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General Discussion => General (Off-Topic) Discussion => Topic started by: Quantum Vagina on September 10, 2013, 08:23:43 AM

Title: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
Post by: Quantum Vagina on September 10, 2013, 08:23:43 AM
TOP 50 CARTOONS OF THE 80's

ctrl+v

Participants were asked to send a list of their 25 Favorite Animated Shows/Movies that were at least in part produced from January 1st, 1980 to December 31st, 1989. 13 ballots were received with 148 unique entries, and those ranked on a point system allowing 25 points for a #1 choice, 24 for a #2, and all the way down to 1 point for #25. The points were added up, and what follows are the selections.

Tiebreakers work like such: If two entries have equal pointage, the entry that appeared on the most lists ranks higher. If those entries appeared on the same amount of lists, then the entry ranked higher on the individual list got the higher spot. An entry that was someone's #4 beats another person's #6, for example. If there was still a tie, then the one with more top votes got the bump. (2 #3 votes beat out 1 #3 vote) And then if the entry was still tied, alphabetical order reigned supreme. Since there was a tie at the bottom of the list, the top 53 choices were represented, with only the one of them making it.

Without further ado, enjoy the top 50 Toy Commercials Cartoons of the ‘80s!
Title: Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
Post by: Quantum Vagina on September 10, 2013, 08:26:16 AM
The Didn’t Quite Make Its –Urotsukidoji
(23 Points) 1 of 13 Lists - Highest Ranking - #3 – McDonald’s
(http://i.imgur.com/AL74fvk.jpg)
What did the tentacle say to the school girl?
http://www.youtube.com/v/la8wB1onNog
Release Date:  1987


Just the plagarism
Urotsukidōji was created by Toshio Maeda in 1986 and was a huge departure from his earlier works in that it mixed erotica with humor and the supernatural. He was commissioned to do the series for Manga Erotopia, a pornographic manga magazine published by Wani Magazine that deals mostly with avant garde stories. Maeda was picked because of his artistic style which paid incredible attention to detail and for his ability to tell rather good stories with complex plots, unlike most erotic manga artists at the time.

Although the manga would grow a cult following, it was the anime which became notorious. Hideki Takayama took great artistic liberties with the Urotsukidōji story, mixing elements of horror, violence, and sadistic scenes of rape not present in the original work. Maeda himself stated in an issue of Playboy Japan that he found the anime to be repugnant, cruel and sadistic, yet brilliant, he also said he admires Takayama's take on his vision.

The anime series is most famous for being the first in the tentacle rape genre, though only one scene in the first OAV actually contains any tentacle rape. Tentacle rape was not present in the Urotsukidōji manga but was featured in a series that he would publish years later called Demon Beast Invasion. Takayama was incredibly influenced by this work of Maeda's but thought that the Urotsukidōji story was stronger.

In an interview as to why Hideki Takayama chose to tell such a violent and sadistic story he said "There is nothing that arouses a stronger response in human beings than either sex or violence. A mixture of the two is very powerful indeed." Today Urotsukidōji, as well as its later sequels, are infamous, not just in Japan, but in the rest of the world as well. According to The Erotic Anime Movie Guide, it is the most recognized adult anime in the world.

Quantum Vagina’s take - It takes more to get me into something than sex and violence, Takayama. There’s gotta be some love in there. Consentacles>Tentacle Rape any day of the week. Also, I know I said I’d watch an episode if I hadn’t seen it before, but… nah… Not for this...
Title: Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
Post by: Quantum Vagina on September 10, 2013, 08:43:59 AM
The Didn’t Quite Make Its –The Completely Mental Misadventures of Ed Grimly
(23 Points) 1 of 13 Lists - Highest Ranking - #3 – Pak-Man
(http://i.imgur.com/dkrV5I6.jpg)
A crossbreed of Gilbert Gottfried and Alfalfa
http://www.youtube.com/v/U5VsIkoyAR4
Release Date:  1988

Just the plagarism
The Completely Mental Misadventures of Ed Grimley is a 1988 animated series produced by Hanna-Barbera starring Martin Short's Ed Grimley as well as other characters and actors from Second City's SCTV. Only one season of 13 episodes was produced. Despite the short run, the show is the only Saturday morning animated adaptation of both an SCTV character and a Saturday Night Live character.

Episodes featured Ed Grimley in adventures, which start out as mundane, but turn very surreal and cartoonish, interspersed with science lessons from The Amazing Gustav Brothers, Roger and Emil, and a live-action segment with a "scary story" presented as a show-within-a-show by Grimley's favorite television host, SCTV's Count Floyd (played by SCTV cast member Joe Flaherty). Grimley's fellow cartoon characters included Grimley's landlord Leo Freebus (voiced by Jonathan Winters), Leo's wife Deidre (Andrea Martin), his ditzy, amateur actress neighbor Ms. Malone (voiced by Catherine O'Hara; a female character by the name of Ms. Malone did appear on an SNL version of an Ed Grimley sketch on the season ten episode hosted by Alex Karras, but Ms. Malone was played by that episode's musical guest Tina Turner), and her little brother, Wendell.

Guest stars on the show included Christopher Guest and SCTV alumni Eugene Levy and Dave Thomas. The show also featured the voices of René Auberjonois, Kenneth Mars, and Arte Johnson from Rowan and Martin's Laugh-In.

While not renewed for a second season, the show was seen in reruns in 1996 on Cartoon Network's unnamed pre-Adult Swim-era late-night programming block, which consisted of such shows as Space Ghost: Coast to Coast, reruns of Looney Tunes cartoon shorts, and repeats of old Hanna-Barbera shows from the 1960s and '70s. Hanna-Barbera sponsored an "Ed Grimley Look-A-Like Contest" midway through the first season, which was won by 10-year-old Matt Mitchell from Des Moines, Iowa.

Quantum Vagina’s take - I tried finding an episode, but Youtube is sorely lacking in it. I managed to find a 3 minute clip where Ed gets sucked up into a tornado in a parody of the Wizard of Oz, and what I saw was pretty funny. Animation is pretty goofy, but it suits the character, so I think it works.
Title: Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
Post by: Quantum Vagina on September 10, 2013, 09:00:07 AM
The Didn’t Quite Make Its –The Care Bears Movie II: A New Generation
(23 Points) 1 of 13 Lists - Highest Ranking - #3 – Mrs. Dick Courier
(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/b/b7/CBMII_poster.jpg)
Why weren’t they called Care-acters?
http://www.youtube.com/v/ZEI2pGSlNsw
Release Date:  1986

Just the plagarism
Care Bears Movie II: A New Generation is a 1986 children's animated film produced by LBS Communications, Inc. and Canadian animation studio Nelvana. The third animated feature from Nelvana, it was directed by Dale Schott, written by Peter Sauder and produced by Nelvana's three founders (Michael Hirsh, Patrick Loubert and Clive A. Smith). It starred the voices of Alyson Court, Cree Summer, Maxine Miller and Hadley Kay.

In the second film based on the Care Bears franchise, a character called The Great Wishing Star (voiced by Chris Wiggins) tells the origins of the Care Bears, and the story of their first Caring Mission. True Heart Bear and Noble Heart Horse lead the other Care Bears and Care Bear Cousins, as they come to the aid of Christy, a young camper who is tempted by an evil shape-shifting figure named Dark Heart. The film marked the first appearance of the Care Bear Cubs, who also had their own line of toys.

Care Bears Movie II was Nelvana's third animated feature film, after 1983's Rock & Rule and The Care Bears Movie. It marked the directorial debut of Dale Schott, a Nelvana staff member who served as assistant director on the first Care Bears Movie, as well as the Nelvana/Lucasfilm TV series Ewoks. Several other crewmembers from the first film returned to the fold; Nelvana's founders (Michael Hirsh, Patrick Loubert and Clive A. Smith) served as producers, while Peter Sauder wrote the screenplay and Charles Bonifacio handled animation duties. Jack Chojnacki, the co-president of American Greetings' licensing division Those Characters from Cleveland, served once again as an executive producer.[7] A roster of Toronto voice actors—among them Cree Summer, Sunny Besen Thrasher, Dan Hennessey and Hadley Kay—appeared in this follow-up. Mickey Rooney and Georgia Engel, who appeared in the first film, did not return.

Upon its release in March 1986, A New Generation gained mostly negative critical attention; some of its key elements received comparisons to the German legend Faust and J. M. Barrie's Peter Pan. The film grossed only US$8.5 million in North America, about a third of what the previous instalment earned, and over US$12 million worldwide.A third film starring the title characters, The Care Bears Adventure in Wonderland, was released in 1987.

Quantum Vagina’s take - The Care Bears were pretty cool. I haven’t watched the movie yet, but I will this afternoon, and I’ll update this little tidbit accordingly.
Title: Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
Post by: Quantum Vagina on September 10, 2013, 09:02:55 AM
I'm going to take a little break and eat. I literally rolled out of bed and started copy pasting things. More when we come back.

http://www.youtube.com/v/HGBCC6ZfNKo
Title: Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
Post by: Darth Geek on September 10, 2013, 09:34:04 AM
The Didn’t Quite Make Its –The Completely Mental Misadventures of Ed Grimly
(23 Points) 1 of 13 Lists - Highest Ranking - #3 – Pak-Man
(http://i.imgur.com/dkrV5I6.jpg)
A crossbreed of Gilbert Gottfried and Alfalfa
http://www.youtube.com/v/U5VsIkoyAR4
Release Date:  1988

Just the plagarism
The Completely Mental Misadventures of Ed Grimley is a 1988 animated series produced by Hanna-Barbera starring Martin Short's Ed Grimley as well as other characters and actors from Second City's SCTV. Only one season of 13 episodes was produced. Despite the short run, the show is the only Saturday morning animated adaptation of both an SCTV character and a Saturday Night Live character.

Episodes featured Ed Grimley in adventures, which start out as mundane, but turn very surreal and cartoonish, interspersed with science lessons from The Amazing Gustav Brothers, Roger and Emil, and a live-action segment with a "scary story" presented as a show-within-a-show by Grimley's favorite television host, SCTV's Count Floyd (played by SCTV cast member Joe Flaherty). Grimley's fellow cartoon characters included Grimley's landlord Leo Freebus (voiced by Jonathan Winters), Leo's wife Deidre (Andrea Martin), his ditzy, amateur actress neighbor Ms. Malone (voiced by Catherine O'Hara; a female character by the name of Ms. Malone did appear on an SNL version of an Ed Grimley sketch on the season ten episode hosted by Alex Karras, but Ms. Malone was played by that episode's musical guest Tina Turner), and her little brother, Wendell.

Guest stars on the show included Christopher Guest and SCTV alumni Eugene Levy and Dave Thomas. The show also featured the voices of René Auberjonois, Kenneth Mars, and Arte Johnson from Rowan and Martin's Laugh-In.

While not renewed for a second season, the show was seen in reruns in 1996 on Cartoon Network's unnamed pre-Adult Swim-era late-night programming block, which consisted of such shows as Space Ghost: Coast to Coast, reruns of Looney Tunes cartoon shorts, and repeats of old Hanna-Barbera shows from the 1960s and '70s. Hanna-Barbera sponsored an "Ed Grimley Look-A-Like Contest" midway through the first season, which was won by 10-year-old Matt Mitchell from Des Moines, Iowa.

Quantum Vagina’s take - I tried finding an episode, but Youtube is sorely lacking in it. I managed to find a 3 minute clip where Ed gets sucked up into a tornado in a parody of the Wizard of Oz, and what I saw was pretty funny. Animation is pretty goofy, but it suits the character, so I think it works.
I remeber hearing about this show, but don't think I ever caught it back in the day. I like the Ed Grimley character, and waaay back then Martin Short was hilarious. But the real reason I want to catch up with it now is I had no idea it had Count Floyd, in live action no less. I loved the Count Floyd segments on SCTV!
Title: Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
Post by: Quantum Vagina on September 10, 2013, 10:01:57 AM
#50 –Babar
(23 Points) 1 of 13 Lists - Highest Ranking - #3 – goflyblind
(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/1/1a/Babar-tv-series.jpg)
Ele-fantastic!
http://www.youtube.com/v/2LUHCa_jnHE
Release Date:  1989

Just the plagarism
Babar is a Canadian/French/Japanese animated television series produced in Quebec, Canada by Nelvana Limited and The Clifford Ross Company. It premiered in 1989 on CBC and HBO, subsequently was rerun on HBO Family and Qubo.The series is based on Jean de Brunhoff's original Babar books, and was Nelvana's first international co-production. The series' 78 episodes have been broadcast in 30 languages in over 150 countries. Episodes of Babar currently air on Ion Television and Qubo.

While the French author Laurent de Brunhoff pronounces the name Babar as "BUH-bar", the TV series in its first five seasons pronounces the name as "BAB-bar".

In 2010, a computer-animated sequel series spin-off of Babar titled Babar and the Adventures of Badou was launched. The new series focuses on a majority of new characters.

Based on the books by Jean de Brunhoff and Laurent de Brunhoff, the plot focuses on the story of Babar as it is told by him to his children. Babar is a young elephant who undergoes many challenges and adventures. However, Babar always finds the strength to rise above difficulty and search out every cloud's silver lining. Babar is crowned king of the elephants, plans and builds Celesteville, and becomes a father himself. And he learns the greatest lesson of all: "despite life's challenges, great things are possible if one never gets discouraged".

As a young boy, Babar witnesses the slaughter of his mother by a hunter and flees from the Great Forest to the city, where he is cared for by a kind Old Lady. Babar learns the workings of the world and returns to elephant land full of ideas for progress in his land. The elephant elders see that Babar has become wise beyond his years and crown him as the New King of elephant land.

Quantum Vagina’s take - I was actually able to find an episode of this! The one I watched is “The Land of Mysterious Water”, and it was pretty good. I was amazed that, no matter how dirty or torn the clothing should have been, it was always pristine. I guess being King of the Elephants gives you some nice perks. Also, screw the monkey.
Title: Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
Post by: Pak-Man on September 10, 2013, 10:11:46 AM
Ed Grimley is totally worth tracking down. It reran for a while in Cartoon Network's early days, and it holds up really well to my adult(ish) tastes. Maybe even fares a little bit better.
Title: Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
Post by: Darth Geek on September 10, 2013, 10:13:35 AM
Ed Grimley is totally worth tracking down. It reran for a while in Cartoon Network's early days, and it holds up really well to my adult(ish) tastes. Maybe even fares a little bit better.
Does Netflix have it?
Title: Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
Post by: Pak-Man on September 10, 2013, 10:26:56 AM
I don't think so. The only way to see it now that I know of is to pick up the slightly overpriced set on Amazon or Warner Direct.
Title: Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
Post by: Quantum Vagina on September 10, 2013, 10:37:37 AM
#49 –The Raccoons
(23 Points) 2 of 13 Lists - Highest Ranking - #5 – goflyblind
(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/b/b1/The_Raccoons_TV_Series.png)
I have an idea: noses at 90 degree angles!
http://www.youtube.com/v/BiVOLvhvsyo
Release Date:  1985

Just the plagarism
The Raccoons is a Canadian animated television series which was originally broadcast from 1985 to 1991 with three preceding television specials from its inception in 1980 and one direct to video special in 1984. The franchise was created by Kevin Gillis with the co-operation of the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation.

The series revolves around Bert Raccoon and married couple Ralph and Melissa Raccoon, who Bert is a friend and roommate of. The series mostly involved the trio's efforts against the industrialist forces of greedy aardvark millionaire Cyril Sneer, who usually tries to destroy the forest for a quick buck. However, the Raccoons would always save their forest from Cyril's schemes, with help from their forest friends including Schaeffer, a gentle sheepdog, Cedric, Cyril's college graduate son, and Sophia Tutu, Cedric's girlfriend. But, as the show progressed, Cyril became more of a sympathetic character, eventually becoming an anti-hero.
Lessons featured in the show mainly included environmentalism, but also included other lessons, including friendship, and teamwork.

The Raccoons franchise was originally conceived by Kevin Gillis in the 1970s, while appearing in shows like Celebrity Cooks, and Yes You Can. The initial idea for the show was created by Gillis and columnist Gary Dunford (they drew their inspiration for Ralph Raccoon from a dilemma that happened at a cottage in Ottawa). Dunford backed out, but Gillis took his idea to Ottawa lawyer Sheldon S. Wiseman, who saw a potential in Gillis' idea and put together a large group - animators, musicians, and writers, to create the first special to star the characters known as The Christmas Raccoons. Production on the special began in 1979 and completed in 1980, and the special was shown on the December of that same year on CBC Television. It was also shown in countries around the world, including the United States and the United Kingdom. The special was a huge hit and resulted in two sequel specials The Raccoons on Ice and The Raccoons and the Lost Star and a direct-to-video special, The Raccoons: Let's Dance!. In 1981, United States TV networks CBS NBC and ABC approached Sheldon Wiseman about producing a 13 episode Raccoons TV series.[5] In 1984, the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation and The Disney Channel began funding on the TV series, which cost about $4.5 million to make.

The Raccoons was well received by critics. The New York Times, in its review for their second TV special, said "the Raccoons are an adorable lot, supported nicely by an attractive production." Variety praised the third special, The Raccoons and the Lost Star, calling it "a rollicking good adventure filled with space-age animation, high-tech gadgetry, lilting tunes, a lovable sheepdog, and the delightful Raccoons team."

The show was nominated for many awards, including a Gemini Award for Best Sound and Best Writing, and won the Gemini for Best Animated Series.

Quantum Vagina’s take - I can’t decide if I find this annoying or enjoyable. I watched the episode “Trouble Shooter”, which was pretty… odd. It involved Bert helping young Bentley come to terms with the fact that being a fugitive because you changed your mark in math was a stupid thing to do. I also got to see computers as viewed through the eyes of 80’s children, which is always a hoot.
Title: Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
Post by: Quantum Vagina on September 10, 2013, 11:09:40 AM
#48 –G-Force
(24 Points) 1 of 13 Lists - Highest Ranking - #2 – McDonald's
(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/f/fd/G-Force_-_Guardians_of_Space_DVD_cover.jpg)
Thanks Aggie, you may have saved my life with that yoyo!
http://www.youtube.com/v/e2jjCMgGOYw
Release Date:  1986

Just the plagarism
G-Force: Guardians of Space (1986) is the second American animated television adaptation of the Japanese anime series Science Ninja Team Gatchaman (1972), following Sandy Frank Entertainment's initial 1978 effort Battle of the Planets and preceding ADV Films recent 2005 attempt, known as just Gatchaman. With G-Force, Sandy Frank Entertainment collaborated with Turner Broadcasting to create a newer, more faithful translation of Science Ninja Team Gatchaman for a new audience, and such a translation was made possible with the relaxed television standards of the 1980s, a luxury that the more Star Wars-themed Battle of the Planets did not enjoy.

With Battle of the Planets having run its course and still holding the domestic rights to the first Gatchaman series, Sandy Frank continued to market BotP wherever they could while seeking ways to continue making use of their license. Interest came from the part of Turner Broadcasting (who was the last to air BotP on a wide scale on their TBS network) in creating a newer, more faithful adaptation of Gatchaman, which would be easier to accomplish with the newly relaxed television standards of the Reagan era-1980s. (Themes such as violence, death and destruction in cartoons were heavily edited, if not cracked down on during the 1970s, which is why Battle of the Planets was so sanitized compared to the original Gatchaman.) Turner executives believed that the series still had potential, and in turn acquired the rights from Sandy Frank to begin work on what would come to be known as G-Force (the same title given to the collective group of protagonists in Battle of the Planets, which in turn would be used for the same purpose on the new version).

To develop this project, Turner enlisted the help of Fred Ladd, a pioneer in the field of translating and distributing Japanese animation in the U.S (with famous works such as Astro Boy, Gigantor & Kimba the White Lion, under his belt) to produce the adaptation. Ladd had previously been offered to produce Battle of the Planets by Sandy Frank himself a few years before, but passed on the offer due to location conflicts; Ladd was working out of New York City at the time, while BotP was being produced in California. Ladd, through his production company "Sparklin' Entertainment", put together two "test" pilot episodes chosen by Turner, and sent them in for approval. Within days, Ladd and his company were given the greenlight to produce the adaptation, and work on "G-Force" began in the fall of 1986. Despite it being handled by Turner & Fred Ladd, Sandy Frank ultimately held the copyrights to the show (along with international distribution rights), while Turner, through its subsidiary Turner Program Services, and King Features Entertainment (a subsidiary of Hearst Corporation) held limited distribution and syndication rights.

Quantum Vagina’s take - Hooty4Life
Title: Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
Post by: Quantum Vagina on September 10, 2013, 11:20:52 AM
#47 –Here Comes Garfield
(24 Points) 1 of 13 Lists - Highest Ranking - #2 – Mrs. Dick Courier
(http://i.imgur.com/RKcWwA7.png)
I prefered Here Comes Garfield Without Garfield
http://www.youtube.com/v/cttTPWocWpc
Release Date:  1982

Just the plagarism
Here Comes Garfield is a half-hour animated television special based on the Garfield comic strip. It featured Lorenzo Music as the voice of Garfield. The special was first broadcast October 25, 1982 on CBS. It has been released on both VHS and DVD home video.

Garfield and Odie are outside harassing a neighbor's dog when the owner, Hubert, calls the pound to capture Odie. When the dogcatcher arrives, Garfield flees, but Odie is too stupid to run away and is captured. Garfield decides to go home, but when he attempt to warn Jon about Odie, Jon thinks that Garfield is just suffering fleas and Garfield gives up telling Jon, but realizes how boring life is without Odie around, so that night, Garfield decides to rescue Odie. However, the dogcatcher captures Garfield and later throws him into the pound and learns from a cellmate that Odie is going to be put to sleep in the morning.

During the night, Garfield remembers through his flashbacks of the all good times that he and Odie had playing together and how sad his life would be without him. The next day, the dogcatcher takes Odie down the hall to be euthanized. Meanwhile, a girl arrives at the pound for a pet and chooses Garfield. Garfield realizes that his plan to escape with this and when the cell opens, Garfield runs out the door instead of the girl. The girl just watches in shock as the rest of the dogs escape the way Garfield did. Garfield leads the dogs on a stampede towards the dogcatcher carrying Odie. Garfield and the dogs eventually rescue Odie and breaks down the pound door, with the knocked-out dogcatcher on it. As the dogs run home, Garfield and Odie knock down the front door while Jon is attempting to fix it after Garfield and Odie knocked it down from the beginning. In the end, Jon bets that Garfield and Odie did something wrong in the night while he was worried about them, and Garfield and Odie agree.

The animation for this first Garfield special and the second one, Garfield on the Town, came from the famous Peanuts cartoon team of Bill Melendez and Lee Mendelson, giving them a look similar to the Peanuts cartoons. All future specials and the popular Garfield and Friends TV series were animated by Film Roman studios. Also, Jon was voiced by Sandy Kenyon, which his voice would later be taken by Thom Huge.

Quantum Vagina’s take - Unfortunately, I couldn’t watch this one, as Youtube appears to be missing it. Judging from the plot, though, it’s better than recent incarnations of Garfield, by a lot. A LOT.
Title: Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
Post by: Quantum Vagina on September 10, 2013, 11:22:34 AM
That'll be it for today; I'll post 7 each day, until the last 2, when I'll post 8 and then the top 10 on the final day. That works out to be a week, FYI.

Now, if you'll excuse me, I need to wash the 80's out of my eyes for a while.
Title: Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
Post by: Johnny Unusual on September 10, 2013, 05:43:26 PM
Dang.  My number 2 is probably not going to make it (though it's possible, though unlikely that QV voted for it)  It wouldn't bother me so much, but it was just by a hair.  But I really couldn't add any more to my list.  I barely like the stuff at the bottom.

EDIT: The Raccoons isn't really all that good, for the most part, but it wasn't JUST nostalgia that landed it on my list.  It's funny, there aren't a lot of Nelvana shows I really like (American's, take a look at the weakest series on the Cartoon Network and there's a good chance it's a Canadian import from Nelvana), but I like some of the characters.  Bert Raccoon is a little too annoying for me, but I really like Schaeffer the dog (there's just something gentle about him I responded too as a kid).  I also liked the three pig henchmen, the good looking animation (I can't fault them for holding back on that, at least in the early days) and the Lisa Loughheed ending theme, which is a staple of the Canadian childhood experience.  Lisa Loughheed might have been a low rent Cyndi Lauper wannabe, but that's a pretty cool theme for an essentially low stakes kids show.

https://www.youtube.com/v/80CD_Ez4jXc

Since it was a Canadian staple, I was praying for a longshot appearance in the Scott Pilgrim movie, but no luck.

Babar didn't make that list, and I didn't like it that much, but I really like that opening animation.  It sets the mood really well and is a nice mix of animation and music.

I had the last 5 minutes of Here Comes Garfield on VHS and was always dissappointed not to have the whole thing.  Nostalgia doesn't save those specials for me, but I certainly understand the appeal.  Lorenzo Music's lazy easy-going voice is perfect for Garfield and the music that Lou Rawls sings is great.
Title: Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
Post by: Pak-Man on September 11, 2013, 05:22:25 AM
Dang.  My number 2 is probably not going to make it (though it's possible, though unlikely that QV voted for it)  It wouldn't bother me so much, but it was just by a hair.  But I really couldn't add any more to my list.  I barely like the stuff at the bottom.

The list started at 23 points. Everyone's #2 is going to make it.
Title: Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
Post by: Johnny Unusual on September 11, 2013, 05:27:36 AM
Except I only had 23 entries...
Title: Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
Post by: Tripe on September 11, 2013, 06:50:27 AM
La Blue Girl is far better than Legend of the Overfiend but I'm not looking it up to see if it's also from the '80s.
Title: Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
Post by: Quantum Vagina on September 11, 2013, 06:36:52 PM
#46 –Galaxy Rangers
(25 Points) 1 of 13 Lists - Highest Ranking - #1 – CJones
(http://i.imgur.com/mCKDNjQ.jpg)
Not even ONE of them was named Mo-rice.
http://www.youtube.com/v/k3EoBl5uBfU
Release Date:  1986

Just the plagarism
The Adventures of the Galaxy Rangers (broadcast between 1986 and 1989) is an American animated Space Western television series created by Robert Mandell and Gaylord Entertainment Company.

The series combines sci-fi stories with traditional wild west themes. It is one of the first anime-style shows produced mainly in the USA, although the actual animation was done by the Japanese animation studio Tokyo Movie Shinsha. At the time it aired, The Adventures of the Galaxy Rangers was considered a revolutionary children's show.

The show is set in the future, some time after the year 2086, when two aliens from the planets Andor and Kirwin travel to Earth to search for allies against the expansionist Crown Empire led by the Queen of the Crown. In return for the help, the two aliens gave mankind construction plans for a hyperdrive device. After this key event in human history, interstellar travel flourished and a huge number of colonies emerged in distant star-systems. Alongside the growth of human activities in space, criminal activities also grew, and the new colonies required defense against various threats, including the Crown Empire. A group known as "BETA" (Bureau for Extra-Terrestrial Affairs) was founded to cope with these tasks, with a "Ranger" division being a part of it.

Most of the colonies portrayed in the show specialized in either agriculture or mining "star stones". Many of the planets on the show have names that evoke ideas of a Western setting, Nebraska, Mesa, Ozark, and Prairie being a few.

BETA is shown to be the major military and exploratory arm of Earth. The organization's headquarters are on Earth. BETA sustains several bases on and around Earth, such as the Longshot Research Facility in the Grand Canyon and the BETA space station in Earth's orbit.
The Series-5 Brain Implant, or S5 is implied to be the closest mankind will ever get to merging with cybernetics. The S5 implant enables a dramatic boost of innate abilities due to its unique conversion of bio-electrical power generated by alpha radiation stored within the badges worn by the Galaxy Rangers.

The Crown Empire, also known as the "Crown," is ruled by the Queen of the Crown, whose intentions and motivations are described as being evil. She controls a large number of planets in a vast section of the galaxy, all of which she rules as a cruel tyrant. The Queen controls her empire using creatures called Slaver Lords with whom she has a psychic link. Slaver Lords derive their power from the psychic energy of other beings. After the Empire encountered humans, the Queen discovered that they were more suitable for energy extraction than any other previously encountered species.

Quantum Vagina’s take - There is absolutely nothing wrong with this concept. Cowboys are awesome. Space is awesome. I’m still annoyed at the lack of a Maurice, though.
Title: Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
Post by: Quantum Vagina on September 11, 2013, 06:46:42 PM
#45 –Fist of the Northstar
(25 Points) 1 of 13 Lists - Highest Ranking - #1 – McDonald’s
(http://i.imgur.com/mCKDNjQ.jpg)
ATATATATATATATA
http://www.youtube.com/v/309lhkdDVIM
Release Date:  1984

Just the plagarism
Fist of the North Star (北斗の拳 Hokuto no Ken?) is a Japanese manga series written by Buronson and drawn by Tetsuo Hara that was serialized in Weekly Shōnen Jump from 1983 to 1988, spanning 245 chapters, which were initially collected in a 27-volume tankōbon edition by Shueisha. Set in a post-apocalyptic world that has been destroyed by a nuclear war, the story centers around a warrior named Kenshiro, the successor of a deadly martial art style known as Hokuto Shinken, which gives him the ability to kill most adversaries from within through the use of the human body's secret vital points, often resulting in an exceptionally violent and gory death. Kenshiro dedicates his life to fighting against the various ravagers who threaten the lives of the weak and innocent, as well as rival martial artists, including his own "brothers" from the same clan.

The manga was adapted into to anime TV series produced by Toei Animation which aired on Fuji TV affiliates from 1984 through 1988, comprising a combined total of 152 episodes. Several films, OVAs, and video games had been produced as well, including a series of spin-offs centering around other characters from the original story.

The original manga was republished in English by Viz Communications as a monthly comic book, and later by Gutsoon! Entertainment as a series of colorized graphic novels, although neither translations were completed. English adaptations of other Fist of the North Star media have also been licensed to other companies, including the TV series and the original 1986 film.

Hokuto no Ken was first adaptated into a weekly anime series by Toei Animation under the title Seikimatsu Kyūseishu Densetsu: Hokuto no Ken (世紀末救世主伝説 北斗の拳?, lit. Legend of the Century's End Messiah: Fist of the North Star). The series aired on Fuji Television from October 4, 1984 to March 5, 1987, lasting 109 episodes. It was immediately followed by a sequel series, titled Hokuto no Ken 2, which aired from March 13, 1987 to February 18, 1988, lasting for 43 additional episodes (a combined total of 152 episodes between both series). Reruns are aired in Japan on the satellite television network Animax.

The first 36 episodes of the first series were translated and dubbed by Manga Entertainment in 1999, although only the first 24 episodes were released on VHS. All 36 episodes of the dub version were aired on Showtime Beyond in the United States and on Sci-Fi Channel in the United Kingdom, and were later released on individual DVD volumes in 2003. In 2008, the US subsidiary of Toei Animation produced official subtitled-only translations of all 152 episodes, which were released on various paid download and video streaming websites available only for North American customers. Discotek Media announced on October 2, 2009 that they have licensed the entire Fist of the North Star TV series. They stated they would release all 152 episodes in a total of four boxsets sometime in 2010. However they released the latter 2 sets in 2011.
In 2009, William Winckler Productions produced six all new English dubbed movie versions edited from the original TV series. Producer William Winckler, known for Tekkaman: The Space Knight, wrote, produced and directed the English films, which are seen on broadband in Japan. The Winckler dubbed films focus on story arcs of the main characters of Shin, Ray, Souther, Toki, Raoh, and Kaioh. However these films are incredibly hard to find.

Quantum Vagina’s take - ATATATATATATATATATATATATATATATATATATATATATATATATATATATATATATATAAAAAAA!
Title: Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
Post by: Quantum Vagina on September 11, 2013, 06:57:26 PM
#44 –The Super Mario Bros Super Show!
(28 Points) 3 of 13 Lists - Highest Ranking - #8 – Quantum Vagina
(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/5/54/Super_Mario_Bros_Super_Show_Title.PNG)
Just TRY to convince me that the Mario Bros aren’t Plumbers from Brooklyn
http://www.youtube.com/v/BkWYP95WbbY
Release Date:  1984

Just the plagarism
The Super Mario Bros. Super Show! is an American television series based upon Nintendo's Super Mario Bros. and Super Mario Bros. 2 video games. It was originally broadcast via first-run syndication to mostly independent or Fox television stations from September 4, 1989, to December 1, 1989, with reruns continuing until September 6, 1991. The Family Channel picked up the series on September 23, 1991, and aired it until August 26, 1994. The show was produced by DiC Animation and was distributed by Viacom Enterprises in association with Nintendo. DHX Media, the successor company of Cookie Jar Entertainment and DiC, is the current distributor.

The first and last parts of each episode were live segments which showed Mario (WWE Hall of Famer Captain Lou Albano) and Luigi (Danny Wells) living in Brooklyn, where they would often be visited by celebrity guest stars. These parts were performed and filmed before a live studio audience. Some of the celebrity guest stars were popular television stars, such as Nedra Volz, Norman Fell, Donna Douglas, Eve Plumb, Vanna White, Jim Lange, Danica McKellar, Nicole Eggert, Clare Carey and Brian Bonsall or professional athletes such as Lyle Alzado, Magic Johnson, and WWE Hall of Famers Roddy Piper and Sgt. Slaughter. In one episode, Ernie Hudson appeared as a Slimebuster, a parody of his Ghostbusters persona Winston Zeddemore and on another occasion Mario and Luigi receive a visit from Inspector Gadget, performed live by Maurice LaMarche. There was also another episode with Cassandra Peterson as Elvira, Mistress of the Dark, but the episode was not included in the DVDs for some unexplained reason. In an interview for the first DVD release of the show, Lou Albano talked about filming these live action skits, which mainly involved he and Wells getting a central plot and mostly improvising the dialogue as they went along.

Each Super Mario Bros. cartoon served as the second segment of every show, following the introduction and first few minutes of the episode's live-action segment. The cartoon featured characters and situations based upon the NES games Super Mario Bros. and Super Mario Bros. 2, as well as several sound effects and musical cues from the two games. Each episode featured Mario, Luigi, Toad and Princess Toadstool defending the Mushroom Kingdom from the reptilian villain King Koopa, often in a movie or pop-culture parody. Getting into the spirit of these parodies, Koopa often used alter egos fitting the current theme.

The theme song for the cartoon segments revealed that the Super Mario Brothers were accidentally warped into the Mushroom Kingdom while working on a bathtub drain in Brooklyn. After traveling via the warp drain, the Super Mario Brothers defeated King Koopa's Koopa Troopas, saved Princess Toadstool and halted Koopa's plan to conquer the Mushroom Kingdom. At the beginning of every cartoon segment Mario recites an entry into his "Plumber's Log," a parody of the Captain's Log from Star Trek.


The cartoon marks an early appearance of Birdo as female, a change made after an odd description of Birdo was given in the manual of Super Mario Bros. 2. She has been female ever since.

The Super Mario Bros. cartoons aired four days a week, from Monday through Thursday.
The voice of Mario in this show most resembles the voice of Mario heard today, whereas Mario's voice in the Super Mario Bros. 3 and Super Mario World shows (voiced by Walker Boone) was lower and raspier.

Quantum Vagina’s take - Do the Mario, bitches.

http://www.youtube.com/v/65uNCLBTje0
Title: Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
Post by: Quantum Vagina on September 11, 2013, 07:08:59 PM
#43 –M.A.S.K.
(28 Points) 2 of 13 Lists - Highest Ranking - #8 – ColeStratton
(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/a/a9/MASK_Logo.JPG)
Did you mean M*A*S*H?
http://www.youtube.com/v/o2Z1yLO9C-Q
Release Date:  1985

Just the plagarism
M.A.S.K. is an animated television series produced by the French-American DIC Enterprises, Inc and Kenner. The series was based on the M.A.S.K. action figures. It was animated in Asia by studios; KK C&D Asia, Studio Juno, Studio World, and Ashi Production.

A total of 75 syndicated episodes of M.A.S.K. were broadcast from 1985 to 1986. One of many cartoons produced during the 1980s as a vehicle for toy merchandising, M.A.S.K. (which is an acronym for the Mobile Armored Strike Kommand), was a hybrid of popular era cartoons G.I. Joe: A Real American Hero and The Transformers.

When originally broadcast, M.A.S.K. was the first closed-captioned series to air in first-run syndication.

Several episodes of the series were released under Karl-Lorimar's "Kideo Video" branding on VHS in the 1980s, with two episodes per tape. The "racing season" of the series would be distributed by Tempest Video. Several episodes were also released under the label M.A.S.K The Movie, and M.A.S.K The Movie II. No true direct-to-video or theatrical M.A.S.K movie was ever made.

M.A.S.K. episodes have been released on DVD in three languages.

English (U.S.): Shout! Factory and FremantleMedia North America acquired the Region 1 DVD rights to the first season of the original series (65 episodes) of the series in 2011 and released a Complete Series set on August 9, 2011, as well as a separate 2-Disc collection of the first 11 episodes. The second season, which consists of 10 episodes, are owned by Cookie Jar Entertainment and are not part of the acquisition.[5] This also officially marks the first time that a DIC Entertainment/LBS Communications co-production will be owned by LBS Communications succeder FremantleMedia.

English (UK): Collection 1 was released in the UK in November 2007 by Jetix Films - Maximum Entertainment, containing the same amount of episodes as the Australian set. Collection 1 was re-released on the 31st August 2009, and Collection 2 was finally released on the 28th September 2009. Both sets (The re-issue Collection 1 and Collection 2) are distributed through Lace DVD, replacing Maximum Entertainment, and both sets are in Region 2 PAL format. All 75 episodes were released across both sets.

English (Australia/New Zealand): Madman Entertainment released the complete series over two DVD collections for the first time in Australia and New Zealand. Collection 1 was released in November 2006 and contains episodes 1 - 38, Collection 2 was released in March 2007 and contains episodes 39 - 75 which includes the season 2 episodes.

[Quantum Vagina’s take[/b] - I’ve seen ONE episode of this, and it was several years ago, but I’m pretty sure I was in love with the concept from the start. It is figuratively off the CHAIN.
Title: Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
Post by: Quantum Vagina on September 11, 2013, 07:21:14 PM
#42 –Robotech
(28 Points) 3 of 13 Lists - Highest Ranking - #11 – Johnny Unusual
(http://i.imgur.com/xJgegAo.jpg)
Giant Robots Improve EVERYTHING
http://www.youtube.com/v/qEe0kzyFOyU
Release Date:  1985

Just the plagarism
Robotech is an 85-episode science fiction anime adaptation produced by Harmony Gold USA in association with Tatsunoko Production Co., Ltd. and first released in the United States in 1985. It was adapted from three original Japanese television series. In the series, Robotechnology refers to the scientific advances discovered in an alien starship that crashed on a South Pacific island. With this technology, Earth developed robotic technologies, such as transformable mecha, to fight three successive extraterrestrial invasions.

Robotech was one of the first anime televised in the United States that attempted to include most of the complexity and drama of its original Japanese source material. Produced by Harmony Gold USA, Inc. in association with Tatsunoko Productions Co. Ltd., Robotech is a story adapted with edited content and revised dialogue from the animation of three different mecha anime series: The Super Dimension Fortress Macross from 1982, Super Dimension Cavalry Southern Cross from 1984, and Genesis Climber Mospeada from 1983. Harmony Gold's cited reasoning for combining these unrelated series was its decision to market Macross for American weekday syndication television, which required a minimum of 65 episodes at the time (thirteen weeks at five episodes per week). Macross and the two other series each had fewer episodes than required since they originally aired in Japan as a weekly series.

Robotech originally aired in 1985 in first-run syndication, meaning it was sold directly to local television stations without having been run on a network first—this was part of a trend in animation in the 1980s. Previously, local stations would rerun theatrical cartoons like Looney Tunes or shows that had previously aired on network TV on Saturday mornings. This changed after He-Man and the Masters of the Universe introduced a new economic model: shows sold directly for first-run to stations, driving and funded by sales of related toys. Though the original Robotech series did well in ratings, the attempt to cash in on toys may have doomed Robotech II: The Sentinels as the original series attracted older viewers, not necessarily the children targeted by the toy line. The failure of the Matchbox toy line is cited as a primary reason for the cancellation of the Sentinels series.

Quantum Vagina’s take - How have I lived 22 years and not seen OR heard of this? I LOVE giant robots. They’re amazing. I cite Code Geass as proof that anything can be improved with Giant Robots, since it’s basically Deathnote… with Giant Robots. As someone who plans on dying in a giant Mech one day, this series gets my thumbs up.
Title: Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
Post by: Quantum Vagina on September 11, 2013, 07:33:57 PM
#41 –G.I. Joe: A Real American Hero
(28 Points) 5 of 13 Lists - Highest Ranking - #10 – McDonald’s
(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/e/e5/G.I._Joe_Cartoon_1985_Title.jpg)
Knowing is half the battle
http://www.youtube.com/v/tCqQ_pUz-58
Release Date:  1983

Just the plagarism
G.I. Joe: A Real American Hero is a half-hour American animated television series based on the successful toyline from Hasbro and the comic book series from Marvel Comics. The cartoon had its beginnings with two five-part mini-series in 1983 and 1984, then became a regular series that ran in syndication from 1985 to 1986.

Ron Friedman created the G.I. Joe animated series for television, and wrote all four miniseries. The fourth mini-series was intended to be a feature film, but as noted subsequently was released as a television mini-series instead because of production difficulties

Following the initial two mini-series, the regular series began airing on September 16, 1985 concurrently in line with the second season of The Transformers, debuting with a third five-part story, The Pyramid of Darkness. A public safety lesson was usually featured at the end of each episode, using G.I. Joe characters in brief scenarios to impart safety tips to children. These lessons gave birth to the catchphrase: "And knowing is half the battle". The majority of the episodes centered around the relationship between Flint and Lady Jaye.

In each episode's opening title sequence voice actor Jackson Beck states that, "G.I. Joe is the code name for America's daring, highly-trained, Special Mission force. Its purpose: To defend human freedom against Cobra, a ruthless terrorist organization determined to rule the world".
Because the cartoons were produced as a vehicle to sell the toys, each episode typically focused on a particular G.I. Joe character.

In order to cut production costs for the animated series, Hasbro dropped Sunbow and contracted DiC to continue the series. Story editor Buzz Dixon explained in an interview: "Hasbro had been funding G.I. Joe out of their own pocket; they got a ridiculous deal from DiC to take over the series and they pretty much let them."

The DiC series is a continuation of the Sunbow show, though it chose to focus primarily on new characters of the period. Hawk was retained as G.I. Joe commander and at times shared his duties with Sgt. Slaughter as head of the G.I. Joe team. Captain Grid-Iron was given field commander duties in Season 1, with Duke regaining his old position in Season 2. Storm Shadow was also now a member of G.I. Joe, as he had been sold as a Joe rather than a Cobra since 1988, keeping in line with the story of the comics, where he had abandoned Cobra in 1986-87.
The first season centered almost exclusively on the 1990 Joes; meanwhile, Cobra, having a less extensive cast, was augmented by select characters from 1989 and the yet-to-be-released 1991 figures. This new ensemble had a much wider variety of Cobra Officers as viewers were introduced to the Night Creepers and their leader, and many different forms of Vipers.
The first season of the DiC series was mainly standalone episodes that focused on establishing new team members and plots. The second season of the DiC show lowered the animation budget but began a series of two part episodes, which often told a deeper story involving more dramatic life and death situations for the Joes. Theme song and underscore by Stephen James Taylor.

Also a casualty of the animation company changeover, was the extensive voice cast Sunbow employed, which largely consisted of voice actors employed by West Coast American companies. Because this DIC series was produced in Canada, an almost entirely new cast was assembled. Only a few actors from the Sunbow series returned for the DIC series; including Sgt. Slaughter, Chris Latta (the voice of Cobra Commander), Ed Gilbert (General Hawk) and Morgan Lofting (Baroness). But with Season 2, those holdover characters & actors were either retired or recast with new voices.

Quantum Vagina’s take - I probably overuse the word awesome, but this(these) show(shows) was(were) AWESOME, and not just because Sgt. Slaughter is a complete badass. I wish I was a kid in the 80’s. You guys got all the best toys. I had to deal with floam and crap like that.
Title: Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
Post by: Quantum Vagina on September 11, 2013, 07:40:24 PM
#40 –The Flight of Dragons
(29 Points) 2 of 13 Lists - Highest Ranking - #11 – Tripe H Redux
(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/e/e5/G.I._Joe_Cartoon_1985_Title.jpg)
Knowing is half the battle
http://www.youtube.com/v/vn9xV6_yyG0
Release Date:  1981

Just the plagarism
The Flight of Dragons is a 1981 animated film produced by Jules Bass and Arthur Rankin, Jr. and loosely combining the speculative natural history book of the same name (1979) by Peter Dickinson with the novel The Dragon and the George (1976) by Gordon R. Dickson. The film centres upon a quest undertaken to stop an evil wizard who plans to rule the world by dark magic. A major theme within the story is the question of whether science and magic can co-exist. This is told mostly through the experience of character Peter Dickinson, drawn from the 20th Century into the magical realm.

Released direct to video on August 17, 1982, it was aired as an ABC Channel 'Movie of the Week' in August 3, 1986, and released by Warner Brothers as a made-to-order DVD in the US on 17 November 2009 as part of the "Warner Archive Collection".
The opening song is sung by Don McLean.

Filmsy.com said of the film, "Animated fantasy films geared for family viewing just aren’t made like this anymore... The voice acting in this movie is excellent, to say the least... Though the animation might seem a bit “dated”, it remains beautiful by 1982 standards", "The dialogue is surprisingly intelligent and may confuse some children but it is nice to see an animated film that will stimulate adult minds a little... The voice cast are all great and I can’t find a single fault with any of them",[4] whilst 'The Unknown Movies' said "There may not be a strong constant thread in The Flight Of Dragons, but all its moments of warmth, imagination, and interest combine to make magic."

Other reviews were less positive: "I'm sure fans of The Flight of Dragons, sick of looking at crappy downloads or worn VHS copies, will be satisfied with what's here, but if you didn't grow up with this one, it's best left alone."

Quantum Vagina’s take - I’m torn. On one hand, I absolutely LOATHE Rankin/Bass Productions, minus Return of the King. On the other, Dragons, Harry Morgan, and Magic are all awesome.
Title: Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
Post by: Tripe on September 11, 2013, 07:40:44 PM
#43 –M.A.S.K.
(28 Points) 2 of 13 Lists - Highest Ranking - #8 – ColeStratton
(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/a/a9/MASK_Logo.JPG)
Did you mean M*A*S*H?
Loved and owned most of the toys, found the show really underwhelming.
Title: Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
Post by: Quantum Vagina on September 11, 2013, 07:42:34 PM
And that's today's entries. I forgot to give you some commercials yesterday, but I didn't tonight!

http://www.youtube.com/v/Tk25rk0_2rk
Title: Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
Post by: Johnny Unusual on September 11, 2013, 09:08:08 PM
I'm not all that fond of Fist of the North Star, but I've read it all and it's easy to see why the formula struck a cord: basically the hero arrives in a town where a low level despot is brutally murdering innocent peasants because he's a jerk, then the main character brutally murders that guy in return.  You doesn't want to see the bad guy get a comeuppance like erupting in a volcano of blood.  You know, for kids.  Seriously, this was printed in Weekly Shonen Jump, which was aimed at ages 13-18.  Not to mention that while rape never actually happens in the series, it's sure as hell threatened a lot.  Though there is still some gory series in Jump from time to time, they are never as perverse as in this series.

Robotech was pretty cool for it's time.  In the first story arc, it really put the opera back in space opera.  As in soap.  Space Soap Opera.  Episodes were just as often to be about character relationships and romance as it was jet-bots.  I was really into the idea of the bad guys inflitrating the humans and then going native and starting up relationship.

I really couldn't vote for GI Joe or the other show which will place... if I have to guess... 23rd place.  I'll guess that.  Anyway, I still think the toys are good, but while I loved it as a kid, I just don't really care.  One cool thing I do like about those shows is that they employed one of the most revolutionary American comics writer Steve Gerber.  In fact, considering his penchant for satire and ridiculous plots, I was surprised to learn that he DIDN'T write the Cold Slither or Destro's Grandma episodes.
Title: Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
Post by: Johnny Unusual on September 11, 2013, 09:17:00 PM
Quantum Vagina’s take - I probably overuse the word awesome, but this(these) show(shows) was(were) AWESOME, and not just because Sgt. Slaughter is a complete badass. I wish I was a kid in the 80’s. You guys got all the best toys. I had to deal with floam and crap like that.

We also had caps.

http://www.youtube.com/v/yfksUyKvc2E
Title: Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
Post by: Quantum Vagina on September 13, 2013, 05:53:51 PM
Sorry about the delay, everyone, I've been  messing with my machine all afternoon trying to get it stable, and managed to get it to a somewhat decent spot. I'm just going to run grab something to eat and then I'm going to post as many as I can get through tonight.
Title: Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
Post by: Quantum Vagina on September 13, 2013, 06:58:36 PM
#39 –The Adventures of Teddy Ruxpin
(30 Points) 2 of 13 Lists - Highest Ranking - #2 - goflyblind
(http://i.imgur.com/BICw7OX.jpg)
Good ol’ fashioned nightmare fuel!
http://www.youtube.com/v/qW5_PqSdI1I
Release Date:  1987

Just the plagarism
The Adventures of Teddy Ruxpin is an American animated television series based on Teddy Ruxpin, an animatronic teddy bear created by Ken Forsse and distributed by toy manufacturer Worlds of Wonder. It was produced for television syndication by DiC with Atkinson Film-Arts using many of the same voice actors used in the book-and-tape series that was made for the eponymous animatronic toy. While some of the stories used in the TV series were adapted from the books, many were original and greatly expanded upon the world established there. The series differed from traditional children's animation in that most of its 65 episodes were serialized rather than in traditional episodic form.

In the United States, the series was originally syndicated by LBS Communications. Today, all international distribution rights to the series are held by Don Taffner's DLT Entertainment.

In mid-1986, Atkinson Film Arts of Ontario, Canada was commissioned to co-produce (with Worlds of Wonder, AlchemyII, and DiC) a 65 episode animated television series based on the World of Teddy Ruxpin characters. The series followed a prior attempt to produce a live-action series which had proved too difficult and expensive. Atkinson was in charge of the principal animation and casting. Of the previous voice actors associated with the Teddy Ruxpin property, only Phil Baron (Teddy) and Will Ryan (Grubby) traveled to Canada to remain part of the cast, most other characters were re-cast with local Canadian voice talent. The series was originally intended to continue for more episodes, but because of economic problems at Worlds of Wonder (the series' primary financial partner) a 2nd set of episodes was not produced while Worlds of Wonder still had rights to the property. Interest remains among the owners of the Teddy Ruxpin property and the fanbase to continue the story originated in the animated series, which ended its 65 episode run in somewhat of a cliffhanger.

The Adventures of Teddy Ruxpin (Мечето Ръкспин), was one of the very first western cartoon shows to be seen by the population of Bulgaria in the late 1980s. The influence of this show can be seen in the text of the then modern post-punk band REVIEW (РЕВЮ)and their song "Teddy Ruxpin"  ; also the very first underground music shop to open in the capital of Bulgaria, Sofia, was and is to this date called MAVO (ОЧЗ), in reference to the antagonistic organization in the cartoon show.

Quantum Vagina’s take - Most HORRIFYING toy in the history of the world.
Title: Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
Post by: Johnny Unusual on September 13, 2013, 07:07:42 PM
I dare not tell anyone at my age, but I loved Teddy Ruxpin.  It certainly wasn't a "girly" show, but it was a pretty wussy looking one, and one an 8 year old might be embarrassed to be caught watching.  But aside from the occasional awful musical number (one per episode, I think), there was a really exciting story about the title character's quest to find his father.  It had a well developed universe and was really engaging.  I'm afraid to revisit it now, but I'm pretty sure this is the show that introduced me to serialized story-telling.  I don't know if they ever finished the story though.  It's been a long time.
Title: Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
Post by: Quantum Vagina on September 13, 2013, 07:08:37 PM
#38 –Captain N: The Game Master
(30 Points) 3 of 13 Lists - Highest Ranking - #8 - Pak-Man
(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/2/28/Captaintitle.jpg)
Yet another reason to have been born in the 80’s
http://www.youtube.com/v/RyoUecpe_wU
Release Date:  1989

Just the plagarism
Captain N: The Game Master is a joint-venture between American-Canadian animated television series that aired on television from 1989 to 1991 as part of the Saturday morning cartoon lineup on NBC. The show is produced by DIC Entertainment and incorporated elements from many of the most popular video games from the Japanese company, Nintendo of the time. There was also a comic book version by Valiant Comics, albeit only featuring characters from games produced by Nintendo. The show is also part of an hour-long block in Season 2 with The Adventures of Super Mario Bros. 3 and with Super Mario World in Season 3 in a half-hour block.

At the outset of the first episode the hero of the series, Kevin Keene, a teenager from the Northridge, Los Angeles, California, and his dog Duke are taken to another universe known as Videoland when they are sucked into a vortex called the Ultimate Warp Zone that formed in his television. In order to fulfill an ancient prophecy, Kevin is destined to become the hero "Captain N: The Game Master" and save Videoland from evil forces led by Mother Brain from the floating world/fortress called Metroid. By the time Kevin arrives on the scene, Mother Brain has almost succeeded in capturing the Palace of Power and conquering all Videoland. Kevin (who in Videoland is armed with a Zapper and a belt buckle shaped like an NES controller) and Duke appear suddenly on the other side of the Ultimate Warp Zone before the N Team, which consists of Princess Lana (the acting ruler of Videoland as a later episode explains the absence of her father the King), Simon Belmont, Mega Man, and Kid Icarus (known as Pit in the video games), none of whom show any confidence in Kevin's ability in the beginning. After Lana is kidnapped by the enemy shortly after Kevin's arrival, the reluctant group puts their differences aside to go on a rescue mission where Kevin eventually gains the others' confidence.

In most episodes, the N Team's enemy is a group of video game villains, usually led by the boisterous and loud Mother Brain who is accompanied by her minions, the Eggplant Wizard, the thuggish King Hippo, and the scheming Dr. Wily. A "villain of the week" is featured in some episodes when a particular video game becomes the setting (such as Malkil of Wizards & Warriors). Donkey Kong also makes an appearance as a territorial, belligerent, Godzilla-sized gorilla in some episodes, but usually serves as a dangerous neutral character posing a hazard to friend and foe alike.

Further recurring characters make an appearance as either friend or foe. The Count (Castlevania) makes multiple appearances, along with Dr. Light (Dr. Wright), Link and Princess Zelda. From season two on Game Boy (a human-sized supercomputer shaped like the console) joins the N Team.

The focus of the show is mostly action-adventure sourced from the video games they parody, with comedic relief forming in the character's interactions with one another and the environment. Sometimes humor also stems from the comparatively loose interpretations of the laws of reality that apply in Videoland.

Quantum Vagina’s take - Oh god, yes. This is totally my style. Just on the edge of the 80’s/90’s border, this show is awesome. AWESOME I SAY.
Title: Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
Post by: Quantum Vagina on September 13, 2013, 07:10:06 PM
#37 –Care Bears
(31 Points) 3 of 13 Lists - Highest Ranking - #6 - goflyblind
(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/4/47/Care_Bears.png)
Nobody ever likes it when I walk around naked showing off my belly tattoo...
http://www.youtube.com/v/BPo9I1d2LwM
Release Date:  1985

Just the plagarism
The Care Bears is an animated television series based on the Care Bears franchise, which aired between 1985 and 1988 in syndication; on the ABC network in the United States; and on Global in Canada. The 1985 episodes were produced by DIC Entertainment; the ABC/Global episodes were made by Toronto's Nelvana studio as The Care Bears Family. This is the only Care Bears series produced by Nelvana; in 2007, Sabella Dern Entertainment produced a revival, Care Bears: Adventures in Care-a-Lot.

The Care Bears live in a faraway place up in the clouds called Care-a-Lot, which constitutes a part of the Kingdom of Caring. With the help of the Cousins and their Buddies, they go all around the world on Missions in Caring whilst Evil villains such as Professor Coldheart (DIC episodes), and Lord No Heart (Nelvana episodes), try to thwart their plans.

In Remote Control: Power, Cultures and the World of Appearances, Barbara Kruger referred to the series as "a veritable position paper, a saccharinely preachy manifesto on 'caring.'"

Quantum Vagina’s take - Honestly, I think all the cartoons with a message in the 80’s were pretty damned heavy handed with it, although maybe not as heavy handed as the diversity and clean earth messages of the 90’s. I definitely think “saccharine” is a mostly 80’s sentiment, though.
Title: Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
Post by: Quantum Vagina on September 13, 2013, 07:19:34 PM
#36 –The New Scooby Doo Mysteries
(33 Points) 2 of 13 Lists - Highest Ranking - #8 - Mrs. Dick Courier
(http://i.imgur.com/P56puYZ.jpg)
Zoinks and Jinkies, and whatnot
http://www.youtube.com/v/FfCSXWDf_s4
Release Date:  1983

Just the plagarism
The New Scooby and Scrappy Doo Show is the sixth incarnation of the Hanna-Barbera Saturday morning cartoon Scooby-Doo. It premiered on September 10, 1983, and ran for one season on ABC as a half-hour program made up of two eleven-minute short cartoons. In 1984, the name of the show was changed to The New Scooby-Doo Mysteries, with the actual show format remaining the same. The New Scooby-Doo Mysteries ran for another season on ABC. The series airs reruns on Cartoon Network's classics channel Boomerang.

Thirteen half-hour episodes, composed of twenty-four separate segments were produced under the New Scooby and Scrappy-Doo title in 1983, and thirteen more episodes, composed of twenty separate segments were produced under the name The New Scooby-Doo Mysteries in 1984.

For this incarnation of the show, Hanna-Barbera attempted to combine the most successful elements of both the original Scooby-Doo, Where Are You! format and the newer Scooby-Doo and Scrappy-Doo format. Daphne Blake, a character from the original Scooby-Doo, Where Are You! format, was added back to the cast after a four-year absence. The plots of each episode feature her, Shaggy Rogers, Scooby-Doo, and Scrappy-Doo solved supernatural mysteries under the cover of being reporters for a teen magazine. Each half-hour program was made up of two 11-minute episodes, which would upon occasion be two parts of one half-hour long episode.

The second season of this format, broadcast as The New Scooby-Doo Mysteries in 1984, continued the same format, and included six two-part episodes featuring original Scooby-Doo characters Fred Jones and Velma Dinkley, both absent from the series for five years. Fred's last name is given as "Rogers" in his return appearance to the series in the episode "Happy Birthday, Scooby-Doo"; although Rogers had been established as Shaggy's surname the previous season. The New Scooby-Doo Mysteries theme song is performed in the style of Thriller-era Michael Jackson. The accompanying opening credits feature shots of a row of monsters dancing like the zombies in Jackson's "Thriller" music video.

Quantum Vagina’s take - At least they brought back Velma for the second season. I like Scooby Doo, but I’m not a huge fan of this series. I don’t know exScrappy why, though.
Title: Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
Post by: RoninFox on September 13, 2013, 07:23:18 PM
Wait, there were Scooby Doo episodes without Velma?  How the hell did they get anything done?  She was the only character with a friggin' brain.
Title: Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
Post by: The Lurker on September 13, 2013, 07:24:11 PM
#37 –Care Bears
(31 Points) 3 of 13 Lists - Highest Ranking - #6 - goflyblind
(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/4/47/Care_Bears.png)
Nobody ever likes it when I walk around naked showing off my belly tattoo...
http://www.youtube.com/v/BPo9I1d2LwM
Release Date:  1985

Just the plagarism
The Care Bears is an animated television series based on the Care Bears franchise, which aired between 1985 and 1988 in syndication; on the ABC network in the United States; and on Global in Canada. The 1985 episodes were produced by DIC Entertainment; the ABC/Global episodes were made by Toronto's Nelvana studio as The Care Bears Family. This is the only Care Bears series produced by Nelvana; in 2007, Sabella Dern Entertainment produced a revival, Care Bears: Adventures in Care-a-Lot.

The Care Bears live in a faraway place up in the clouds called Care-a-Lot, which constitutes a part of the Kingdom of Caring. With the help of the Cousins and their Buddies, they go all around the world on Missions in Caring whilst Evil villains such as Professor Coldheart (DIC episodes), and Lord No Heart (Nelvana episodes), try to thwart their plans.

In Remote Control: Power, Cultures and the World of Appearances, Barbara Kruger referred to the series as "a veritable position paper, a saccharinely preachy manifesto on 'caring.'"

Quantum Vagina’s take - Honestly, I think all the cartoons with a message in the 80’s were pretty damned heavy handed with it, although maybe not as heavy handed as the diversity and clean earth messages of the 90’s. I definitely think “saccharine” is a mostly 80’s sentiment, though.
Coldheart looks like he wandered in from a Rankin-Bass holiday special.
Title: Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
Post by: Quantum Vagina on September 13, 2013, 07:28:33 PM
#35 –Droids
(34 Points) 3 of 13 Lists - Highest Ranking - #12 - gojikranz
(http://i.imgur.com/6wkJvxW.jpg)
More stuff for Mr. Abrams to ignore in his sure to be forgettable Star Wars movie!
http://www.youtube.com/v/S7XCe2XorcY
Release Date:  1985

Just the plagarism
Star Wars: Droids, also known as Droids: The Adventures of R2-D2 and C-3PO, and 2004 re-released on DVD as Star Wars Animated Adventures: Droids, is an animated television series that features the exploits of R2-D2 and C-3PO, the droids who have appeared in all six Star Wars films. The series takes place between the events depicted in Star Wars Episode III: Revenge of the Sith and Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope.

Over the course of the series, the droids team up with four different sets of masters. The series is divided up into three cycles: at the beginning of each, the droids usually run into their new masters in an accidental way, and at the end of each cycle, they usually are forced to leave their masters for one reason or another. The Great Heep, a television special following the series, served as a prequel to the third Mungo Baobab cycle.

The series featured Anthony Daniels as the voice of C-3PO, who also portrayed the character in the films, along with the voice talents of Graeme Campbell, Rob Cowan, Don Francks, Peter MacNeill, John Stocker and Winston Rekert. Several episodes feature guest stars like Dan Hennessey, Chris Wiggins, George Buza, Andrew Sabiston, Eric Peterson, Rob Cowan, Jamie Dick, Cree Summer, Donny Burns, Don McManus, Long John Baldry and Gordon Masten. Several episodes of the series were written by Ben Burtt. The series was produced by Nelvana on behalf of Lucasfilm and broadcast on ABC. The cartoon series lasted one season and was made up of thirteen regular episodes in 1985. There was also a two-part television special entitled The Great Heep in 1986. Following the original run of the complete series, the entire show was rebroadcast as part of The Ewoks and Droids Adventure Hour the same year, along with its series counterpart, Star Wars: Ewoks. The shows, Droids and Ewoks, were also played on the Sci Fi Channel in 1993 as a part of their early morning Sci-Fi cartoon run, although somewhat edited for time.

In the UK, BBC Television bought rights to screen the series in its entirety between 1986 and 1991 as part of Children's BBC. The entire series was shown twice within this time (in 1986 and 1988 to coincide with the full release of the Star Wars trilogy as well as Droids on VHS). The Great Heep only made one showing in 1989 on BBC's Going Live!, which was a Saturday morning kids show and split into two parts over two weeks. Different episodes from different cycles were also screened across the five-year licence, with the Trigon cycle being shown in full in early 1991 on the Saturday morning children's show called The 8:15 from Manchester.

Quantum Vagina’s take - I stand by the fact that C-3PO is one of the best characters in the Star Wars universe, and his relationship with R2-D2 is one of the best models of friendship ever. If you’ve ever been interested on their goings on in between the various films of the franchise, then I’d watch this series. Provided you can get past the hideous animation, you’re good.
Title: Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
Post by: Quantum Vagina on September 13, 2013, 07:38:00 PM
#34 –Spiderman and His Amazing Friends
(34 Points) 4 of 13 Lists - Highest Ranking - #13 - ColeStratton
(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/4/4e/Spider-Man_and_His_Amazing_Friends_%28intertitle%29.jpg)
The Groan Saga
http://www.youtube.com/v/cgN0g4vqYMg
Release Date:  1981

Just the plagarism
Spider-Man and His Amazing Friends is an American animated television series produced by Marvel Productions starring established Marvel Comics characters Spider-Man and Iceman and an original character, Firestar. As a trio called the Spider-Friends, they fought against various villains.

Originally broadcast on NBC as a Saturday morning cartoon, the series ran first-run original episodes for three seasons, from 1981 to 1983, then aired repeats for an additional two years (from 1984 to 1986). Alongside the 1981 Spider-Man animated series, Amazing Friends was later re-aired in the late 1980s as part of the 90 minute Marvel Action Universe (not to be confused with 1977's The Marvel Action Universe), a syndicated series that was used as a platform for old and new Marvel-produced animated fare (the newer programming featured RoboCop: The Animated Series, Dino-Riders and on occasion “X-Men: Pryde of the X-Men”, which was intended to serve as a pilot for a potential X-Men animated series).

In the second season, the show was aired along with a newly produced Hulk animated series as The Incredible Hulk and the Amazing Spider-Man. The two shows shared one intro which showcased the new title. Stan Lee began narrating the episodes in the second season. Narrations by Stan Lee were added to the first season episodes at this time so that the series seemed cohesive. These narrations (for the first and second season) are not on the current masters. They have not aired since the NBC airings. (As seen on the Stan Lee narration list at Spider-Friends.com)

For the third season, there was another title change. This time the characters' names would be reversed and the show was called, The Amazing Spider-Man and the Incredible Hulk. It remained that way for most of the remaining years. NBC did air the show individually in mid-season (post 1986) after it was not initially announced for their fall schedule. Only some of the Stan Lee narrations for the third season are on the current masters. The missing narrations have not aired since the NBC airings.

Quantum Vagina’s take - Firestar’s pretty damn cute. And, I suppose that the male characters also deserve some respect as well, but my inner child is always interested in babes that can burn him alive.

He has some issues.
Title: Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
Post by: Tripe on September 13, 2013, 07:40:29 PM
Quantum Vagina’s take - Most HORRIFYING toy in the history of the world.
But awesome to slap a Megadeath or Sabbath cassette into.
Title: Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
Post by: Johnny Unusual on September 13, 2013, 07:45:24 PM
Man, those monsters look like they're having fun on that Scooby Doo opening.  Also, I think the estate of Michael Jackson should sue.

Man, that giant monster made entirely of fire is probably responsible for thousands of deaths by the time Spider-Man is on the scene.

I barely remember the Droids show, but I really like the premise of them going from owner to owner and getting caught in other people's intrique.  It reminds us that the Star Wars universe is pretty big and as I'm sure Imrahil is quick to remind us, does not begin and end with jedi crap.
Title: Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
Post by: Quantum Vagina on September 13, 2013, 07:48:57 PM
#33 –Dungeons and Dragons
(34 Points) 4 of 13 Lists - Highest Ranking - #4 - CJones
(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/d/d7/Dungeons_and_Dragons_DVD_boxset_art.jpg)
I failed my saving throw to avoid making this joke.
http://www.youtube.com/v/3JjhQ1Oi_3k
Release Date:  1983

Just the plagarism
Dungeons & Dragons is an American fantasy animated television series based on TSR's Dungeons & Dragons role-playing game. A co-production of Marvel Productions and TSR, the show originally ran from 1983 through 1985 for three seasons on CBS for a total of twenty-seven episodes. The animation for this series was done in Japan by Toei Animation.

The show focused on a group of six friends who are transported into the titular realm and followed their adventures as they tried to find a way home with the help of their guide 'Dungeon Master'. A final un-produced episode would have served as a conclusion as well as a re-imagining had the series been picked up for a fourth season. However, the show was cancelled before the episode was made. The script can be found from various sources online and was performed as an audio drama as a special feature for a DVD edition of the series.

The show focuses on a group of friends aged between 8-15 who are sucked into the "Realm of Dungeons & Dragons" by taking a magical dark ride on an amusement park roller coaster. Upon arriving in the realm they meet Dungeon Master (named for the referee in the role-playing game) who gives each child a weapon to defend themselves with.
The children's main goal is to find a way home, but they often take detours to help people, or find that their fates are intertwined with that of others. The group come across many different enemies, but their primary antagonist is Venger. Venger is a powerful wizard who wishes to rule the realm and believes the power from the children's weapons will help him to do so. Another recurring villain is Tiamat, who is a five-headed dragon and the only creature Venger fears.
Throughout the show, a connection is suggested between Dungeon Master and Venger. The final un-produced episode would have revealed that Venger is the Dungeon Master's corrupted son, and would have explained that the children were brought into this realm to help redeem Venger and to restore balance to their world.

The level of violence was controversial for American children's television at the time, and the script of one episode, "The Dragon's Graveyard", was almost shelved because the characters contemplated killing their nemesis, Venger. In 1985, the National Coalition on Television Violence demanded that the FTC run a warning during each broadcast stating that Dungeons & Dragons had been linked to real-life violent deaths. The series spawned more than 100 different licenses, and the show led its time slot for two years.

Quantum Vagina’s take - I enjoy fantasy things. I REALLY love D&D. But I’m not too interested in this show. It doesn’t seem like it’s based on the funny things that can happen with the D&D ruleset, like a 1 foot tall pixie sorceress picking up an axe that the 8 foot tall minotaur in the party can’t because of a natural 20. Man, was that guy pissed when I made him give me most of his money for the axe I couldn’t use. But yeah, the story looks pretty cool. I might check it out, and I might not.
Title: Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
Post by: Quantum Vagina on September 13, 2013, 07:50:38 PM
http://www.youtube.com/v/Tb3-UNcJSLI

And that's going to be it for today. I'm unseasonably tired tonight. Worry not, list goers! I plan on finishing it up in the next 3 days or so.
Title: Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
Post by: Darth Geek on September 13, 2013, 08:35:14 PM
Cinester Theater did a really good riff of one of the episodes of Dungeons & Dragons:

(part1 of 3)
http://www.youtube.com/v/8LXhu8V9lMs?

Title: Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
Post by: Darth Geek on September 13, 2013, 08:36:51 PM
Wait, there were Scooby Doo episodes without Velma?  How the hell did they get anything done?  She was the only character with a friggin' brain.
Agreed! And I do like that they jettisoned Fred, and it didn't matter at all.
Title: Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
Post by: CJones on September 14, 2013, 04:30:48 PM
#33 –Dungeons and Dragons
(34 Points) 4 of 13 Lists - Highest Ranking - #4 - CJones
(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/d/d7/Dungeons_and_Dragons_DVD_boxset_art.jpg)
I failed my saving throw to avoid making this joke.


The level of violence was controversial for American children's television at the time, and the script of one episode, "The Dragon's Graveyard", was almost shelved because the characters contemplated killing their nemesis, Venger. In 1985, the National Coalition on Television Violence demanded that the FTC run a warning during each broadcast stating that Dungeons & Dragons had been linked to real-life violent deaths. The series spawned more than 100 different licenses, and the show led its time slot for two years.

Supposedly the reason why the show was cancelled before it was completed was because some Christian Coalition jackasses complained to the network about how "evil" and "demonic" it was. Much like the same jackasses who protested Harry Potter. I know I saw an interview with the creators of the show, where they basically outright said this, but now I can't find it.

Title: Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
Post by: Tripe on September 15, 2013, 07:00:30 AM
Yes it's still pretty sharp as far as stories and writing go (even with the annoying '80s-obligatory cute mascot character*), I still love the little bit of music played during the fights and, you know, there was

(http://outcaststudios.com/forums/uploads/monthly_08_2013/post-1680-0-84820300-1375839413.jpeg)

and

(http://i204.photobucket.com/albums/bb319/TripeHoundRedux/sheila_zps6a899163.jpg)

*and there were arguably two of those feckers in this show.
Title: Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
Post by: Johnny Unusual on September 15, 2013, 07:35:55 AM
I remember thinking it was cool at the time, but I think I was too young to remember much of the writing.  There's another show that's going to be on here (it can't not be with this group) that I might have included if I saw it in the last 20 years that also had a reputation for great writing.  It's also another show that Steve Gerber worked on.  I love that guy (though, of course, he could never go quite as bizarre as his comic books, though he got pretty close with some of the Batman: TAS episodes he wrote.)
Title: Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
Post by: Quantum Vagina on September 15, 2013, 09:55:00 AM
I just found out I have to go meet some relatives today, so if I post today, it'll be late.
Title: Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
Post by: Tripe on September 16, 2013, 11:18:18 AM
Well bugger, with my love of mythology and all things French, there was a show I should have included on my list and I completely forgot about it. I really doubt it's showing up here now.
Title: Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
Post by: Pak-Man on September 16, 2013, 11:44:00 AM
I had something mythical and French on my list. I might be the only one, though...
Title: Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
Post by: Tripe on September 16, 2013, 11:48:30 AM
Is that a link I should wait to click on until I get home?
Title: Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
Post by: Tripe on September 16, 2013, 12:23:02 PM
Oh, ok, yeah, it's deviantart so one has to ask (plus I've seen a few of Shelia that were definitely not safe for work, in the process of finding the image I posted). :)



Title: Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
Post by: Quantum Vagina on September 17, 2013, 12:55:50 PM
#32 –Heavy Metal
(36 Points) 2 of 13 Lists - Highest Ranking - #6 - McDonald’s
(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/2/2c/Heavy_Metal_%281981%29.jpg)
A step beyond Science Fiction
http://www.youtube.com/v/B_MzWF8YLhY
Release Date:  1981

Heavy Metal is a 1981 Canadian fantasy-animated film directed by Gerald Potterton and produced by Ivan Reitman and Leonard Mogel, who also was the publisher of Heavy Metal magazine, the basis for the film. The screenplay was written by Daniel Goldberg and Len Blum.
The film is an anthology of various science fiction and fantasy stories adapted from Heavy Metal magazine and original stories in the same spirit. Like the magazine, it has a great deal of graphic violence, nudity and sexuality. Its production was expedited by having several animation houses working simultaneously on different segments, including CinéGroupe and Atkinson Film-Arts.

The film uses the rotoscoping technique of animation in several shots. This process consists of shooting models and actors, then tracing the shot onto film for animation purposes. The B-17 bomber was shot using a 10-foot replica, which was then animated. Additionally Taarna the Taarakian was rotoscoped, using Toronto model Carole Desbiens as a model for the animated character. The shot of the exploding house at the end of the Grimaldi sequence was originally to be rotoscoped, but as the film's release date had been moved up from October/November to August 7, 1981, a lack of time prevented this. This remains as the only non-animated sequence in the film.

The film was released on August 7, 1981. The release grossed nearly $20,000,000.
Prior to official release on VHS and Laserdisc in 1996, the film was re-released to select theaters on March 8, 1996 taking in $550,000. The subsequent home video release moved over one million units. The film was released on Blu-ray Disc on February 1, 2011 as a Best Buy exclusive and it was later released everywhere on June 14, 2011.

Quantum Vagina’s take - All I remember about this was two lizards humping. From there, you’re on your own.
Title: Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
Post by: Quantum Vagina on September 17, 2013, 12:56:17 PM
#31 –Ranma 1/2
(36 Points) 2 of 13 Lists - Highest Ranking - #5 - Johnny Unusual
(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/1/10/Ranma1_2volume1.jpg)
I fell into the Spring of Drowned Sad-Sack.
http://www.youtube.com/v/mX1vLgK49p4
Release Date:  1989

Just the Plagarism
Ranma ½ (Japanese: らんま½ Hepburn: Ranma Nibun-no-Ichi?, pronounced Ranma One-Half) is a Japanese manga series written and illustrated by Rumiko Takahashi. It was originally serialized in Shogakukan's Weekly Shōnen Sunday from September 1987 to March 1996, and later collected into 38 tankōbon volumes. The story revolves around a 16-year old boy named Ranma Saotome who was trained from early childhood in martial arts. As a result of an accident during a training journey, he is cursed to become a girl when splashed with cold water, while hot water changes him back into a boy.

The manga has been adapted into two anime series produced by Kitty Films: Ranma ½ and Ranma ½ Nettōhen (らんま½ 熱闘編?), which together were broadcast on Fuji Television from 1989 to 1992. In addition, Kitty Films has developed 12 original video animations and three films. In 2011, a live-action television special was produced and aired on Nippon Television. The manga and anime series were licensed by Viz Media for English-language releases in North America. Madman Entertainment released part of the anime series and the first two movies in Australasia, before their license expired, and MVM Films released the first two movies in the United Kingdom.

An animated TV series was created by Kitty Films and aired weekly between April 15, 1989 and September 16, 1989 on Fuji TV for 18 episodes, before being canceled due to low ratings. The series was then reworked by most of the same staff, retitled Ranma ½ Nettōhen (らんま½ 熱闘編?) and launched in a different time slot, running for 143 episodes from October 20, 1989 to September 25, 1992. The anime stays true to the original manga but does diverge by keeping Ranma's sex transformation a secret to the high school students, at least throughout most of its length (in both versions, the Kuno family act as if there were two Ranmas). It also does not introduce Hikaru Gosunkugi until very late in the series, and his character is slightly altered, whereas Gosunkugi is an important rival for Akane's affections early in the manga. Instead, the anime introduces its own major recurrent character: Sasuke Sarugakure, the diminutive ninja retainer of the Kuno family. Sasuke fills a number of Gosunkugi's roles in early storylines but is a major character in his own right. The anime also alters the placement of many story arcs; one of the earliest, Martial Arts Tea Ceremony, appears in chapter 56 of the manga but does not appear until the TV series' fifth season. It also contains numerous original episodes and characters not adapted from the manga.

Quantum Vagina’s take - I LOVE Ranma ½. I only watched a bit of the anime, and it was pretty good, but I’ve read the entire series. It’s hilarious, and one of my favorite stories ever. I always find genderbending to be humorous or cute, and Ranma does a fantastic job of making it both. Watch, or, better yet, read it!
Title: Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
Post by: Quantum Vagina on September 17, 2013, 01:03:17 PM
#30 –Beetlejuice
(37 Points) 3 of 13 Lists - Highest Ranking - #8 - goflyblind
(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/4/49/Beetlejuice_cartoon_screenshot.jpg)
I hope at least one person called him a huge star
http://www.youtube.com/v/EO1x632BzSQ
Release Date:  1989

Just the plagarism
Beetlejuice is an American-Canadian animated television series which ran from September 9, 1989 to October 26, 1991 on ABC and, on Fox from September 9, 1991 to December 6, 1991. Loosely based on the 1988 film of the same name, it was developed and executive-produced by the film's director, Tim Burton. The series focus on the life of goth girl Lydia Deetz and her undead friend Beetlejuice as they explore the world, called The Neitherworld, a wacky afterlife realm inhabited by monsters, ghosts, ghouls and zombies. Danny Elfman's theme for the film was arranged for the cartoon by Elfman himself.

The premise of the animated series was changed from the film to the point where one only superficially resembled the other. In the film, Beetlejuice was the antagonist of the story, called upon to "bioexorcise" Lydia's family from the Maitlands' home. In the series, Beetlejuice and Lydia are best friends. Lydia, being something of a social misfit in the living world, frequently visits him in the afterlife during her free time. The Maitlands, the central characters in the film, are not present in the series. In the film, the afterlife is portrayed as an otherworldly bureaucratic social service office, and for the series, the afterlife was changed to "The Neitherworld," an alternate reality that parodies the living world, with the fact of it being the afterlife only rarely mentioned.

For the cartoon series, many character roles from the film were reassigned to other characters. Beetlejuice plays the role of Lydia's ghostly best friend in place of the Maitlands. Lydia's father, a businessman of questionable ethics, and her mother, an eccentric, self-centered avantgarde artiste, are presented in a more domesticated fashion, more resembling the Maitlands of the film. While her parents in the film were aware of Beetlejuice's existence, they were not aware of his presence in the cartoon.

Quantum Vagina’s take - I vaguely remember watching reruns of it in my childhood. I think. I don’t quite remember. I know the intro looked VERY familiar. I’ll probably scrounge up an episode or two to watch before too long.
Title: Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
Post by: Quantum Vagina on September 17, 2013, 01:13:04 PM
#29 –The Fox and the Hound
(39 Points) 4 of 13 Lists - Highest Ranking - #6 - Quantum Vagina
(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/7/70/The_Fox_and_the_Hound.jpg)
Friendship overcomes all, including the ability to hold back tears
http://www.youtube.com/v/OjeRUVbLeII
Release Date:  1981

Just the plagarism
The Fox and the Hound is a 1981 American animated film loosely based on the Daniel P. Mannix novel of the same name, produced by Walt Disney Productions and released in the United States on July 10, 1981. The 24th film in the Walt Disney Animated Classics series, the film tells the story of two unlikely friends, a red fox named Tod and a hound dog named Copper, who struggle to preserve their friendship despite their emerging instincts and the surrounding social pressures demanding them to be adversaries.

The film is directed by Ted Berman and Richard Rich and features the voices of Kurt Russell, Mickey Rooney, Pearl Bailey, Pat Buttram, Sandy Duncan, Richard Bakalyan, Paul Winchell, Jack Albertson, Jeanette Nolan, John Fiedler, John McIntire, Keith Coogan, and Corey Feldman. At the time of release it was the most expensive animated film produced to date, costing $12 million.

Production of the film began in 1977. The film marked a turning point in the studio: Walt Disney's "Nine Old Men" did initial development of the animation, but by the end of production the younger set of Disney animators completed the production process. Wolfgang Reitherman was producer, and championed staying true to the novel, and Larry Clemmons was head of the story team. Frank Thomas and Ollie Johnston did much of the early development of the main characters. The newer generation of directors and animators, such as Don Bluth (who previously worked on films like Sleeping Beauty and The Sword in the Stone) and started with John Lasseter, John Musker, Ron Clements, Glen Keane, Tim Burton, Brad Bird and Henry Selick. would finalize the animation and complete the film's production. These animators had moved through the in-house animation training program, and would all play an important role in the Disney Renaissance of the eighties and nineties.

However, the transition between the old guard and the new resulting in arguments over how to handle the film. Reitherman has his own ideas on the designs and layouts that should be used, but the newer team backed Stevens. Animator Don Bluth declared Disney's work "stale" and walked out with eleven others to form his own studio. With 17% of the animators now gone, production on The Fox and the Hound was delayed. Bluth had animated Widow Tweed and her cow, Abigail, and his team worked on the rest of the sequence. The exodus of so many animators forced the cancellation of the film's original Christmas 1980 premiere while new artists were hired. Four years after production started the film was finished with approximately 360,000 drawings, 110,000 painted cels and 1,100 painted backgrounds making up the finished product. A total of 180 people, including 24 animators, worked on the film.

Quantum Vagina’s take - I don’t care how hard or tough you think you are, this is figuratively the most heartfelt movie in the history of anything ever, and you cried. Even if it was just the one tear going down your cheek, manly tears were shed while watching this movie. It’s something we all can relate to. It’s a damn good movie, and you cried. Unless you had your tear ducts surgically removed because your eyes were replaced with robotic ones.
Title: Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
Post by: Quantum Vagina on September 17, 2013, 01:21:03 PM
#28 –An American Tail
(40 Points) 4 of 13 Lists - Highest Ranking - #5 - gojikranz
(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/d/d2/AnAmericanTailPoster.jpg)
Direct from the Mouserland
http://www.youtube.com/v/kvZfEQ_pMdg
Release Date:  1986

Just the plagarism
An American Tail is a 1986 American animated adventure film directed by Don Bluth and produced by Sullivan Bluth Studios and Amblin Entertainment. The film tells the story of Fievel Mousekewitz and his family as they immigrate from Russia to the United States for freedom. However, Fievel gets lost and must find a way to reunite with his family. The film was released on November 21, 1986.

Production began in December 1984 as a collaboration between Steven Spielberg, Don Bluth, and Universal Studios, based on a concept by David Kirschner. Spielberg had asked Bluth to "make me something pretty like you did in NIMH...make it beautiful." In a 1985 interview, Spielberg described his role in the production as "first in the area of story, inventing incidents for the script, and now consists of looking, every three weeks to a month, at the storyboards that Don Bluth sends me and making my comments." Bluth later commented that "Steven has not dominated the creative growth of Tail at all. There is an equal share of both of us in the picture." Nevertheless, this was Spielberg's first animated feature, and it took some time for him to learn that adding a two minute scene would take dozens of people months of work. In 1985 he stated, "at this point, I'm enlightened, but I still can't believe it's so complicated."

During production, Amblin Entertainment and Universal Studios expected to view the dailies and approve all major work on the film, and various outside parties also requested changes here and there. This caused the production to buckle from excessive oversight, and made Bluth feel that he was losing freedom of control over the production process. As the release deadline approached, pressure grew throughout the crew and numerous problems arose, ranging from slower-than-expected cel painting in Ireland to low footage output by some animators. Also, the song writers had written the score much later than originally desired. Suddenly scenes had to be dropped to save time and money and new, shorter scenes had to created to help pick up the story points lost in the process, sometimes making the film's story line look jumbled. Notable cuts include the Mousekewitz family's journey across Europe, a scene in which the Mouskewitzes first meet Tiger and he gets stuck up in a tree, an upbeat song that Fievel was planned to sing while imprisoned in the sweatshop, and a scene which gave greater explanation of the changing of names at Ellis Island. Cuts are also responsible for the baby Yasha's apparent disappearance after the boat trip.

The film was also plagued by union difficulties. Bluth had agreed to accept $6.5 million to get the film produced (which later grew to $9 million), at a time when Disney was spending around $12 million per film. He knew it would be difficult, but felt it was worth the sacrifice to work with Spielberg on a major project. With the agreement of his employees, salaries were frozen for a year and half. Unlike the former Bluth studios, the new Sullivan Bluth studios were non-union, and when many workers attempted to withdraw from the union, it sparked a battle between Bluth and the union which continued through most of production. It was mostly this struggle that later compelled Bluth to relocate to Ireland, which he felt offered a more supportive atmosphere.

Quantum Vagina’s take - Once again, I remember seeing this as a child. I actually remember Fievel Goes West a little better, and it was pretty cool, but I remember virtually nothing about this film. Can’t go wrong with Spielberg animation, though.
Title: Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
Post by: Tripe on September 17, 2013, 01:25:03 PM
The Fox and the Hound is a 1981 American animated film loosely based on the Daniel P. Mannix novel of the same name.
If you love the film don't ever read that book, not kidding.
Title: Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
Post by: Quantum Vagina on September 17, 2013, 01:29:48 PM
#27 –Chip and Dale Rescue Rangers
(41 Points) 5 of 13 Lists - Highest Ranking - #11 - goflyblind
(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/3/38/ChipDaleLogo.jpg)
Rodents to the Rescue!
http://www.youtube.com/v/hFXTa2yeYWs
Release Date:  1989

Just the plagarism
Chip 'n Dale: Rescue Rangers is an animated series produced by Walt Disney Television Animation. Created by Tad Stones and Alan Zaslove, it featured the established Disney characters Chip 'n' Dale in a new setting. The series premiered on the Disney Channel on March 4, 1989, after a preview episode ("Catteries Not Included") was aired on August 27, 1988. The series premiered with a two-hour movie special, Rescue Rangers: To the Rescue, which was later broken up into five parts to air as part of the weekday run. The final episode aired on November 19, 1990.

Rescue Rangers was originally conceived as the first of three new companion shows to Disney's popular DuckTales series, which had more than doubled the ratings among child audiences in its time slots after it debut in the fall of 1987. It, along with TaleSpin and a third series, Double-O Duck (which ultimately became Darkwing Duck), would round out a programming block later known as the "Disney Afternoon" along with the previously established Disney's Adventures of the Gummi Bears to capitalize on DuckTales' success.

When Tad Stones first came up with the idea for the Rescue Rangers series, Chip and Dale were not part of the show. In the original draft, the main character was an Indiana Jones-type mouse named Kit Colby who sported a fedora and a fluffy collared leather jacket, and the rest of the team included a chameleon, an earlier version of Gadget, and a character resembling Monterey Jack with a different name. When he proposed the show in a meeting with Michael Eisner and Jeffrey Katzenberg, the idea was well received except for the character of Kit. At Eisner's suggestion, they replaced him with the chipmunk duo to give the show some established Disney characters to work with. By late 1987, two years before its television debut, the show was announced under its original proposed title of "Chip 'n Dale and the Rescue Rangers".

While Chip and Dale were established characters, in order to bring them into the series only their general appearance and basic personality traits were kept. Unlike their appearances in Disney shorts, in the Rescue Rangers the chipmunk duo are very verbal, with Chip voiced by Tress MacNeille and Dale voiced by Corey Burton. Audio processing was used to speed-up the voice recordings and give the voices a higher pitch, particularly Chip's. The pair were given clothes—Chip the clothing of the original concept Kit, while the goofier Dale was modeled after Magnum, P.I. with his Hawaiian shirt.

The series premiered in 1989 on the Disney Channel before moving into a regular slot in the Disney Afternoon line up the next year. On October 2, 1995, Chip 'n Dale Rescue Rangers began reruns on the Disney Channel as part of a two-hour programming block called "Block Party" which aired on weekdays in the late-afternoon/early-evening and which also included Darkwing Duck, TaleSpin, and DuckTales.

Quantum Vagina - Once more, this has vague memories. The problem with a lot of the shows in this period was that the reruns were always on cable, and all I had was basic public television. Cable was something I got when I went to friends’ houses, and we rarely watched tv. What I remember was good, but I really can’t form an opinion on this show, and I’m taking advantage of a high mood to crank out as many list entries as I can right now, so I’m not able to watch an episode.
Title: Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
Post by: Quantum Vagina on September 17, 2013, 01:49:03 PM
#26 –The Great Mouse Detective
(43 Points) 5 of 13 Lists - Highest Ranking - #12 - Darth Geek
(http://i.imgur.com/jHNtK2o.jpg)
Once again proving that mice are awesome.
http://www.youtube.com/v/LozWJHSqh9o
Release Date:  1986

Just the plagarism
The Great Mouse Detective is a 1986 American animated mystery film produced by Walt Disney Feature Animation, originally released to movie theaters on July 2, 1986 by Walt Disney Pictures. The 26th animated feature in the official canon, the film was directed by Burny Mattinson, David Michener, and the team of John Musker and Ron Clements, who later directed Disney's hit films The Little Mermaid and Aladdin. The film was also known as The Adventures of the Great Mouse Detective for its 1992 theatrical re-release and Basil the Great Mouse Detective in some countries. The main characters are all mice and rats living in Victorian London.

Based on the children's book series Basil of Baker Street by Eve Titus, it draws heavily on the tradition of Sherlock Holmes with a heroic mouse who consciously emulates the detective; Titus named the main character after actor Basil Rathbone, who is best remembered for playing Holmes in film (and whose voice, sampled from a 1966 reading of "The Adventure of the Red-Headed League" was the voice of Holmes in this film, 19 years after his death). Sherlock Holmes also mentions "Basil" as one of his aliases in the Arthur Conan Doyle story "The Adventure of Black Peter".

After the failure of the Disney animated feature film The Black Cauldron, this simpler film proved to be a success upon its initial release in 1986. As such, the new senior management of the company were convinced that their animation department was still a viable enterprise and this set the stage for the Disney Renaissance.

The film was well-received by critics during its initial release, including a "two thumbs up" rating from critics Siskel and Ebert. The film also maintains a 80% "Fresh" rating on Rotten Tomatoes, based on 15 reviews. London's Time Out magazine wrote, "As usual with film noir [...] it is the villain who steals the heart and one is rooting for in the breathtaking showdown high up in the cogs and ratchets of Big Ben."

This film did fairly well at the box office, garnering around $38,625,550 over a budget of $14 million during its initial release. Its moderate success after its predecessor's failure gave the new management of Disney confidence in the viability of their animation department. This led to creation of The Little Mermaid, released three years later, which signaled a renaissance for the company.

After a re-release in February 1992, the film was released on VHS and laserdisc in July 1992 as part of the Walt Disney Classics series. It was released again on VHS in August 1999 (with a game sheet inside it as part of a contest) and on DVD in 2002 with a short making-of featurette.
A new "Mystery in the Mist Edition" of The Great Mouse Detective was released on DVD on April 13, 2010 and on Blu-ray Disc on October 9, 2012. Unlike previous home video releases, which all used the 1992 reissue title print (The Adventures of the Great Mouse Detective), this DVD restored the original 1986 title card, which had previously not been seen since the original 1986 release. The DVD also has the film in 1.78:1 aspect ratio Widescreen revealing more picture, bringing it closer to its original theatrical aspect ratio. This edition has not been released in Europe.

Quantum Vagina’s take - This movie was and still is damn awesome. Before I had to cancel my movie nights, I was planning on watching it next. It’s a great blend of adult and child storytelling. The 80’s also seem to have really liked mice.
Title: Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
Post by: Quantum Vagina on September 17, 2013, 01:55:45 PM
#25 –Count Duckula
(46 Points) 3 of 13 Lists - Highest Ranking - #7 - Pak-Man
(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/1/15/Count_duckula_titles.jpg)
WHY was it not Quackula?
http://www.youtube.com/v/g9ZVWMPuZ2c
Release Date:  1988

Just the plagarism
Count Duckula is a British children's drama, horror, comedy, animated television series created by British studio Cosgrove Hall and a spin-off from DangerMouse, a show in which the Count Duckula character was a recurring villain. The series aired on 6 September 1988 and was produced by Thames Television for three series and Central Television for the fourth and final series. In all, 65 episodes were made, each about 22 minutes long. All 65 episodes have been released to DVD in the UK, while only the first series has been released in North America. Both the series and its characters continue to have a large following on the internet.

The show is a loose parody of the story of Count Dracula. Set in Transylvania (a region in Romania), Duckula lives in a spooky castle known as Castle Duckula alongside his butler Igor and his large nanny (always referred to as "Nanny" and perpetually wearing an arm sling). Almost all of the characters in the show are anthropomorphised birds.

The story (as shown in the title sequence of each episode) is that Duckula has been a vampire for centuries. He could only be destroyed by exposure to sunlight or by a wooden stake thrust through his heart. In fact, Duckula has died numerous deaths – but he always returns through a mystic ritual, performed once a century, "when the moon is in the eighth house of Aquarius" (The opening credits depict Igor's incantation). Several episodes explore the theme that each resurrection creates a new incarnation with little to no memory of its past life; thus, every incarnation is free to develop its own personality and pursue its own personal interests. The vampire is thus able to pose as a "dreadful dynasty, the counts of Duckula.". The preceding generations included knights, sorcerers, scientists, artists, egyptologists and even professional gamblers, all of whom were also secretly "vicious vampire ducks".

Yet, as the title sequence put it, "the latest reincarnation did not run according to plan.". The successful conclusion of the ritual requires blood (a send-up of the Hammer Dracula films), the source of sustenance for any vampire, but Nanny accidentally substituted tomato ketchup. Consequently, the newest version is not a blood-sucking vampire, but a vegetarian one. He is more interested in juicy carrots than hunting for victims. Naturally, Igor is appalled at this. Even worse, his "new" master is obsessed with pursuing wealth and fame as an entertainer.

The stories often centre around Duckula's adventures in search of riches and fame, assisted by the castle's ability to teleport around the world. Another regularly occurring theme is the reiterated attempt by Igor to turn Duckula into a proper vampire. Some episodes feature Duckula's nemesis Doctor Von Goosewing (based on Dr. Abraham Van Helsing, the nemesis of Dracula), a vampire hunter who blindly refuses to believe the current incarnation of Duckula is harmless. There is also an array of bizarre, often supernatural foes, from zombies to mechanical werewolves. The show also features a cuckoo clock whose bat-like Russian-accented characters come out and make jokes about the current situation (or just corny jokes in general); the clock is also a vital part of the castle's travelling mechanism, and even has the ability to turn back time.

Quantum Vagina’s take - I got nothing. Never even heard of this show. From just the title, I thought it was going to be a Disney series.
Title: Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
Post by: Quantum Vagina on September 17, 2013, 01:58:41 PM
http://www.youtube.com/v/vpkaLqPBYgw

For the moment, that'll do me. I'm hoping I get called this afternoon for that job interview; I need to take advantage of a non shitty mood.
Title: Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
Post by: Mrs. Dick Courier on September 17, 2013, 04:02:24 PM
The Fox and the Hound makes me cry like a little girl.

I am a girl....but still....
Title: Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
Post by: Tripe on September 17, 2013, 04:42:14 PM
List ain't over yet.
Title: Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
Post by: Johnny Unusual on September 17, 2013, 05:36:25 PM
Good luck with the job, QV!  And take your time, if you need to.  The next list will be a Halloween one, and that's still a while away, so there's no hurry.

Heavy Metal... did that one make my list?  I don't think so.  I might have put it on simply because of Den, which I thought was by far the best story.  That was the one where John Candy plays a 16 year old boy who essentially has his mind put into the body of Conan the Barbarian.  What makes that one so great is that it is essentially a classic Conan-style story, but with the narration that would come from someone reading it.  In the animation, he's a classic Conan, but in his mind he's like "HOLY SHIT!  I JUST HAD SEX!"  Other than that, I never really cared for it.

I've soured a bit on Rumiko Takahashi over the years.  Inu-Yasha was just kind of dull and meandering and Ranma went on far to long for me.  But both the first season of the show and the first couple years of the comic are very strong.  The jokes are strong, it has very fun characters and is just strong storytelling.  Probably my favourite story is the martial arts gymnastics competition.  I actually now prefer her contemporary, Misturu Adachi who has a similar style but is MUCH more low key and gentle.  But when she's good, Takahashi is among the best.

Beetlejuice has a good opening, but that's about it for me.

Really need to revisit the Fox and the Hound and the Great Mouse Detective.  I barely remember either of them.  I need to ask, Tripe, is the Fox and the Hound book just more depressing, or just badly written.

I've never cared for An American Tail or most Don Bluth.  He's certainly talented, but I can't stand his sense of humour or his super-cutesyness.  And I'm a guy who loves cute.  Besides, I much prefer Fourvel.

http://www.youtube.com/v/m6gn3HhKzNU

Chip & Dale made it higher on my list than I expected, though it was still low.  It's mostly because of Gadget.  Well all agree that she was hot, right?  But unfortunately she and Monterey Jack were the only good characters on that show.  Dale was annoying, but why did they make Chip such an ass.

I loved Duckula.  Great theme song, a relatively dry sense of humour for an 80's kids show (or at least I thought so at the time) and a good cast.
Title: Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
Post by: Tripe on September 17, 2013, 05:46:18 PM
I need to ask, Tripe, is the Fox and the Hound book just more depressing, or just badly written.
No it's very well written but it is grim as all fuck; it's really a sort of drama-documentary in book form and it has a few subjects:

*All the ways in which foxes are hunted and killed.
*The ways in which hunting dogs do their hunting dog things.
*How rural america changes to become more suburban and how that effects those, human and animal, who knew the land as rural.
And finally, and possibly most brutally
*How age robs an individual of the things he loves and, crucially, forces him to destroy some of them.

If you've never seen the film, or if it doesn't really have much of a hold on you, it's probably worth tracing down. On the other hand if you loved the film then I can't see that version of the characters not appearing in your head as you read about the horrible things that happen to them.
Title: Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
Post by: Pak-Man on September 17, 2013, 08:19:46 PM
My Blu-ray of The Fox and the Hound came with the direct-to-video sequel. I haven't dared...
Title: Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
Post by: The Lurker on September 17, 2013, 08:36:11 PM
It does have Patrick Swayze, though.
Title: Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
Post by: Johnny Unusual on September 18, 2013, 07:35:54 AM
Watched the Great Mouse Detective tonight.  Not quite as good as I was hoping, but still enjoyable.  Vincent Price is always a treat.

Also, in watching those commercials... Amway was some kind of scam, right?  Cause that's the vibe I get from those commercials.

And, while I don't want to steal Quantam Vagina's thunder, I must make this prediction for the #1 cartoon.

http://www.youtube.com/v/YDDHHrt6l4w
Title: Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
Post by: Rainbow Dash on September 18, 2013, 11:55:02 AM
1.  Saturday Morning Watchmen
2.  The Simpsons.

Sounds legit.
Title: Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
Post by: CJones on September 18, 2013, 08:24:44 PM
#31 –Ranma 1/2
(36 Points) 2 of 13 Lists - Highest Ranking - #5 - Johnny Unusual

Release Date:  1989

I have to admit. I was never a fan of Ranma 1/2. However, I was a fan of Maison Ikkoko, and somewhat embarrassingly, Urusei Yatsura (bonus points to me if I spelled that correctly). Hey, Lum was gorgeous.

Title: Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
Post by: goflyblind on September 18, 2013, 08:35:21 PM
it was a really weird prequel to the rendezvous book. :-\
Title: Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
Post by: RoninFox on September 19, 2013, 12:58:57 AM

Also, in watching those commercials... Amway was some kind of scam, right?  Cause that's the vibe I get from those commercials.


IS some kind of scam, it's still around.
Title: Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
Post by: Tripe on September 19, 2013, 03:15:01 AM
It's the scam that built (or built up) Grand Rapids, MI.
Title: Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
Post by: CJones on September 20, 2013, 04:37:14 PM
I really should have included Count Duckula. Though to be honest I only remember the intro.
Title: Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
Post by: Johnny Unusual on September 23, 2013, 06:02:39 PM
I hope QV will be ready to continue soon.

Until then, more toy commercials.

http://www.youtube.com/v/hI742WyP76M
Title: Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
Post by: Quantum Vagina on September 24, 2013, 01:30:48 PM
I'm going to hit up the dog park this afternoon, which should give me enough energy to get through another round of posting tonight.
Title: Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
Post by: Quantum Vagina on September 24, 2013, 05:06:57 PM
#24 –Disney’s Adventures of the Gummi Bears
(47 Points) 3 of 13 Lists - Highest Ranking - #2 - CJones
(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/8/89/Gummi.jpg)
Game of Thrones… with bears.
http://www.youtube.com/v/SM9fRjRPKEo
Release Date:  1985

Just the Plagarism
Disney's Adventures of the Gummi Bears is a Disney animated television series that first aired in the United States in the mid-1980s through the early 1990s. The series was the first animated production by Walt Disney Animation Television, and loosely inspired by the gummi bear candies; Disney CEO Michael Eisner was struck with inspiration for the show when his son requested the candies one day. The series premiered on NBC on September 14, 1985, and aired there for four seasons. The series moved to ABC for one season from 1989 to 1990, and concluded on September 6, 1991 as part of the Disney Afternoon television syndication package. Of the series' 65 shows, 30 were double-features, consisting of two 11-minute cartoons, thereby bringing the series total to 94 distinct episodes overall. The show is well-remembered for its theme music, written by Michael and Patty Silversher and creation of "gummiberry juice" which was a topic of magic potion, gaining abilities to defend them against the foes.

The series was later rebroadcast on the syndicated Disney Afternoon block, and rerun on the Disney Afternoon through the summer of 1991. In later years, it was shown on the Disney Channel and Toon Disney, with its most recent televised airing occurring on Toon Disney on December 28, 2001. Seasons 1 to 3 of the series were released on DVD on November 14, 2006.

Disney's Adventures of the Gummi Bears was Disney's first major serialized animated television series (it was released back to back with another show, The Wuzzles, which lasted only 13 episodes), and is often credited by animators and animation historians as having helped jump start the television animation boom of the late 1980s and 1990s. Consequently, it also became the forerunner to Disney's famous Disney Afternoon timeslot, which gave way to other famous serialized Disney television series, such as Darkwing Duck, DuckTales, Chip 'n Dale Rescue Rangers, Goof Troop, Bonkers, TaleSpin and Gargoyles. Although many of these subsequently-created shows exceeded Gummi Bears in budget and length, it is often credited as the sort of prototype to all of the subsequent animation which followed it.

The show was so successful in the United Kingdom that the episodes A New Beginning and Faster than a Speeding Tummi were released as theatrical featurettes there in 1986 and 1987.

Other appearances of Gummi Bears in other media included one appearance of Gruffi Gummi starring in a D-TV music video of the Elvis Presley song "Teddy Bear" in 1986. The show's popularity also led to a re-theming of Disneyland's Motor Boat Cruise, along with a small part of Disneyland that became known as "Disney Afternoon Avenue." The Motor Boat Cruise became the "Motor Boat Cruise to Gummi Glen" and plywood characters from the show made Gummiberry Juice along the waterway. The Gummi Bears, and on occasion human characters such as Duke Igthorn, Princess Calla, or King Gregor, have also been featured as meetable characters who greet guests in Disney theme parks.

Quantum Vagina’s take - This show is pretty damned cool, when you think about what it is. Not only is it a fantasy story with a deep world, it was Disney’s first push into the television animation community, which raised the hell out of a bar that had been low since Hanna/Barbara put neckties on animals. This show gets a thumbs up from me.
Title: Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
Post by: Quantum Vagina on September 24, 2013, 05:17:47 PM
#23 –Laputa:Castle in the Sky
(51 Points) 3 of 13 Lists - Highest Ranking - #1 - Rainbow Dash
(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/4/40/Castle_in_the_Sky_%28Movie_Poster%29.jpg)
Prepare your Ghiblits.
http://www.youtube.com/v/McM0_YHDm5A
Release Date:  1986

Just the Plagarism
Laputa: Castle in the Sky (天空の城ラピュタ Tenkū no Shiro Rapyuta?) (or simply Laputa) (re-titled Castle in the Sky for release in the United States) is a 1986 animated adventure feature film written and directed by Hayao Miyazaki. It is the first film produced and released by Studio Ghibli. The film was distributed by Toei Kabushiki Kaisha. Laputa: Castle in the Sky won the Animage Anime Grand Prix in 1986.

The name 'Laputa' is derived from Jonathan Swift's novel Gulliver's Travels, wherein Swift's Laputa is also a flying island that may be controlled by its citizens. Anthony Lioi feels that Miyazaki's Laputa: Castle in the Sky is similar to Swift's Laputa, where the technological superiority of the castle in the sky is used for political ends.

Laputa is credited by Colonel Muska with having informed Biblical and Hindu legends — thus tying the world of Laputa to our Earth (and to western European civilization) — as do the medieval castle architecture on the ground; the Gothic and half-timbered buildings in the village near the fort; the Welsh mining-town architecture, clothing, and ground vehicles of Pazu's homeland; and the Victorian ambiance of the pirate ship. The anime also makes references to the Hindu epic Ramayana, including "Indra's arrow", while the name Sheeta may be a reference to Sita, the female lead in the Ramayana.

Some of the architecture seen in the film was inspired by a Welsh mining town. Miyazaki first visited Wales in 1984 and witnessed the miners' strike firsthand. He returned to the country in 1986 to prepare for Laputa, which he said reflected his Welsh experience: "I was in Wales just after the miners' strike. I really admired the way the miners' unions fought to the very end for their jobs and communities, and I wanted to reflect the strength of those communities in my film." Miyazaki told The Guardian, "I admired those men, I admired the way they battled to save their way of life, just as the coal miners in Japan did. Many people of my generation see the miners as a symbol; a dying breed of fighting men. Now they are gone."

In the late 1980s, an English version of Laputa was briefly shown in the US by Streamline Pictures. This dub, produced for showing on international flights to Japan, was not produced by Streamline. According to Fred Patten of Streamline, "Streamline Pictures theatrically distributed an English-dubbed print of Laputa from March 24, 1989 for the next year, but Streamline never dubbed it. Streamline licensed Laputa from Tokuma Shoten in late 1988 or early 1989, and was sent a print from Japan that had already been dubbed into English for use as an in-flight film by Japan Air Lines on its trans-Pacific flights. "We have no idea who actually dubbed it." Reportedly, Carl Macek was disappointed with this early dub, which is available only on the Japanese DVD release.

The Disney-produced English dub was recorded in 1998 and planned for release on video in 1999, but Disney eventually decided to release it to theaters instead.

After Princess Mononoke flopped financially in the US, Laputa's release date was pushed back yet again; on occasion the completed dub was screened at select children's festivals. The film was finally released on DVD and video in the US on August 16, 2005 alongside Kiki's Delivery Service and Spirited Away. As with Mononoke and Kiki, critical opinion was mixed about the new dub, but Cloris Leachman and Mark Hamill's performances as Dola and Muska drew praise. Laputa was the second-best selling DVD from Studio Ghibli distributed by Disney in the year of its release (after Spirited Away and ahead of Kiki's Delivery Service). Laputa was reissued on American home video in March 2010 as a tribute accompanying the home video release of Ponyo. The film was released on Blu-ray in North America on May 22, 2012, alongside Whisper of the Heart and The Secret World of Arrietty.

The film currently holds a 94% "Fresh" rating at Rotten Tomatoes. In an audience poll (with 80,402 voters) of 100 best animations of all time, conducted by Japan's Agency for Cultural Affairs in 2007, Castle in the Sky was the second highest-ranked animated film, and third highest-ranked animation overall on the list.

Quantum Vagina’s take - This movie is friggin’ amazing. I need to watch it again.
Title: Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
Post by: Quantum Vagina on September 24, 2013, 05:24:37 PM
#22 –The Smurfs
(51 Points) 4 of 13 Lists - Highest Ranking - #1 - Mrs. Dick Courier
(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/a/a1/The_Smurfs_%281981_TV_series%29_title_card.jpg)
Too bad they didn’t make a major motion picture.
http://www.youtube.com/v/wU2Jkc1cHrE
Release Date:  1981

Just the Plagarism
The Smurfs (also known as simply Smurfs, and syndicated as Smurfs' Adventures) is an American-Belgian animated fantasy-comedy television series that aired on NBC from September 12, 1981, to December 2, 1989. Made by Hanna-Barbera, it is based on the Belgian comic series by the same name, created by Belgian cartoonist Peyo (who also served as Story Supervisor of this adaptation) and aired for 256 episodes with a total of 418 stories, excluding three cliffhanger episodes and six specials.

In 1976, Stuart R. Ross, an American media and entertainment entrepreneur who saw the Smurfs while traveling in Belgium, entered into an agreement with Editions Dupuis and Peyo, acquiring North American and other rights to the characters, whose original name was "les Schtroumpfs". Subsequently, Ross launched the Smurfs in the United States in association with a California company, Wallace Berrie and Co., whose figurines, dolls and other Smurf merchandise became a hugely popular success. NBC president Fred Silverman's daughter, Melissa, had a Smurf doll of her own that he had bought for her at a toy shop while they were visiting Aspen, Colorado. Silverman thought that a series based on the Smurfs might make a good addition to his Saturday-morning lineup.

The series currently airs on Boomerang. The episodes were edited by Hanna-Barbera in 1987 into a half-hour syndicated version called Smurfs' Adventures; 26 episodes of this series aired as part of DiC's E/I-compliant children's programming block for broadcast stations in the early 2000s. The series is still being shown regularly on many channels throughout the world.

The cartoon was formerly distributed by Worldvision Enterprises (now CBS Television Distribution). The cartoon is now distributed by Warner Bros. Television Distribution; Time Warner is the current owner of all Hanna-Barbera properties, having inherited them in their 1996 merger with Turner Broadcasting. Some episodes are available through the online video service In2TV.

Quantum Vagina’s take - Eh, I’ve never really been a huge fan of The Smurfs. I guess they’re mildly interesting, and kind of fun, but meh. Also, Smurfette has every STD ever. It’s canon.
Title: Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
Post by: Johnny Unusual on September 24, 2013, 05:41:13 PM
From what I heard, the original Smurfs comics are actually quite good.  The tone is still largely the same, but there is darker undercurrents.  I read a book about 1001 comic to read before you die, and a really interesting one is a political comedy (no, really) called King Smurf, in which Papa leaves a smurf in charge who basically gets corrupt.  Nothing really nasty happens, it's more that the power goes to his head and there's various changes of power before Papa Smurf comes back.

Also, there's (and I'm not even kidding) a zombie smurf story before zombies were even a thing (at least in the modern definition).  Published in 1959, The Black Smurfs (later changed to purple for... obvious reason) is about Smurfs turning black and become mindless jerks who bite people to make them Black Smurfs, until Papa Smurf finds the cure.

But yeah, not an interesting cartoon, in my opinion.
Title: Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
Post by: Nunyerbiz on September 24, 2013, 05:50:38 PM
My only memory of the Gummi Bears cartoon is the theme song... I was 11 years old when it came out and I can remember myself and a friend just laughing hysterically at the combination of the theme song and the bouncing bears. Even to us at that young age, having already seen so many ridiculous concepts for Saturday morning cartoons... this one seemed even more ridiculous. I'm sure I watched full episodes, as there wasn't much else to do back then on wintery Saturday mornings... but the show will always just be the theme song.... which I still find myself signing every now and again.
Title: Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
Post by: Quantum Vagina on September 24, 2013, 05:53:51 PM
#21 –ThunderCats
(52 Points) 6 of 13 Lists - Highest Ranking - #1 - Quantum Vagina
(http://i.imgur.com/mitslSd.jpg)
HOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO!
http://www.youtube.com/v/CjaTkPYzK00
Release Date:  1985

Just the Plagarism
ThunderCats is an American/Japanese animation based on a group of cat-like humanoid aliens. The show was created by Tobin "Ted" Wolf and animated by Japanese animation studio, Pacific Animation Corporation. The characters were originally featured in an animated TV series named ThunderCats, running from 1985 to 1989.

The original show was animated in Japan while being produced, written and voice-acted in the United States. Many of the artists went on to be in Studio Ghibli, and worked on [Hayao] Miyazaki's first film, so "ThunderCats" does have a footprint in Japanese animation. The series was originally distributed by Rankin-Bass Productions' then-parent company Telepictures Corporation, which would later merge with Lorimar Productions in 1986. In 1989, Lorimar-Telepictures was purchased by and folded into Warner Bros., whose television syndication arm would eventually assume distribution of the show; Warner Bros. has had the rights to the series (and all Lorimar-Telepictures programming) from that point on.

There were also several comic book series produced. A ThunderCats comic book series based on the animated series was originally published by Marvel Comics (currently owned by Warner Bros. rival Disney) through its Star Comics imprint in 1985, lasting for 3 years and 24 issues. During this time, a new series was published by Marvel UK consisting of 129 issues and was also published for three years. Beginning in 2002 ThunderCats titles were published by Wildstorm Productions, an imprint of DC Comics (Warner Bros.' corporate sibling), and included 5 non-canon mini-series and several one-shots. A side-scrolling video game based on the series, ThunderCats: The Lost Eye of Thundera, was published in 1987.
Items of clothing featuring the ThunderCats logo and DVD boxsets of the original series enjoyed a resurgence in the mid-to-late 2000s as nostalgia for the former children's favorite grew. It was announced on June 7, 2007, that Aurelio Jaro is making a CGI-animated feature film of ThunderCats, based on a script written by Paul Sopocy. In October 2007, Variety magazine revealed that Jerry O'Flaherty, veteran video game art director, had signed on to direct. The film is being produced by Spring Creek Productions. It was originally set for a summer 2010 release, but it has since been reported that the movie is on hold. Concept art for the film has also been leaked online.

Quantum Vagina’s take - This show is off the CHAIN. It’s got EVERYTHING. Swords. Lasers. Mummies. Furries. EVERY. FUCKING. THING. IN. THIS. SHOW. Except Snarf. No. Even Snarf. Awesome. Pure awesome.
Title: Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
Post by: Quantum Vagina on September 24, 2013, 05:56:55 PM
http://www.youtube.com/v/iH8au4ckD0Y

That'll do me for now. I'm on an energy headache. I'll probably post 20-11 later tonight, and get onto the top 10 tomorrow. Probably, providing no unexpected happenings.
Title: Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
Post by: Tripe on September 24, 2013, 06:17:28 PM
#23 –Laputa:Castle in the Sky
(51 Points) 3 of 13 Lists - Highest Ranking - #1 - Rainbow Dash
(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/4/40/Castle_in_the_Sky_%28Movie_Poster%29.jpg)
Prepare your Ghiblits.
http://www.youtube.com/v/McM0_YHDm5A
Release Date:  1986

Just the Plagarism
Laputa: Castle in the Sky (天空の城ラピュタ Tenkū no Shiro Rapyuta?) (or simply Laputa) (re-titled Castle in the Sky for release in the United States) is a 1986 animated adventure feature film written and directed by Hayao Miyazaki. It is the first film produced and released by Studio Ghibli. The film was distributed by Toei Kabushiki Kaisha. Laputa: Castle in the Sky won the Animage Anime Grand Prix in 1986.

The name 'Laputa' is derived from Jonathan Swift's novel Gulliver's Travels, wherein Swift's Laputa is also a flying island that may be controlled by its citizens. Anthony Lioi feels that Miyazaki's Laputa: Castle in the Sky is similar to Swift's Laputa, where the technological superiority of the castle in the sky is used for political ends.

Laputa is credited by Colonel Muska with having informed Biblical and Hindu legends — thus tying the world of Laputa to our Earth (and to western European civilization) — as do the medieval castle architecture on the ground; the Gothic and half-timbered buildings in the village near the fort; the Welsh mining-town architecture, clothing, and ground vehicles of Pazu's homeland; and the Victorian ambiance of the pirate ship. The anime also makes references to the Hindu epic Ramayana, including "Indra's arrow", while the name Sheeta may be a reference to Sita, the female lead in the Ramayana.

Some of the architecture seen in the film was inspired by a Welsh mining town. Miyazaki first visited Wales in 1984 and witnessed the miners' strike firsthand. He returned to the country in 1986 to prepare for Laputa, which he said reflected his Welsh experience: "I was in Wales just after the miners' strike. I really admired the way the miners' unions fought to the very end for their jobs and communities, and I wanted to reflect the strength of those communities in my film." Miyazaki told The Guardian, "I admired those men, I admired the way they battled to save their way of life, just as the coal miners in Japan did. Many people of my generation see the miners as a symbol; a dying breed of fighting men. Now they are gone."

In the late 1980s, an English version of Laputa was briefly shown in the US by Streamline Pictures. This dub, produced for showing on international flights to Japan, was not produced by Streamline. According to Fred Patten of Streamline, "Streamline Pictures theatrically distributed an English-dubbed print of Laputa from March 24, 1989 for the next year, but Streamline never dubbed it. Streamline licensed Laputa from Tokuma Shoten in late 1988 or early 1989, and was sent a print from Japan that had already been dubbed into English for use as an in-flight film by Japan Air Lines on its trans-Pacific flights. "We have no idea who actually dubbed it." Reportedly, Carl Macek was disappointed with this early dub, which is available only on the Japanese DVD release.

The Disney-produced English dub was recorded in 1998 and planned for release on video in 1999, but Disney eventually decided to release it to theaters instead.

After Princess Mononoke flopped financially in the US, Laputa's release date was pushed back yet again; on occasion the completed dub was screened at select children's festivals. The film was finally released on DVD and video in the US on August 16, 2005 alongside Kiki's Delivery Service and Spirited Away. As with Mononoke and Kiki, critical opinion was mixed about the new dub, but Cloris Leachman and Mark Hamill's performances as Dola and Muska drew praise. Laputa was the second-best selling DVD from Studio Ghibli distributed by Disney in the year of its release (after Spirited Away and ahead of Kiki's Delivery Service). Laputa was reissued on American home video in March 2010 as a tribute accompanying the home video release of Ponyo. The film was released on Blu-ray in North America on May 22, 2012, alongside Whisper of the Heart and The Secret World of Arrietty.

The film currently holds a 94% "Fresh" rating at Rotten Tomatoes. In an audience poll (with 80,402 voters) of 100 best animations of all time, conducted by Japan's Agency for Cultural Affairs in 2007, Castle in the Sky was the second highest-ranked animated film, and third highest-ranked animation overall on the list.

Quantum Vagina’s take - This movie is friggin’ amazing. I need to watch it again.
The bit with the robot and the flowers makes me tear up every time.
Title: Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
Post by: Johnny Unusual on September 24, 2013, 06:48:09 PM
I really need to see Laputa.

Thundercats is really not that good.  The animation is pretty weak.  But it has a hell of an opening that makes it WAY more amazing.

Fun fact:

The theme of Thundercats was written by James Lipton.  I'm told Mumm-Ra smells like apples.
Title: Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
Post by: Rainbow Dash on September 24, 2013, 08:29:47 PM
Laputa set a Twitter record for Tweets per second last month when they did the annual airing in Japan and people tweeted "Balus" when the two characters say it in the film.
Title: Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
Post by: Nunyerbiz on September 25, 2013, 08:46:40 AM
Thundercats was indeed awful... Still watched the hell out of it, as that's just what you did in November after walking home from school, you watched horrid shit like Thundercats and Voltron.

I did really love Robotech as a kid... Even though I would get confused as hell when the story jumped to a completely different plot line with completely different characters. It wasn't until the dawn of the internets that I learned about how it was cobbled together from disparate source material. Still, it was the show probably most responsible for making me realize that girls weren't icky... In whatever plot line involved the love triangle between the hot shot pilot guy, the other military woman and the singer... Rick and Lisa and.... I'm drawing a blank on the name of the singer. But yea, I can remember almost being embarrassed to be caught up in a love triangle. The show aired really early in the morning in Detroit, like 6:30 or something ridiculous. I would have my mom wake me up as she was getting ready for work so I could watch it... and she'd tease me about liking "All My Children with Robots"... which is how she had rechristened the series.
Title: Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
Post by: Tripe on September 25, 2013, 09:09:44 AM
That's Macross right?
Title: Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
Post by: Nunyerbiz on September 25, 2013, 09:40:25 AM
Yea, I believe one of the Macross shows was one of the things mashed into Robotech... But I haven't watched any of it since I was a kid and never saw the original source material. So I have no idea which original show corresponded to which plot thread in Robotech.
Title: Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
Post by: Mrs. Dick Courier on September 25, 2013, 09:41:26 AM
Said it before will say it again.  Transformers is number one
Title: Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
Post by: Rainbow Dash on September 25, 2013, 11:46:09 AM
Only Macross I've seen was the 2002 Macross Zero, which I thought was pretty good.
Title: Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
Post by: Tripe on September 25, 2013, 11:52:43 AM
I've only ever heard of Robotech, I always thought it was related to Macross the same way Starblazers is to Space Battleship Yamato or Battle of the Planets is to Gatchaman. I guess it's more complex than that then.
Title: Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
Post by: Johnny Unusual on September 25, 2013, 03:13:19 PM
Basically, season one of Robotech is Macross, season 2 was Southern Cross (incidentally, both of the full titles included the words "super dimensional"), and the last one was MOSPEADA, although I think there's some mixing between series in an attempt to edit in continuity between them that didn't exist.
Title: Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
Post by: Quantum Vagina on September 25, 2013, 05:05:22 PM
#20 –Nausicaa and the Valley of the Wind
(53 Points) 3 of 13 Lists - Highest Ranking - #3 - Charles Hussein Castle
(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/b/bc/Nausicaaposter.jpg)
Better than the Valley of the Broken Wind
http://www.youtube.com/v/vJdQtnhKAtU
Release Date:  1984

Just the Plagarism
Nausicaä of the Valley of the Wind (Japanese: 風の谷のナウシカ Hepburn: Kaze no Tani no Naushika?) is a 1984 Japanese animated post-apocalyptic fantasy adventure film written and directed by Hayao Miyazaki, based on his own 1982 manga of the same name. Isao Takahata produced the film for Tokuma Shoten and Hakuhodo, and Top Craft animated the film. Joe Hisaishi provided the music. The film stars the voices of Sumi Shimamoto, Goro Naya, Yoji Matsuda, Yoshiko Sakakibara and Iemasa Kayumi.

The film tells the story of Nausicaä (Shimamoto), a young princess of the Valley of the Wind who gets involved in a struggle with Tolmekia, a kingdom that tries to use an ancient weapon to eradicate a jungle of mutant giant insects. Nausicaä must stop the Tolmekians from enraging these creatures.

The film was released in Japan on March 11, 1984. While created before Studio Ghibli was founded, the film is considered to be the beginning of the studio and is often included as part of the Studio's works, including the Studio Ghibli Collection DVDs and Blu-rays.

Miyazaki's work on Nausicaä of the Valley of the Wind was inspired by a range of the works including Ursula Le Guin's Earthsea, Brian Aldiss's Hothouse, Isaac Asimov's Nightfall, and J.R.R Tolkien's Lord of the Rings. Dani Cavallaro also suggests inspiration from The Princess Who Loved Insects folktale, and the works of William Golding. Nausicaä, the character, was inspired in name and personality, by Homer's the Phaeacian princess in the Odyssey. While a connection to Frank Herbert's Dune is often made there is no confirmation apart from the name "Ohmu" being a syllabic rendition of the English "worm". Miyzaki's imagination was sparked the mercury poisoning of Minamata Bay and how nature responded and thrived in a poisoned environment; using it to create the polluted world of Nausicaä of the Valley of the Wind. Ian DeWeese-Boyd agrees, "Her commitment to love and understanding—even to the point of death—transforms the very nature of the conflict around her and begins to dispel the distorting visions that have brought it about.”

The most prominent themes are the anti-war and environmental focus of the film. Nausicaä, the heroine, believes in the value of life regardless of its form and through her actions stops a war. Loy and Goodhew state there is no evil portrayed in the film, but the Buddist roots of evil: greed, ill will and delusion. Fear is what drives the conflicts, the fear of the poisoned forest results in the greed and resentment. Nausicaä, besides from being a transformative force, leads people to understand and respect nature which is portrayed as a welcoming, spiritual, and restorative for those who enter it peacefully.

Nausicaä of the Valley of the Wind received generally positive reviews from film critics. The film frequently ranked among the best animated films in Japan and is seen as a seminal influence on the development of anime, as the film's success lead to the foundation of Studio Ghibli and several other anime studios.Theron Martin of Anime News Network praised the film for its character designs, as well as Hayao Miyazaki's direction and Joe Hisaishi's score. He also said that the film "deserves a place on any short list of all-time classic anime movies."
 Commonsense Media, which serves to inform parents about media for children, rated the film positively and cited its good role models and positive messages, but also cautions parents about its dramatic setting and violent scenes. As of August 2013, review aggregator Rotten Tomatoes reports that 83% of critics gave the film positive reviews, based on 11 reviews with an average rating of 7.8/10.

Quantum Vagina’s take - I haven’t seen this movie in probably close to a decade now, and I don’t remember much from it, but I do remember that I liked it. It’s a cool movie with a cool story, and I think it’s up their in Miyazaki’s better works.
Title: Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
Post by: Quantum Vagina on September 25, 2013, 05:12:20 PM
#19 –Vampire Hunter D
(53 Points) 4 of 13 Lists - Highest Ranking - #7 - McDonald’s
(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/8/8f/Vampire_Hunter_%281985_film%29_DVD_cover.jpg)
The Japanese Blade
http://www.youtube.com/v/WkDYDkVSNJA
Release Date:  1985

Just the Plagarism
Vampire Hunter D (吸血鬼(バンパイア)ハンターD Vampaia hantā D) is a 1985 Japanese animated film produced by Ashi Productions, based on the novels written by Hideyuki Kikuchi and illustrated by Yoshitaka Amano. It was one of the first anime films released outside of Japan and remains a cult classic in the English-speaking world. Billed by the Japanese producers as a "dark future science-fiction romance", Vampire Hunter D is set in the year 12,090 AD, in a post-nuclear holocaust world where a vampire nobility terrorizes human peasants.

While walking her guard rounds in the country, 17 year old Doris Lang, daughter of a deceased werewolf hunter, is attacked by Count Magnus Lee, the 10,000 year old, long-lost vampire lord. Magnus intends to make Doris his new zombie vampire bride. Doris later encounters a mysterious horseman, D (the first wandering hunter she has been unable to defeat), whom she hires to protect her from the vampires.
The young hunter becomes a pawn in a conflict between Count Lee, his daughter Lamica and the mutant servant Rei Ginsei. Greco Rohman, the mayor's son, also wants the feisty Doris for himself. When Doris is kidnapped by Count Lee, D battles his way into the vampire's gigantic fortress to rescue her. Lamica's loyalties are torn when she becomes disgusted with her father's lack of "nobility."
There is a long rescue attempt, with numerous running battles, as D tries to defeat the count and prevent Doris from transforming into a vampire. Once D defeats the count, the castle crumbles and D escapes with Doris and her brother Dan. D sets off under a now clear blue sky. Doris and her little brother wave him off as D looks back briefly and smiles. He then rides off into the sunset.

In December 2003, German anime distributor OVA Films released a restored version of Vampire Hunter D on DVD (PAL, Region Code 2, priced 29,95 €). Unlike the overwhelming majority of PAL anime releases, which are NTSC-PAL conversions of whatever master the Japanese licensor offers, OVA Films requested the film negative to do their own transfer from scratch in the PAL format. As the Japanese, French, US and UK DVDs have all been taken from composite transfers originally used for LD and VHS replication, Vampire Hunter D was sorely in need of a new master for the digital age. The OVA Films DVD included a brand new transfer from what OVA Films claimed to be the original negative. It should be noted that while the Japanese DVD does not have reel change-over marks, the German and American film masters do, so it's unlikely that this transfer was taken from the camera negative, and was more likely taken from a slightly lower quality inter-negative source a few generations away from the actual negative. The film is presented in 25 frames per second as opposed to its original 24 frames per second runtime, so the video and audio are both pitched up by 4% as is expected in PAL transfers. Despite running a few minutes shorter than all prior versions due to the PAL speedup, this release is completely unedited.

Quantum Vagina’s take - HOW DID I FORGET THIS MOVIE?! I was so annoyed when I got the lists from CJones and saw Vampire Hunter D. Massive frustration. This movie is AWESOME, and really cool, and you should watch it.
Title: Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
Post by: Quantum Vagina on September 25, 2013, 05:30:38 PM
#18 –The Little Mermaid
(55 Points) 4 of 13 Lists - Highest Ranking - #5 - Cole Stratton
(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/7/75/Movie_poster_the_little_mermaid.jpg)
Better down where it’s wetter.
http://www.youtube.com/v/Oz0H4UHd2J4
Release Date:  1989

Just the Plagarism
The Little Mermaid is a 1989 American animated musical fantasy film produced by Walt Disney Feature Animation and released by Walt Disney Pictures. Based on the Danish fairy tale by Hans Christian Andersen, The Little Mermaid tells the story of a beautiful mermaid who dreams of becoming human. Written, directed, and produced by Ron Clements and John Musker, with music by Alan Menken and Howard Ashman (who also served as a co-producer), the film features the voices Jodi Benson, Christopher Daniel Barnes, Pat Carroll, Samuel E. Wright, Jason Marin, Kenneth Mars, Buddy Hacket, and Rene Auberjonois.

The 28th film in the Walt Disney Animated Classics series, The Little Mermaid was released to theaters on November 14, 1989 to largely positive reviews, garnering $84 million at the box office during its initial release, and $211 million in total lifetime gross.

After the success of the 1988 Disney/Amblin film Who Framed Roger Rabbit, The Little Mermaid is given credit for breathing life back into the art of Disney animated feature films after a string of critical or commercial failures produced by Disney that dated back to the early 1970s. It also marked the start of the era known as the Disney Renaissance.

A stage adaptation of the film with a book by Doug Wright and additional songs by Alan Menken and new lyricist Glenn Slater opened in Denver in July 2007 and began performances on Broadway January 10, 2008.

The film was originally released on November 14, 1989 along with the first Wallace and Gromit short A Grand Day Out, followed by a November 17, 1997 reissue. After the success of the 3D re-release of The Lion King, Disney announced a 3D re-release of The Little Mermaid scheduled for September 13, 2013, but this was cancelled on January 14, 2013 due to the under performances of other Disney 3D re-releases. The 3D version of the movie will instead be released on Blu-ray in Fall 2013. On September 20, 2013, The Little Mermaid began playing in select theaters where audiences can bring IPads and use an app called Second Screen Live.The film was also screened out of competition at the 1990 Cannes Film Festival.

In a then atypical and controversial move for a new Disney animated film, The Little Mermaid was released as part of the Walt Disney Classics line of VHS and Laserdisc home video releases in May 1990, eight months after the release of the film. Before Mermaid, only a select number of Disney's catalog animated films had been released to home video, as the company was afraid of upsetting its profitable practice of theatrically reissuing each film every seven years. Mermaid became that year's top-selling title on home video, with over 10 million units sold (including 7 million in its first month). This success led future Disney films to be released soon after the end of their theatrical runs, rather than delayed for several years.
Following Mermaid's 1997 re-release in theaters, a new VHS version of the film was released in March 1998 as part of the Masterpiece Collection and included a bonus music video of Jodi Benson singing "Part of Your World" during the end credits, replacing "Under the Sea" as the end credit song. The VHS sold 13 million units and ranked as the third best-selling video of the year.

The Little Mermaid was released in a Limited Issue "bare-bones" DVD in 1999, with a standard video transfer and no substantial features. The film was re-released on DVD on October 3, 2006, as part of the Walt Disney Platinum Editions line of classic Walt Disney animated features. Deleted scenes and several in-depth documentaries were included, as well as an Academy Award-nominated short film intended for the shelved Fantasia 2006, The Little Match Girl. The DVD sold 1.6 million units on its first day of release, and over 4 million units during its first week, making it the biggest animated DVD debut for October. By year's end, the DVD had sold about 7 million units and was one of the year's top ten selling DVDs. The Platinum Edition DVD was released as part of a "Little Mermaid Trilogy" boxed set on December 16, 2008. The Platinum Edition of the movie, along with its sequels, went on moratorium in January 2009. The film is set to be re-released on 3-disc Blu-ray/DVD/Digital Copy Combo, a 2-disc Blu-ray/DVD combo and 3D Blu-ray on October 1, 2013 as part of the Walt Disney Diamond Editions line.

Qunatum Vagina’s take - This movie is fun. It’s been awhile since I’ve seen it, since I’m not an incredibly annoying pretentious hipster girl in her mid 20’s, but I remember it fairly well from my childhood. I do remember going through it with my cousins and finding the dirty secrets in it, like the dick on the cover, and the priest’s “kneecaps”. I think Daniel Tosh said it best, though when he said, “You try drawing Ariel for 12 hours a day and not putting a dick SOMEWHERE!”
Title: Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
Post by: Johnny Unusual on September 25, 2013, 05:37:48 PM
Really need to see Nausicaa.  Vampire Hunter D was low on my list if I recall, but it is still a pretty cool vampire hunting movie before EVERYONE was doing it.  Also, he talks to his hand, so he's also like a new Senor Wences.

Was never really into the Little Mermaid, though Ursula was a pretty great villain.
Title: Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
Post by: CJones on September 25, 2013, 05:46:52 PM
First off: Thank you very very much to Quantum Vagina for taking over this list. Things are going much better for me now. Just ask me for any favor and I'll do it. As long as it doesn't involve money. Or sex...

Anyway... Here's why The Gummi Bears was so awesome: There was extensive lore built into it from the start. There were a crap load of forgotten lands, lost technology, and stuff that still existed, but that they no longer knew about, or knew how to use. It was like Battletech, but with bears.

Speaking of Battletech, FASA was actually sued by the makers of Macross for stealing their designs. The same designs that made it into Robotech, which was actually a mish-mash of Macross, Southern Cross and Mospeada. Seriously, watch Macross: Do you Remember Love. You can clearly see a Marauder and a Warhammer from Battletech, not to mention plenty of Phoenix Hawk LAMs. Also watch it because it's a damn good movie.

EDIT: I started writing this post two hours ago, so yes I know Johnny Unusual already mentioned the three series Robotech came from. But as long as I'm typing more:

Nausicaa is one of my favorite movies ever. The only reason I didn't include it was because I was sticking strictly to TV series. 
Title: Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
Post by: Quantum Vagina on September 25, 2013, 05:47:37 PM
#17 –A Grand Day Out with Wallace and Grommit
(58 Points) 3 of 13 Lists - Highest Ranking - #5 - gojikranz
(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/1/14/A_Grand_Day_Out_with_Wallace_and_Gromit_movie_poster.jpg)
Fuck the supermarket; let’s get our cheese from the MOON.
http://www.youtube.com/v/uw6Xh9enu_w
Release Date:  1989

Just the Plagarism

A Grand Day Out is a 1989 British stop motion animated short film directed and animated by Nick Park at Aardman Animations in Bristol. In the film, Wallace and Gromit spend a bank holiday by building a rocket to the Moon to sample some cheese. It was released in theaters with Disney's The Little Mermaid.

As Wallace and Gromit relax at home, pondering where to go for the upcoming bank holiday, Wallace discovers that he has run out of cheese. He suggests that they go somewhere to get more, and they settle on the moon, since "everybody knows the moon's made of cheese." They quickly construct a rocket in the basement and pack provisions for the journey, but Wallace realises at the last moment that he has forgotten the crackers. He hurries to the kitchen and gets all the crackers, making it back to the rocket just as the engine ignites. However, the rocket stays in place until Gromit remembers to release the hand brake so it can lift off.

Nick Park started creating the film in 1982 as a graduation project for the National Film and Television School. In 1985, Aardman Animations took him on before he finished the piece, allowing him to work on it part-time while still being funded by the school. To make the film, Park wrote to William Harbutt's company, requesting a long ton of plasticine. The block he received had ten colours, one of which was called "stone"; this was used for Gromit. Park wanted to voice Gromit, but he realised the voice he had in mind – that of Peter Hawkins – would have been difficult to animate.

For Wallace, Park offered Peter Sallis £50 to voice the character, and his acceptance greatly surprised the young animator. Park wanted Wallace to have a Lancastrian accent like himself, but Sallis could only do a Yorkshire voice. Inspired by how Sallis drew out the word "cheese", Park chose to give Wallace large cheeks. When Park called Sallis six years later to explain he had completed his film, Sallis swore in surprise.

Gromit was named after grommets, because Park's brother, an electrician, often mentioned them, and Nick Park liked the sound of the word. Wallace was originally a postman named Jerry, but Park felt the name did not match well with Gromit. Park saw an overweight Labrador retriever named Wallace, who belonged to an old woman boarding a bus in Preston. Park commented it was a "funny name, a very northern name to give a dog".


According to the book The World of Wallace and Gromit, original plans were that the film would be 40 minutes long including a sequence where Wallace and Gromit would discover a Fast-food restaurant on the Moon. Regarding the original plot, Park said:

Quote
The original story was that Wallace and Gromit were going to go to the Moon and there were going to be a whole lot of characters there. One of them was a parking meter attendant, which was the only one that remained – the robot cooker character – but there were going to be aliens, and all sorts. There was going to be a McDonalds on the Moon, and it was going to be like a spoof Star Wars. Wallace was going to get thrown into prison and Gromit was going to have to get him out. By the time I came to Aardman, I had just started doing the Moon scene and somebody told me, "It's going to take you another nine years if you do that scene!" so I had to have a check with reality and cut that whole bit out. Somehow, I had to tie up the story on the Moon and finish the film.

Quantum Vagina’s take - Kind of a funny coincidence that this showed up on the list right above it’s partner in theaters. I’ve never seen it, but I have seen some Wallace and Grommit stuff, and all I remember is that it was very British and mildly entertaining.
Title: Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
Post by: Quantum Vagina on September 25, 2013, 05:55:07 PM
#16 –The Last Unicorn
(62 Points) 4 of 13 Lists - Highest Ranking - #2 - ColeStratton
(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/1/17/Last_unicorn.jpg)
Unicorns are pretty damned cool.
http://www.youtube.com/v/t-UpwWauZ50
Release Date:  1982

Just the Plagarism
The Last Unicorn is a 1982 American animated fantasy film directed by Jules Bass and Arthur Rankin, Jr. and featuring the voices of Alan Arkin, Jeff Bridges, and Mia Farrow as the Unicorn. The film was produced by Rankin/Bass for ITC Entertainment, and animated by Topcraft. Based on the novel The Last Unicorn written by Peter S. Beagle, who also wrote the film's screenplay, the film is about a unicorn who, upon learning that she is the last unicorn in the world, goes on a quest to find out what has happened to the others of her kind.

The film features additional voices of Tammy Grimes, Keenan Wynn, René Auberjonois, Robert Klein, Angela Lansbury, and Christopher Lee. The musical score and the songs were composed and arranged by Jimmy Webb, and performed by the group America with additional vocals provided by Lucy Mitchell. The film earned $2,250,000 on its opening weekend and grossed $6,455,330 domestically.

The Last Unicorn premiered on 648 theaters in the United States on November 19, 1982, and earned $2,250,000 on its opening weekend. The first U.S. DVD, released by Lionsgate in April 2004, was made from poor-quality masters and the video and audio both suffer. Upon the release of this DVD, Conlan Press lobbied Lionsgate to "to do something about it." Lionsgate licensed the German video masters and audio mix, and came up with a "25th Anniversary Edition" DVD which was released in North America on February 6, 2007. It has audio and visual quality superior to the original U.S. release, and is in 16:9 widescreen format, but has several swear words edited out, and as a result of being taken from PAL masters, plays 4% faster than the original film, resulting in a slightly higher audio pitch than normal. The new DVD edition includes a featurette with an interview with the author, as well as a set-top game, image gallery, and the original theatrical trailer. Conlan Press is offering the 25th Anniversary Edition DVD for sale.

Due to ongoing contractual disputes, none of the proceeds of DVD purchases through other sources will reach Peter S. Beagle. However, because of the special agreement Conlan Press made with Lionsgate Entertainment, more than half of the payment for copies purchased through Conlan Press will go to Beagle. In addition to the standard version of the DVD, Conlan Press offers the option of purchasing individually personalized autographed copies. As of October 2011, over 2,500,000 copies of the DVD have been sold.

Since 1999, this film has been controlled by a British company, Granada Media International (a subsidiary of ITV plc). From 2003-11, Beagle was involved in a financial dispute with Granada over nonpayment of contractually due profit and merchandising shares. On July 29, 2011, Beagle announced at his Otakon appearance that he and ITV had reached an agreement that was beneficial to all parties, and should please fans of the book of the same name because it will make new merchandise and business development possible. On October 14, 2011, at his New York Comic Con appearance, he announced the first results of the deal, including limited edition art prints of original concept paintings from the film, an 80-city digital screening tour with Beagle doing audience Q&A, and a complete renovation of the original film for worldwide release in movie theaters as a 30th anniversary event.

Quantum Vagina’s take - I think I’m just going to have to accept that I like this portion of Rankin/Bass work, and hate the shitty Christmas specials. I haven’t seen it, and indeed wasn’t aware of it’s existence, but I believe this is the kind of thing that’d get a “Bwaaaah!” out of Hank Hill, and I usually enjoy those.
Title: Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
Post by: Quantum Vagina on September 25, 2013, 06:08:07 PM
#15 –He-Man and the Masters of the Universe
(64 Points) 5 of 13 Lists - Highest Ranking - #2 - Quantum Vagina
(http://i.imgur.com/YHqQDjD.jpg)
By the Power of Greyskull!
http://www.youtube.com/v/7yeA7a0uS3A
Release Date:  1983

Just the Plagarism
He-Man and the Masters of the Universe is an American animated television series produced by Filmation based on Mattel's successful toy line Masters of the Universe. The show, often referred to as simply He-Man, was one of the most popular animated children's shows of the 1980s, and has retained a heavy cult following to this day.

It made its television debut in 1983 and ran until 1985, consisting of two seasons of 65 episodes each. Reruns continued to air in syndication until 1988, at which point USA Network bought the rights to the series. USA aired He-Man until September 1990. Reruns of the show are no longer being broadcast on the Qubo Night Owl in the U.S. Currently the show is viewed on Retro Television Network, on Me-TV, and in Canada on Teletoon Retro.

The show takes place on the fictional planet of Eternia, a planet of magic, myth and fantasy. The show's lead character is Prince Adam, the young son of Eternia's rulers, King Randor and Queen Marlena. Whenever Prince Adam uses the Sword of Power, and when he holds it aloft and says the magic words "By the Power of Grayskull, I HAVE THE POWER" he is endowed with fabulous secrets powers and transformed into He-Man, the most powerful man in the universe. Together with his close allies, Battle Cat (who undergoes a similar transformation from being Adam's cowardly pet tiger Cringer), The Sorceress, Teela, Man-At-Arms and Orko, He-Man uses his powers to defend Eternia from the evil forces of Skeletor. Skeletor's main goal is to conquer the mysterious fortress of Castle Grayskull, from which He-Man draws his powers. If he succeeds, Skeletor would conquer the world of Eternia, and possibly the whole universe.

Despite the limited animation techniques that were used to produce the series, He-Man was notable for breaking the boundaries of censorship that had severely restricted the narrative scope of children's TV programming in the 1970s. For the first time in years, a cartoon series could feature a muscular superhero who was actually allowed to hit people (although he more typically used wrestling-style moves rather than actually punching enemies), though he still could not use his sword often; more often than not He-Man opted to pick up his opponents and toss them away rather than hit them. The cartoon was controversial in that it was produced in connection with marketing a line of toys; advertising to children was itself controversial during this period. In the United Kingdom, advertising regulations forbade commercials for He-Man toys to accompany the program itself. In similar fashion to other shows at the time: notably G.I. Joe, an attempt to mitigate the negative publicity generated by this controversy was made by including a "life lesson" or "moral of the story" at the end of each episode. This moral was usually directly tied to the action or central theme of that episode.

Quantum Vagina’s take -

Spoiler (click to show/hide)
That is all.
Title: Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
Post by: RoninFox on September 25, 2013, 06:16:33 PM
Interesting, we're getting into a little "I've riffed this" section of the list.
Title: Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
Post by: Quantum Vagina on September 25, 2013, 06:31:45 PM
I've been meaning to watch the next entry on the list for ages, so I'm going to take the opportunity to so so before posting it. I will finish off the next 4 tonight, with the top 10 tomorrow!
Title: Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
Post by: The Lurker on September 25, 2013, 06:33:37 PM
Interesting, we're getting into a little "I've riffed this" section of the list.
If only this was still in print...
(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51518AY44VL.jpg)
Title: Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
Post by: Johnny Unusual on September 25, 2013, 06:39:50 PM
I know people here seem to love it, but to me the Last Unicorn is a real mixed bag.  The stuff that's good is really good (much of the animation, the voice acting, especially Christopher Lee doing an amazing job, much of the dialogue, the clever toying with archetypes), the stuff that is not (the other animation, the music of America, the feeling like some character stuff didn't have the opportunity to properly set in, like some great character stuff was there, but was cut for time, the butterfly at the beginning that makes pop culture references) is really not.
Title: Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
Post by: ColeStratton on September 25, 2013, 06:51:39 PM
I LOVE the music by America. The singing voice of Mia Farrow? Not so much.
Title: Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
Post by: RoninFox on September 25, 2013, 07:16:29 PM
I don't think its going out on a limb to say that Last Unicorn is the best looking piece of animation work Rankin/Bass ever made.  It definately has some weird issues though, which worked out great for me.

Good to hear Beagle is getting a settlement out of all the crap he's gone through.  He really got screwed over hard by two animated movies.  He wrote the screenplay for Bakshi's Lord of the Rings movie for a pittance on the promise of more and better paying work that never materialized, and then there were all the unpaid royalties for this. 
Title: Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
Post by: Johnny Unusual on September 25, 2013, 07:42:12 PM
Also, I'm sure I'm alone on this, but I would love to see a live action adaptation of the Last Unicorn.  Christopher Lee can reprise his role (and time has made him even more fitting for it) and you can get someone like Terry Gilliam who is great at mixing the darkness and whimsy so well.  Or maybe Guillermo del Toro.  Despite not really caring for Pacific Rim, I think his style would be really suited for it.

Christopher Lee is by far my favourite thing about the Last Unicorn.  He is fucking amazing as the lead villain and imbues him with a lot of pathos where it could have been a one note villain with a bad childhood.  I guess that's another thing that dissappointed me about it: I felt that I wished the movie dived more into the idea of subverted archetypes.  Haggard gets a lot of good stuff: he's a dark evil lord, but he's barely ruling over everyone and he doesn't have a big plan: he's just letting himself rot in a creepy "house of Usher" type castle while enjoying his unicorns.  But I wish more time and care was spent on his knightly son, who clearly wants to be a good heroic knight character but clearly doesn't have a lot to do.  We don't nearly spend enough time with him.  Or Molly Grue, who seems like a maiden who was supposed to be a fairy tale hero but life didn't go well.  She gets a few really good scenes, but the film doesn't feel entirely cohesive in this regard.
Title: Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
Post by: CJones on September 25, 2013, 08:04:48 PM
I recently re-watched The Last Unicorn (with RoninFox's riff). It really isn't as good as I remembered. Mia Farrow can't sing, Jeff Bridges is terrible, and that butterfly makes me want to rip his wings off.

However, Haggard (Christopher Lee) gives the second best villain speech I've ever heard. The first being the Ur-Quan from Star Control 2 (aka The Ur-Quan Masters, which is totally free, and one of the best games ever). The woman who played Molly was also very good, and it cheeses me off that the current version of the movie cuts out the part where she says "damn you, where where you when I was young"
Title: Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
Post by: Quantum Vagina on September 25, 2013, 08:05:54 PM
#14 –My Neighbor Totoro
(69 Points) 4 of 13 Lists - Highest Ranking - #2 - Tripe H Redux
(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/0/02/My_Neighbor_Totoro_-_Tonari_no_Totoro_%28Movie_Poster%29.jpg)
I WANT A CATBUS
http://www.youtube.com/v/TuLX50_5UAI
Release Date:  1988

Just the Plagarism
My Neighbor Totoro (となりのトトロ Tonari no Totoro?) is a 1988 Japanese animated fantasy film written and directed by Hayao Miyazaki and produced by Studio Ghibli. The film stars Noriko Hidaka, Chika Sakamoto and Hitoshi Takagi, and tells the story of two young daughters (Hidaka and Sakamoto) of a professor and their interactions with friendly wood spirits in postwar rural Japan. The film won the Animage Anime Grand Prix prize and the Mainichi Film Award for Best Film in 1988.

The film was released on VHS and laserdisc in the United States by Tokuma Japan Communications' US subsidiary in 1993 with the title My Friend Totoro.
In 1988, Streamline Pictures produced an exclusive dub for use on transpacific flights by Japan Airlines and its Oneworld partners. Troma Films, under their 50th St. Films banner, distributed the dub of the film co-produced by Jerry Beck. It was released on VHS and DVD by Fox Video. Troma's and Fox's rights to this version expired in 2004. The film was re-released by Disney on March 7, 2006 and by Madman on March 15, 2006. It features a new dub cast. This DVD release is the first version of the film in the United States to include both Japanese and English language tracks, as Fox did not have the rights to the Japanese audio track for their version.

After writing and filming Nausicaä of the Valley of the Wind (1984) and Castle in the Sky (1986), Hayao Miyazaki began directing My Neighbor Totoro for Studio Ghibli. Miyazaki's production paralleled his colleague Isao Takahata's production of Grave of the Fireflies. Miyazaki's film was financed by executive producer Yasuyoshi Tokuma, and both My Neighbor Totoro and Grave of the Fireflies were released on the same bill in 1988. The dual billing was considered "one of the most moving and remarkable double bills ever offered to a cinema audience".

In 1993, Tokuma Japan Communications' US subsidiary released the first English-language version of My Neighbor Totoro, with the title My Friend Totoro. However, because of his disappointment with the result of the heavily edited English version of Nausicaä of the Valley of the Wind, Miyazaki would not permit any part of the movie to be edited out, all the names had to be remain the same (with the exception being Catbus), the translation had to be as close to the original Japanese as possible, and no part of the movie could be changed for any reason, cultural or linguistic (which was very common back then) despite creating problems with some English viewers, particularly in explaining the origin of the name "Totoro". It was produced by John Daly and Derek Gibson, with co-producer Jerry Beck, and was available on VHS and laserdisc. This was the only United States home video release of the film from Tokuma (20th Century Fox would release all upcoming English-language releases of the film until Fox and Troma's rights to the film expired in 2004). Disney's English-language version premiered on October 23, 2005; it then appeared at the 2005 Hollywood Film Festival. The Turner Classic Movies cable television network held the television premiere of Disney's new English dub on January 19, 2006, as part of the network's salute to Hayao Miyazaki. (TCM aired the dub as well as the original Japanese with English subtitles.) The Disney version was initially released on DVD on March 7, 2006, but is now out of print. A reissue of Totoro, Castle in the Sky, and Kiki's Delivery Service featuring updated cover art highlighting its Studio Ghibli origins was released on March 2, 2010, coinciding with the US DVD and Blu-ray debut of Ponyo.

My Neighbor Totoro helped bring Japanese animation into the global spotlight, and set its writer-director Hayao Miyazaki on the road to success. The film's central character, Totoro, is as famous among Japanese children as Winnie-the-Pooh is among British ones. The Independent recognized Totoro as one of the greatest cartoon characters, describing the creature, "At once innocent and awe-inspiring, King Totoro captures the innocence and magic of childhood more than any of Miyazaki's other magical creations." The Financial Times recognized the character's appeal, "[Totoro] is more genuinely loved than Mickey Mouse could hope to be in his wildest—not nearly so beautifully illustrated—fantasies."

The environmental journal Ambio described the influence of My Neighbor Totoro, "[It] has served as a powerful force to focus the positive feelings that the Japanese people have for satoyama and traditional village life." The film's central character Totoro was used as a mascot by the Japanese "Totoro Hometown Fund Campaign" to preserve areas of satoyama in the Saitama Prefecture. The fund, started in 1990 after the film's release, held an auction in August 2008 at Pixar Animation Studios to sell over 210 original paintings, illustrations, and sculptures inspired by My Neighbor Totoro. A main-belt asteroid was named 10160 Totoro after the film's central character Totoro.

Quantum Vagina’s take - I feel like I’m abusing the phrase “off the chain”, so let me just say that the bee’s knees dream of being this cool. I decided that, since I had it available, I’d watch the movie before I posted this, and I’m damn glad I did. It’s a really touching and heartfelt movie. It made me remember being a child and seeing things with eyes full of wonder and grandeur. It also made me dread having children of my own, because even in English, the Fanning girls captured the annoying nature of the Japanese track. It's also fun to say the word "Brazzers" after every suggestive shot. Also, no rude jokes referring to the amount of points
Title: Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
Post by: Quantum Vagina on September 25, 2013, 08:17:29 PM
#13 –Kiki's Delivery Service
(71 Points) 4 of 13 Lists - Highest Ranking - #4 - Tripe H Redux
(http://i.imgur.com/hTajoKG.jpg)
Witches and panty-shots
http://www.youtube.com/v/piIdiZ44zzU
Release Date:  1989

Just the Plagarism
Kiki's Delivery Service (魔女の宅急便 Majo no Takkyūbin?, translated "Witch's Delivery Service") is a 1989 Japanese animated fantasy film written, produced and directed by Hayao Miyazaki. It is based on the 1985 novel of the same name by Eiko Kadono, an author of children's literature. The film features the voices of Minami Takayama, Rei Sakuma and Kappei Yamaguchi, and tells the story of a young witch (Takayama) as she spends a year in a town on her own while using her magical abilities to earn her living.

According to Miyazaki, the movie touches on the gulf that exists between independence and reliance in Japanese teenage girls.

The film was released on July 22, 1989, and won the Animage Anime Grand Prix prize. It was the first Studio Ghibli film released under the partnership between The Walt Disney Company and Studio Ghibli; Disney recorded an English dub in 1997, which premiered theatrically in the United States at the Seattle International Film Festival on May 23, 1998. It was released on home video in the U.S. and Canada on September 1, 1998.

The first official English dub of Kiki's Delivery Service was produced by Carl Macek of Streamline Pictures at the request of Tokuma Shoten for Japan Airlines' international flights. Kiki was portrayed by voice actress Lisa Michelson. This dub is only available in the Ghibli Laserdisc Box Set.

Kirsten Dunst voiced Kiki in Disney's 1997 English dub, released in 1998. This dub was also Canadian comedian & actor Phil Hartman's last voice-acting performance (as Jiji) before his death in 1998; the dub is dedicated to his memory. Critics generally praised the dub, though some objected to script changes compared to the original Japanese.

In Spain, Kiki was renamed "Nicky", and the film re-titled Nicky la aprendiz de bruja (Nicky the Apprentice Witch), because in Castilian Spanish, the phonetically similar "quiqui" is commonly used in a slang expression: "echar un quiqui" which means "to have intercourse".

Upon the release of the English dub of Kiki's Delivery Service by Disney which had its theatrical premiere at the Seattle International Film Festival on May 23, 1998. On September 15 1998, it was released to VHS video, becoming the 8th-most-rented title at Blockbuster stores during the first week of its availability. This video release also sold over a million copies. A few weeks later, Disney released another VHS of the movie, this time with the original Japanese soundtrack and with both English and Japanese subtitles. A Laserdisc version of the English dub was also available at this time. The Region 1 DVD was released on August 16, 2005, alongside Spirited Away and Castle in the Sky. It was again reissued on Region 1 DVD in March 2010 along with My Neighbor Totoro and Castle in the Sky as a tribute to the home release of Ponyo. The version of this 2010 release was slightly edited to match the original Japanese version.

Quantum Vagina’s take - I think Ghibli films are all wonderfully designed to use one’s heart strings as a violin. Kiki’s Delivery Service holds fond memories for me, from when before my cousin became a massive douche canoe and was a pretty cool guy. I think it’s a timeless movie, and I love it.
Title: Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
Post by: Quantum Vagina on September 25, 2013, 08:24:42 PM
#12 –Danger Mouse
(79 Points) 5 of 13 Lists - Highest Ranking - #4 - Pak-Man
(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/d/d8/DangerMouseTVtitle.jpg)
Stranger Danger, Danger Mouse?
http://www.youtube.com/v/Wv43hKSzBws
Release Date:  1981

Just the Plagarism
Danger Mouse is a British children's animated television series which was produced by Cosgrove Hall Films for Thames Television. It features the eponymous Danger Mouse, an English mouse who works as a superhero/secret agent. The show is a loose parody of British spy fiction, particularly James Bond and the Danger Man series starring Patrick McGoohan. The show originally ran in the United Kingdom from 28 September 1981 to 19 March 1992. In the English-language version, the titular hero was voiced by David Jason.

The hero wears an eyepatch and his chest is prominently emblazoned with the initials 'DM'. This causes problems for those translating the series into other languages, where a literal translation of the words 'Danger' and 'Mouse' do not have those initials; the Scots Gaelic version, for example, calls the series (and the lead) Donnie Murdo (two given names unconnected either with mice or danger). He was Dzielna Mysz (brave mouse) in Polish, Dundermusen (Thundermouse) in Swedish, and Dare Dare Motus in French, "Dare Dare" being French slang for "as fast as possible". The Slovene translation omitted the DM initials entirely, however, dubbing Danger Mouse Hrabri mišek ('Brave Mouse').

By 1983, Danger Mouse viewing figures hit all-time high of 21.59 million viewers. Danger Mouse was the first British cartoon to break into the American TV market (since the animated shorts Simon in the Land of Chalk Drawings, Ludwig, and Paddington Bear being shown in the 1970s) following syndication on 4 June 1984, where, it garnered a tremendous fan following that still exists. Since it went off air, it has been periodically repeated and been released on DVD. In the United States, it was broadcast on Nickelodeon in the 1980s in the late afternoons and in the early evenings as a segue into prime-time hours (as the A&E Network and later Nick-at-Nite) as the series appealed to both pre-teens and adults with its quick-witted English humour.

FremantleMedia released six Region 0 in 2001-2003, featuring 6-8 random episodes in each set. In September 2006, Fremantle Media released a further six DVDs and a 12 Disc DVD box set. The 25th Anniversary DVD set has all 161 episodes but some were originally aired in five-minute segments, so these have been edited together to make a total of 89 episodes. This means much of David Jason's 'cliffhanger' narration is not present on the DVDs. Although, the box set has received mostly positive reviews some cited the lack of chronological order of the episodes as a disappointment. A 10-disc 30th Anniversary Edition box set was released on 26 September 2011 with the episodes in broadcast order.

Quantum Vagina’s take - I don’t like mice, generally, so this one’s a no go with me. There are some exceptions, but this show isn’t one of them.
Title: Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
Post by: Quantum Vagina on September 25, 2013, 08:34:48 PM
#11 –Akira
(83 Points) 6 of 13 Lists - Highest Ranking - #3 - ColeStratton
(http://i.imgur.com/JNZYwL3.jpg)
Moral: Don’t give biker punks psychic powers
http://www.youtube.com/v/KQnw35kR6Pw
Release Date:  1988

Just the Plagarism
Akira is a 1988 Japanese animated cyberpunk action film directed by Katsuhiro Otomo, written by Otomo and Izo Hashimoto, and featuring the voices of Mitsuo Iwata, Nozomu Sasaki, Mami Koyama, and Taro Ishida. The screenplay is based on Otomo's manga Akira, focusing mainly on the first half of the story.

The film depicts a dystopian version of Tokyo in the year 2019, with cyberpunk tones. The plot focuses on teenage biker Tetsuo Shima and his psychic powers, and the leader of his biker gang, Shotaro Kaneda. Kaneda tries to prevent Tetsuo from releasing the imprisoned psychic Akira. While most of the character designs and settings were adapted from the original 2182-page manga epic, the restructured plot of the movie differs considerably from the print version, pruning much of the last half of the manga.

The film became a hugely popular cult film and is widely considered to be a landmark in Japanese animation.

Akira was released by Toho on July 16, 1988. The film set attendance records for an animated film in Japan. Fledgling North American distribution company Streamline Pictures soon acquired an existing English-language rendition created by Kodansha (originally dubbed for the Hong Kong market) which saw limited release in North American theaters from late 1988 throughout 1989. Streamline is reported to have become the film's distributor when both George Lucas and Steven Spielberg labelled it unmarketable in the U.S. In the UK, Akira was theatrically released by ICA Projects on January 25, 1991 and will be re released on July 13, 2013. In Australia, Akira was theatrically released by Island World Communications and distributed by Satellite Entertainment, later on by Manga Entertainment, then Madman Entertainment after Manga Entertainment's Australia branch merged with Madman. In Canada, the Streamline dub was released by Lionsgate (at the time known as C/FP Distribution) in 1990. In 2001, Pioneer released a new dub which was produced by Animaze and was presented in select theaters from March through December 2001.

Roger Ebert selected Akira as his "Video Pick of the Week" in 1989 on Siskel & Ebert and the Movies. For its wider 2001 release, he gave the film "Thumbs Up." As of September 2013, the film has a 87% "fresh" rating on Rotten Tomatoes. The title has been regarded as one of the greatest animated movies of all time and prompted an increase in popularity of anime movies in the US and, generally, outside of Japan. It is still admired for its exceptional visuals. In Channel 4's 2005 poll of the 100 greatest cartoons of all time featuring both cartoon shows and cartoon movies, Akira came in at number 16. On Empire magazine's list of the 500 greatest movies of all time, Akira is number 440. It showed again on Empire's list of The 100 Best Films Of World Cinema, coming in at #51. IGN also named it 14th on its list of Top 25 Animated Movies of All-Time.

Akira is regarded by many critics as a landmark anime film, one that influenced much of the art in the anime world that followed its release with many illustrators in the manga industry citing the film as an important influence. The film led the way for the growth of popularity of anime outside of Japan. Akira is considered a forerunner of the second wave of anime fandom that began in the early 1990s and has gained a massive cult following since then. Akira has also been cited as a major influence on live-action films ranging from The Matrix to Chronicle.

The Akira anime also made TIME magazine's list of top 5 anime DVDs. The film also made number 16 on Time Out's top 50 animated movie list and number 5 on Total Film's Top 50 Animated Films list. Wizard magazine also listed the film as #5 on their list of the greatest anime.

Quantum Vagina’s take - I’ve only seen this movie once, at a crowded movie night with a bunch of people who also hadn’t seen it before, but didn’t care and preferred to be incredibly annoying by talking through the whole movie, so my recollection of it is sketchy, but it seemed like it was a REALLY good movie, and I plan on watching it again, without people around me who won’t shut up about really annoying things.
Title: Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
Post by: Quantum Vagina on September 25, 2013, 08:36:40 PM
http://www.youtube.com/v/F9wOjL9neGU

And that'll be it for tonight! The top ten will be posted tomorrow, probably in sections of 5.
Title: Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
Post by: Johnny Unusual on September 25, 2013, 08:44:50 PM
I know I've seen Danger Mouse, but I barely remember it.  It never played in Canada and I only caught it (and Bananaman) when I was living in Australia for two months.

Akira probably would have been higher if it was a little more clear.  In trying to include all of the stuff from the comic (except the latter half) in becomes hard to decipher in spots.  But it has some of the most gorgeous animation ever (all hand drawn and apparently pretty much every animation studio was working on it at one point), incredible music and fantastic and horrific imagery (poor Tetsuo's transformation at the end is disgusting, scary and tragic).  Still, for story, I prefer the original manga, which is a lot easier to digest and also has a lot more humour, that the movie was missing.
Title: Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
Post by: RoninFox on September 25, 2013, 09:32:51 PM
Also, I'm sure I'm alone on this, but I would love to see a live action adaptation of the Last Unicorn.  Christopher Lee can reprise his role (and time has made him even more fitting for it) and you can get someone like Terry Gilliam who is great at mixing the darkness and whimsy so well.  Or maybe Guillermo del Toro.  Despite not really caring for Pacific Rim, I think his style would be really suited for it.

Christopher Lee is by far my favourite thing about the Last Unicorn.  He is fucking amazing as the lead villain and imbues him with a lot of pathos where it could have been a one note villain with a bad childhood.  I guess that's another thing that dissappointed me about it: I felt that I wished the movie dived more into the idea of subverted archetypes.  Haggard gets a lot of good stuff: he's a dark evil lord, but he's barely ruling over everyone and he doesn't have a big plan: he's just letting himself rot in a creepy "house of Usher" type castle while enjoying his unicorns.  But I wish more time and care was spent on his knightly son, who clearly wants to be a good heroic knight character but clearly doesn't have a lot to do.  We don't nearly spend enough time with him.  Or Molly Grue, who seems like a maiden who was supposed to be a fairy tale hero but life didn't go well.  She gets a few really good scenes, but the film doesn't feel entirely cohesive in this regard.

You should really read the original novel.  The entire concept of the book is basically to explore exactly what you are asking for.  The fact that its a piece of satire on the fantasy genre gets lost a little in the translation to film.  Also, if you get one of the later editions theres a small sequel coda to the story and some interesting info on the making of the movie at the end.
Title: Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
Post by: Johnny Unusual on September 25, 2013, 10:26:06 PM
Yeah, I'll definitely have to check it out.
Title: Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
Post by: goflyblind on September 26, 2013, 04:12:21 AM
I know I've seen Danger Mouse, but I barely remember it.  It never played in Canada...

weird. i saw it all the time, but that may have been on a washington station.
Title: Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
Post by: Nunyerbiz on September 26, 2013, 06:13:09 AM
I vaguely remember Danger Mouse from it's Nickelodeon run in the early/mid 80s... Primarily I remember that my dad enjoyed it more than I did and would insist on keeping it on when I was ready to channel flip... Guessing I was too young at the time to catch on to that trademark snappy British wit.
Title: Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
Post by: Quantum Vagina on September 26, 2013, 07:10:59 PM
Alright, here we go! I'm going to post the next 5 entries, and then in an hour or two, I'll post the Top 5! GO GO GO!
Title: Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
Post by: Quantum Vagina on September 26, 2013, 07:11:23 PM
#10 –Garfield and Friends
(87 Points) 6 of 13 Lists - Highest Ranking - #4 - goflyblind
(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/7/74/GandF.gif)
GAAAARFIELD!!
http://www.youtube.com/v/LD_KMpBNB80
Release Date:  1988

Just the Plagarism
Garfield and Friends is an American animated television series based on the comic strip Garfield by Jim Davis. The show was produced by Film Roman, in association with United Feature Syndicate and Paws, Inc., and ran on CBS Saturday mornings from September 17, 1988 to December 10, 1994, with reruns airing until October 7, 1995. The show's seven seasons make it one of the longest running Saturday morning cartoons in history, with most lasting no more than two or three seasons.

Regular segments feature both Garfield and U.S. Acres, a lesser-known comic strip also created by Davis. The latter was retitled Orson's Farm for foreign syndication, as that was the name of the comic strip outside of the United States.

A total of 121 episodes were made, each consisting of two Garfield segments and one U.S. Acres segment, totalling 242 Garfield segments and 121 U.S. Acres segments. All episodes have been released in the U.S. on five DVD sets by 20th Century Fox Home Entertainment. The first season aired in a half-hour format. In the second season, it switched to an hour-length format, showing two episodes each week. However, in the show's last season, the second half-hour of the show featured either an episode from the previous season or one of Garfield's TV specials.

Episodes were filled with puns and non sequiturs, and often lapsed into complete absurdity (such as the US Acres short "Over The Rainbow", in which Roy's quest to find the pot of gold at the end of the rainbow leads him instead to a Let's Make A Deal-style game show complete with Rod Roddy announcing). Running gags were frequent, throughout either single shorts (such as in the Garfield short "The Creature That Lived In The Refrigerator, Behind the Mayonnaise, Next to the Ketchup and to the Left of the Cole Slaw!", in which the name of said creature is spoken repeatedly), or entire seasons (the Klopman Diamond is mentioned in many, many episodes). U.S. Acres characters would frequently make unexplained cameo appearances in Garfield shorts, and vice-versa. For example, the "Giant Radioactive Mutant Guppies" that Garfield and Nermal flushed down the sewer resurfaced in the U.S. Acres quickie that immediately followed, and then one asks the others if they could maybe get on the Muppet Babies, which at that time preceded Garfield and Friends on the CBS Saturday Morning lineup. There was even some mild satire, particularly in the form of the "Buddy Bears", which spoofed such saccharine cartoons as The Get-Along Gang and Smurfs.

The seventh season (1994–1995) was the last one because CBS wanted to cut the budget (and in fact, CBS's Saturday morning cartoon lineup would be mostly replaced by CBS News Saturday Morning two years later, which eventually evolved into the Saturday edition of The Early Show). The production company nixed this proposal, so they mutually agreed to cease production, even though Garfield and Friends had still been doing very well in the ratings.

Quantum Vagina’s take - Ehhhhhhhhhhhhhh… really? THIS is what you guys put at #10? I mean, I suppose I should be thankful it isn’t higher, but come ON, REALLY?
Title: Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
Post by: Quantum Vagina on September 26, 2013, 07:11:47 PM
#9 –Grave of Fireflies
(91 Points) 4 of 13 Lists - Highest Ranking - #1 - Tripe H Redux, Charles Hussein Castle
(http://i.imgur.com/3odu5ea.jpg)
It’s not anti-war, I swear!
http://www.youtube.com/v/hxv9ghINEhs
Release Date:  1988

Just the Plagarism
Grave of the Fireflies (火垂るの墓 Hotaru no haka?) is a 1988 Japanese animated drama film written and directed by Isao Takahata and animated by Studio Ghibli. It is based on the 1967 semi-autobiographical novel of the same name by Akiyuki Nosaka. It is commonly considered an anti-war film, but this interpretation has been challenged by some critics and by the director. The film stars Tsutomu Tatsumi, Ayano Shiraishi, Yoshiko Shinohara and Akemi Yamaguchi. Predominantly set in Japan during World War II, the film tells the story of Seita, a young boy who has to take care of his younger sister Setsuko when their mother dies.

Grave of the Fireflies received positive reviews from film critics. Roger Ebert of the Chicago Sun-Times considered it to be one of the best and most powerful war films and, in 2000, included it on his "Great Movies" list. Two live-action remakes of Grave of the Fireflies were made, one in 2005 and one in 2008.

Grave of the Fireflies author Akiyuki Nosaka said that many offers had been made to create a film version of Grave of the Fireflies. Nosaka argued that "t was impossible to create the barren, scorched earth that's to be the backdrop of the story." He also argued that contemporary children would not be able to convincingly play the characters. Nosaka expressed surprise when an animated version was offered. After seeing the storyboards, Nosaka concluded that it was not possible for such a story to have been made in any method other than animation and expressed surprise in how accurately the rice paddies and townscape were depicted.

Isao Takahata said that he was compelled to film the novel after seeing how the main character, Seita, "was a unique wartime ninth grader." Takahata explained that any wartime story, whether animated or not animated, "tends to be moving and tear-jerking," and that young people develop an "inferiority complex" where they perceive people in wartime eras as being more noble and more able than they are, and therefore the audience believes that the story has nothing to do with them. Takahata argued that he wanted to dispel this mindset. When Nosaka asked if the film characters were "having fun," Takahata answered that he clearly depicted Seita and Setsuko had "substantial" days and that they were "enjoying their days." Takahata said that Setsuko was even more difficult to animate than Seita, and that he had never before depicted a girl younger than five. Takahata said that "n that respect, when you make the book into a movie, Setsuko becomes a tangible person," and said that four-year olds often become more assertive, self-centered, and try to get their own ways during their ages, and he explained that while one could "have a scene where Seita can't stand that anymore," "that's difficult to incorporate into a story." Takahata explained that the film is from Seita's point of view, "and even objective passages are filtered through his feelings."

Some critics have viewed Grave of the Fireflies as an anti-war film due to the graphic and emotional depiction of the pernicious repercussions of war on a society, and the individuals therein. The film focuses its attention almost entirely on the personal tragedies that war gives rise to, rather than seeking to glamorize it as a heroic struggle between competing ideologies. It emphasizes that war is society's failure to perform its most important duty to protect its own people. However, director Takahata repeatedly denied that the film was an anti-war anime. In his own words, "[The film] is not at all an anti-war anime and contains absolutely no such message." Instead, Takahata had intended to convey an image of the brother and sister living a failed life due to isolation from society and invoke sympathy particularly in people in their teens and twenties, whom he felt needed to straighten up and respect their elders for the pain and suffering they had experienced during arguably the darkest point in Japan's history.

Quantum Vagina’s take - Never saw this one, so I have no idea what to think. I know several people who’ve watched it, said it was awesome, and that I should watch it, so I might like it. It’s one of those films that’s been on my “To Watch” list forever, and unless things change, probably will be.
Title: Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
Post by: Quantum Vagina on September 26, 2013, 07:12:13 PM
#8 –The Secret of NIMH
(95 Points) 6 of 13 Lists - Highest Ranking - #4 - ColeStratton, Rainbow Dash
(http://i.imgur.com/BO5jrdb.jpg)
Rats are industrious little buggers, aren’t they?
http://www.youtube.com/v/FwNfsLwQBhM
Release Date:  1982

Just the Plagarism
he Secret of NIMH is a 1982 American animated adventure fantasy drama film directed by Don Bluth in his directorial debut. It is an adaptation of Robert C. O'Brien's 1971 children's novel Mrs. Frisby and the Rats of NIMH. The film was produced by Aurora Pictures and released by United Artists. The film features the voices of Elizabeth Hartman, Dom DeLuise, Arthur Malet, Derek Jacobi, Hermione Baddeley, John Carradine, Peter Strauss, and Paul Shenar. The "Mrs. Frisby" name in the novel had to be changed to "Mrs. Brisby" during production due to trademark concerns with Frisbee discs. Released to wide critical acclaim, the film was a moderate commercial success. It was followed in 1998 by a direct-to-video sequel called The Secret of NIMH 2: Timmy to the Rescue, which was made without Bluth's input or consent.

Mrs. Brisby, a shy and timid field mouse, lives in a cinder block with her children in a field on the Fitzgibbons' farm. She prepares to move her family out of the field as plowing time approaches, but her son Timothy has fallen ill. She visits Mr. Ages, another mouse and old friend of her late husband, Jonathan, who diagnoses Timothy with pneumonia and provides her with medicine. Mr. Ages warns her that Timothy must stay inside for at least three weeks or he will die. On her way home she encounters Jeremy, a clumsy but compassionate crow. They both narrowly escape from the Fitzgibbons' cat, Dragon, who is the one who had killed and eaten Jonathan.

The Secret of NIMH was the first feature film to be directed by Don Bluth. In September 1979 he, fellow animators Gary Goldman and John Pomeroy, and eight other animation staff left Walt Disney Productions animation department to set up their own independent studio, Don Bluth Productions. The studio worked, at first, out of Bluth's house and garage, but moved to a two-story, 5,500-square-foot (510 m2) facility in Studio City several months later. After completing work on several shorter projects, including a two-minute animated sequence for the film Xanadu, the studio forged a deal with Aurora Productions, a film-making partnership established by former Disney executives.

The rights to the book Mrs. Frisby and the Rats of NIMH had reportedly been offered to Disney in 1972 but turned down. At Bluth, Goldman and Pomeroy's request, Aurora Productions acquired the film rights, and offered Don Bluth Productions a budget of US$ 5.7 million and 30 months to complete the film, tighter in both budget and schedule than most Disney animated features at the time. The studio set out with the explicit goal in mind of returning feature animation to its “golden era”, concentrating on strong characters and story, and experimenting with unusual and often more labor-intensive animation techniques. Bluth believed older techniques were being abandoned in favor of lower production costs, and the only way animation could survive was to continue traditional production methods. Among the techniques experimented with on The Secret of NIMH were rotoscoping, multiple passes on the camera to achieve transparent shadows, and backlit animation (where animated mattes are shot with light shining through color gels to produce glowing areas for artificial light and fire effects), multiple color palettes for characters to fit in different lighting situations, from daylight, to night, to warm environments to underwater. Mrs Brisby had 46 different lighting situations, therefore there were 46 different color palettes, or lists of color, for her. Two modern, computerized versions of the multiplane camera were also manufactured for this production.

To achieve the film's detailed full animation while keeping to the tight budget, the studio strove to keep any waste of time and resources to a minimum. The crew often worked long hours with no immediate financial reward (though they were offered a cut of the film's profits, a practice common for producers, directors and stars of live action films but never before offered to artists on an animated feature); producer Gary Goldman recalled working 110 hour weeks during the final six months of production. Around 100 in-house staff worked on the film, with the labor-intensive cel painting farmed out to 45 people working from home. Many minor roles, including incidental and crowd voice work, were filled in by the in-house staff. The final cost of the film was US$ 6.385M. The producers, Bluth, Goldman, Pomeroy and the executive producers at Aurora mortgaged their homes collectively for $700,000 to complete the film, with an agreement that their investment would be the first money to be repaid.

During the film's production, Aurora contacted Wham-O, the manufacturers of Frisbee flying discs, with concerns about possible trademark infringements if the "Mrs. Frisby" name in O'Brien's original book was used in the movie. Wham-O rejected Aurora's request for waiver to use the same-sounding name to their "Frisbee", in the movie. Aurora informed Bluth & company that Mrs. Frisby's name would have to be altered. By then, the voice work had already been recorded for the film, so the name change to "Mrs. Brisby" necessitated a combination of re-recording some lines and, because John Carradine was unavailable for further recordings, careful sound editing had to be performed, taking the "B" sound of another word from Carradine's recorded lines, and replace the "F" sound with the "B" sound, altering the name from "Frisby" to "Brisby".

Quantum Vagina’s take - I really love this movie. Mrs. Brisby is adorable, and a wonderful character, with tons of depth and complexity. And really, all of the other characters are, as well. I never knew Wil Wheaton was in it, either, which makes the movie even more awesome. Dom DeLuise is, as always awesome. If I have one issue with the movie, it’s that I wish it was longer. 82 minutes isn’t enough time for that much awesome.
Title: Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
Post by: Quantum Vagina on September 26, 2013, 07:12:41 PM
#7 –Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles
(98 Points) 7 of 13 Lists - Highest Ranking - #5 - Pak-Man
(http://i.imgur.com/DdJmkj8.jpg)
Heroes in a Half-Shell
http://www.youtube.com/v/q6jQIul9x8w
Release Date:  1987

Just the Plagarism
Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles (known as Teenage Mutant Hero Turtles in Europe due to controversy at the time) is an American animated television series produced by Murakami-Wolf-Swenson. The pilot was shown during the week of December 14, 1987 in syndication as a five-part miniseries and began its official run on October 1, 1988. The series featured the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles characters created in comic book form by Kevin Eastman and Peter Laird. The property was changed considerably from the darker-toned comic, to make it more suitable for children and the family.

The initial motivation behind the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles animated series was that, upon being approached to create a toy line, Playmates Toys was uneasy with the comic book characters' small cult following. They requested that a television deal be acquired first, and after the initial five-episode series debuted, the California toy company released their first series of Ninja Turtles action figures in the summer of 1988. The two media would correspond in marketing style and popularity for many years to come.

David Wise and Patti Howeth wrote the screenplay for the first five-part miniseries. When the series continued in the second season, comic artist Jack Mendelsohn joined the show as the executive story editor. Wise went on to write over seventy episodes of the series, and was executive story editor for four later seasons as well. Wise left the series partway through the ninth season, and Jeffrey Scott took over as the story editor and chief writer for the rest of the show's run.
The show was in Saturday morning syndication from October 1, 1988 to September 9, 1989. After it became an instant hit, the show was expanded to five days a week and aired weekday afternoons in syndication in most markets, from September 25, 1989 to September 17, 1993.[2] Starting on September 8, 1990 (with a different opening sequence), the show began its secondary run on CBS's Saturday morning lineup, beginning as a 60-minute block from 1990 to 1993, initially airing a couple of Saturday exclusive episodes back to back. There would also be a brief "Turtle Tips" segment in between the two episodes which served as PSA about the environment or other issues. There were a total of 20 "Turtle Tips" segments produced and aired. Beginning in 1994, the show began airing as a 30-minute block until the series ended. The series ran until November 2, 1996, when it aired its final episode.

The show helped launch the characters into mainstream popularity and became one of the most popular animated series in television history. Breakfast cereal, plush toys, and all manner of products featuring the characters appeared on the market during the late 1980s and early 1990s A successful Archie Comics comic book based on the animated show instead of the original black-and-white comics was published throughout the late 1980s and early 1990s. Action figures were top-sellers around the world. In 1990, the cartoon series was being shown daily on more than 125 television stations, and the comic books sold 125,000 copies a month.

IGN named TMNT as the 55th best show in the Top 100 Best Animated TV Shows. While the story diverged heavily from the original conception of the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles with the universe of the original Mirage comics, the 1987 television series is largely the most notable and popular incarnation and drove the franchise to the phenomenal status it would achieve in pop culture. Retroactively, the cross-over film Turtles Forever established a common multiverse continuity between all Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles variations that existed at the time of the 25th anniversary of the original Mirage comicbooks, primarily focusing on this series, and those of the 2003 animated series. Therefore, while not part of the original canon of the Mirage Turtles, the series can be considered part of the wider official turtles canon. At the time, the series was criticised for its commercialism and violent content.

Quantum Vagina’s take - Who’d have thought such a weird thing could be so popular? TMNT, which is incredibly awesome, has been a long-running franchise, and has been a huge part of tons of peoples’ childhoods, mine included. I remember my MOTHER had a set of figures in the basement that I wasn’t allowed to touch or play with, or open the packages, even.
Title: Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
Post by: Quantum Vagina on September 26, 2013, 07:13:07 PM
#6 –Inspector Gadget
(99 Points) 7 of 13 Lists - Highest Ranking - #2 - gojikranz
(http://i.imgur.com/o7v9Fz1.jpg)
Wowsers!
http://www.youtube.com/v/71LZhzHgua8
Release Date:  1983

Just the Plagarism
Inspector Gadget is an animated television series that revolves around the adventures of a clumsy, dim-witted cyborg detective named lnspector Gadget – a human being with various bionic gadgets built into his body. Gadget's arch-nemesis is Dr. Claw, the leader of an evil organization, known as "M.A.D."

This is the first syndicated cartoon show from DIC Entertainment (as well as the first from the company to be created specifically for US viewers, along with The Littles). lt originally ran from 1983 to 1986 and remained in syndication into the late 1990s. It continues to air successfully in reruns around the world.

The series was produced by companies in France, Canada, the United States, Taiwan, and Japan. It was a co-production between DIC Entertainment in France (the main headquarters did not move to the US untiI 1987) and Nelvana in Canada; the animation work was outsourced to foreign studios such as Tokyo Movie Shinsha in Japan and Cuckoo's Nest Studio in Taiwan. It was the first animated television series to be presented in stereo.

Inspector Gadget is a famous cyborg policeman with a seemingly endless amount of gadgets he can summon by saying "Go-Go-Gadget" then the gadget's name. The word "Gadget" is actually part of the name, as hinted at in some episodes. Although he has all this equipment, Gadget is ultimately incompetent and clueless (in a manner similar to the Inspector Clouseau character of the Pink Panther series), and overcomes obstacles and survives perilous situations by sheer good luck, with help from his faithful niece Penny and intelligent dog Brain who both must secretly help him solve each case. Even his gadgets often malfunction, which Gadget often deals with by exclaiming that he needs to get them fixed.

Almost every episode of the first season follows a detailed and set formula, with little variation (though many of these elements were tinkered with in season 2). Gadget, Penny, and Brain will usually be doing something together when Chief Quimby calls the top-secret Gadgetphone (a telephone built into one of Gadget's hands). Usually, the call consists of Gadget saying, "Is that you, Chief? You're where? Right away, Chief." Gadget then tracks down Quimby, who is either disguised or hiding, and receives a brief message about the latest caper by Dr. Claw and M.A.D, along with his assigned task aimed at stopping it. Each of these messages self-destructs after reading (a nod to Mission: Impossible), a fact which Gadget always ignores as he crumples the messages up and tosses them away, inevitably getting them somewhere near Quimby where they explode in his face.

The episode then usually takes Gadget to some exotic locale and somehow Penny and Brain find a way to accompany him. Brain keeps Gadget out of trouble from M.A.D. agents (who Gadget usually mistakes for friendly locals; ironically, Gadget often mistakes Brain in disguise for a MAD agent), while Penny solves the case. With the help of Penny and Brain, Gadget inadvertently saves the day, Dr. Claw escapes, and Chief Quimby arrives to congratulate Gadget on a job well done.

Each episode ends (as many cartoons did in the 1980s) with Gadget (and usually Penny and Brain also) giving a public service announcement - in direct contrast with his dangerous job and risk-taking behavior in the show, with most of the tips having a connection with problems Gadget had experienced during the episode. For example in one episode, Gadget tries to hitchhike saying he hopes the approaching motorist doesn't mind him doing so, with the ending PSA making very clear how dangerous hitchhiking can be.

Like many animated television series, Inspector Gadget contains a few running gags – events that occur in almost every episode. At the start of each episode, Chief Quimby stealthily presents Inspector Gadget with a note containing his next mission, the final line of each stating that, "This message will self destruct." (similar to mission briefings in the Mission: Impossible series). As Gadget casually tosses the note away it explodes, leaving Chief Quimby the only one injured. As the series evolves, Quimby, knowing what will be coming next, often attempts to protect himself as he sees the note being tossed, always to no avail.

Another gag involves the inspector's built-in gadgets. While usually faithful in responding to his commands under normal circumstances, often while in desperate need for a specific tool (for instance, something to slow his descent or brace from impact after falling from a building), a different, often useless tool such as a flower will appear from his hat instead. This misfortune is overcome by luck or Brain's quick thinking, saving him from injury. When such glitches occur, Gadget often remarks that he needs to get them fixed.

Yet another gag is how Gadget often mistakes Brain for a MAD Agent, yet ironically often sees the real MAD Agents as friendly locals and Gadget naively trust them without having any suspicion of being MAD Agents.
Quantum Vagina’s take - I completely forgot this series existed, and I have no idea why. I do remember it being friggin’ awesome. I loved watching it when I could, and it was one of the things that made it worth going over to my annoying relatives’ house for. I also remember being really excited for the Matthew Broderick movie, not for the movie itself, which I don’t remember at all, but for the AWESOME McDonald’s toys that came with it. Not technically related, but still awesome.
Title: Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
Post by: Pak-Man on September 26, 2013, 07:42:23 PM
I contributed to Garfield's success, and I regret nothing. It was the '80s, his comic was still consistently funny, and until the cartoon came out all we had were the 30 minute specials. Suddenly, it was like getting a special every day! Plus it was a great way to kill time between Captain N and The Real Ghostbusters. :^) Never cared much for the US Acres bits, but after a few seasons, it got kind of self-aware, like the writers knew the kids were just tuning in for Garfield.
Title: Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
Post by: Rainbow Dash on September 26, 2013, 08:00:47 PM


Quantum Vagina’s take - Never saw this one, so I have no idea what to think. I know several people who’ve watched it, said it was awesome, and that I should watch it, so I might like it. It’s one of those films that’s been on my “To Watch” list forever, and unless things change, probably will be.

No one has ever seen this movie twice.
Title: Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
Post by: Quantum Vagina on September 26, 2013, 08:06:31 PM
Before I post the Top 5, I want to thank everyone for putting up with my haphazard posting schedule. My head's been playing a TON of nasty tricks on me lately, and while it really was a blast to post this list, I don't think I'll be volunteering for the job again, or at least not for a while. Also, don't forget to give me list suggestions for the next LoC, so I can put that poll up and get you guys voting!

Now, without further ado, let's finish off the list!
Title: Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
Post by: Quantum Vagina on September 26, 2013, 08:07:08 PM
#5 –Muppet Babies
(106 Points) 8 of 13 Lists - Highest Ranking - #1 - goflyblind
(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/9/9b/MuppetBabiesTitle.jpg)
Because puppets had childhoods, too, dammit!
http://www.youtube.com/v/znwaVBtVtxA
Release Date:  1984

Just the Plagarism
Muppet Babies (also known as Jim Henson's Muppet Babies) is an American animated television series that aired from September 15, 1984 to November 2, 1991 on CBS. The show portrays childhood versions of the Muppets living together in a large nursery in the care of a human woman called Nanny (the whereabouts of their parents are never addressed). Nanny appears in almost every episode, but her face is never shown, only the babies' view of her pink skirt and purple sweater as well as her distinctive green and white striped socks. The idea of presenting the Muppets as children first appeared in a dream sequence in The Muppets Take Manhattan, released two months before Muppet Babies debuted, in which Miss Piggy imagined what it would be like if she and Kermit the Frog grew up together.

Muppet Babies was produced by The Jim Henson Company and Marvel Productions. The rights are now held by Disney-ABC Domestic Television. Although the episodes were 30 minutes (including commercials), it was typically shown in 60 and even 90 minute blocks during the peak of its popularity. Outside of the United States, the show was distributed by Walt Disney Television.

The Muppet Babies live in a large nursery watched over by Nanny, the only human character in the show that appears on a regular basis. The babies have hyperactive imaginations and often embark on adventures into imaginary worlds and perilous situations from which they are eventually returned to reality by some external event, such as Nanny coming to see what the noise was. They are constantly finding creative ways to entertain themselves and learn to work together to solve problems and survive their wild-imagined adventures.

Each episode included a single storyline. Usually the babies were confronted with a childlike problem, such as fear of the dentist, or a question, such as 'where do muffins come from?' Other times, they were simply finding ways to amuse themselves with old toys or video tape equipment. The babies would then enter into their imaginations, transforming their toys into everything from time machines to pirate ships. Nearly every episode contained one song, and occasionally more than one. After the credits, the episodes would end with Animal shouting out his catchphrase 'Go bye-bye!' usually while Gonzo blasted off into the sky due to some accident he or Animal had caused. When the show aired in its 60 or 90 minute blocks however, Gonzo would instead end the first episode saying "Don't go away, we'll be right back."

Although the program was a cartoon, live-action film sequences were added in unusual moments. When the babies opened a door, box or book, they were often confronted with anything from a speeding train to a space ship. Foreign landscapes in their imagination were usually photos or bits of stock footage which the babies would walk across, interacting indirectly with the film's actors. Though much of the live-action came from stock footage and old black-and-white horror/monster films, more recent films such as Star Wars, Ghostbusters, and Indiana Jones were also played and parodied.

The show was drawn from the babies’ point of view, meaning the babies were always looking up to view the world. Objects like couches and doors were far larger than normal and more momentous obstacles for the babies. As a result of the upward view, the faces of adult characters were never shown. Nanny was only ever seen from the shoulders down as were the adults in the babies’ fantasies. Exceptions were made for Uncle Statler and Uncle Waldorf and a few ‘Muppet style’ adults in the fantasy worlds.

Muppet Babies entered local syndication in 1989, through Hasbro's television distribution unit Claster Television, Inc.. The series ran on local stations until 1992, often on affiliates of the new Fox Network. Syndication rights were sold to Nickelodeon/Nick Jr. (1992–1998), Cartoon Network (1994-1999) and Odyssey Network (1999–2000) in the US with only 96 episodes in regular rotation. In the United Kingdom, it aired in reruns on Playhouse Disney UK, Disney Channel UK, Toon Disney UK, Disney Cinemagic and Nickelodeon UK with all 107 episodes in regular rotation. In the UK, it is best known from its first run on UK TV on BBC 1 on Saturday mornings during Going Live! at 8:15am. The show also aired on Network Ten in Australia. Muppet Babies has been off the air since 2000. In reruns on Nickelodeon and Odyssey Network, the intro was truncated and the 1984 closing was replaced with the 1985 closing.

Quantum Vagina’s take - I feel like I’ve seen this before, but younger me didn’t like it. In all fairness, I wasn’t really into the Muppets until I got older, when I could appreciate how awesome they were. It also doesn’t help that I keep getting it mixed up in my head with that show where the Looney Toons were babies, and so I don’t know which one I actually enjoyed.
Title: Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
Post by: Quantum Vagina on September 26, 2013, 08:07:36 PM
#4 –The Simpsons
(121 Points) 6 of 13 Lists - Highest Ranking - #1 - ColeStratton
(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/0/0d/Simpsons_FamilyPicture.png)
D’oh!
http://www.youtube.com/v/DX1iplQQJTo
Release Date:  1989

Just the Plagarism
The Simpsons is an American animated sitcom created by Matt Groening for the Fox Broadcasting Company. The series is a satirical parody of a middle class American lifestyle epitomized by its family of the same name, which consists of Homer, Marge, Bart, Lisa, and Maggie. The show is set in the fictional town of Springfield and parodies American culture, society, television, and many aspects of the human condition.

The family was conceived by Groening shortly before a solicitation for a series of animated shorts with the producer James L. Brooks. Groening created a dysfunctional family and named the characters after members of his own family, substituting Bart for his own name. The shorts became a part of The Tracey Ullman Show on April 19, 1987. After a three-season run, the sketch was developed into a half-hour prime time show and was an early hit for Fox, becoming the network's first series to land in the Top 30 ratings in a season (1989–1990).

Since its debut on December 17, 1989, the show has broadcast 530 episodes and the twenty-fourth season ended on May 19, 2013. The Simpsons is the longest-running American sitcom, the longest-running American animated program, and in 2009 it surpassed Gunsmoke as the longest-running American primetime, scripted television series. The Simpsons Movie, a feature-length film, was released in theaters worldwide on July 26 and July 27, 2007, and grossed over $527 million.

The Simpsons is widely considered to be one of the greatest television series of all time. Time magazine's December 31, 1999, issue named it the 20th century's best television series, and on January 14, 2000, the Simpson family was awarded a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame. It has won dozens of awards since it debuted as a series, including 27 Primetime Emmy Awards, 30 Annie Awards and a Peabody Award. Homer's exclamatory catchphrase "D'oh!" has been adopted into the English language, while The Simpsons has influenced many adult-oriented animated sitcoms.

The Simpson family first appeared as shorts in The Tracey Ullman Show on April 19, 1987. Groening submitted only basic sketches to the animators and assumed that the figures would be cleaned up in production. However, the animators merely re-traced his drawings, which led to the crude appearance of the characters in the initial shorts. The animation was produced domestically at Klasky Csupo, with Wes Archer, David Silverman, and Bill Kopp being animators for the first season. Colorist Gyorgyi Peluce was the person who decided to make the characters yellow.

In 1989, a team of production companies adapted The Simpsons into a half-hour series for the Fox Broadcasting Company. The team included the Klasky Csupo animation house. Brooks negotiated a provision in the contract with the Fox network that prevented Fox from interfering with the show's content. Groening said his goal in creating the show was to offer the audience an alternative to what he called "the mainstream trash" that they were watching. The half-hour series premiered on December 17, 1989, with "Simpsons Roasting on an Open Fire", a Christmas special. "Some Enchanted Evening" was the first full-length episode produced, but it did not broadcast until May 1990, as the last episode of the first season, because of animation problems. In 1992, Tracey Ullman filed a lawsuit against Fox, claiming that her show was the source of the series' success. The suit said she should receive a share of the profits of The Simpsons—a claim rejected by the courts.

On February 9, 1997, The Simpsons surpassed The Flintstones with the episode "The Itchy & Scratchy & Poochie Show" as the longest-running prime-time animated series in the United States. In 2004, The Simpsons replaced The Adventures of Ozzie and Harriet (1952 to 1966) as the longest-running sitcom (animated or live action) in the United States. In 2009, The Simpsons surpassed The Adventures of Ozzie and Harriet's record of 435 episodes and is now recognized by Guinness World Records as the world's longest running sitcom (in terms of episode count). In October 2004, Scooby-Doo briefly overtook The Simpsons as the American animated show with the highest number of episodes. However, network executives in April 2005 again cancelled Scooby-Doo, which finished with 371 episodes, and The Simpsons reclaimed the title with 378 episodes at the end of their seventeenth season. In May 2007, The Simpsons reached their 400th episode at the end of the eighteenth season. While The Simpsons has the record for the number of episodes by an American animated show, other animated series have surpassed The Simpsons. For example, the Japanese anime series Sazae-san has over 6,000 episodes to its credit.

In 2009, Fox began a year-long celebration of the show titled "Best. 20 Years. Ever." to celebrate the 20th anniversary of the premiere of The Simpsons. One of the first parts of the celebration is the "Unleash Your Yellow" contest in which entrants must design a poster for the show. The celebration ended on January 10, 2010 (almost 20 years after "Bart the Genius" aired on January 14, 1990), with The Simpsons 20th Anniversary Special – In 3-D! On Ice!, a documentary special by documentary filmmaker Morgan Spurlock that examines the "cultural phenomenon of The Simpsons".

As of the twenty-first season (2009–2010), The Simpsons became the longest-running American primetime, scripted television series, having surpassed Gunsmoke. However, Gunsmoke's episode count of 635 episodes far surpasses The Simpsons, which would not reach that mark until its approximate 29th season, under normal programming schedules. In October 2011, Fox announced that The Simpsons had been renewed for a 24th and 25th season, which means the show will reach at least 559 episodes.

Quantum Vagina’s take - Sometimes, I feel like I’m the only one who thinks The Simpsons still has gas in the tank. Going back and watching old episodes of it, they’re good, but I don’t think that they’re the revolutionary, immaculate pieces of art die-hard fans would have you believe. I think Homer and Co. still have quite a bit going for them. I think the characters are all wonderful and hilarious, like Disco Stu. I love a series that can commit to a one-off joke enough to make him a full character on the show. it’s AWESOME. I was actually REALLY upset that I couldn’t find a decent recording of the show’s intro from the earlier seasons. &*%^ people who film their TV screens. That is NOT OK.
Title: Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
Post by: Quantum Vagina on September 26, 2013, 08:08:00 PM
#3 –Transformers
(134 Points) 8 of 13 Lists - Highest Ranking - #1 - Darth Geek
(http://i.imgur.com/SngJ0qf.jpg)
More than meets the eye!
http://www.youtube.com/v/TF463RT5tWc
Release Date:  1984

Just the Plagarism
The Transformers is the first animated television series in the Transformers franchise. The series depicts a war among giant robots that can transform into vehicles and other objects. Written and recorded in America, the series was animated in Japan and South Korea. The entire series was based upon the Diaclone and Microman toy lines originally created by Japanese toy manufacturer Takara, which were developed into the Transformers toy line by American company Hasbro. The series was supplemented by a feature film, The Transformers: The Movie (1986), taking place between the second and third seasons.

Due to the 1992 franchise-wide relaunch under the name Transformers: Generation 2, the original series and its toy and comic book parallels are referred to as Transformers: Generation 1, aka G1. Initially a fan-coined term, it has since made its way into official use as a retronym. Although not a completely new show, new CGI features such as bumpers, alter the appearance of the old episodes.

The Transformers toyline and cartoon/animated series was inspired by the Japanese toyline, Microman (an Eastern descendant of the 12" G.I. Joe action figure series). In 1980, the Microman spin-off, Diaclone, was released, featuring inch-tall humanoid figures able to sit in the drivers' seats of scale model vehicles, which could transform into humanoid robot bodies the drivers piloted. Later still, in 1983, a Microman sub-line, MicroChange was introduced, featuring "actual size" items that transformed into robots, such as microcassettes, guns and toy cars. Diaclone and MicroChange toys were subsequently discovered at the 1983 Tokyo Toy Fair by Hasbro toy company product developer Henry Orenstein, who presented the concept to Hasbro's head of R&D, George Dunsay. Enthusiastic about the product, it was decided to release toys from both Diaclone and MicroChange as one toyline for their markets, although there were eventual changes to the color schemes from the original toys to match the new series.

By 1984, U.S. regulators had removed many of the restrictions regarding the placement of promotional content within children's television programming. The way was cleared for the new product-based television program. Hasbro had previously worked with Marvel Comics to develop G.I. Joe: A Real American Hero for a three-pronged marketing scheme - the toyline, a tie-in comic book by Marvel, and an animated mini-series co-produced by Marvel's media arm, Marvel Productions, and the Griffin-Bacal Advertising Agency's Sunbow Productions animation studio. Given the success of that strategy, the process was repeated in 1984 when Hasbro marketing vice president Bob Prupis approached Marvel to develop their new robot series, which Jay Bacal dubbed "Transformers."

1986 would prove to be a big year for Transformers, with the summer release of The Transformers: The Movie. The story line is based in the year 2005 and introduces a new cast of characters that were the first to be originally created for the Transformers line, and not derived from other toylines. The new characters were the Autobots Hot Rod, Kup, Blurr, Arcee, the triplechanger Springer, Ultra Magnus, Wreck-Gar, Wheelie, and Blaster's own group of mini-cassette Autobots Steeljaw, Ramhorn, Eject and Rewind. The only new Decepticon was Ratbat, Soundwave's new minion. Other new characters were the ferocious Sharkticons who were owned by a race of evil five-faced robotic aliens called the Quintessons.

Free of the restrictions of television, the movie featured many character deaths (including Optimus Prime, Brawn, Ironhide, Ratchet, Wheeljack, Windcharger, Prowl, and Starscream), as the old guard were wiped out to make room for the next generation of toys. Megatron, Skywarp, Thundercracker, and the Insecticons were remodeled into Galvatron, Cyclonus, Scourge and the Sweeps by a planet-sized Transformer known as Unicron. Megatron and Thundercracker clearly became Galvatron and Scourge, but there is debate as to who actually became Cyclonus, Bombshell or Skywarp.

Near the end of the movie, Hot Rod used the Matrix of Leadership to destroy Unicron, save Cybertron and become Rodimus Prime, the new leader of the Autobots, at least until Optimus made his surprise return at the end of the third season. The movie also introduced an adult Spike and his son Daniel.

Quantum Vagina’s take - HNNNNNNNNNNNNNG. Toys. Seriously, I don’t care at ALL that half of the cartoons in the 80’s were toy commercials. You know why? Because those toys were DAMN AWESOME. Being able to play with the toys while watching the shows? DOUBLE AWESOME. And the Transformers? They were possibly the coolest toy concept EVER. You wanna play cars? Cool, I’ll just do a quick rearrange here, and PRESTO! It’s a car. Robots? BOOM, you got it! Seriously, shut up and take my money!
Title: Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
Post by: Quantum Vagina on September 26, 2013, 08:08:21 PM
#2 –The Real Ghostbusters
(137 Points) 8 of 13 Lists - Highest Ranking - #1 - Pak-Man, gojikranz
(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/5/5d/Realghostbusters_title.jpg)
More than meets the eye!
http://www.youtube.com/v/bPiZptATdGc
Release Date:  1986

Just the Plagarism
The Real Ghostbusters is an American animated television series spun-off from the Ghostbusters franchise. The series ran from 1986 to 1991, and was produced by Columbia Pictures Television, DiC Enterprises, and Coca-Cola Telecommunications. "The Real" was added to the title after a dispute with Filmation and its Ghost Busters properties. The series continues the adventures of paranormal investigators Dr. Peter Venkman, Dr. Egon Spengler, Dr. Ray Stantz, Winston Zeddemore, their secretary Janine Melnitz and their mascot ghost Slimer.

There also were two ongoing Real Ghostbusters comics, one published monthly by Now Comics in USA and the other published weekly (originally biweekly) by Marvel Comics in the United Kingdom, and a popular toy line manufactured by Kenner (the toyline lasted longer than the television series itself).

A short pilot episode was produced, but never aired in full. The full four-minute promo was released on Time Life's DVD set in 2008. Scenes of the pilot can be seen in TV promos that aired prior to the beginning of the series. Among differences seen in the promo pilot, the Ghostbusters wore the beige jumpsuits they had worn in the film instead of the color-coded jumpsuits they would wear in the finished series, and the character design for Peter Venkman bore more of a resemblance to actor Bill Murray than the character design seen in the finished series. When he auditioned for the voice of Egon Spengler, Maurice LaMarche noted that while he was asked not to impersonate Harold Ramis, he did so anyway and eventually got the part. LaMarche also noted that Bill Murray complained that Lorenzo Music's voice of Peter Venkman sounded more like Garfield (who was also voiced by Music at the time.) A different explanation for the change of actor for Peter Venkman came from Dave Coulier, who took over the role of Venkman from Music, who expalined that Joe Medjuck a producer on both the original 1984 film and the animated series, wanted the character to sound more like Bill Murray. Ernie Hudson was the only actor from the films who auditioned to play his character in the series; however, the role was given to Arsenio Hall.

At the same time The Real Ghostbusters was being created, Filmation was making a cartoon known simply as "Ghostbusters", which was a revamp of Filmation's 1970s series The Ghost Busters. The character designs by Jim McDermott were dramatically redesigned from the way the same characters looked in the movie.

Although the "Ghostbusters" concept was tinkered with, the finalized show does feature many tie-ins from the films. The Stay Puft Marshmallow Man made numerous appearances. During the third season, Walter Peck, the Environmental Protection Agency antagonist from the original film, reappeared. The uniforms and containment unit were redesigned, and Slimer was changed from a bad ghost to a resident and friend, events which are explained in the episode "Citizen Ghost" that flashes back to what happened to the Ghostbusters right after the movie's events. Gozer is also mentioned repeatedly throughout the series, usually in comparison to a ghost they are currently battling (e.g. "Cthulhu makes Gozer look like Little Mary Sunshine").

In 1997, a sequel cartoon entitled Extreme Ghostbusters, was created by Columbia TriStar Television and Adelaide Productions. It premiered on September 1, 1997 and ran for forty episodes until its conclusion on December 8, 1997. Set several years after the end of The Real Ghostbusters, the series opened by saying the team has disbanded due to a lack of supernatural activity. Only Egon remains in the firehouse, along with Slimer, to care for the containment system while teaching classes at a local university. When supernatural events begin occurring in New York, Egon recruits four of his university students as a new team of Ghostbusters, and Janine, also one of Egon's students, returns to manage the office. The original Ghostbusters return for the two-episode season finale to celebrate Egon's 40th birthday, leading to them reluctantly working together with the younger generation to solve one last case.

Quantum Vagina’s take - I know very little about this show, but I know nothing that makes me want to watch it less. I even think the whole title controversy thing was kind of hilarious and probably confused the hell out of many kids and parents at the time.
Title: Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
Post by: Quantum Vagina on September 26, 2013, 08:08:58 PM
#1 –DuckTales
(142 Points) 8 of 13 Lists - Highest Ranking - #1 - Johnny Unusual
(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/4/48/DuckTales_%28Main_title%29.jpg)
Not ponytails or cottontails!
http://www.youtube.com/v/frGLMtGsotc
Release Date:  1987

Just the Plagarism
DuckTales is an American animated television series produced by Disney Television Animation. Based on Carl Barks' Uncle Scrooge comic book series, it premiered on September 18, 1987 and ended on November 28, 1990 with a total of four seasons and 100 episodes. An animated theatrical spin-off film based on the series, DuckTales the Movie: Treasure of the Lost Lamp, was released widely in the United States on August 3, 1990. The voice cast from the series reprised their roles for the film.

The series is a dramatization of the Duck universe comic series created by Carl Barks. The viewer follows the adventures of Scrooge McDuck and his three grandnephews, Huey, Dewey, and Louie. Important secondary characters, that often take part in the adventures, include Donald Duck, Scrooge's pilot Launchpad McQuack and butler Duckworth, the inventor Gyro Gearloose, and the nanny Mrs. Beakley and her granddaughter Webby. The most notable antagonists in the series are the Beagle Boys, the witch Magica De Spell, and the industrialist Flintheart Glomgold. In a typical story, the villains are after McDuck's fortune or his Number One Dime; another common theme is a race after some sort of treasure. Although some stories are original or based on Barks' comic book series, others are pastiches on classical stories or legends, including characters based on either fictional or historical persons. The series is known for its many references to popular culture, including Shakespeare, Jack the Ripper, Greek mythology, James Bond, Indiana Jones, and Sherlock Holmes.

The show features the adventures of Scrooge McDuck and his great-nephews. The nephews, who were originally living with their uncle Donald, are left in Scrooge's care when Donald joins the Navy.

Though Scrooge is the richest duck in the world, he constantly tries to find ways to increase his wealth. Many episodes involve protecting his wealth from villains who want to rob Scrooge of all his money. The prominent recurring antagonists in the show include the Beagle Boys and Magica De Spell who are always finding ways to rob and swindle Scrooge and his nephews. Scrooge's nemesis in the show is Flintheart Glomgold, who always tries to devise plans to unseat Scrooge McDuck from his "Richest Duck in the World" title. A few of the stories also surround Scrooge's "Number One Dime" which is the source of Scrooge's good luck and wealth. Scrooge keeps the dime in a glass jar in his money vault, and constantly protects it from the villains on the show.

The show's second season saw the addition of characters Fenton Crackshell and Bubba Duck. Along with them came stories that generally shifted away from the globetrotting plots of the first season, and revolved primarily in the contemporary setting of Duckburg. Episodes would feature either Bubba or Fenton but rarely both.

Although Scrooge and his nephews were the show's main characters, some episodes focused on other characters like Launchpad or Gyro. Some members of Scrooge's extended family (The Duck Universe), like Gladstone Gander who had extremely good luck, were also seen in the series. Characters like Gladstone were often seen in the early Carl Barks comic book stories.

The series is notable for being the first Disney cartoon to be produced for syndication, and paving the way for future Disney cartoons, such as Chip 'n Dale Rescue Rangers, TaleSpin and Darkwing Duck, the latter of which is considered to be a spinoff of DuckTales.

A world broadcast premiere television movie (entitled "The Treasures of the Golden Suns") first aired during the weekend of September 18–20, 1987 (date and time varied by market). Since then, it has been shown in the series' regular rotation as a five-part serial. A feature-length movie was released in theatres on August 3, 1990. The hundredth episode (which was also the series finale) aired on November 28, 1990.

The 1987-1988 season of DuckTales consisted of 65 episodes (the standard length for a Disney TV show, as well as the standard length of many 1st season of 1990's TV shows). Two more five-part serials - "Time Is Money" and "Super DuckTales" - premiered as television movie specials in November 1988 and March 1989, respectively. The rest of the second season (fall 1989 - winter 1989) included an additional 18 episodes. In the second season, Bubba the Caveduck and his pet triceratops, Tootsie, and Fenton Crackshell and his alter ego Gizmo Duck appeared. DuckTales the Movie: Treasure of the Lost Lamp was released in August 1990. Seven final episodes premiered in the fall of 1990 (including three produced for season two but held back for airing, and four produced explicitly for season three), bringing the total to 100 episodes—making DuckTales one of the longest-running Disney shows in terms of number of episodes.

Chip 'n Dale Rescue Rangers was paired with DuckTales in an hour-long syndicated block during the 1989-1990 television season. In the 1990-1991 season, Disney expanded the idea even further, creating The Disney Afternoon, a two-hour long syndicated block of half-hour cartoons. DuckTales was one of the early flagship cartoons in the series.
On October 2, 1995, DuckTales began reruns on the Disney Channel as part of a two-hour programming block called "Block Party" which aired on weekdays in the late-afternoon/early-evening and which also included Darkwing Duck, TaleSpin, and Chip 'n Dale Rescue Rangers.

Huey, Dewey, and Louie all appeared in the drug prevention video Cartoon All-Stars to the Rescue. Scrooge and Launchpad appeared in Disney's short-lived animated series Raw Toonage (originally aired on CBS in 1992 and 1993).

The show was the most successful of Disney's early attempts to create high-quality animation for a TV animated series (earlier shows included The Wuzzles and Disney's Adventures of the Gummi Bears in 1985). Disney invested a far greater amount of money into the TV series than had previously been spent on animated shows of the time. This was considered a risky move, because animated TV series were generally considered low-budget investments for most of the history of TV cartoons up through the 1980s. Most of the DuckTales episodes were animated in Asia by companies such as Cuckoo's Nest Studios, Wang Film Productions of Taiwan, and Tokyo Movie Shinsha of Japan.

Many critics say that Disney's own animation studio had lost most of its luster during the period from Walt Disney's passing through the 1980s. However, the studio took a number of risks that paid off handsomely, and DuckTales was one of those risks that won big. The studio gambled on the idea that a larger investment into quality animation could be made back through syndication — a concept that worked well with live-action TV reruns, but which had only been used with inexpensive cartoon series that either recycled theatrical shorts from decades past or only featured limited, low-budget animation.

The show was successful enough to spawn a feature film, DuckTales the Movie: Treasure of the Lost Lamp, and a spinoff series: Darkwing Duck. The success of DuckTales also paved the way for a new wave of high-quality animated TV series, including Disney's own The New Adventures of Winnie the Pooh in 1988.

Quantum Vagina’s take - If you do not have AWESOME memories of this show, you need to get off the internet RIGHT now and watch the entire thing. This show is so damned cool, there’s just no way to put it into words. I kept the theme song on my friggin’ mp3 player for AGES, and now that I think about it, I have absolutely NO idea why i took it off. I need to put that shiz back on there so I can jam out to DuckTales the entire 8 hour drive to Kansas.
Title: Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
Post by: Rainbow Dash on September 26, 2013, 08:15:00 PM
The Muppet babies have not aged well at all. 

Honestly shocked Simpsons wasn't #1 and for all the anime that made the list, Gundam didn't make the list.
Title: Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
Post by: Darth Geek on September 26, 2013, 08:19:19 PM
Good pick for #1. I'm actually surprised Transformers wasn't #1, although I knew it would rank high.

By the way, you have the wrong poster for The Real Ghostbuster. It's the same one for Transformers.
Title: Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
Post by: Quantum Vagina on September 26, 2013, 08:23:58 PM
Good pick for #1. I'm actually surprised Transformers wasn't #1, although I knew it would rank high.

By the way, you have the wrong poster for The Real Ghostbuster. It's the same one for Transformers.

Liar. No one likes a liar.
Title: Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
Post by: Pak-Man on September 26, 2013, 08:42:52 PM
Quantum Vagina’s take - I feel like I’ve seen this before, but younger me didn’t like it. In all fairness, I wasn’t really into the Muppets until I got older, when I could appreciate how awesome they were. It also doesn’t help that I keep getting it mixed up in my head with that show where the Looney Toons were babies, and so I don’t know which one I actually enjoyed.

If you enjoyed it, it was probably Muppet Babies. I don't think it's possible to derive joy from Baby Looney Tunes.

The Simpsons didn't make my list because, as an '80s cartoon, it only really has  the Tracy Ulman shorts and "Simpsons Roasting on an Open Fire" to claim. Now when we do the '90s toon list, you'll see some Simpsons. :^)

Wouldn't have called Ducktales at #1. It was a good cartoon, sure, but trumping Transformers and The Real Ghostbusters?
Title: Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
Post by: Johnny Unusual on September 26, 2013, 08:48:44 PM
#10 –Garfield and Friends
(87 Points) 6 of 13 Lists - Highest Ranking - #4 - goflyblind

I don't really care for it, but Lorenzo Music IS Garfield.

#8 –The Secret of NIMH
(95 Points) 6 of 13 Lists - Highest Ranking - #4 - ColeStratton, Rainbow Dash

I'm not a big Don Bluth fan.  I get sick of his brand of cutesiness and humour REAL fast.  But he sure can animate and this has probably the richest story of all of his works.  Solid stuff that's both dark, hopeful and exciting.

#7 –Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles
(98 Points) 7 of 13 Lists - Highest Ranking - #5 - Pak-Man

Not so much of a Turtles fan anymore (I did rather like the 2000's series a bit) but I loved it when I was a kid and I think those characters had a lot more personality than the heroes of, say GI Joe (how boring was Duke.  Answer, very).

#6 –Inspector Gadget
(99 Points) 7 of 13 Lists - Highest Ranking - #2 - gojikranz
(http://i.imgur.com/o7v9Fz1.jpg)

HOLY SHIT THAT POSTER IS AWESOME!  I loved Inspector Gadget.  Not all of the humour works for me, but this stayed on the list in a way that Joe, Thundercats and other shows I loved as a kid haven't.  One reason is that Don Adams is peerless as Gadget.  It has a solid formula and there's something perfect about the character and the structure.

According to the toy line, Inspector Gadget looked like this:

(http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_m7bAUR6HToY/TTfT_XsHi8I/AAAAAAAAAQY/6JTJ5k6r3-A/s1600/claw1.jpg)

Go to hell, toy line.  Still better than Rupert Evertt, I guess.

#5 –Muppet Babies
(106 Points) 8 of 13 Lists - Highest Ranking - #1 - goflyblind

Ooh, I didn't put this on my list, but now I wish I did.  Again, the jokes probably don't hold up well, but I think the way it used film footage was really cool.  Of course, that's also why you will NEVER see it on DVD.

http://www.youtube.com/v/_AYLjZso8T4

#4 –The Simpsons
(121 Points) 6 of 13 Lists - Highest Ranking - #1 - ColeStratton
(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/0/0d/Simpsons_FamilyPicture.png)

This one feels like a cheat, unless you really like the Christmas special.  I think that and MAYBE one more episode aired (more like errored) in the 80's.  But if you really like that one (it is easily the best season one episode, though the episode with Albert Brooks comes close) then by all means.

#3 –Transformers
(134 Points) 8 of 13 Lists - Highest Ranking - #1 - Darth Geek

Transformers doesn't hold up for me as a show but those are some incredible toys and it had incredible intros.
#2 –The Real Ghostbusters
(137 Points) 8 of 13 Lists - Highest Ranking - #1 - Pak-Man, gojikranz
[img
http://I hear the story telling is pretty good on this show, outside of Slimer, but I haven't seen it in so long and it didn't stay with me aside from a few plots (that creepy one where the team all gets part of a ghost's face attached to their chests) to vote for it.

#1 –DuckTales
(142 Points) 8 of 13 Lists - Highest Ranking - #1 - Johnny Unusual
(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/4/48/DuckTales_%28Main_title%29.jpg)


I won!  And, in a way, we all did.  Ducktales is an AMAZING kids show.  This show has it's flaws: I could use less Webby and Bubba and Gizmoduck joining the cast were big mistakes.  Don't get me wrong, I like Gizmoduck (go to hell, Bubba) but he really stole the show too often and overstayed his welcome.

But it has some great animation, great characters (Scrooge is so awesome) and fun, clever stories.  How great is it that an adventure show has an old man as the lead.  Alan Young was so perfect for this role, I hear only Scrooge in all of his roles.

It's also very 80's and yet isn't too dated.  I wouldn't go as far as to say that it has a "Gordon Gecko says Greed is Good" message but it all revolved around Scrooge's love of wealth and never shamed him for loving it, just for taking it too far at times.  And it occasionally told stories from the original comics, such as the Glittering Goldie story.

Warning, this gets creepy.  And then, hilarious!
http://www.youtube.com/v/NmpAx8Z5z40
Title: Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
Post by: Johnny Unusual on September 26, 2013, 08:52:32 PM
Thanks so much for hosting this one Quantum Vagina.  It was a real treat.  And don't feel bad about the schedule.  I think it went really well and bought us some time for the Halloween one.

Also, can we agree that the 80's rocked the art of the opening.  There were some good ones in the 90's, but too many just used footage from the show and the opening almost always looked 10 times better than in the show.
Title: Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
Post by: Pak-Man on September 26, 2013, 08:54:05 PM
Best animated TV Show openings would make a pretty awesome list, actually.
Title: Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
Post by: Johnny Unusual on September 26, 2013, 08:59:27 PM
Too many to count, friend.
Title: Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
Post by: Pak-Man on September 26, 2013, 09:03:28 PM
My list:
1. The Real Ghostbusters
2. Transformers
3. The Completely Mental Misadventures of Ed Grimley
4. Danger Mouse
5. Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles
6. Garfield and Friends
7. Count Duckula
8. Captain N: The Gamemaster
9. Ducktales
10. Q*Bert
11. Donkey Kong
12. Alftales
13. Spartakus and the Sun Beneath the Sea
14. Droids
15. He-Man and the Masters of the Universe
16. Pac-Man
17. The Super Mario Bros. Super Show
18. Muppet Babies
19. Chip & Dale's Rescue Rangers
20. ALF
21. Ewoks
22. Jetsons
23. Fat Albert
24. Dragon's Lair
25. Thundercats
Title: Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
Post by: Mrs. Dick Courier on September 26, 2013, 09:05:04 PM
eh, I was wrong

And no She ra?  You male pigs!
Title: Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
Post by: Darth Geek on September 26, 2013, 09:09:57 PM
Quantum Vagina did a good job with the list.

Here's mine. Most all of them made it. I am surprised I am the only one that put Transformers at #1

1. Transformers
2. The Real Ghostbusters
3. The Secret of Nymh
4. Duck Tales
5. Wallace & Gromit: A Grand Day Out
6. Muppet Babies
7. Thundercats
8. Garfield and Friends
9. Inspector Gadget
10. Mickey's Christmas Carol
11. Chip & Dale Rescue Rangers
12. The Great Mouse Detective
13. Beetlejuice
14. The Plastic Man Comedy/Adventure Show
15. The Brave Little Toaster
16. Dino-Riders
17. Spiderman and his Amazing Friends
18. Fat Albert and the Cosby Kids
19. G.I. Joe
20. Smurfs
21. Dungeons & Dragons
Title: Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
Post by: Rainbow Dash on September 26, 2013, 09:54:11 PM
My list.

1.  Laputa:  Castle in the Sky
2.  Who Framed Roger Rabbit
3.  The Simpsons
4.  My Neighbor Totoro
5.  The Secret of Nimh
6.  Nausicaa Of The Valley of the Wind
7.  Kiki's Delivery Service
8.  Grave of the Fireflies
9.  Ducktales
10.  Ranma 1/2
11.  Mobile Suit Gundam
12.  All Dogs Go To Heaven
13.  Transformers
14.  An American Tale
15.  The Last Unicorn
16.  Vampire Hunter D
17.  Kimagure Orange Road
18.  The Great Mouse Detective
19.  Mickey's Christmas Carol
20.  The Little Mermaid
21.  Maison Ikkoku
22.  Thundercats
23.  Chip and Dale's Rescue Rangers
24.  Unico:  The Island of Magic
25.  Bon Voyage, Charlie Brown (and Don't Come Back!!)

26.  The Brave Little Toaster (if you chose not to count Who Framed Roger Rabbit)
Title: Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
Post by: Nunyerbiz on September 26, 2013, 10:14:36 PM
Had I made a list, I don't know if DuckTales would have been at the top... But yea, it was a really good show. I was middle school / high school age during it's run, but watched it on a regular basis... Still remember getting into fights with my little sister when she wanted to flip to Kids Incorporated or some equally stupid shit.

A co-worker has a bunch of Real Ghostbusters episodes on DVD... and while I had no intention of revisiting 100+ episodes of the show, what I did watch held up well. The animation is pretty sketchy in places, but the voice cast was good and it had the same goofball charm I remembered loving as a kid... I even liked the Slimer-centric stuff.

Even as a kid, I thought the Transformers series was a mess... Although that was probably partly due to not seeing the movie at the time and being all confused when characters started disappearing... Starscream was always great fun, even if I always preferred Cobra Commander... But I was never too much into the toys. Maybe I was just lazy, but who the hell wanted to play with a damn 18 wheeler? And I had plenty of other toy cars and planes...  So they just always stayed in robot form... Fighting robots are cool, turning it into a tape deck was a corny gimmick... even when I was 10 years old. And you couldn't be remotely rough with them... no tossing them around the backyard after your pretend explosions like you could do with your GI Joes or Star Wars guys... I dunno, just never got the phenomenon. Of course I loaded up on them one x-mas, just so I wouldn't be the outcast, but they never really pulled me in.



Title: Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
Post by: Johnny Unusual on September 26, 2013, 10:34:22 PM
Mine was a little more oddball.

1. DuckTales
2. Touch
This is a criminally underseen series, but I understand why: it is a lot more low key than a lot of anime, especially sports and teen rom-com anime.  It focuses on a pair of twin brothers (Katsuya and Tatsuya), one of whom is the most popular kid in school and an ace on the baseball team and the other is lazy and womanizing.  They live next to a girl who they grew up with.  As the show goes on, we learn that Tatsuya actually has more potential but, like Mycroft Holmes, is just too lazy to persue.  Amazingly, the series shifts in a shocking way in a wordless, subtle episode that acts as an emotional gut punch.  It's a really impressive and underseen series.  It is 100 episodes long and ends with a really satisfying finale.  Just thinking about it makes me want to tear up.  Amazing cast and a great sports story.
http://www.youtube.com/v/lOdGXe8F1H8
3. A Grand Day Out
4. Dragonball (I know I'm in the minority, but I much prefer Dragonball to Dragonball Z.  It's faster, funnier and while the fights are a little less intense, they are more imaginative.)
5. Ranma 1/2
6. The Wizard of Oz
I mentioned this one before.  Great introduction to the world.
http://www.youtube.com/v/aPy4_f5alKA
7. Galaxy Express 999
I talked about this one too.  It started in the 70's, but finished in the 80's.  It's about a future where spacecrafts can look like anything, even trains.  A boy  head on a space train to another world to get a robot body, so the boy can fulfill his mother's wish that he be immortal.  As the series continues, the character begins to see that immortality comes at a price and doesn't always lead to happiness.  Will he stick to his decision when he finally gets there.  And if he does... will he have a choice.
You can find the whole show for free on the site Crunchy Roll.
http://www.youtube.com/v/Gq-b_iNrQaQ
8. Glass Mask
Another anime, this one is strongest in it's first stories, then overstays its welcome a bit.  Still, it is a very fun and addictive melodrama.  A scarred, aging, bitter actress discovers a young girl in the Cinderella vein (re: asshole parents, poor as hell, kind and gentle) who ha the potential to become a great actress.  The character uses her wits and her acting ability to overcome adversity and a rival theatre company.  My favourite bit involved the main character dealing with all of her co-stars in a stage production of Snow White stranded in a van before the show.  Without her co-stars, our hero quickly plays the lead and turns it into a one woman show by pulling a Bob Newhart and letting her words and responses speak for what the other characters would be saying.  The comic getsa ridiculous at times since it is about characters strongly tied to method acting to the point that they'll electrocute or burn themselves to get into character.

http://www.dailymotion.com/video/x1aopm_glass-no-kamen-opening_music
There was a later series, but it felt too preppy and polished rather than putting emphasis on the difficulty of the character acheiving her dream.

9. Count Duckula
10. Akira             
11. Robotech
12. Muppet Babies
(Cool, I thought I forgot this)
13. The Secret of NIMH
14. The Brave Little Toaster
15. The Last Unicorn
16. Vampire Hunter D
17. Astro Boy
This had some good animation and interesting stories.  Atlas was a cool, tragic villain and I think Slippery is kind of a cool villain too (although looking him up, I can't find him.  Did I remember his name wrong?)
http://www.youtube.com/v/6O7qBbdZZYE
18. The Adventures of Teddy Ruxpin
19. Inspector Gadget
20. Chip & Dale’s Rescue Rangers

21. The Raccoons and the Lost Star
This is a weird one: before the Raccoons was a family drama type kids show, they made a TV movie where it is a Star Wars like adventure.  Weird.
22. The Raccoons
23. They Were Eleven
I don't remember how well this obscure anime film holds up, but I remember it being an interesting piece of hard sci-fi with a nice premise: 10 space cadets from all walks of life enter a space ship for a month long training mission... but when they get in there are 11.  And no one can seem to keep track of who was or wasn't with them to begin with...
Title: Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
Post by: Tripe on September 27, 2013, 06:23:01 AM
1   Grave of the Fireflies
2   My Neighbor Totoro
3   Laputa: Castle in the Sky
4   Kiki's Delivery Service
5   Danger Mouse
6   The Trap Door
7   James the Cat
8   Bananaman
9   Alias the Jester
10   Stoppit and Tidyup
11   The Flight of Dragons
12   Bod
13   Willo the Wisp
14   Count Duckula
15   Henry's Cat
16   The Real Ghostbusters
17   Moschops
18   Droids
19   Drak Pack
20   Spiderman and his Amazing Friends
21   Galaxy High
22   Dungeons & Dragons
23   The 13 Ghosts of Scooby-Doo
24   Thundercats
25   Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles

I think I highlighted all the ones that made it. TMNT is only on there for one character because I thought she was sexy even then.

Title: Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
Post by: Pak-Man on September 27, 2013, 06:40:12 AM
I think I highlighted all the ones that made it. TMNT is only on there for one character because I thought she was sexy even then.

Irma?
Title: Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
Post by: Tripe on September 27, 2013, 06:42:22 AM
That's the one.
Title: Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
Post by: Johnny Unusual on September 27, 2013, 06:52:41 AM
She was Mayim Bailik of her day.
Title: Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
Post by: Tripe on September 27, 2013, 06:57:37 AM
Ick, way to insult a fantastically sexy character. Sod Blossom.
Title: Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
Post by: Johnny Unusual on September 27, 2013, 07:07:04 AM
Ick, way to insult a fantastically sexy character. Sod Blossom.

Well, that's your opinionation.
Title: Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
Post by: goflyblind on September 27, 2013, 07:16:30 AM
i think this might be my best showing to date.

01. Muppet Babies
02. Adventures of Teddy Ruxpin
03. Babar
04. Garfield and Friends
05. The Raccoons
06. Care Bears
07. Inspector Gadget
08. Beetlejuice
09. Disney's Adventures of the Gummi Bears
10. DuckTales
11. Chip 'n Dale Resuce Rangers
12. Real Ghostbusters
13. Police Academy
14. My Pet Monster
15. Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles
16. ALF
17. Thomas & Friends
18. Camp Candy
19. G.I. Joe
20. Hulk Hogan's Rock 'n' Wrestling
21. Alvin and the Chipmunks
22. Pingu
23. Smurfs
24. Danger Mouse
25. CBS Storybreak
Title: Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
Post by: Tripe on September 27, 2013, 07:20:53 AM
Sod Blossom.

I'm glad you didn't say "Fuck Blossom."
No,I'd say that about Six though...
Title: Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
Post by: ColeStratton on September 27, 2013, 11:59:09 AM
Pretty great list. The Simpsons made my list because it's my favorite animated show of all time -- I know the bulk of it occurred in the 90s, but the genesis was the 80s, thus the showing. I'm amazed that like 21 of my 25 made it! Anyhoo, my list:

1.   The Simpsons
2.   The Last Unicorn
3.   Akira
4.   The Secret of Nimh
5.   The Little Mermaid
6.   Duck Tales
7.   Danger Mouse
8.   M.A.S.K.
9.   Inspector Gadget
10.    Garfield and Friends
11.    The New Scooby Doo Mysteries
12.    Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles
13.    Spiderman and his Amazing Friends
14.    He-Man and the Masters of the Universe

15.    The Land Before Time
16.    The Great Mouse Detective
17.    Captain Caveman
18.    The Fox and the Hound
19.    Captain N: The Game Master
20.    Muppet Babies
21.    Transformers
22.    An American Tale

23.    The Black Cauldron
24.    Mr. T (I PITY THE FOOL WHO DIDN'T PUT THIS ON THEIR LISTS! MOST OF Y'ALL IS FOOLS!)
(http://i39.tinypic.com/bijw9v.jpg)
25.    G.I. Joe
Title: Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
Post by: Charles Castle on September 27, 2013, 04:21:10 PM
1. Grave of the Fireflies
2. The Simpsons
3. Nausicaä of the Valley of the Wind

4. The Castle of Cagliostro - Well, it seems as though this was released in December of 1979, so it was a wasted vote for me. Great movie, though.
5. Kiki's Delivery Service
6. Whisper of the Heart
7. The Plague Dogs
8. Wicked City
9. Muppet Babies
10. Heavy Metal
11. Vampire Hunter D
12. The Flight of Dragons

13. Gandahar (aka Light Years)
14. My Neighbor Totoro
15. Mickey's Christmas Carol
16. Bon Voyage, Charlie Brown (and Don't Come Back!!)
17. The Great Mouse Detective
18. Akira
19. Dungeons & Dragons

20. Time Masters
21. Bubblegum Crisis
22. Little Nemo: Adventures in Slumberland
23. Castle in The Sky
24. The Fox and The Hound

25. Starchaser: The Legend of Orin

I guess I approached the list from a not so sentimental standpoint, which eliminated most shows. Having said that, I am shocked Mickey's Christmas Carol, one of my few sentimental picks (though I still think it holds up pretty well) did not make it (unless I missed it, in which case I am not shocked at all).
Title: Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
Post by: Johnny Unusual on September 28, 2013, 11:40:59 PM
Poll is up for the next list.  Apparently, whatever you pick, I'm hosting.

http://forum.rifftrax.com/index.php?topic=27776.0
Title: Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
Post by: Tripe on September 30, 2013, 10:54:32 AM
Oh and here's the one I completely forgot about but should have included:

http://www.youtube.com/v/lz_U9Np_nZ8

Loved this stupid show when I was littleish.
Title: Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
Post by: CJones on October 01, 2013, 07:15:25 PM
First off, I have to say again, thank you so much for taking over this list for me Quantum Vagina. I owe you one. My contractor has finally started work on fixing the massive water damage to my house. Unsurprisingly, the insurance company put off accepting my claim for as long as humanly possible.

Anyway, here's my list. I stuck to TV series, as that was what I originally intended.

1 Galaxy Rangers
2 The Gummi Bears
3 Real Ghostbusters
4 Dungeons & Dragons
5 The Smurfs
6 TMNT

7 The Mighty Orbots
8 Bionic Six
9 Transformers
10 Legend of the Galactic Heroes
11 Pole Posistion
12 Maison Ikkoku
13 Duck Tales
14 Inspector Gadget
15 Muppet Babies
16 MASK
17 Thundercats

18 Fat Albert
19 Voltron
20 SilverHawks
21 Captain N: The Game Master
22 The Wuzzles
23 Robotech
24 Tale Spin
25 GI Joe

Legend of the Galactic Heroes is almost certainly the most epic thing ever put to animation. It's based on a series of Japanese novels (not graphic novels, actual books), that encompasses an absurd number of characters. The sheer scope of this series is just incredible. It's not available in English, but there are fansubs of the entire series.