 PM
I LOVE F-Zero GX, and it was on my list, but I think its biggest flaw (without taking away from its many, many excellent elements) is that its learning curve is steep as hell. You get it, but it takes hours of crashing into walls to get it right. But once you got it, you got it.

I had that game for ages before I learned to play it properly.
Title: Re: LoC #81 - Top 50 Video Games of the Oughts
Post by: Relaxing Dragon on September 17, 2014, 07:39:07 PM
I forgot to put Knights of the Old Republic on my list?

(http://24.media.tumblr.com/tumblr_m6v6rmr24z1rafdwyo1_500.gif)

KOTOR was something of a game-changer for me and my simple, console-playing ways. It's not as though it was my first RPG, or even my first big story-driven game, it was just that I'd never before played a game with so much scope to it. The characters were more interesting, the story was deeper, the choices more wide-reaching, and that's without even counting the fact that it was the most interesting Star Wars thing I'd encountered outside the original movies (it still is, for that matter). One hell of a game, and it's a shame a rushed schedule botched the sequel from being better (or even as good).
Title: Re: LoC #81 - Top 50 Video Games of the Oughts
Post by: Sugar Ray Dodge on September 17, 2014, 08:59:38 PM
I LOVE F-Zero GX, and it was on my list, but I think its biggest flaw (without taking away from its many, many excellent elements) is that its learning curve is steep as hell. You get it, but it takes hours of crashing into walls to get it right. But once you got it, you got it.

I had that game for ages before I learned to play it properly.

Exactly. Once you get the hang of it it's a very fulfilling game.
Title: Re: LoC #81 - Top 50 Video Games of the Oughts
Post by: CJones on September 17, 2014, 11:26:07 PM
If I had known there would be so few entries, I might have ordered my list differently. But my number 1 & 2 made it (and I was pretty sure no one else would vote for them). So that worked out. However if my numbers 3 & 5 don't make it, I'll be seriously disappointed.

I just bought Knights of the Old Republic. Supposedly this was the inspiration behind Mass Effect (another game I really need to play).

Now, if you don't mind, let me plug my #1 again. Download The Ur-Quan Masters! It is easily in my top 5 favorite video games of all time. And it's FREE! And let me add... Best Villain Speech Ever.

Title: Re: LoC #81 - Top 50 Video Games of the Oughts
Post by: Pak-Man on September 18, 2014, 09:53:36 AM
So I didn't  have time last night to compile entries. Tonight should be a double-dip and I'll get the next 10 out. If I'm feeling especially ambitious, I'll finish up the list. We'll see. :^)
Title: Re: LoC #81 - Top 50 Video Games of the Oughts
Post by: Pak-Man on September 19, 2014, 12:41:36 AM
#15–Resident Evil 4

(36 Points) 4 of 11 Lists - Highest Ranking - #6 – PsychoGoatee
(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/d/d9/Resi4-gc-cover.jpg)
I'm sure you boys didn't just tag along so we could sing "Kumbaya" together at some Boy Scout bonfire. But then again, maybe you did. 
Release Date:  January 11, 2005
Just the facts/Stuff I wiki'd:
Resident Evil 4 is a survival horror video game developed by Capcom Production Studio 4 and released by multiple publishers, including Capcom, Ubisoft, Nintendo Australia, Red Ant Enterprises and THQ Asia Pacific. The sixth main entry in the Resident Evil horror series, the game was originally released for the GameCube in January 2005 in North America and Japan, and in March 2005 in Europe and Australia.
 
The story of Resident Evil 4 follows the U.S. government special agent Leon S. Kennedy, who is sent on a mission to rescue Ashley Graham, the U.S. President's daughter who has been kidnapped by a sinister cult. Traveling to a remote rural area of Europe, Leon fights hordes of violent villagers and mutated monsters, and reunites with the mysterious spy Ada Wong. The game pioneered and popularized the "over the shoulder" third-person view perspective in video games.
 
First hinted at in early December 1999, Resident Evil 4 underwent a long development time during which four proposed versions of the game were discarded. Initially developed for the Sony Computer Entertainment's PlayStation 2, the first attempt was directed by Hideki Kamiya after producer Shinji Mikami requested him to create a new entry in the Resident Evil series. Nevertheless, it was decided to start development over again.

The player controls the protagonist Leon S. Kennedy from a third-person, over-the-shoulder perspective in a mission to rescue the daughter of the President of the United States, Ashley Graham. The gameplay focuses on action and shootouts involving crowds of enemies in large open areas. The camera is focused behind Leon, and it zooms in for an over-the-shoulder view when aiming a weapon. Unlike previous games in the series, there is the addition of a laser sight that adds a new depth to the aiming, allowing the player to aim in various directions and easily change their placement at any time. Bullets affect the enemies specifically where they are shot: shots to the feet can cause enemies to stumble, while shots to the arms can cause them to drop their weapons.

Resident Evil 4 is regarded as one of the most influential games of the 2000s decade, due to its influence in redefining the third-person shooter genre by introducing a "reliance on offset camera angles that fail to obscure the action". The new gameplay alterations and immersive style appealed to many not previously familiar with the series. The over-the-shoulder viewpoint introduced in Resident Evil 4 has later become standard in third-person shooters, including titles ranging from Gears of War to Batman: Arkham Asylum. It has also become a standard "precision aim" feature for action games in general, with examples ranging from Dead Space and Grand Theft Auto to the Ratchet & Clank Future series.

Pak's Thoughts – Tyrant and I were beating this game at a pretty steady pace until we got to the part where the bad guys are firing catapults at you. We kind of rage-quit it at that part. I think we eventually made it through that scene a couple years later, but we never got our groove back and have yet to finish it…
Title: Re: LoC #81 - Top 50 Video Games of the Oughts
Post by: Pak-Man on September 19, 2014, 12:42:04 AM
#14–The Legend of Zelda: The Wind Waker

(37 Points) 2 of 11 Lists - Highest Ranking - #6 – Quantum Vagina
(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/7/72/ZeldaWindWakerGCNCoverArtUS.jpg)
As wide as the world is, I am the only boat upon it who can speak the words of men. 
Release Date:  December 13, 2002
Just the facts/Stuff I wiki'd:
The Legend of Zelda: The Wind Waker is an action-adventure game and the tenth installment in The Legend of Zelda series. It was released for the GameCube in Japan on December 13, 2002, in North America on March 24, 2003, in Europe on May 2, 2003, and in Australia on May 7, 2003.

The game is set on a group of islands in a vast sea—a first for the series. The player controls Link, the protagonist of the Zelda series. He struggles against the evil king, Ganondorf, for control of a sacred relic known as the Triforce. Link spends a large portion of the game sailing, traveling between islands, and traversing dungeons and temples to gain the power necessary to defeat Ganondorf. He also spends time trying to find his little sister Aryll.
 
The Wind Waker follows in the footsteps of Ocarina of Time, retaining the basic gameplay and control system from the two Nintendo 64 titles. A heavy emphasis is placed on using and controlling wind with a baton called the Wind Waker, which aids sailing and floating in air. Though controversial during development for its use of cel shading graphics and the younger Link character, The Wind Waker was met with critical acclaim. A direct sequel, The Legend of Zelda: Phantom Hourglass, was released in 2007.

The control scheme of The Wind Waker is largely unchanged from that of Ocarina of Time and Majora's Mask. Link's basic actions of walking, running, attacking, defending, and automatic jumping at ledges are retained. Link also uses the control system introduced in Ocarina of Time that allows him to "lock-on" to an enemy or other target. An addition to this basic control scheme is the ability to parry. When Link is locked on to an opponent and not actively defending, certain attacks by the opponent will trigger a visual cue, a vibration of the controller, and a chime. Attacking at that point causes Link to dodge or parry then counter-attack from the rear or while leaping over the foe's head. This tactic becomes crucial for defeating armored enemies or bosses.
 
The new art style used in The Wind Waker gives Link eyes that are much larger and more expressive than in previous games. This allows Link to focus his gaze on approaching enemies or important items. For example, if Link needs to solve a puzzle by lighting a torch to set a distant object on fire, his eyes might turn to look at a nearby stick, giving a hint to an observant player on how to proceed.

Pak's Thoughts – I think the fans (back then) would have embraced the art direction more fully if Nintendo hadn’t shown that awesome tech demo when they announced the GameCube, showing a super-realistic Link fighting Gannondorf. I was on board with the whole “Toon Link” thing from the very beginning, though. It’s like playing a stained glass window. Fortunately, it turns out a cartoony art direction doesn’t matter that much when you’re having a blast playing, and Wind Waker won over the hearts of the masses.
Title: Re: LoC #81 - Top 50 Video Games of the Oughts
Post by: Pak-Man on September 19, 2014, 12:42:39 AM
#13–Wii Sports

(38 Points) 2 of 11 Lists - Highest Ranking - #1 – Johnny Unusual
(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/e/e0/Wii_Sports_Europe.jpg)
Welcome to the world of Wii Sports: A new way to play! 
Release Date:  November 19, 2006
Just the facts/Stuff I wiki'd:
Wii Sports is a 2006 sports game developed and published by Nintendo as a launch title for the Wii video game console (and the first title for this console), and part of the Touch! Generations. The game was first released in North America along with the Wii on November 19, 2006, and was released in Japan, Australia, and Europe the following month. It was included as a pack-in game with the Wii console in all territories except Japan, making it the first game included with the launch of a Nintendo system since Mario's Tennis for the Virtual Boy in 1995. Wii Sports is now available on its own as part of the Nintendo Selects collection of games and is no longer a pack-in game for the Wii.
 
The game is a collection of five sports simulations, designed to demonstrate the motion-sensing capabilities of the Wii Remote to new players. The five sports included are tennis, baseball, bowling, golf, and boxing. Players use the Wii Remote to mimic actions performed in real life sports, such as swinging a tennis racket. The rules for each game are simplified to make them more accessible to new players. The game also features training and fitness modes that monitor players' progress in the sports.
 
Overall, Wii Sports has been well received by critics and received awards from the gaming press and entertainment community. It is the second best-selling video game of all time, behind Tetris, as of April 2013, having outsold the previous best-seller, Super Mario Bros., also published by Nintendo.

Wii Sports consists of five separate sports games—tennis, baseball, bowling, golf, and boxing—accessed from the main menu. The games use the motion sensor capabilities of the Wii Remote and Nunchuk attachment to control the actions of the on-screen character. The player moves the remote in a similar manner to how the separate games are played in real life; for example, holding and swinging the Wii Remote like a golf club, baseball bat or bowling ball. Some aspects of the gameplay are computer controlled. In tennis, player movement is controlled by the Wii, while the swinging of the racket is controlled by the player. Baseball consists of batting and pitching, with all of the fielding and baserunning handled by the Wii.

Pak's Thoughts – Not much to say for this one. I liked it, but it was less about the game itself and more about OH MY GOSH I HAVE A WII CHECK OUT THESE WII CONTROLS! The Wii was the first and probably last system that I actually camped out overnight for. I had a preorder with a local game store, and they decided to tell me the day before the Wii came out that they were going to just sell their Wiis online for way more money. This left me and my brother out in the cold. Literally. On a cold November Night, I sat huddled on a chair in front of the only Circuit City in town that still had a spot left. If you’ve never slept in front of a store in the freezing cold, I wouldn’t recommend it. Nothing wakes you up quite like the sound of a car going through the parking lot. Your brain screams at you, “WE SHOULDN’T BE SLEEPING HERE!” We got our Wiis, though, and it was totally worth it, and I’m never going to ever do that again.
Title: Re: LoC #81 - Top 50 Video Games of the Oughts
Post by: Pak-Man on September 19, 2014, 12:43:06 AM
#12–Super Smash Bros. Brawl

(40 Points) 2 of 11 Lists - Highest Ranking - #2 – Pak-Man
(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/f/f3/SSBB_Cover.jpg)
Falcon Punch! 
Release Date:  January 31, 2008
Just the facts/Stuff I wiki'd:
Super Smash Bros. Brawl is the third installment in the Super Smash Bros. series of crossover fighting games, developed by an ad hoc development team consisting of Sora, Game Arts, and staff from other developers, and published by Nintendo for the Wii video game console. Brawl was announced at a pre-E3 2005 press conference by Nintendo president and Chief Executive Officer Satoru Iwata. Masahiro Sakurai, director of the previous two games in the series, assumed the role of director for the third installment at the request of Iwata. Game development began in October 2005 with a creative team that included members from several Nintendo and third-party development teams. After delays due to development problems, the game was finally released on January 31, 2008, in Japan; March 9, 2008, in North America; June 26, 2008, in Australia; and June 27, 2008, in Europe. Twenty-seven months after its original Japanese release, the game was released in Korea, on April 29, 2010.
 
The number of playable characters in Brawl has grown from that in Super Smash Bros. Melee; Brawl is the first game in the series to expand past Nintendo characters by allowing players to control third-party characters. Like that of its predecessors, the object of Brawl is to knock an opponent off the screen. It is a departure from traditional fighting games, notably in its simplified move commands and emphasis on ring outs over knockouts. It includes a more extensive single-player mode than its predecessors, known as the Subspace Emissary (SSE). This mode is a plot-driven, side-scrolling beat 'em up featuring computer-generated cut scenes and a selection of playable characters. Brawl also supports multiplayer battles with up to four combatants, and is the first game of its franchise to feature online battles via Nintendo Wi-Fi Connection. The game is unique, in that it may be played with four different controllers, including the Wii Remote, Wii Remote with Nunchuk, GameCube controller, and Classic Controller, simultaneously.
 
Following its predecessors, Brawl uses a battle system unlike that of typical fighting games. Players can choose from a large selection of characters, each attempting to knock their opponents off the screen as they fight on various stages. The characters in Brawl include most of the same ones as the predecessors, such as the well-known Mario and Pikachu. Instead of using traditional health bars that start at a maximum value and lose value, Brawl characters start the game with 0%; the value rises as they take damage and may rise over 100% to a maximum of 999%. As a character's percentage increases, the character flies further back when hit. When a character is knocked beyond a stage's boundary and disappears from the screen, the character loses either a life, a point, or coins, depending on the mode of play. Brawl includes a function which allows players to create profiles with personalized button configurations for each control method along with their chosen username.

Pak's Thoughts – Smash Bros. Brawl is more than just a great game. It’s a love letter to the entire history of Nintendo games. The game itself is loaded with references to every nook and cranny of Nintendo’s long history, and the soundtrack has several hours worth of some of the greatest video game music ever created. There are trophys, stickers, and scads of unlockables. The game you play when you first boot it up is only a fraction of the game you have if you ever finish unlocking it all.
Title: Re: LoC #81 - Top 50 Video Games of the Oughts
Post by: Pak-Man on September 19, 2014, 12:43:32 AM
#11–Grand Theft Auto: Vice City

(41 Points) 2 of 11 Lists - Highest Ranking - #1 – PsychoGoatee
(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/c/ce/Vice-city-cover.jpg)
You. You the boy? Yeah. You the boy. I think so, you know? 
Release Date:  October 27, 2002
Just the facts/Stuff I wiki'd:
Grand Theft Auto: Vice City is an open world action-adventure video game developed by Rockstar North and published by Rockstar Games. It was released on 27 October 2002 for the PlayStation 2 console, on 12 May 2003 for Microsoft Windows, and on 31 October 2003 for the Xbox console. It is the sixth title in the Grand Theft Auto series, and the first main entry since 2001's Grand Theft Auto III.
 
Grand Theft Auto: Vice City is played from a third-person perspective in an open world environment, allowing the player to interact with the game world at their leisure. The game is set in 1986 within the fictional city of Vice City, which is heavily based on Miami and draws inspiration from 1980s' American culture. The single-player story follows Tommy Vercetti, a Mafia hitman who is released from prison. After his involvement in a drug deal gone wrong, Tommy seeks out those responsible while building a criminal empire and seizing power from other criminal organizations in the city.

Because Vice City was built upon Grand Theft Auto III, the game follows a largely similar gameplay design and interface with GTA III with several tweaks and improvements over its predecessor. The gameplay is very open-ended, a characteristic of the Grand Theft Auto franchise; although missions must be completed to complete the storyline and unlock new areas of the city, the player is able to drive around and visit different parts of the city at his/her leisure and otherwise, do whatever they wish if not currently in the middle of a mission. Various items such as hidden weapons and packages are also scattered throughout the landscape, as it has been with previous GTA titles.
 
Players can steal vehicles, (cars, boats, motorcycles, and even helicopters) partake in drive-by shootings, robberies, and generally create chaos. However, doing so tends to generate unwanted and potentially fatal attention from the police (or, in extreme cases, the FBI and even the National Guard). Police behavior is mostly similar to Grand Theft Auto III, although police units will now wield night sticks, deploy spike strips to puncture the tires of the player's car, as well as SWAT teams being rappelled down from flying police helicopters and undercover police units, à la-Vice Squad. Police attention can be neutralized in a variety of ways.
 
A new addition in the game is the ability of the player to purchase a number of properties distributed across the city. Some of these are additional hideouts (essentially locations where weapons can be collected and the game saved). There are also a variety of businesses called "assets" which the player can buy. These include a film studio, a dance club, a strip club, a taxi company, an "ice-cream delivery business" (acting as a front company), a boatyard, a printing works, and a car showroom. Each commercial property has a number of missions attached to it, such as eliminating the competition or stealing equipment. Once all the missions for a given property are complete, the property will begin to generate an ongoing income, which the increasingly prosperous Vercetti may periodically collect.
 
Various gangs make frequent appearances in the game, some of whom are integral to story events. These gangs typically have a positive or negative opinion of the player and act accordingly by following the player or shooting at him. Shootouts between members of rival gangs can occur spontaneously and several missions involve organized fights between opposing gangs.
 
Optional side-missions are once again included, giving the player the opportunity to make pizza deliveries, drive injured people to a hospital with an ambulance, extinguish fires with a fire truck, deliver passengers in a taxi, be a vigilante, using a police vehicle to intercept (and kill) criminals, and the ability to drive a bus, transporting fare-paying passengers. Monetary rewards and occasional gameplay advantages (e.g. increased health and armor capacity and infinite sprinting) are awarded for completing different difficulty levels of these activities. Different sums of money are awarded for landing trick jumps in motorcycles or fast cars depending on the number of flips and height achieved.

Pak's Thoughts – I could never get into Grand Theft Auto. The seedy criminal world just isn’t where I enjoy spending my virtual time. I enjoy a good sandbox game, so I guess I see the appeal, but I’d rather play something like Hulk: Ultimate Destruction to get my sandbox fix.

OK. So the top ten will come up late tomorrow night, but to make up for the delay of the next five, and in honor of International Talk Like a Pirate Day…
Title: Re: LoC #81 - Top 50 Video Games of the Oughts
Post by: Pak-Man on September 19, 2014, 12:45:31 AM
BONUS LIST: Top 5 Pirate Games of the ‘00s!

Avast, ye swabs! It be Talk like a Pirate Day, and I’ll be breakin’ down the best Pirate Games  o’ the oughts, as selected by yers truly!

#5 - Skies of Arcadia – October 5, 2000
(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/6/65/ArcadiaDC.png)

If ye be wantin’ to do some Role Playin’ on yer Dreamcast, this piratey game be one of yer best bets. It’s got a great story, fun action, and pirate booty galore!

#4 - Tropico 2: Pirate Cove – April 8, 2003
(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/0/0c/Tropico2.jpg)

Arr, this Tropico game be a departure for the series. Instead of a Tin Can dictator, ye be a pirate king. It still be a blast to impose your will on the powerless people beneath you!

#3 - Zack & Wiki: Quest for Barbaros' Treasure – October 23, 2007
(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/1/12/Zack_%26_Wiki_-_Quest_for_Barbaros%27_Treasure_Coverart.png)

Yar, when this came out, thar weren’t many adventure games coming out- let alone fer consoles. This game be broken down into a series of one-room mini-adventure games. If ye can track down a copy, ye owe it to yerself to give ‘er a whirl.

#2 - Tales of Monkey Island – July 7, 2009
(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/5/53/Tales_of_Monkey_Island_artwork.jpg)
Avast! It be the continued adventures of Guybrush Threepwood- mighty pirate. Long after we’d given up hope for another Monkey Island game, Telltale came along and let us get our pirate on one more time. It don’t have the luster of the previous entries, but it still be a good time!

#1 - Sid Meyer’s Pirates – November 22, 2004
(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/7/70/Sid_Meier%27s_Pirates%21_%282004%29_Coverart.png)

This be the ultimate pirate sim! Ye get yer ship, get yer crew, and sail the seas in search of love, plunder, an’ buried treasure. I make it a habit to play it every year around this time. It puts me in a piratey mood!

An’ that’ll do fer now! Tune in tonight fer the top ten, an’ I’ll stop talkin’ pirate!
Title: Re: LoC #81 - Top 50 Video Games of the Oughts
Post by: Relaxing Dragon on September 19, 2014, 01:25:15 AM
Pak's Thoughts – Tyrant and I were beating this game at a pretty steady pace until we got to the part where the bad guys are firing catapults at you. We kind of rage-quit it at that part. I think we eventually made it through that scene a couple years later, but we never got our groove back and have yet to finish it…

Sniper rifle and a lot of back-and-forth running across the tower across the way, and that part's no problem.

Those Iron Maidens, though... those always got to me.

This game is a ton of fun, even if I preferred the series back when it was more survival horror and less action-y. But the action flows so well it's hard to gripe, to say nothing of the fact that it's nice not to feel like you're trying to steer a tank around a chair every time you want to move around.
Title: Re: LoC #81 - Top 50 Video Games of the Oughts
Post by: Quantum Vagina on September 19, 2014, 08:42:47 AM
I think it should be mentioned that Brawl is a significantly better game if you mod it. Project M is the standard for competitive Brawl, because it makes the game more fast paced and hectic.
Title: Re: LoC #81 - Top 50 Video Games of the Oughts
Post by: Johnny Unusual on September 19, 2014, 12:18:13 PM
#13–Wii Sports

(38 Points) 2 of 11 Lists - Highest Ranking - #1 – Johnny Unusual
(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/e/e0/Wii_Sports_Europe.jpg)
Welcome to the world of Wii Sports: A new way to play! 


This was a fantastic game and one of the few that really took advantage of the wii-motes.  Too many of the others are more wonky, but Wii Tennis worked great.
Title: Re: LoC #81 - Top 50 Video Games of the Oughts
Post by: RoninFox on September 19, 2014, 01:48:10 PM
#13–Wii Sports

(38 Points) 2 of 11 Lists - Highest Ranking - #1 – Johnny Unusual
(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/e/e0/Wii_Sports_Europe.jpg)
Welcome to the world of Wii Sports: A new way to play! 


This was a fantastic game and one of the few that really took advantage of the wii-motes.  Too many of the others are more wonky, but Wii Tennis worked great.

Even if the movement was crazy at times, there were few things as fun as our apartment Wii-Boxing tournaments when I first hooked up the system.
Title: Re: LoC #81 - Top 50 Video Games of the Oughts
Post by: PsychoGoatee on September 19, 2014, 02:27:18 PM
It should also be noted that Vice City has the best soundtrack ever, pretty much the best 80s compilation in existence right there. And the best one-liners of glorious beautiful cheese belong to Leon Kennedy in RE4, oh yes! Saddler.. you're small time!
Title: Re: LoC #81 - Top 50 Video Games of the Oughts
Post by: Johnny Unusual on September 19, 2014, 03:09:44 PM
I have a difference GTA preference, which might come up.  That said, Vice City is pretty great and a lot of fun.
Title: Re: LoC #81 - Top 50 Video Games of the Oughts
Post by: Pak-Man on September 20, 2014, 12:09:36 AM
#10–Grand Theft Auto: San Andreas

(43 Points) 2 of 11 Lists - Highest Ranking - #3 – Johnny Unusual
(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/c/c4/GTASABOX.jpg)
See, baby, I got everything... Mink sheets... Mink coats... Mink curtains in the window. When I walk down the stairs, I'm walking down on... mink carpet. 
Release Date:  October 26, 2004
Just the facts/Stuff I wiki'd:
Grand Theft Auto: San Andreas is an open world action-adventure video game developed by Rockstar North and published by Rockstar Games. It was released on 26 October 2004 for the PlayStation 2 console. It is the seventh title in the Grand Theft Auto series, and the first main entry since 2002's Grand Theft Auto: Vice City. It was released on the same day as the handheld game Grand Theft Auto Advance.
 
Grand Theft Auto: San Andreas is played from a third-person perspective in an open world environment, allowing the player to interact with the game world at their leisure. The game is set within the fictional U.S. state of San Andreas, which is heavily based on California and Nevada. The state of San Andreas consists of three metropolitan cities: Los Santos, based on Los Angeles; San Fierro, based on San Francisco; and Las Venturas, based on Las Vegas. The single-player story follows Carl "CJ" Johnson, who returns home to Los Santos after learning of his mother's murder. CJ finds his old friends and family in disarray, and over the course of the game he attempts to re-establish his old gang, clashes with corrupt cops, and gradually unravels the truth behind his mother's murder. The plot is based on multiple real-life events in Los Angeles, including the rivalry between the Bloods and Crips street gangs, the 1980s crack epidemic, the LAPD Rampart scandal, and the 1992 Los Angeles riots.
 
Upon its release, the game was acclaimed by many reviewers who praised the music, story and gameplay. It became the best-selling video game of 2004, and has sold over 27 million copies; it remains the best-selling PlayStation 2 game of all time. The game, like its predecessors, is cited as a landmark in video games for its far-reaching influence within the industry. The violence and sexual content of San Andreas has been the source of public concern and controversy. In particular, a player-made software patch, dubbed the "Hot Coffee mod", unlocked a previously hidden sexual mini-game.
 
San Andreas is structured similarly to the previous two games in the series. The core gameplay consists of elements of a third-person shooter and a driving game, affording the player a large, open world environment in which to move around. On foot, the player's character is capable of walking, eating, running, sprinting, swimming, climbing and jumping as well as using weapons and various forms of hand-to-hand combat. Players can drive a variety of vehicles, including automobiles, buses, semis, boats, fixed wing aircraft, helicopters, trains, tanks, motorcycles and bikes. Players may also import vehicles rather than steal them.
 
The open, non-linear environment allows players to explore and choose how they wish to play the game. Although storyline missions are necessary to progress through the game and unlock certain cities and content, they are not required as players can complete them at their own leisure. When not taking on a storyline mission, players can free-roam and look around the cities, eat from the restaurant, or cause havoc by attacking people and causing destruction. Creating havoc can attract unwanted and potentially fatal attention from the authorities. The more chaos caused, the stronger the response: police will handle "minor" infractions (attacking pedestrians, pointing guns at people, stealing vehicles, manslaughter, etc.), whereas SWAT teams, the FBI, and the military respond to higher wanted levels.

In mid-June 2005, a software patch for the game dubbed the "Hot Coffee mod" was released by Patrick Wildenborg (under the Internet alias "PatrickW"), a 38-year old modder from the Netherlands. The name "Hot Coffee" refers to the way the released game alludes to the unseen sex scenes. In the unmodified game, the player takes his girlfriend to her front door and she asks him if he would like to come in for "some coffee". He agrees, and the camera stays outside, swaying back and forth a bit, while moaning sounds are heard.
 
After installing the patch, users can enter the main character's girlfriends' houses and engage in a crudely rendered, fully clothed or nude sexual intercourse mini-game. The fallout from the controversy resulted in a public response from high-ranking politicians in the United States and elsewhere and resulted in the game's recall and re-release.

On 20 July 2005, North America's organization that establishes content ratings for video games, the ESRB, changed the rating of the game from Mature (M) to Adults Only (AO), making San Andreas the only mass-released AO console game in the United States. Rockstar announced that it would cease production of the version of the game that included the controversial content. Rockstar gave distributors the option of applying an Adults Only ESRB rating sticker to copies of the game, or returning them to be replaced by versions without the Hot Coffee content. Many retailers pulled the game off their shelves in compliance with their own store regulations that kept them from selling AO games. That same month in Australia, the Office of Film and Literature Classification revoked its original rating of MA15+, meaning that the game could no longer be sold there.

Pak's Thoughts – Again, I’ve never really played any of the GTA games, but I do remember the whole Hot Coffee controversy. I never quite agreed with the ESRB ruling. If you have to patch a game to unlock the dirty content, then I say the rating still refers to the unpatched game. However you patch it after the fact is your own business.
Title: Re: LoC #81 - Top 50 Video Games of the Oughts
Post by: Pak-Man on September 20, 2014, 12:10:20 AM
#9–Rock Band

(43 Points) 2 of 11 Lists - Highest Ranking - #2 – ColeStratton
(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/e/e0/Rock_band_cover.jpg)
Release Date:  November 20, 2007
Just the facts/Stuff I wiki'd:
Rock Band is a music video game developed by Harmonix, published by MTV Games and Electronic Arts. It is the first title in the Rock Band series. The Xbox 360 and PlayStation 3 versions were released in the North America on November 20, 2007.
 
Rock Band allows up to four players to simulate the performance of popular rock music songs by playing with controllers modeled after musical instruments. Players can play the lead guitar, bass guitar, and drums parts to songs with "instrument controllers", as well as sing through a USB microphone. Players are scored on their ability to match scrolling musical "notes" while playing instruments, or by their ability to match the singer's pitch on vocals. Players with the Xbox 360 and PlayStation 3 versions can interact through both online and offline multiplayer capabilities. In addition to the 58 core songs included on the game disc, over 2,000 downloadable songs were released for the Xbox 360 and PlayStation 3 versions.
 
At launch, the game software was made available in a bundle that packaged it together with the instrument peripherals, as well as for purchase separately. Individual instrument peripherals were released at a later date. The game has received widespread critical acclaim, with sales of four million units and global revenues of $600 million. Players have made over 100 million downloadable song purchases since Rock Band's release.

Reusing many gameplay elements from the Guitar Hero series, Rock Band players use peripherals modeled after musical instruments to simulate the performance of rock music. Players use these instruments by playing scrolling musical "notes" on-screen in time with the music. Rock Band expands upon the Guitar Hero series, in that it offers gameplay for drums and vocals, in addition to lead and bass guitar.
 
Rock Band's gameplay and on-screen interface uses a combination of elements from Guitar Hero and Karaoke Revolution. Rock Band has up to three tracks of vertically scrolling colored music notes, one section each for lead guitar, drums, and bass. The colored notes on-screen correspond to buttons on the guitar and drum peripherals. For lead and bass guitar, players play their notes by holding down colored fret buttons on the guitar peripheral and pushing the controller's strum bar; for drums, players must strike the matching colored drumhead, or step on the pedal to simulate playing bass drum notes. Along the top of the screen is the vocals display, which scrolls horizontally, similar to Karaoke Revolution. The lyrics display beneath green bars, which represent the pitch of the individual vocal elements. When singing vocals, the player must sing in relative pitch to the original vocals. A pitch indicator displays the singer's accuracy relative to the original pitch. The remainder of the screen is used to display the band's virtual characters as they perform in concert.

Pak's Thoughts – Never got into Rock Band. While most of the world was heroically playing guitar or starting rock bands, I was jamming out to Samba De Amigo and Dance Dance Revolution. To each their own, I suppose.
Title: Re: LoC #81 - Top 50 Video Games of the Oughts
Post by: Pak-Man on September 20, 2014, 12:10:42 AM
#8–Silent Hill 2

(46 Points) 3 of 11 Lists - Highest Ranking - #5 – Relaxing Dragon
(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/9/95/Silent_Hill_2.jpg)
Don't worry..I'm not crazy. At least I don't think so.
Release Date:  September 24, 2001
Just the facts/Stuff I wiki'd:
Silent Hill 2 is a survival horror video game published by Konami for the PlayStation 2 and developed by Team Silent, a production group within Konami Computer Entertainment Tokyo. The game was released in September 2001 as the second installment in the Silent Hill series
 
While set in the series' eponymous fictional American town, Silent Hill 2 is not a direct sequel to the first Silent Hill game. Instead, it centers on James Sunderland, who enters the town after receiving a letter written by his deceased wife, saying she is waiting for him in their "special place" in Silent Hill. Joined by Maria, who strongly resembles her, he searches for her and discovers the truth about her death. Additional material in re-releases and ports included Born from a Wish, a sub-scenario which focuses on Maria before she and James meet.
 
Silent Hill 2 uses a third-person view and gameplay places a greater emphasis on finding items and solving riddles than combat. Psychological aspects such as the gradual disappearance of Mary's letter were added to the game. More humanoid than their counterparts in the preceding game, some of the monsters were designed as a reflection of James' subconscious. References to real world history, films and literary works can also be found in the game.
 
Silent Hill 2 was positively received by the audience and critics. Within the month of its release in North America, Japan, and Europe, over one million copies were sold, with the greatest sales in North America. English-language critics praised the atmosphere, graphics, story and monster designs of Silent Hill 2, but criticized the controls as difficult to use.
 
Since its release Silent Hill 2 appeared on several critics' top lists for its story and use of metaphors, psychological horror and taboo topics as well as its soundtrack/sound design. It has since topped several critics lists for the greatest horror game of all-time.

Pak's Thoughts – Good ol’ fashioned nightmare fuel! I haven’t played very much of this one, but my brother was way into it. Once, in the middle of the night, I got a knock on my door. It was my brother, at the time legally an adult, asking me if I would walk him to the kitchen.  That’s some powerful creepy, right there.
Title: Re: LoC #81 - Top 50 Video Games of the Oughts
Post by: Pak-Man on September 20, 2014, 12:11:04 AM
#7–Half Life 2

(56 Points) 3 of 11 Lists - Highest Ranking - #5 – CJones
(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/2/25/Half-Life_2_cover.jpg)
Rise and shine, Mister Freeman, rise and … shine.
Release Date:  November 16, 2004
Just the facts/Stuff I wiki'd:
Half-Life 2, the sequel to Half-Life, is a first-person shooter video game and part of the Half-Life series. Developed by Valve Corporation, it was initially released on November 16, 2004, following a protracted five-year, $40 million development cycle, during which a substantial part of the project was leaked and distributed on the Internet.
 
The game was developed alongside Valve's Steam software. It introduced the Source game engine and, because of Steam, was the first single-player video game to require online product activation.
 
Like its predecessor, Half-Life 2 is a single-player first-person shooter broken into several chapters, permanently casting the player as the protagonist Gordon Freeman. The sequel has nearly the same mechanics as Half-Life, including health-and-weapon systems and periodic physics puzzles, except with the newer Source Engine and improved graphics. The player also starts without items, slowly building up an arsenal over the course of the game. Despite the game's mainly linear nature, much effort was put into making exploration rewarding and interesting; many optional areas can be missed or avoided.
 
A diverse set of enemies are present, which usually require being approached with different tactics: some coordinate in groups to out-maneuver or out-position the player; others, like the Manhack, fly directly at the player through small openings and tight corridors; some use predictable but powerful attacks, while others hide before swiftly attacking the player. Gordon can kill most enemies with his weapons, or make use of indirect means, exploiting environmental hazards such as explosive pressurized canisters, gas fires or improvised traps. At one point in the game, Gordon can be joined by up to four armed Resistance soldiers, and can send his team further from him or call them back; however, they can still die easily due to lack of damage protection. Squad members are indicated on the HUD (squad member icons with a cross sign are field medics).

Pak's Thoughts – Half Life was an excellent shooter, but I never quite beat it and so I never took the leap to Half Life 2. Everything I’ve seen and the popularity of certain characters way back when I was doing the Top 50 Video Game Characters list makes me excited to try it, but I just really need to get through part 1 first…
Title: Re: LoC #81 - Top 50 Video Games of the Oughts
Post by: Pak-Man on September 20, 2014, 12:12:00 AM
#6–Shadow of the Colossus

(64 Points) 3 of 11 Lists - Highest Ranking - #3 – CJones
(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/b/bf/Sotc_boxart.jpg)
Raise thy sword by the light, and head to the place where the sword's light gathers.
Release Date:  October 18, 2005
Just the facts/Stuff I wiki'd:
Shadow of the Colossus is an action-adventure game published by Sony Computer Entertainment (SCEI) for the PlayStation 2. The game was released in North America and Japan in October 2005 and PAL territories in February 2006. It was directed by Fumito Ueda and developed at SCEI's International Production Studio 1, also known as Team Ico; the same development team responsible for the cult hit Ico. Shadow of the Colossus is considered a spiritual successor to Ico. Along with Ico, Shadow of the Colossus was re-released in The Ico & Shadow of the Colossus Collection (ICO & Shadow of the Colossus Classics HD in the PAL region) for the PlayStation 3 in September 2011; it features high-definition (HD) graphics, content previously missing from the North American version, PlayStation Network Trophies, and 3D support. The HD version was released separately in Japan.
 
The game's storyline focuses on a young man named Wander who enters a forbidden land. Wander must travel across a vast expanse on horseback and defeat sixteen massive beings, known simply as colossi, in order to restore the life of a girl named Mono. The game is unusual within the action-adventure genre in that there are no towns or dungeons to explore, no characters with which to interact, and no enemies to defeat other than the colossi. Shadow of the Colossus has been described as a puzzle game, as each colossus' weakness must be identified and exploited before it can be defeated.
 
Cited as an influential title in the video game industry, Shadow of the Colossus is often regarded as an important example of video game art due to its minimalist landscape designs, immersive gameplay and emotional journey. It received wide critical acclaim by the media and was met with strong sales compared to Ico, due in part to a larger marketing campaign. The soundtrack was also widely praised. The game won several awards for its audio, design, and overall quality. Shadow of the Colossus is also referenced numerous times in debates regarding the art quality and emotional perspectives of video games.

Progression through Shadow of the Colossus occurs in cycles. Beginning at a central point in an expansive landscape, the player seeks out and defeats a colossus, and is then returned to the central point to repeat the process. To find each colossus, Wander may raise his sword while in a sunlit area to reflect beams of light, which will converge when the sword is pointed in the right direction of the next encounter. The journey to a colossus is seldom a straightforward matter: stretches of varied terrain often require that a detour be taken along the way. Most colossi are located in remote areas, such as atop cliffs or within ancient structures.

Once a colossus is found, the player must discover its weaknesses to defeat it. Each colossus dwells in a unique lair, and many colossi cannot be defeated without making use of the surrounding environment. Every colossus has at least one weak point, indicated by a glowing sigil that can be illuminated and identified by the sword's reflected light. Each colossus has areas covered with fur or protruding ledges, which Wander may use to grip and scale the colossus while it thrashes about in an attempt to dislodge him. While scaling a colossus, the player must act quickly, as Wander has a limited stamina gauge that decreases while he hangs onto the creature.

Pak's Thoughts – A beautiful game that abandons pretense and says, “We know why you’re here. You want boss fights. Get to it! Isolating the challenge to conquering the colossi means that every boss fight you have is well thought out and uniquely challenging.

And we’re down to the Top 5. I can say without hyperbole that the Top 5 consists of 5 of the greatest games ever made. Which ones? Read on!
Title: Re: LoC #81 - Top 50 Video Games of the Oughts
Post by: Pak-Man on September 20, 2014, 12:12:40 AM
#5–Super Smash Bros. Melee

(67 Points) 4 of 11 Lists - Highest Ranking - #3 – Quantum Vagina
(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/7/75/Super_Smash_Bros_Melee_box_art.png)
Show me your moves!
Release Date:  November 21, 2001
Just the facts/Stuff I wiki'd:
Super Smash Bros. Melee is a crossover fighting game released for the Nintendo GameCube shortly after its launch in 2001 (2002 in the PAL region). It is the second game in the Super Smash Bros. series, following the first game released for Nintendo 64 in 1999. HAL Laboratory developed the game, with Masahiro Sakurai as head of production.
 
The game is centered on characters from Nintendo's video gaming franchises such as Mario, The Legend of Zelda, and Pokémon. The stages and gameplay modes make references to, or take their designs from, popular games released by Nintendo. Melee's gameplay system offers an unorthodox approach to the "fighter" genre as percentage counters measure the level of damage received, rather than the health bar traditionally seen in most fighting games. It builds on the first game's broad appeal by adding new features related to gameplay and playable characters. Following the popularity of its multiplayer gameplay, Melee has been featured in several multiplayer gaming tournaments.

Like its predecessor, Super Smash Bros. Melee differs from traditional fighting games in that inflicting the most damage does not guarantee victory. Instead, opposing players must force their opponents beyond the boundaries of the stage. Most attacks inflict damage and can, if enough damage is dealt, knock back the enemy. Each character's health is measured by a meter that represents the damage received as a percentage. The higher the percentage value, the farther the player gets knocked back, and the easier they are to knock off the stage. Unlike other games of the same genre, in which moves are entered by button-input combinations, most moves in Super Smash Bros. Melee can be accessed via one-button presses and a joystick direction.
 
During battles, items related to Nintendo games or merchandise fall onto the game field. These items have purposes ranging from inflicting damage on the opponent to restoring health to the player. Additionally, most stages have a theme relating to a Nintendo franchise or a specific Nintendo game and are interactive to the player. Although the stages are rendered in three dimensions, players can only move on a two-dimensional plane. Not all stages are available immediately; some stages must be "unlocked" by achieving particular requirements.

Pak's Thoughts – Don’t get me wrong. I love this game and I’ve devoted a hefty portion of my life to it, but how did this do so much better then Brawl? Brawl was an improvement in every way. It was this game, but more. That said, it’s good to see the top 5 starting with such an awesome title, and it keeps getting better from here..
Title: Re: LoC #81 - Top 50 Video Games of the Oughts
Post by: Pak-Man on September 20, 2014, 12:13:18 AM
#4–BioShock

(75 Points) 4 of 11 Lists - Highest Ranking - #1 – Relaxing Dragon
(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/6/6d/BioShock_cover.jpg)
I am Andrew Ryan, and I'm here to ask you a question. Is a man not entitled to the sweat of his brow? "No," says the man in Washington, "it belongs to the poor." "No," says the man in the Vatican, "it belongs to God." "No," says the man in Moscow, "it belongs to everyone." I rejected those answers; instead, I chose something different. I chose the impossible. I chose... Rapture. A city where the artist would not fear the censor; where the scientist would not be bound by petty morality; where the great would not be constrained by the small! And with the sweat of your brow, Rapture can become your city as well.
Release Date:  August 21, 2007
Just the facts/Stuff I wiki'd:
BioShock is a biopunk first-person shooter video game with horror themes developed by 2K Boston (later Irrational Games), and published by 2K Games. The game was released for Microsoft Windows and Xbox 360 platforms in August 2007. The game's concept was developed by Irrational's creative lead, Ken Levine, and was based on the ideas of Objectivism as highlighted by Ayn Rand, while incorporating influences from other authors such as George Orwell. The game is considered a spiritual successor to the System Shock series, which many of Irrational's team including Levine had worked on previously.
 
BioShock is set in 1960, in which the player guides the protagonist, Jack, after his airplane crashes in the ocean near the bathysphere terminus that leads to the underwater city of Rapture. Built by the business magnate Andrew Ryan, the city was intended to be an isolated utopia, but the discovery of ADAM, a plasmid which grants superhuman powers, initiated the city's turbulent decline. Jack tries to find a way to escape, fighting through hordes of ADAM-obsessed enemies such as the deadly Big Daddies, while engaging with the few sane humans that remain and eventually learning of Rapture's past. The player, as Jack, is able to defeat foes in a number of ways by using weapons, utilizing plasmids that give unique powers and by turning Rapture's own defenses against them. BioShock includes elements of role-playing games, giving the player different approaches in engaging enemies such as by stealth, as well as moral choices of saving or killing characters.

BioShock is a first-person shooter with role-playing game customization and stealth elements, and is similar to System Shock 2. The player takes the role of Jack as he is guided through Rapture towards various objectives. The player collects various weapons and plasmids as they work their way through enemy forces. The player can switch between one active weapon and one active plasmid at any time, allowing them to find combination attacks that can be effective against certain enemies, such as first shocking a Splicer then striking them down with a wrench. Weapons are limited by ammunition that the player collects; many weapons have secondary ammo types that can be used instead for additional benefits, such as bullets that inflict fire damage. Plasmid use consume a serum called EVE which can be restored using EVE syringes collected by the player. The player has a health meter that decreases when they take damage. The player can restore their health with medical packs found throughout Rapture. If the player's health reduces to zero, they will be regenerated at the last Vita-Chamber that they passed with limited amounts of health and EVE. A patch for the game disables these Vita-Chambers, requiring players to restart a saved game if the character dies.

Pak's Thoughts – I fell in love with this game as soon as I played the intro. What I love about that intro is that it never takes control away from the player. No cut scenes. It doesn’t lock your feet to the ground or change the camera to an external one. If the game wants you to watch a movie, it ensures that the movie is the only really interesting thing to be watching at the time. You can stare at the bathysphere ceiling if you want to, but why would you? Because it never takes that control from you, you stay emerged in the game and it just never stops….
Title: Re: LoC #81 - Top 50 Video Games of the Oughts
Post by: Pak-Man on September 20, 2014, 12:13:50 AM
#3– Sid Meier's Civilization IV

(77 Points) 4 of 11 Lists - Highest Ranking - #2 – Compound
(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/7/7e/CivIVboxshot.jpg)
Just one more turn…
Release Date:  October 25, 2005
Just the facts/Stuff I wiki'd:
Sid Meier's Civilization IV is a turn-based strategy computer game and the fourth installment of the Civilization series. It was developed by lead designer Soren Johnson under the direction of Sid Meier and his video game development studio Firaxis Games, and then first released in North America, Europe, and Australia, between October 25 and November 4 of 2005.
 
Civilization IV uses the 4X empire-building model for turn-based strategy gameplay, in which the player's main objective is to construct a civilization from limited initial resources. Most standard full-length games start the player with a settler unit and/or a city unit in the year 4000 BC. As with other games in the series, there are by default five objectives the player can pursue in order to finish the game: conquering other civilizations, controlling a supermajority of the game world's land and population, building and sending the first sleeper ship to the Alpha Centauri star system, increasing the "Culture ratings" of at least three different cities to "legendary" levels, or winning a "World Leader" popularity contest by the United Nations. However, if the time limit for the game is reached and none of the previous goals has been fulfilled by any players including game AI players, the civilization with the highest total game score is declared winner. A large departure from earlier Civilization games is a new graphics engine created from scratch, based on the Gamebryo engine by Numerical Design Limited (NDL).
 
The game has generally received nearly universal acclaim and was hailed as an example product of one of the leading video game producers in the turn-based strategy genre. Civilization IV has sold 3 million copies and won multiple awards, including several Game of the Year awards. In addition to this, Firaxis Games has also released two other major expansions, Civilization IV: Warlords and Civilization IV: Beyond the Sword, plus the standalone game Civilization IV: Colonization, which were all combined in 2007 into one release edition titled Sid Meier's Civilization IV: The Complete Edition.

Civilization IV follows some of the 4X model of turn-based strategy games, a genre in which players control an empire and "explore, expand, exploit, and exterminate", by having the player attempt to lead a modest group of peoples from a base with initially scarce resources into a successful empire or civilization. The condition for winning the game is accomplished through one of the five ways: militarily defeating all other civilizations in the game world, controlling over two-thirds of the game world's land and population, building the first spaceship in the Space Age and sending it to Alpha Centauri, having the most dominant Culture ratings over other civilizations, or becoming "World Leader" through the United Nations votes. Additionally, there are multiple game scores for each civilization throughout the game based on the actions of each civilization and a number of different factors, allowing for a win condition based on the total of these points if the game timer runs out. The game can be played in multiple modes: as a single player facing against one or more computer-controlled opponents, or through online multiplayer games.
 
As with other turn-based strategy video games, the player can customize the look and feel of their game world as well as the difficulty of any game AI players before the game starts. Each map space has a terrain type, such as plains, tundra, or desert, that affects the available resources players can extract from their environments and the movements of certain units through that terrain. The player is then given a total of 18 different civilizations to choose from, each with their own pros and cons, plus a leader avatar, an initial set of civilization technology, and any units unique to that civilization. When the game starts, however, it chooses random locations to place across a predefined square grid map. Like other strategy games, Civilization IV has a fog of war feature, in which unexplored territory remains darkened and territories without any units stationed on its designated square is shaded with darker colors.

The game had a viral marketing campaign, revolving around a fictitious self-help organization known as Civilization Anonymous (shortened to CivAnon), the intention being to satirise how addictive the game was. With the slogan "No More Turns", the premise was the following: "Rumors have begun to circulate that the newest edition of the "One More Turn" franchise is on its way. STAY AWAY from this game at all costs. You will likely be powerless to its extreme addictive properties once exposed". Various characters were created, and their scenarios were included in various trailers showing the "inside [of] a Civanon meeting for [Civiization] addicts., the first of which being played during E3 2005 once an hour at the 2K Games booth These "video testimonials of supposedly recovering Civilization addicts" also featured cameos by Sid Meier. In addition to this, "official" website was created by 2K Games with extra content. The Civilization Anonymous campaign was brought back for the following game Civilization V. Break described the campaign as "hilarious", while Kotaku described it as a "great promotional campaign" that "comes across as terrifyingly realistic". Destructoid shared this view, saying the support group campaign is "a clever marketing tool", but wishing it existed as "we all know there really are people who suffer from one-more-turn-itis". VantureBeat said the campaign was "incredibly clever and funny", adding "what made it so powerful was not the near-flawless execution and fine detail; it was the fact that it could have been real". 'Ctrl-Alt-Play: Essays on Control in Video Gaming noted the spoof highlighted the series' "hyper-addictive turn-based gameplay".

Pak's Thoughts – If you ever find yourself wishing you could just make the next couple of days completely vanish into the aether, this is the game you boot up to make that happen. There is nothing like plopping your first city down on a prime piece of real estate, picking your first of many technologies, and turning your fledgling city into an empire to be reckoned with. I have a tendency to forget to battle my rivals, though. I’m always too focused on building the next wonder, or connecting my cities via roads, or gaining access to new resources. Most of my victories have been space victories.
Title: Re: LoC #81 - Top 50 Video Games of the Oughts
Post by: Pak-Man on September 20, 2014, 12:14:31 AM
#2–Mass Effect

(81 Points) 6 of 11 Lists - Highest Ranking - #8 – Pak-Man and lassieface
(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/e/e8/MassEffect.jpg)
We impose order on the chaos of organic evolution. You exist because we allow it, and you will end because we demand it.
Release Date:  November 16, 2007
Just the facts/Stuff I wiki'd:
Mass Effect is a 2007 science fiction action role-playing third person shooter video game developed by BioWare for the Xbox 360 and ported to Microsoft Windows by Demiurge Studios. The Xbox 360 version was released worldwide in November 2007, published by Microsoft Game Studios. The Microsoft Windows version was released on May 28, 2008, published by Electronic Arts. A PlayStation 3 version from Edge of Reality was released through the Mass Effect trilogy and digitally as a standalone title on PlayStation Network in December 2012.
 
The game takes place in the year 2183, with the player assuming direct control of an elite human soldier named Commander Shepard and setting out to explore the Galaxy on a starship, the SSV Normandy. The eponymous "mass effect" is a form of inertia-suppressing technology, allowing faster-than-light travel.
 
Mass Effect was met with overwhelmingly positive reviews from general publications. Combat and visuals were receiving generally positive responses but much acclaim was given to interactive storytelling, great characters, dialogue, choices and atmospheric scores. Several reviewers deemed Mass Effect as the "Best story ever told in gaming history".

Although most of the game's screen shots and concept art show the same "default" male/female Commander Shepard, it is possible for the player to fully customize his or her character's appearance, gender, abilities and even military background.
 
The game includes six character classes. Each class contains several "talents"; as each talent is leveled, the character either gains stats (extra health, stamina, etc), unlocks new abilities (for example leveling the Shotgun talent unlocks the "Carnage" ability, which allows the character to fire a concentrated explosive blast from the shotgun), or unlocks other talents. Each class also possesses a unique talent with the same name as its respective class; the characters may also have talents tied to their background. Characters who have reached level 20 will unlock a "Rogue VI" side-mission on Luna (Earth's moon) in the Sol System, upon the completion of which the player is allowed to choose a new specialist class, which in turn unlocks a new talent bar. The specialist class the character is offered depends on the base class.
 
When characters are first created, six classes are available: Soldier, Engineer, Adept, Infiltrator, Sentinel, and Vanguard. Soldiers are the most skilled with weaponry, Engineers make the most use of the omni-tool and tech-abilities, and Adepts are the best at using biotic powers. The other three classes are combinations of the first three: Infiltrators are a combination of Soldiers and Engineers, Sentinels are a combination of Engineers and Adepts, and Vanguards are a combination of Soldiers and Adepts. While the combination classes do not have the focus of the main classes, they are versatile and offer unique game-play opportunities. (Vanguards, for example, have access to half of the soldier skills and half of the Adept skills).
 
Players also have some control over their character's back story. They are able to choose to have been either a "spacer" (born and bred in space), a "colonist" (born on one of Earth's extra-solar colonies), or "Earth-born" (hailing from the streets of one of Earth's cities). They also choose whether they have been the sole survivor of a terrible battle, a war hero, or a ruthless soldier. These backgrounds have only a small effect in the game, although many characters will reference the player's chosen background when talking to Commander Shepard. The character's background can also affect whether some side quests are available or not. With only a few exceptions, the character's background does not directly affect the player's dialogue choices.

Pak's Thoughts – I want to live in this universe. I love the characters, love the setting, love the space opera, love the story, and I love that all of the decisions I make in this game echo through the next 2. Sure, the game was a little clunky while BioWare tried to figure out the right balance between RPG and third person shooter, and sure the poorly disguised and seemingly endless elevator loading sequences were a pain, but the overall experience is like none other.
Title: Re: LoC #81 - Top 50 Video Games of the Oughts
Post by: Pak-Man on September 20, 2014, 12:15:08 AM
#1–Portal

(94 Points) 6 of 11 Lists - Highest Ranking - #1 –lassieface
(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/9/9f/Portal_standalonebox.jpg)
This was a triumph. I’m making a note here: HUGE SUCCESS.
Release Date:  October 9, 2007
Just the facts/Stuff I wiki'd:
Portal is a 2007 first-person puzzle-platform video game developed by Valve Corporation. The game was released in a bundle package called The Orange Box for Microsoft Windows and Xbox 360 on October 9, 2007.
 
The game primarily comprises a series of puzzles that must be solved by teleporting the player's character and simple objects using "the Aperture Science Handheld Portal Device", a device that can create inter-spatial portals between two flat planes. The player-character, Chell, is challenged by an artificial intelligence named GLaDOS (Genetic Lifeform and Disk Operating System) to complete each puzzle in the Aperture Science Enrichment Center using the portal gun with the promise of receiving cake when all the puzzles are completed. The game's unique physics allows momentum to be retained through portals, requiring creative use of portals to maneuver through the test chambers. This gameplay element is based on a similar concept from the game Narbacular Drop; many of the team members from the DigiPen Institute of Technology who worked on Narbacular Drop were hired by Valve for the creation of Portal.
 
Portal was acclaimed as one of the most original games of 2007, despite being considered short in length. The game received praise for its unique gameplay and darkly humorous story. It received acclaim for the character of GLaDOS, voiced by Ellen McLain in the English-language version, and the end credits song "Still Alive" written by Jonathan Coulton for the game. Not counting sales through Steam, over four million copies of the game have been sold since its release. The game's popularity has led to official merchandise from Valve including plush Companion Cubes, as well as fan recreations of the cake and portal gun.

In Portal, the player controls the protagonist, Chell, from a first-person perspective as she is challenged to navigate through a series of rooms using the Aperture Science Handheld Portal Device, or portal gun. The portal gun can create two distinct portal ends, orange and blue. The portals create a visual and physical connection between two different locations in three-dimensional space. Neither end is specifically an entrance or exit; all objects that travel through one portal will exit through the other. An important aspect of the game's physics is momentum redirection. As moving objects pass through portals, they come through the exit portal at the same direction as the exit portal is facing and with the same speed with which they passed through the entrance portal. For example, a common maneuver is to jump down to a portal on the floor and emerge through a wall, flying over a gap or another obstacle. This allows the player to launch objects or Chell herself over great distances, both vertically and horizontally, referred to as 'flinging' by Valve. As GLaDOS puts it, "In layman's terms: speedy thing goes in, speedy thing comes out." If portal ends are not on parallel planes, the character passing through is reoriented to be upright with respect to gravity after leaving a portal end.

Pak's Thoughts – This would have merely been a pretty decent and successful puzzle-platformer if not for the addition of GLaDOS. By the time you’ve made it to the final showdown with GLaDOS, you’re very much ready for it. Her voice- one of the only other voices in the game- has been taunting you for over 2 hours. And while GLaDOS’ passive-aggressive barbs are aimed at player-character Chell, you’re really eager to shut her up once and for all. Plus there was that whole thing with the companion cube. The vengeance isn’t Chell’s vengeance. It’s yours.

I’m not sure if I’d call Portal the best game of its decade, but it was probably one of the most important. This is the game that spawned a billion memes. It holds a special place in the heart of anyone who plays it, and it’s a worthy number one.

That’s all, folks. Thanks to everyone who submitted, and additional thanks to everyone who’s been reading along and following the list.
Title: Re: LoC #81 - Top 50 Video Games of the Oughts
Post by: Compound on September 20, 2014, 01:38:17 AM
I am Andrew Ryan, and I'm here to ask you a question. Is a man not entitled to the sweat of his brow? "No," says the man in Washington, "it belongs to the poor." "No," says the man in the Vatican, "it belongs to God." "No," says the man in Moscow, "it belongs to everyone." I rejected those answers; instead, I chose something different. I chose the impossible. I chose... Rapture. A city where the artist would not fear the censor; where the scientist would not be bound by petty morality; where the great would not be constrained by the small! And with the sweat of your brow, Rapture can become your city as well.

I am still pissed off that my Bioshock riff got rejected from the Batman and Robin riff. Perfect bucketman joke and it got left on the cutting room floor.

Nothing to do with the list, just that damn quote always reminds me of it.
Title: Re: LoC #81 - Top 50 Video Games of the Oughts
Post by: Johnny Unusual on September 20, 2014, 07:52:25 AM
Great list.  Thanks for the fantastic job, Pak. 

Melee made it high than Brawl for me simply because me and my friends spent a LOT more time with it.  A lot.  We loved Brawl, but we stopped playing it pretty quick.  Also, I don't really like the Smash Ball mechanic in that one, especially since some are so much more potent and unfair than others.

San Andreas was my top GTA game easily.  GTA IV was good but it had some problems: it felt a little more sluggish, and Niko Bellic is an alright character but he is so humourless and dour that it feels inappropriate for the franchise where the fun is rising up the ranks.  In fact, that never really happens in the game either.  I much prefer being able to buy businesses and making my own little empire.  On the other hand, Vice City is good but I don't like Tommy as a character too much.  I think the fact that CJ has loyalties, values and people he likes (as well as the fact that he starts under some people's thumbs and gets betrayed, which makes you want him to succeed) make it a real winner.  It also helps that it is just FUN!  I love the setting, that goes from faux-Hollywood to the backwoods to faux-Vegas and more, there is all sorts of hidden stuff that makes the game super playable and it is just huge in a way that most of the other games weren't, even the admittedly very good Vice City.

Shadow of the Colossus, Bioshock and Portal also made it pretty high on my list.  Great games all.

1.   Wii Sports
2.   Portal
3.   Grand Theft Auto: San Andreas
4.   Ico
5.   Super Smash Brothers Melee
6.   Shadow of the Colossus
7.   Bioshock
8.   Fallout 3

9.   Guitar Hero II
10.   Grand Theft Auto: Vice City
11.   Batman: Arkham Asylum
12.   Kingdom Hearts
13.   Final Fantasy X
14.   Deus Ex
15. Katamari Damacy
16. Mass Effect
17. Osu!! Taketae Ouendan-Dan 2 (the first one was largely remade as "Elite Beat Agents" but this is a tremendously fun rhythm game)
18. Elder Scrolls IV: Oblivion
19. Super Mario Galaxy
20. Grand Theft Auto IV
21. Strong Bad’s Cool Game For Attractive People
22. Resident Evil 4
23. Call of Duty 4: Modern Warfare
24. Jump Ultimate Stars (It's basically a DS version of Smash Brothers, but with Shounen Jump characters.  Apparently, its popularity was part of the reason that there wasn't a DS version of Smash Brothers)
25. Zack & Wiki
Title: Re: LoC #81 - Top 50 Video Games of the Oughts
Post by: Quantum Vagina on September 20, 2014, 09:16:33 AM
Pak's Thoughts – Don’t get me wrong. I love this game and I’ve devoted a hefty portion of my life to it, but how did this do so much better then Brawl? Brawl was an improvement in every way. It was this game, but more. That said, it’s good to see the top 5 starting with such an awesome title, and it keeps getting better from here..

I strongly disagree. Brawl was slowed down significantly. Random tripping was complete garbage. It got rid of a lot of technical tricks that you could do, such as Wave-Dashing. I like Brawl, but it's a notch down from Melee, especially from a competitive standpoint.
Title: Re: LoC #81 - Top 50 Video Games of the Oughts
Post by: Sugar Ray Dodge on September 20, 2014, 09:54:16 AM
Pak's Thoughts – Don’t get me wrong. I love this game and I’ve devoted a hefty portion of my life to it, but how did this do so much better then Brawl? Brawl was an improvement in every way. It was this game, but more. That said, it’s good to see the top 5 starting with such an awesome title, and it keeps getting better from here..

I strongly disagree. Brawl was slowed down significantly. Random tripping was complete garbage. It got rid of a lot of technical tricks that you could do, such as Wave-Dashing. I like Brawl, but it's a notch down from Melee, especially from a competitive standpoint.

I gotta say that I'm glad Melee came out on top. I got Brawl, and I felt like to was just reheated Melee, and I ended up trading it a few months later with a few other games for... I forget what. I spent hours upon hours playing Melee. It really should have been a GCN launch game.
Title: Re: LoC #81 - Top 50 Video Games of the Oughts
Post by: Sugar Ray Dodge on September 20, 2014, 09:56:54 AM
Great job, Pak! List making can be time consuming, but this is one of the more fun ones we've had in the last couple years. Here's my list:

1. Final Fantasy IX – PS1
2. WWF No Mercy – N64
3. New Super Mario Bros – DS
4. Animal Crossing – GCN

5. Mario Kart Double Dash – GCN
6. Lego Star Wars (Prequel Trilogy) – PS2

7. Mortal Kombat: Deadly Alliance – PS2
8. Super Smash Bros. Melee – GCN
9. Jak and Daxter – PS2
10. Kingdom Hearts 2 – PS2
11. Final Fantasy X – PS2
12. Madden NFL Football 2005 – PS2
13. New Super Mario Bros. Wii – Wii
14. Chrono Cross – PS1
15. Lego Star Wars (Original Series) – PS2
16. Mario Tennis – N64
17. Super Monkey Ball – GCN
18. Wild Arms 2 – PS1
19. Bomberman Generations – GCN
20. F-Zero: GX – GCN
21. Star Wars: Rogue Leader – GCN
22. Kingdom Hearts – PS2
23. Ratchet and Clank – PS2
24. Luigi's Mansion – GCN
25. Mortal Kombat Deception – PS2
Title: Re: LoC #81 - Top 50 Video Games of the Oughts
Post by: PsychoGoatee on September 20, 2014, 04:49:44 PM
Fun stuff! And I definitely recommend Half-Life 2 even if you haven't beaten HL1. Personally I've never beaten HL1 either, I thought it started strong and kind of got messy. HL2 I'd say is probably more recommendable, and in general I think is a better game. Still one of the best FPS games ever. And gotta love Silent Hill 2, for me more notably than being a scary game, it's the most depressing game ever made. Cool list.


01. Grand Theft Auto: Vice City (PS2)
02. Max Payne (PC)
03. Metal Gear Solid 4: Guns of the Patriots (PS3)
04. Metal Gear Solid 3: Snake Eater (PS2)
05. Dragon Quest VIII: Journey of the Cursed King (PS2)
06. Resident Evil 4 (Gamecube)
07. Dragon Age: Origins (360)
08. Tales of Symphonia (Gamecube)
09. Mass Effect (360)
10. Grand Theft Auto III (PS2)
11. Half-Life 2 (PC)
12. God of War II (PS2)
13. Doom 3 (PC)
14. Silent Hill 2 (PS2)
15. Metal Gear Solid: The Twin Snakes (Gamecube)
16. The Operative: No One Lives Forever (PC)
17. Ninja Gaiden (Xbox)
18. Grand Theft Auto IV (360)
19. King of Fighters 2000 (Dreamcast)
20. Wet (360)
21. Tomb Raider: Anniversary (PC)
22. Metal Gear Solid 2: Sons of Liberty (PS2)
23. Hitman 2: Silent Assassin (PC)
24. Mario Kart: Double Dash‼ (Gamecube)
25. Armored Core: For Answer (360)
Title: Re: LoC #81 - Top 50 Video Games of the Oughts
Post by: Pak-Man on September 20, 2014, 05:14:04 PM
Here's mine, BTW:
1. Paper Mario: The Thousand Year Door
2. Super Smash Bros. Brawl
3. Civilization IV

4. Majesty: The Fantasy Kingdom Sim
5. Mother 3
6. Samba De Amigo
7. Star Wars: Knights of the Old Republic
8. Mass Effect

9. Sam & Max: Beyond Time & Space
10. Tales of Monkey Island
11. Portal
12. Shenmue
13. Jet Set Radio Future
14. Super Mario Sunshine
15. Phoenix Wright: Ace Attorney
16. Strong Bad's Cool Game for Attractive People
17. Spore
18. Marvel Vs. Capcom 2
19. Katamari Damacy
20. Super Mario Galaxy
21. The Sims 3
22. Crazy Taxi
23. Professor Layton and the Curious Village
24. Godzilla: Destroy All Monsters Melee
25. Conker's Bad Fur Day
Title: Re: LoC #81 - Top 50 Video Games of the Oughts
Post by: lassieface on September 20, 2014, 06:46:30 PM
1. Portal
2. Bioshock
3. The Legend of Zelda: Twilight Princess
4. Uncharted 2
5. Shadow of the Colossus
6. Half-Life 2
7. Civilization IV
8. Mass Effect
9. The Legend of Zelda: The Wind Waker
10. Super Mario Sunshine

11. Metal Gear Acid
12. Fallout 3
13. Knights of the Old Republic
14. Uncharted

15. Torchlight
16. The Elder Scrolls IV: Oblivion
17. Final Fantasy Tactics Advance
18. Harvest Moon: A Wonderful Life
19. Star Wars Jedi Knight II: Jedi Outcast
20. Metal Gear Solid: The Twin Snakes
21. Super Smash Bros. Melee
22. James Bond 007: Nightfire
23. Kingdom Hearts
24. World of Goo
25. Lego Star Wars: The Complete Saga
Title: Re: LoC #81 - Top 50 Video Games of the Oughts
Post by: Sugar Ray Dodge on September 20, 2014, 09:15:45 PM
#34–Final Fantasy IX

(25 Points) 1 of 11 Lists - Highest Ranking - #1 –Sugar Ray Dodge
(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/5/51/Ffixbox.jpg)
Yeah...I promised Garnet I'd kidnap her. 
Release Date:  July 7, 2000

Considering who all participated in this and what else ended up on the list, I gotta say I'm surprised that I'm the only one who voted for this.
Title: Re: LoC #81 - Top 50 Video Games of the Oughts
Post by: PsychoGoatee on September 20, 2014, 09:21:51 PM
I was the only vote for Dragon Quest VIII, there's another long running Square-Enix saga for ya. I'm more of an FF7 guy but I do love a good black mage, especially that awesome band The Black Mages.  ;D
Title: Re: LoC #81 - Top 50 Video Games of the Oughts
Post by: lassieface on September 21, 2014, 07:45:59 AM
That was fun. Thank you Pak-Man
Title: Re: LoC #81 - Top 50 Video Games of the Oughts
Post by: Relaxing Dragon on September 22, 2014, 09:27:34 AM
Little late, but finally in to comment. Great to see GTA: SA so high. That one gets my vote for best of the series, since it was just the right blend of story/character and wacky world/play mechanics (jetpacks in gang turf wars! It's so simple!). Then there's Silent Hill 2, which is about as close to a playable nightmare as I've ever seen.

As for Bioshock, well, that game was pretty flawless for me, and also (almost coincidentally) marked something of the point of decline in my general gaming lifestyle. Not in the sense of any fault of the game, just that this was also a point in my life where my general priorities started to shift, and this was the last game that I was well and truly obsessed with to the degree that I was. And still am a little bit, though (I was much kinder to Bioshock 2 than most, if only because it was another trip down to Rapture).

Anywho, time for my list:

1. Bioshock
2. Manhunt
3. The Legend of Zelda: Majora’s Mask

4. Psychonauts
5. Silent Hill 2
6. Grand Theft Auto: San Andreas

7. Rise of Nations
8. Advance Wars: Dual Strike
9. Timesplitters: Future Perfect
10. RollerCoaster Tycoon 2
11. Halo 2
12. The Legend of Zelda: The Minish Cap
13. Mass Effect
14. F.E.A.R.
15. Dead Rising
16. Splinter Cell: Chaos Theory
17. SSX 3
18. Jet Set Radio Future
19. Burnout 3: Takedown
20. Resident Evil 4
21. Hitman: Blood Money
22. Pikmin 2
23. Luigi’s Mansion
24. Eternal Darkness: Sanity’s Requiem
25. Dead Space

Looking over it, while there are a few that I could easily have omitted for the ones I forgot (KOTOR! Shadow of the Colossus! Freaking Paper Mario!), there are still a couple that I'm surprised never made the list. JSRF came with every new Xbox for a while, which was good, since it gave everyone a chance to experience that awesomely enjoyable game for themselves. And no Psychonauts? That's easily one of the finest platformers ever made, one who's goofy humor, art design, and general playstyle still strikes a chord as incredibly original. For those who haven't yet played it, please do give it a go, you won't be disappointed.

Still a great list overall, of course (thank you Pak for running it!). The way I look at it, there were simply too many amazing games in that decade, so even with so many of my personal favorites not included, it still ended up being a fantastic collection here. Good stuff.
Title: Re: LoC #81 - Top 50 Video Games of the Oughts
Post by: CJones on September 22, 2014, 01:59:15 PM
Here's mine. I totally spaced on Bioshock. That definitely should have been on my list.

1 The Ur-Quan Masters. (Hands down the best video game I've ever played. Like I said, it's kinda cheating, but I had to get this on there somehow) 
2 Romancing SaGa: Minstrel Song (This was the last RPG I ever finished. And I did so twice.)
3 Shadow of the Colossus. (I had this on the 90's list due to some brain fart, but now it's actually eligible.)

4 Final Fnatasy Tactics: War of the Lions
5 Half-Life 2
6 Dwarf Fortress
7 Castlevania: Symphony of the Night. (The XBox 360 version. This is where Bioshock would have been if I hadn't forgotten about it)
8 Vagrant Story
9 Deus Ex
10 La-Mulana (The original one from 2007 that was fan hacked into English. Sadly it won't work on modern computers. There is a remake though.)
11 Final Fantasy 12
12 Dragon Age: Origins
13 I Wanna Be the Guy.
14 Galactic Civilizations II (I'm actually surprised this didn't make it)
15 Civilization 4
16 Gauntlet: Dark Legacy
17 Guilty Gear XX / X2 (or any of it's later incarnations)
18 Disgaea
19 Portal

20 Cave Story
21 SoulCalibur 2
22 Final Fantasy 10
23 Sakura Taisen 2
24 A Boy and His Blob (The Wii remake)
25 King of Fighters 2001

I wish I had put more thought into this list.

Seriously though, do play The Ur-Quan Masters. I'm not kidding when I say it's the best game I've ever played.
Title: Re: LoC #81 - Top 50 Video Games of the Oughts
Post by: ColeStratton on September 23, 2014, 04:13:41 PM
Guess I am too old for this list having mostly quit gaming in the 90s. Also, my number #1 is nowhere to be found, which doesn't make sense as there are entries that received 23 points, so everyone's top 3 should have made it. RIP Guitar Hero. My list:

1.   Guitar Hero
2.   Rock Band
3.   The Simpsons: Hit and Run

4.   Just Dance
5.   DJ Hero
6.   Mario Kart Wii
7.   LittleBigPlanet
8.   Super Mario Bros Wii
9.   NHL10
10.   Madden08
11.   Angry Birds
12.   Wii Fit
13.   Wii Sports
14.   Wii Sports Resort
15.   Mario Super Sluggers
16.   Kingdom Hearts
17.   The Simpsons Game
18.   The Beatles: Rock Band
19.   BioShock
20.   Coraline
21.   The Sims
22.   Bejeweled
23.   Guitar Hero II
24.   Rock Band II
25.   Guitar Hero World Tour
Title: Re: LoC #81 - Top 50 Video Games of the Oughts
Post by: Compound on September 23, 2014, 05:33:54 PM
Finally getting around to commenting. Every list, I forget something. And this time I forgot the best game to be released on the Gamecube, and arguably one of the best horror games of all time.

Eternal Darkness: Sanity's Requiem

ED spanned 2000 years of time and spanned the globe from the Middle East to Thailand to New England to the unspeakable vastness between the worlds. It had a fluidity of controls that Resident Evil still has problems with 3 games later in their series. And it had one of the more unique ways of showing your character go insane. And I regret not putting it on the list. Oh well.
Title: Re: LoC #81 - Top 50 Video Games of the Oughts
Post by: Compound on September 23, 2014, 05:40:18 PM
And my list:

1   Disgaea: Hour of Darkness (2003)
2   Civilization IV (2005)
3   World of Warcraft (2004)

4   City of Heroes (2004)
5   Rock Band (2007)
6   Persona 4
7   Saint's Row 2
8   SSX 3
9   Burnout Paradise
10   Valkyria Chronicles
11   Diablo II
12   Dead Rising
13   Batman Arkham Asylum
14   Freedom Force
15   Persona 3
16   Marvel Ultimate Alliance
17   Borderlands
18   The Sims 3

19   Crackdown
20   Amplitude
21   Mass Effect
22   Lego Star Wars

23   Rise of Nations
24   Beyond Good & Evil
25   Portal
Title: Re: LoC #81 - Top 50 Video Games of the Oughts
Post by: Compound on September 23, 2014, 05:59:11 PM
Also, my number #1 is nowhere to be found, which doesn't make sense as there are entries that received 23 points, so everyone's top 3 should have made it. RIP Guitar Hero. My list:



I think SSX 3 also made the list with 27 points. (18 from me, 9 from CJones.) I accuse your parents for any math problems. (Party at Jack Taylor's!)
Title: Re: LoC #81 - Top 50 Video Games of the Oughts
Post by: Relaxing Dragon on September 23, 2014, 06:25:25 PM
Also, my number #1 is nowhere to be found, which doesn't make sense as there are entries that received 23 points, so everyone's top 3 should have made it. RIP Guitar Hero. My list:



I think SSX 3 also made the list with 27 points. (18 from me, 9 from CJones.) I accuse your parents for any math problems. (Party at Jack Taylor's!)

Don't forget the 9 points SSX 3 got from me as well!
Title: Re: LoC #81 - Top 50 Video Games of the Oughts
Post by: Pak-Man on September 23, 2014, 06:35:53 PM
Ack! One moment while I check some things... Bonus entries numbered stuff like 25.5 may be in order...
Title: Re: LoC #81 - Top 50 Video Games of the Oughts
Post by: Pak-Man on September 23, 2014, 06:43:53 PM
OK. So when I was scoring Guitar Hero, I gave it one point instead of 25. That fixes that. Cjones didn't have any vote for SSX, but Relaxing Dragon and Compound did, which would have given it 27 points. For some reason I have 21. Nothing systemically wrong, at least. Just faulty maths.

Guitar Hero should be between 34 and 35 and SSX should be between 28 and 29. This would have been a Top 53 list if it had been done right, so there's very little impact. I'll immortalize the two games with proper entries as soon as I get a chance. Probably later tonight.
Title: Re: LoC #81 - Top 50 Video Games of the Oughts
Post by: Pak-Man on September 23, 2014, 09:15:03 PM
#34.5–Guitar Hero

(25 Points) 1 of 11 Lists - Highest Ranking - #1 –ColeStratton
(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/2/2d/Guitarhero-cover.jpg)
It’s time to leave. It’s time to get ready to rock!
Release Date:  November 8, 2005
Just the facts/Stuff I wiki'd:
Guitar Hero is a music rhythm game developed by Harmonix and published by RedOctane for the PlayStation 2 video game console. It is the first entry in the Guitar Hero series. Guitar Hero was released on November 8, 2005 in North America, April 7, 2006 in Europe and June 15, 2006 in Australia. The game's development was a result of collaboration between RedOctane and Harmonix to bring a Guitar Freaks-like game to America.
 
The game features a guitar-shaped controller (resembling a miniature Gibson SG) that the player uses to simulate playing rock music. The gameplay is similar to GuitarFreaks, in that the player presses buttons on the guitar controller in time with musical notes that scroll on the game screen. The game features covers of 30 popular rock songs spanning five decades of rock, from the 1960s up through 2005, in addition to bonus tracks. Guitar Hero became a surprise hit, earning critical acclaim and winning many awards from major video game publications, and was considered one of the most influential games of the first decade of the 21st century. The game's success launched the Guitar Hero franchise, which has earned more than $2 billion in sales, spawning several sequels, expansions, and other game-related products.

The gameplay is similar to other music and rhythm video games, in that the player must press buttons on a game controller in time with scrolling notes on the game screen to complete a song. The basic mechanics are based on Konami's Guitar Freaks. In the case of Guitar Hero, the player may use either the guitar peripheral (a 3/4-scale reproduction of the Gibson SG guitar as bundled with the game, or a third-party version) or a standard controller to play the scrolling notes. The guitar peripheral has five different-colored fret buttons near the nut of the guitar neck, and a strum bar and a whammy bar on the body of the guitar. The peripheral also has other buttons in order to navigate the game's menus. Music is displayed on screen through a series of notes, matching in color and position to the fret buttons, that scroll down the screen on a fret board. To hit or play a note, the player must hold down the fret button corresponding to the note shown and toggle the strum bar at the same time as that note passes a marked area on the screen. Faster series of notes may be played on the guitar controller using hammer-on and pull-off techniques where the player does not need to strum each note. The game supports toggling the handedness of the guitar, allowing both left-handed and right-handed players to utilize the guitar controller. A player using the standard controller simply presses the buttons that correspond with the displayed notes as outlined in the game's manual.

Pak's Thoughts – I’ve only played Guitar Hero once, in an arcade a long time ago. I wasn’t that good at it, but thanks to years of Dance Dance Revolution  I know the joys of getting really good at a rhythm game. This game also shone a little spotlight on one of my favorite indie-pop bands, Freezepop, and they’ve enjoyed a pretty decent measure of respect since then, so I’m grateful for that too.
Title: Re: LoC #81 - Top 50 Video Games of the Oughts
Post by: Pak-Man on September 23, 2014, 09:15:43 PM
#28.5–SSX 3

(27 Points) 2 of 11 Lists - Highest Ranking - #8 - Compound
(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/4/43/SSX_3_Coverart.png)
There is not a mountain around I can't tame!
Release Date:  October 20, 2003
Just the facts/Stuff I wiki'd:
SSX 3 (Snowboard Super Cross 3) is a snowboarding extreme racing game developed by EA Canada and published by EA Sports Big, which was released in late 2003 for the GameCube, PlayStation 2, Xbox and Game Boy Advance.
 
SSX 3 is the third installment in the SSX series, and is THX approved. The game was critically acclaimed.

As in previous SSX titles, players choose one of several characters, participate in races or trick competitions, and earn rewards.
 
The most obvious change to the series is the location. In earlier games, individual tracks were located around the world. In SSX 3, the entire game takes place on one mountain, with three peaks and several individual runs. Runs are designated as "race", "slopestyle", "super pipe", "big air", or "backcountry" tracks, and are designed accordingly. The race tracks are connected; it is possible to board through these tracks from the top of the mountain to the bottom without stopping or reloading each track.
 
The reward system is also revamped and improved. Although some rewards are still tied to what medals the player gets, most rewards are bought using money earned in competition or when finding hidden collectibles. Outfits, stat improvements, "cheat characters" (character models) and game art are all available.
 
Graphically the game is improved over previous installments by featuring a new graphics engine which adds various visual improvements such as 'Mountain effects': special effects to the game's mountain, such as thunder. Furthermore, the game is based around a "freeroaming" architecture akin to the later installments of the Tony Hawk's Pro Skater series.
 
Other notable changes include the introduction of a second level of "über tricks"; the elimination of freestyle/BX/Alpine boards in favor of a single board type, and the elimination of statistical differences between characters, and the continuity in tracks linked together by "Stations." In general, the game emphasizes customization much more than in previous games; for example, different boards no longer have different effects on how they perform, allowing the player to choose between them based purely on aesthetics as opposed to taking the statistics into consideration, as was common previously.
 
There are four ways to "Conquer the Mountain" and advance to higher peaks:
 
One is to earn medals in racing events, eventually leading to a challenge by the master of that peak in a backcountry event, and then a full peak challenge, which covers that peak's backcountry all the way to the bottom of Peak 1. There are 5 official race courses in the game, not including the 6 rival challenge races.
 
Freestyle works similarly, given that there are more freestyle events than there are races. Also, the full peak challenges for Peaks 1 and 2 only cover their respective backcountries and slopestyles. There are 9 official freestyle courses in the game, not including the 6 rival challenge freestyles.
 
Freeride works in an entirely different way. The player can earn a certain percentage of the collectibles for the peak and also win a certain number of the peak's "Big Challenges" (special challenges that range from breaking glass panes in superpipes to punching targets in "The Throne"). The "typical" Big Challenge has the player score points in a race track or speed down a slopestyle track. Some of the BIG Challenges have three different steps - the higher step, the harder challenge. After completing a challenge who appeared as a green beam, it will eventually turn blue instead of white, showing that there is a harder version of that challenge. After you complete step two, the challenge will turn red, and will become much more difficult than the previous challenges. This could for example be: The first challenge has a goal to punch 5 punching bags. The second step of this challenge is punching 10, and the third and last step is punching 15.

Pak's Thoughts – I feel bad this and Guitar Hero didn’t get listed where they should have been, and I have almost nothing to say about either one, since I never really played them. This game looks like fun, though. Wish I had more to say than that!
Title: Re: LoC #81 - Top 50 Video Games of the Oughts
Post by: Pak-Man on September 23, 2014, 09:16:00 PM
OK. Now we should be square. :^)