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General Discussion => General (Off-Topic) Discussion => Topic started by: goflyblind on September 21, 2012, 08:46:44 AM

Title: LoC #64: Top 52 Scientists
Post by: goflyblind on September 21, 2012, 08:46:44 AM
LoC #64 - Top Fifty-Two Scientists


Welcome to the sixty-fourth List of Crap! In this instalment, we will be counting down our fifty-two favourite scientists. First, a huge thank-you to everyone who voted for this topic, and a big thank-you to everyone who submitted a list. I'd like to apologize to those entries that I don't know well. I've had to copy and paste Wikipedia information for those.

The posting schedule will be 8-5-6-5-8-10-10 due to some ties. Before I begin the list proper, I'd like to share some general topic data and observations. These data include all submissions, not just the final list. Numbers, graphs, and charts seem appropriate, this being a list about scientists.


Total lists received: 16
Unique entries: 175
Average number of lists on which an entry appears: 2.275
Maximum number of lists on which an entry appears: 11


(http://i1172.photobucket.com/albums/r567/listocrap64/subgraph_zps79576e14.png) (http://i1172.photobucket.com/albums/r567/listocrap64/appearchart_zps591a3a16.png)

The quick submission of two lists got me all excited that there'd be a huge number of lists by the end. I should not have been so optimistic. While I did get a good number of lists, they mostly came in the latter half of the submission period. With a hundred and seventy-five unique entries, it's not surprising that there wasn't a huge amount of overlap between the lists. Thankfully, there was some and all of the singletons got pushed out of the top fifty.


(http://i1172.photobucket.com/albums/r567/listocrap64/realchart_zpsd944548c.png) (http://i1172.photobucket.com/albums/r567/listocrap64/specieschart_zps7ca5c812.png)

The split between real and fictional was much closer than I thought it'd be, and also the other way around. I'm very proud of you, board, for picking so many real scientists. Something I hadn't thought of when I suggested the topic was the species of fictional scientists. As it turns out, all sentient beings seem to be curious about the world around them and start down the path of science.


(http://i1172.photobucket.com/albums/r567/listocrap64/sexchart_zpsd9ad0c58.png) (http://i1172.photobucket.com/albums/r567/listocrap64/centchart_zps906255a2.png)

Sadly, the ladies were under-represented in the submissions, but this was not unexpected. It is possible that this is due to the western "dead white guys'" history of science that is usually taught in school. Hopefully, if this list were run again in a hundred years, it would be closer to gender parity. The recent past featured most heavily for the real scientists in the submissions. This is also likely due to the Eurocentric science history that we've learned.


(http://i1172.photobucket.com/albums/r567/listocrap64/nationchart_zpsb41cd4c7.png) (http://i1172.photobucket.com/albums/r567/listocrap64/nationmap_zps29f853cc.png)

Based on the population of the board, I suppose it's not too surprising that the submissions were heavy with Americans and Europeans. Just as a side note: it was annoyingly difficult to pick a good colour scheme for the map (the darker the blue, the more entries).


(http://i1172.photobucket.com/albums/r567/listocrap64/fieldchart_zps5775fcc2.png)

The breakdown of fields was very general (eg. someone considered an inventor was classed as an engineer), but showed that the engineers/inventors, physicists, and biologists are favoured. The chemists were not as heavily represented, which was somewhat surprising.


Quote
Fortunately science, like that nature to which it belongs, is neither limited by time nor by space. It belongs to the world, and is of no country and of no age. The more we know, the more we feel our ignorance; the more we feel how much remains unknown; and in philosophy, the sentiment of the Macedonian hero can never apply: there are always new worlds to conquer.
Sir Humphry Davy


And now, on to the list!
Title: Re: LoC #64: Top 52 Scientists
Post by: goflyblind on September 21, 2012, 08:47:05 AM
51 (tie)

(http://i1172.photobucket.com/albums/r567/listocrap64/west_zpseec5f4b1.jpg)
Herbert West

28 points - 2 lists - Highest Position: 11 ScottotD

Portrayed By: Jeffrey Combs (films)

Short Biography

Herbert West is a fictional character created by H. P. Lovecraft for his short story "Herbert West—Reanimator." In Lovecraft's tale, Herbert West was ostracized by his fellow medical students because he believed he could overcome death and had only one friend: the unnamed narrator of the story. After a series of successful experiments Herbert West is eventually torn to pieces by his own experiments. The films transplant the character into the end of the twentieth century rather than the early twentieth century in the story.


Major Discovery

Herbert West is the inventor of a special solution that when injected into a main artery of a recently deceased person causes the body's mechanical, living functions to return. However, most subjects that have undergone the "re-animation" process have turned violent and, after failed attempts to return to their own graves, have terrorized the communities into which they were reanimated.


http://www.youtube.com/v/JpZ75kPYVcs


Up Next: Never has a scientist been so blue.
Title: Re: LoC #64: Top 52 Scientists
Post by: goflyblind on September 21, 2012, 08:47:26 AM
51 (tie)

(http://i1172.photobucket.com/albums/r567/listocrap64/mccoy1_zps87f8be0a.jpg)
Hank McCoy (Beast)

28 points - 3 lists - Highest Position: 10 (Johnny Unusual)

Portrayed By: Kelsey Grammar (film), Nicholas Hoult (film), George Buza (animated series), Fred Tatasciore (animated series)

Short Biography

Hank McCoy is a mutant in the Marvel Universe. He is associated with the X-Men, but has also been a member of the Avengers, the Defenders, and X-Factor (I don't know how well he got along with Simon Cowell). Throughout the various incarnations, he is portrayed as a furry blue humanoid with immense strength and intelligence. He is usually a soft-spoken, gentle person, but can be provoked to use his strength. He is an expert in the fields of genetics and biophysics, with knowledge of physics, mathematics, electrical engineering, and computer science. He is also an MD.


Major Discovery

Hank's greatest achievement was curing the Legacy virus, a deadly viroid (part of a virus) meant to kill all mutants.

(http://i1172.photobucket.com/albums/r567/listocrap64/mccoy2_zps4ef22457.jpg)

(http://www.littlestuffedbull.com/images/comics/365hankmccoy/hankmccoy0303.jpg)


Up Next: They let walruses do science now?
Title: Re: LoC #64: Top 52 Scientists
Post by: goflyblind on September 21, 2012, 08:47:46 AM
45 (tie)

(http://i1172.photobucket.com/albums/r567/listocrap64/hyneman_zps130edc0c.jpg)
Jamie Hyneman

29 points - 2 lists - Highest Position: 8 (Gunflyer)

Short Biography

Jamie Hyneman is a special effects expert who is best known for his work on MythBusters, a television show where the presenters test various myths. Though their methodology may not be entirely scientific, they do promote the idea that you should question things you are told. Also, blowing stuff up is always a good solution.


Major Discoveries

Some of the myths that Jamie has confirmed include:
 - poppy seeds false positive
 - rowing eight can pull a water skier
 - winner of the Ultimate Mythbuster competition
 - drive on wooden wheels
 - a serviceable boat can be built from duct tape
 - Jamie wants and gets big boom
 
http://www.youtube.com/v/ZSlm2OFvXvA
 
http://www.youtube.com/v/pp5hNhHp3Ew


Up Next: Come, family, sit in the snow with daddy and let us all bask in TV's warm glowing warming glow.
Title: Re: LoC #64: Top 52 Scientists
Post by: goflyblind on September 21, 2012, 08:48:08 AM
45 (tie)

(http://i1172.photobucket.com/albums/r567/listocrap64/farnsworth_p_zpsd8b480eb.jpg)
Philo Farnsworth

29 points - 2 lists - Highest Position: 7 (Pak-Man)

Short Biography

Philo Farnsworth was an American inventor and television pioneer. As a teenager, his family moved to a home that had an electric generator. By repairing the generator, he was able to learn about mechanical and electrical technology.


Major Discoveries

Farnsworth major achievement was the invention of the television while still in high school. He also designed a fusion reactor which, while unfortunately unable to be scaled up to a power generator, has found use as a neutron source. Farnsworth held over 300 patents worldwide. In an interview with his wife, she recounted watching the images beamed back from the moon landing, "and, when Neil Armstrong landed on the moon, Phil turned to me and said, 'Pem, this has made it all worthwhile.' Before then, he wasn't too sure."


Up Next: Eight is enough.
Title: Re: LoC #64: Top 52 Scientists
Post by: goflyblind on September 21, 2012, 08:48:30 AM
45 (tie)

(http://i1172.photobucket.com/albums/r567/listocrap64/octopus_zps27ec950d.jpg)
Otto Octavius

29 points - 2 lists - Highest Position: 6 (Johnny Unusual)

Portrayed By: Alfred Molina (film), Tom Kenny (animated series), Peter MacNicol (animated series), Efrem Zimbalist Jr. (animated series)

Short Biography
Otto Octavius is a super-villain who appears in the Marvel Universe. During Otto's freshman year of college, his father's death due to an industrial accident pushed Otto towards the study of, and obsession with, physical science. After graduating from college, Otto Octavius found work in an engineering firm. Otto became a brilliant and respected nuclear physicist, atomic research consultant, inventor, and lecturer.


Major Discovery
Octavius designed a set of highly advanced mechanical arms controlled via a brain–computer interface to assist him with his research into atomic physics. The tentacle arms were resistant to radiation and were capable of great strength and highly precise movement, attached to a harness that fit around his body. During an accidental radiation leak that ended in an explosion, the apparatus became fused to Octavius' body. It was later revealed that the radiation (or possibly his own latent mutation) had mutated his brain so that he could control the movement of the arms using his thoughts alone.

(http://m0vie.files.wordpress.com/2012/06/amazingspidermanomnibus11.jpg)



Up Next: This next scientist has a real chimp on her shoulder.
Title: Re: LoC #64: Top 52 Scientists
Post by: goflyblind on September 21, 2012, 08:48:54 AM
45 (tie)

(http://i1172.photobucket.com/albums/r567/listocrap64/goodall_zps74a0f4f0.jpg)
Jane Goodall

29 points - 2 lists - Highest Position: 6 (Mrs. Dick Courier)

Short Biography

Jane Goodall is a primatologist. She is the founder of the Jane Goodall Institute and has worked extensively on conservation and animal welfare issues. As a child she was given a lifelike chimpanzee toy named Jubilee by her father; her fondness for the toy started her early love of animals. Today, the toy still sits on her dresser in London. Goodall had always been passionate about animals and Africa, which brought her to the farm of a friend in the Kenya highlands in 1957. From there, she obtained work as a secretary, and acting on her friend's advice she telephoned Louis Leakey, a Kenyan archaeologist and paleontologist, with no other thought than to make an appointment to discuss animals. Leakey arranged funding and in 1962 sent Goodall, who had no degree, to Cambridge University where she obtained a Ph.D degree in Ethology. She became only the eighth person to be allowed to study for a Ph.D there without first obtaining a BA or B.Sc.


Major Discoveries

Goodall is best known as an expert on chimpanzees, due to her forty-five-year-long study of chimpanzee social and family interactions. Goodall’s research at Gombe Stream is best known to the scientific community for challenging two long-standing beliefs of the day: that only humans could construct and use tools, and that chimpanzees were vegetarians. She discovered that chimps will systematically hunt and eat smaller primates such as colobus monkeys. But perhaps more startling, and disturbing, was the tendency for aggression and violence within chimpanzee troops. Goodall observed dominant females deliberately killing the young of other females in the troop in order to maintain their dominance, sometimes going as far as cannibalism.

(http://i.imgur.com/Y3lVv.jpg)

(http://i.imgur.com/z9VRy.jpg)


Up Next: With science, of course!
Title: Re: LoC #64: Top 52 Scientists
Post by: goflyblind on September 21, 2012, 08:49:19 AM
45 (tie)

(http://i1172.photobucket.com/albums/r567/listocrap64/insano_zps1814d2d1.jpg)
Dr. Insano

29 points - 2 lists - Highest Position: 3 (Darth Geek)

Portrayed By: Noah Antwiler

Short Biography

Dr. Insano is a mad scientist villain created by Spoony. His catchphrase is "With SCIENCE!" punctuated by sticking his finger in the air, usually given as an glib explanation for how he has accomplished some amazing feat. Insano is the result of years of SpoonyOne reviewing bad movies and videogames. He was, at one time, elected President of the United States.

http://www.youtube.com/v/AA8OnP4__Og

http://www.youtube.com/v/HfP3nsVrFOU


Up Next: He saw the operation, and he still votes "neigh."
Title: Re: LoC #64: Top 52 Scientists
Post by: goflyblind on September 21, 2012, 08:49:43 AM
45 (tie)

(http://i1172.photobucket.com/albums/r567/listocrap64/horrible_zpsbbd9334c.jpg)
Dr. Horrible

29 points - 4 lists - Highest Position: 9 (Johnny Unusual)

Portrayed By: Neil Patrick Harris

Short Biography

Dr. Horrible is the anti-hero and main character of Dr. Horrible's Sing-Along Blog who aspires to join the Evil League of Evil. Hi alter-ego, Billy, is primarily motivated by a desire to make a drastic social change in the world by putting the power in his own hands. Many of his inventions go awry, including the trans-matter beam, which dissolved gold bars he meant to steal.


Major Discovery

Dr. Horrible's most successful invention was the freeze ray, which he used to overpower Captain Hammer and get into the Evil League of Evil.

http://www.youtube.com/v/ILObfEzX92k

http://www.youtube.com/v/dDD-SP2iaa8


Up Next (Tomorrow): You wouldn't like me when I'm angry.
Title: Re: LoC #64: Top 52 Scientists
Post by: Darth Geek on September 21, 2012, 09:23:09 AM
45 (tie)

(http://i1172.photobucket.com/albums/r567/listocrap64/insano_zps1814d2d1.jpg)
Dr. Insano

29 points - 2 lists - Highest Position: 3 (Darth Geek)


YES!

Great list so far, goflyblind. I particularly liked all the graphs at the beginning. Nice touch.
Title: Re: LoC #64: Top 52 Scientists
Post by: Johnny Unusual on September 21, 2012, 09:44:27 AM
Great list indeed.  I should point out however that you're "ties" aren't actually ties.  See, there are 2 kinds of tie-breakers: the number of list and their top placements within those lists.  Actually, this means that with the exception of Jane Goodall and Doctor Insano, all of the current entries are in the correct order.  All you need to do is number them as such.
Title: Re: LoC #64: Top 52 Scientists
Post by: Kete on September 21, 2012, 10:29:21 AM
Poor Jamie. I'm sure Adam ranked much higher.
Title: Re: LoC #64: Top 52 Scientists
Post by: Tripe on September 21, 2012, 10:34:34 AM
I think that's a terrible tragedy and a black eye for walrusi everywhere, beard solidarity should have made me include him on my list, alas....
Title: Re: LoC #64: Top 52 Scientists
Post by: Johnny Unusual on September 21, 2012, 10:41:15 AM
Everyone knows Jamie is the best one.  There's an episode of the Nerdist podcast with Adam Savage where he tells some awesome Jamie stories that I won't paraphrase since it won't have the same effect.  You may have to sit through Adam Savage doing some not great stand up to get to it (not awful, like you might imagine and perhaps even better than you'd expect, but still not great).
Title: Re: LoC #64: Top 52 Scientists
Post by: gojikranz on September 21, 2012, 12:27:57 PM
well i missed this one but im enjoying it thus far great graphs at the start i wouldnt mind seeing similar things on future lists.
Title: Re: LoC #64: Top 52 Scientists
Post by: CJones on September 21, 2012, 04:46:57 PM
45 (tie)

Jane Goodall

29 points - 2 lists - Highest Position: 2 (Mrs. Dick Courier)

I really wish I had thought of Jane Goodall. Definitely would have included her if I had. I was wracking my brain trying to think of real female scientists that people would know, and I could only think of one.
Title: Re: LoC #64: Top 52 Scientists
Post by: Darth Geek on September 21, 2012, 04:54:47 PM
Even though she wouldn't have made my list, I wish I had at least thought of her.
Title: Re: LoC #64: Top 52 Scientists
Post by: Zombie Monty on September 21, 2012, 05:06:54 PM
Forgot to send in a list for this one.  Oops.  Good choices so far.

Title: Re: LoC #64: Top 52 Scientists
Post by: ScottotD on September 21, 2012, 08:13:42 PM
Nice work with the graphs!
Title: Re: LoC #64: Top 52 Scientists
Post by: goflyblind on September 22, 2012, 07:41:07 AM
up and atom!

(http://i.imgur.com/k4EcV.gif)
Title: Re: LoC #64: Top 52 Scientists
Post by: goflyblind on September 22, 2012, 07:41:33 AM
43 (tie)

(http://i1172.photobucket.com/albums/r567/listocrap64/banner1_zps5e8a77c4.jpg)
Bruce Banner

31 points - 3 lists - Highest Position: 7 (ScottotD)

Portrayed By: Mark Ruffalo (film), Ed Norton (film), Eric Bana (film),  Gabriel Mann (animated series), Michael Bell(animated series), Bill Bixby (television)

Short Biography

Bruce Banner is a fictional scientist in the Marvel Universe. As with most comic book geniuses, he is proficient in many areas of science, including physics, biology,computer science, mathematics, chemistry and engineering. Due to an accident with intense gamma radiation, he becomes the Incredible Hulk when provoked to anger.


Major Discoveries

Banner's greatest achievement is also the cause of his transformation, in that he designed the gamma ray bomb. He has also developed many interesting technologies since his accident, such as a force field generator and a teleporter. In an alternate Universe, Banner's transformation to the Hulk is caused by his attempt to re-create the serum that gave Captain America his powers.

(http://i.imgur.com/QNpNo.jpg)

(http://i1172.photobucket.com/albums/r567/listocrap64/banner2_zps2ba9d0d0.jpg)


Up Next: Failure is always an option.
Title: Re: LoC #64: Top 52 Scientists
Post by: goflyblind on September 22, 2012, 07:41:53 AM
43 (tie)

(http://i1172.photobucket.com/albums/r567/listocrap64/savage_zps81c41acb.jpg)
Adam Savage

31 points - 3 lists - Highest Position: 4 (ScottotD)

Short Biography

Adam Savage is an American industrial design and special effects designer/fabricator, and one of the presenters of MythBusters. As a teenager, Savage "realized you could take a bike apart and put it back together and it wasn't that hard...I've been building and putting bicycles together since then."


Major Discovery

Some of the myths that Adam has shown to be true include
 - weather balloon chair
 - breaking a glass with amplified voice
 - toilet seat cleanest part of house
 - a serviceable boat can be built from newspapers
 - a bridge can be built from duct tape

http://www.youtube.com/v/F8UFGu2M2gM

http://www.youtube.com/v/d-XbjFn3aqE

http://www.youtube.com/v/BhAt-7i36G8
(the relevant bit starts at about seven minutes)


Up Next: Where Who am I this time?
Title: Re: LoC #64: Top 52 Scientists
Post by: goflyblind on September 22, 2012, 07:42:17 AM
41 (tie)

(http://i1172.photobucket.com/albums/r567/listocrap64/beckett_zps88c5b866.jpg)
Sam Beckett

33 points - 2 lists - Highest Position: 7 (Cole Stratton)

Portrayed By: Scott Bakula

Short Biography

Samuel Beckett is a fictional physicist on the television show Quantum Leap. He is portrayed as a super-genius with an IQ of 267. Beckett attended MIT, CalTech, Georgia Tech, and Florida Tech. He earned doctorates in quantum physics, medicine, music, archaeology, ancient languages, space sciences, and artificial intelligence. He has won a Nobel Prize in physics.


Major Discovery

Beckett's major discovery is the development of string theory (not the mathematical one based on eleven or twenty-six dimensional spacetime). This theory describes a person's life as a string, and that it could be possible to leap from one part of the string to another, effectively travelling through time. The leaping had the side effect of giving Sam partial amnesia.

http://www.youtube.com/v/DjK9GJMBpt0

http://www.youtube.com/v/5v4zCHRf8Ro


Up Next: Science rules!
Title: Re: LoC #64: Top 52 Scientists
Post by: goflyblind on September 22, 2012, 07:42:31 AM
41 (tie)

(http://i1172.photobucket.com/albums/r567/listocrap64/nye_zps04cb40b0.jpg)
Bill Nye

33 points - 5 lists - Highest Position: 12 (Darth Geek)

Short Biography

Bill Nye is an American science educator, television host, and scientist. He was educated as a mechanical engineer, but turned to acting on Almost Live, a Seattle sketch show where he first displayed the Bill Nye the Science Guy persona. He the appeared on live-action segments of Back to the Future: The Animated Series, whose popularity led to Nye getting his own show, called Bill Nye the Science Guy. Since the end of the show, he has worked on further educational science shows The Eyes of Nye, 100 Greatest Discoveries, Greatest Inventions with Bill Nye, and The Climate Code. He regularly appears on news shows to comment on scientific news stories.


http://www.youtube.com/v/FVZmL5UARcs

http://www.youtube.com/v/97Ob0xR0Ut8

http://www.youtube.com/v/AqCytRZRXng

http://www.youtube.com/v/w_8mw-1HYFg


Up Next: "I am thinking that all these tables might be calculated by machinery."
Title: Re: LoC #64: Top 52 Scientists
Post by: goflyblind on September 22, 2012, 07:42:49 AM
40

(http://i1172.photobucket.com/albums/r567/listocrap64/babbage_zpsec29dc00.jpg)
Charles Babbage

34 points - 2 lists - Highest Position: 5 (CJones)

Short Biography

Charles Babbage was an English mathematician and engineer. He studied at Trinity College, Cambridge, but was frustrated by the available math courses. Along with John Herschel and others, he formed the Analytical Society to better study and promote Leibniz's version of calculus. As a student, Babbage was also a member of other societies such as the Ghost Club, concerned with investigating supernatural phenomena, and the Extractors Club, dedicated to liberating its members from the madhouse, should any be committed to one. He especially hated street music, and in particular the music of organ grinders, against whom he railed in various venues. The following quotation is typical: "It is difficult to estimate the misery inflicted upon thousands of persons, and the absolute pecuniary penalty imposed upon multitudes of intellectual workers by the loss of their time, destroyed by organ-grinders and other similar nuisances."


Major Discovery

In Babbage's time, numerical tables were calculated by humans who were called 'computers', meaning "one who computes", much as a conductor is "one who conducts". At Cambridge, he saw the high error-rate of this human-driven process and started his life's work of trying to calculate the tables mechanically. He began in 1822 with what he called the difference engine, made to compute values of polynomial functions. Unlike similar efforts of the time, Babbage's difference engine was created to calculate a series of values automatically. By using the method of finite differences, it was possible to avoid the need for multiplication and division. This first difference engine would have been composed of around 25,000 parts, weigh 13600 kg, and would have been 2.4 m tall.

Soon after the attempt at making the difference engine crumbled, Babbage started designing a different, more complex machine called the Analytical Engine. The engine is not a single physical machine but a succession of designs that he tinkered with until his death in 1871. The main difference between the two engines is that the Analytical Engine could be programmed using punched cards. He realised that programs could be put on these cards so the designer had only to create the program initially and then put the cards in the machine and let it run. The analytical engine would have used loops of Jacquard's punched cards to control a mechanical calculator, which could formulate results based on the results of preceding computations. This machine was also intended to employ several features subsequently used in modern computers, including sequential control, branching and looping and would have been the first mechanical device to be Turing-complete.


Up Next (Tomorrow):  Wait, is this guy a string theorist?
Title: Re: LoC #64: Top 52 Scientists
Post by: Darth Geek on September 22, 2012, 09:30:35 AM
41 (tie)

(http://i1172.photobucket.com/albums/r567/listocrap64/beckett_zps88c5b866.jpg)
Sam Beckett

GAH! How could I have forgotten about Sam Beckett?!
Title: Re: LoC #64: Top 52 Scientists
Post by: CJones on September 22, 2012, 11:04:01 AM
40


Charles Babbage

34 points - 2 lists - Highest Position: 5 (CJones)

Interesting side note about Charles Babbage's Analytical Engine: There actually were programs written for it. Primarily By Ada Lovelace, after which the Ada programming language (designed, and still used, by the US DoD) is named. She's often referred to as the first computer programmer. I considered adding her, but felt that was a bit too obscure. Plus, since the machine was never actually built, none of her programs were ever run on it.

Incidentally, I spoke with a computer programmer at Redstone Arsenal last year, who is one of the many people trying to convert all the old Ada code into something more modern.  I asked him "Why in the world was all this stuff written in Ada in the first place, instead of, say Pascal?" His answer was basically "It seemed like a good idea at the time." The DoD wanted to have their own programming language that no one else used.
Title: Re: LoC #64: Top 52 Scientists
Post by: Russell on September 22, 2012, 06:15:48 PM
Ffffffuuuuuuu---- I forgot Sam Beckett! I thought why not add him then I thought wait a minute he's a writer then my brain said oh well then moved on... shiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii--
Title: Re: LoC #64: Top 52 Scientists
Post by: Johnny Unusual on September 22, 2012, 07:18:44 PM
I forgot Sam, but I don't think I would have included him, not because he isn't great, but more because there are certain characters who are scientists who I think of more as adventurers.  Sort of like how Tintin is a reporter but, come on, we never actually see him report on anything.  There's another one I expect to be high up that I love, but didn't put him/her on the list for the same reason.

Though I didn't pick him, I am glad to see him on the list.  Also probably the only transsexual on the list.  You know, occasionally.

(http://starwrecked.com/contents/other-parts/Enterprise-Scott-Bakula-Captain-Jonathan-Archer/Quantum-Leap-Sam-Beckett--dressed-in-drag.JPG)

I think this is when he leaped into Tim Curry on the Rocky Horror set.
Title: Re: LoC #64: Top 52 Scientists
Post by: Russell on September 22, 2012, 11:09:25 PM
I forgot Sam, but I don't think I would have included him, not because he isn't great, but more because there are certain characters who are scientists who I think of more as adventurers.  Sort of like how Tintin is a reporter but, come on, we never actually see him report on anything.  There's another one I expect to be high up that I love, but didn't put him/her on the list for the same reason.

Though I didn't pick him, I am glad to see him on the list.  Also probably the only transsexual on the list.  You know, occasionally.

(http://starwrecked.com/contents/other-parts/Enterprise-Scott-Bakula-Captain-Jonathan-Archer/Quantum-Leap-Sam-Beckett--dressed-in-drag.JPG)

I think this is when he leaped into Tim Curry on the Rocky Horror set.
Yeah... thanks for sharing that. Still though, being in drag had to be more comfortable for Scott Bakula than being on Enterprise.
Title: Re: LoC #64: Top 52 Scientists
Post by: Tripe on September 23, 2012, 05:46:06 AM
Interesting side note about Charles Babbage's Analytical Engine: There actually were programs written for it. Primarily By Ada Lovelace, after which the Ada programming language (designed, and still used, by the US DoD) is named. She's often referred to as the first computer programmer. I considered adding her, but felt that was a bit too obscure.
Unfortunate.
Title: Re: LoC #64: Top 52 Scientists
Post by: goflyblind on September 23, 2012, 08:21:26 AM
38 (tie)

(http://i1172.photobucket.com/albums/r567/listocrap64/banzai_zps7a1cc1f1.jpg)
Buckaroo Banzai

35 points - 2 lists - Highest Position: 6 (ScottotD)

Portrayed By: Peter Weller (film)

Short Biography

Buckaroo Banzai is the lead character in the film, The Adventures of Buckaroo Banzai Across the 8th Dimension. He is a top neurosurgeon, particle physicist, race car driver, rock star and comic book hero, and probably the last hope of the human race. Dissatisfied with a life devoted exclusively to medicine, Buckaroo Banzai perfected a wide range of skills. He designed and drove high-powered automobiles. He studied bujutsu and particle physics. He spoke a dozen languages and wrote songs in all of them. His band, the Hong Kong Cavaliers, was one of the most popular, hard-rocking bar bands in east New Jersey, though its members were not professional musicians at all, but rather cartographers and botanists, linguists and propellant engineers, an entomologist and an epidemiologist.

http://www.youtube.com/v/0gNJ1z-ulB4

http://www.youtube.com/v/jv_jkju_iZg


Up Next: This scientist rules his own country.
Title: Re: LoC #64: Top 52 Scientists
Post by: goflyblind on September 23, 2012, 08:21:47 AM
38 (tie)

(http://i1172.photobucket.com/albums/r567/listocrap64/doom_zpsb2d575f9.jpg)
Doctor Doom

35 points - 2 lists - Highest Position: 5 (Johnny Unusual)

Portrayed By: Julian McMahon (film)

Short Biography

Victor von Doom is a fictional character that appears in the Marvel Universe. Jack Kirby modeled Doom after Death, with the armor standing in for that character's skeleton. His trademark green cloak and metal armour are worn due to an accident he had while constructing a machine intended for use in speaking to the dead. Doom is the arch-nemesis of the Fantastic Four, but frequently battle Spider-Man, Doctor Strange, the Avengers, the X-Men, and others.


Major Discoveries

Throughout most of his publication history, he has been depicted as one of the most intelligent humans in the Marvel Universe. This is shown on many occasions, most famously by actually curing Ben Grimm of his Thing form, which Reed Richards has never repeated. Doom has constructed numerous devices in order to defeat his foes or gain more power, including a time machine, a device to imbue people with superpowers, and numerous robots; Doom's calculating and strategic nature leads him to use "Doombots," exact mechanical replicas of the real Doctor Doom, for many missions, typically those where he fears defeat. The character has also used his scientific talents to steal or replicate the power of other beings such as the Silver Surfer, or in one case the entity Galactus' world-ship.

(http://cache.io9.com/assets/images/8/2010/12/custom_1292000514723_picture_2.png)


Up Next: Jackie O's second husband, or, y'know, not.
Title: Re: LoC #64: Top 52 Scientists
Post by: goflyblind on September 23, 2012, 08:22:14 AM
37

(http://i1172.photobucket.com/albums/r567/listocrap64/aristotle_zpsdcea8cb9.jpg)
Aristotle

37 points - 4 lists - Highest Position: 10 (anais.butterfly)

Short Biography

Aristotle was a Greek philosopher, physicist, mathematician, and biologist. He was a student of Plato (inventor of the plate) and teacher of Alexander the Great. Aristotle was appointed as the head of the royal academy of Macedon. During that time he gave lessons not only to Alexander, but also to two other future kings: Ptolemy and Cassander.


Major Discovery

Aristotle's views on the physical sciences profoundly shaped medieval scholarship, and their influence extended well into the Renaissance, although they were ultimately replaced by Newtonian physics. In the zoological sciences, some of his observations were confirmed to be accurate only in the 19th century. His works contain the earliest known formal study of logic, which was incorporated in the late 19th century into modern formal logic. Aristotle's writings on science are largely qualitative, as opposed to quantitative. He added a fifth element (aether) to the classical four (earth, wind, fire, and water), through which he thought the heavenly bodies moved. It was not until the beginning of the twentieth century that it was shown that there was no aether. Aristotle also wrote an influential series of lectures on natural philosophy called Physics.


Up Next: The next entry exists in a linear superposition of being on the list and of not being on the list.
Title: Re: LoC #64: Top 52 Scientists
Post by: goflyblind on September 23, 2012, 08:22:39 AM
34 (tie)

(http://i1172.photobucket.com/albums/r567/listocrap64/schrodinger_zpsae1b984d.jpg)
Erwin Schrödinger

39 points - 2 lists - Highest Position: 1 (anais.butterfly)

Short Biography

Scrödinger was an Austrian-born physicist, and one of the founders of quantum mechanics. In 1914 Erwin Schrödinger achieved habilitation (an even higher qualification than a PhD). Between 1914 and 1918 he participated in war work as a commissioned officer in the Austrian fortress artillery. In 1933, however, Schrödinger decided to leave Germany; he disliked the Nazis' anti-semitism. He became a Fellow of Magdalen College at the University of Oxford. Soon after he arrived, he received the Nobel Prize together with Paul Dirac. His position at Oxford did not work out; his unconventional personal life (Schrödinger lived with two women) was not met with acceptance. In 1934, Schrödinger lectured at Princeton University; he was offered a permanent position there, but did not accept it. Again, his wish to set up house with his wife and his mistress may have posed a problem.


Major Discovery

Schrödinger's most significant contribution was the development of the Schrödinger equation, which describes the time-evolution of quantum mechanical systems. This equation shows how the Hamiltonian acting on a quantum mechanical state will return the energy of that state. The paper in which he published these findings is (rightfully) regarded as one of the most important papers of the twentieth century. It is for this discovery that he was awarded the Nobel Prize in physics. However, he is best-known to the general public as the originator of Schrödinger's cat, a thought experiment designed to show the absurdity of the Copenhagen Interpretation of quantum mechanics. In the thought experiment, a cat is placed in a sealed box, along with a sample of radioactive material, a geiger counter hooked up to a small hammer, and a vial of poison. When the radioactive material decays, the geiger counter will trigger the hammer, smashing the vial, thus poisoning the cat. Unfortunately, due to the statistical nature of radioactive decay, we cannot know when the cat will die. Therefore, according to the Copenhagen Interpretation, we must say that the cat exists in both states (alive and dead) at the same time. Of course, this ignores the third possible state: bloody furious.

Edit: On a personal note, my third-year quantum mechanics professor was trying to teach us about the meaning of different operators in Schrödinger's equation and, without realizing, came out with a great one-liner. As some context, the momentum operator is labelled by the letter p, and the wave-function by the greek letter psi.
"When we act on the wave function with p, we get a measure of how much p-ness there is in psi."
He didn't notice anything until the next day, when we'd printed up a sign with the quote on it and hung it at the front of the class.


Up Next: Where do you get those wonderful toys?
Title: Re: LoC #64: Top 52 Scientists
Post by: goflyblind on September 23, 2012, 08:23:06 AM
34 (tie)

(http://i1172.photobucket.com/albums/r567/listocrap64/q_zpsd3ae4fca.jpg)
Q

39 points - 3 lists - Highest Position: 9 (Cole Stratton)

Portrayed By: Peter Burton (film), Desmond Llewelyn (film), Geoffrey Bayldon (film), Alec McCowen (film), John Cleese (film), Ben Whishaw (film)

Short Biography

Q is a fictional character in the James Bond novels and films. Q (standing for Quartermaster), like M, is a job title rather than a name. He is the head of Q Branch (or later Q Division), the fictional research and development division of the British Secret Service. We know little about Q other than his opinions towards Bond. However, one line of dialogue in Diamonds Are Forever indicated that he does have children and he uses his technical expertise in order to amuse them. Although primarily seen in his workshop, Q has often ventured out of Britain, normally to deliver some equipment to Bond. He occasionally operates undercover; in particular in Tomorrow Never Dies he poses as a car hire agent.


Major Discovery

Q supplies Bond with all of his gadgets including:
 - a trick briefcase in From Russia with Love
 - an Aston Martin car with the ejector seat in Goldfinger
 - an autogyro 'Little Nellie' in You Only Live Twice
 - a submersible Lotus car ('Wet Nellie') in The Spy Who Loved Me
 - an AcroStar mini-jet in Octopussy
 - a pen grenade in GoldenEye
 - a remote control BMW 7 Series in Tomorrow Never Dies
 - a camouflaged Aston Martin in Die Another Day


Up Next: The nose knows. Also, it's a somewhat longer entry, being my number one and all. :P
Title: Re: LoC #64: Top 52 Scientists
Post by: goflyblind on September 23, 2012, 08:26:29 AM
34 (tie)

(http://i1172.photobucket.com/albums/r567/listocrap64/brahe_zps734eaabb.jpg)
Tycho Brahe

39 points - 3 lists - Highest Position: 1 (goflyblind)

Short Biography

Tycho was a Danish astronomer in the sixteenth century, and had one of the most exciting and bizarre lives ever. As a toddler, he was kidnapped by his uncle. He was raised by his uncle, mostly because his parents didn't care enough to retrieve him. At the age of twenty, he lost most of his nose in a duel. He had false noses made, reputedly of gold and silver, but likely containing copper as well. He earned the patronage of the king of Denmark when Tycho's uncle saved the king from drowning (although the uncle subsequently died of pneumonia). Tycho owned a pet moose, and kept a dwarf (whom he thought was a clairvoyant) at his home to entertain guests. Tycho had a lifelong interest in alchemy, which may have led to his death by mercury poisoning (though some think he may have been deliberately poisoned). This is a more recent supposition, based on samples of moustache hair from his exhumed corpse. The usual story of his death involves a dinner party where he felt it would be impolite to leave the table to pee, and as a result his bladder or kidney ruptured. He was paranoid that someone would steal his data, and so would not allow his assistants to see all of it. Turns out, that paranoia paid off, as after his death Johannes Kepler stole as much as he could carry, did some calculations, and became famous as a result.


Major Discoveries

Tycho's most significant contribution to science is the idea of repeated, regular, and recorded observations, particularly in astronomy. Before him, astronomical observations were done haphazardly. In particular, the astronomical tables that predicted positions of planets, stars, eclipses, and so on, were horribly inaccurate. To remedy this situation, he decided to undertake systematic observations of the night sky. His first chance to do so (in impressive fashion, no less), came when he was walking home, drunk, from the pub. He observed a new star in the sky. Over the ensuing weeks, he made detailed observations of the star, and found that it displayed no parallax (apparent motion against the backdrop of the stars) and determined that it must be further distant than the moon.

(http://i1172.photobucket.com/albums/r567/listocrap64/Mauerquadrant_zpsb222a3db.png) (http://i1172.photobucket.com/albums/r567/listocrap64/Uraniborgs_zps6c9d60e9.png) (http://i1172.photobucket.com/albums/r567/listocrap64/tychonic_system_zpsa0200b76.png)

Later, on the island of Hven, he established what may have been the world's first research institution. It included two observatories with many new or improved precise astronomical instruments, which allowed him to make even more and better observations. These observations allowed him to reject the Copernican model. Due to Copernicus' poor observation habits, his model contained wildly inaccurate assumptions and needless complications. Tycho then proposed his own model, based on the Ptolemaic model that had been in use for nearly two thousand years by that point. In it, the Earth was at the centre of the Universe being orbited by the moon and the sun, while the other planets orbited the sun. It allowed him to keep circular motion, geocentrism, while disposing of crystalline spheres and explaining retrograde motion--the apparent backwards motion of the planets. Unfortunately, his adherence to geocentrism and his paranoia about his observations being stolen kept him from truly following the data and discovering what Kepler would find decades later.


Up Next (Tomorrow): We can call the next entry "the reduced scientist" if we divide him by two pi.
Title: Re: LoC #64: Top 52 Scientists
Post by: Russell on September 23, 2012, 04:48:10 PM
It's Buckaroo Banzai... it's the latest issue!
Title: Re: LoC #64: Top 52 Scientists
Post by: Johnny Unusual on September 23, 2012, 04:58:24 PM
Buckaroo Banzai is a movie I REALLY wanted to like, but I just found it too hard to get into and I found the main plot rather uninteresting.  That said, I like the character himself quite a bit, I just wish he was in a better movie for him and the Hong Kong Cavaliers.  Also, I want Peter Weller to be in more things.

Peter Weller update: Peter Weller will be in the next Star Trek movie (Tripe hopes as Trelaine, I'll bet) AND in this:

http://www.youtube.com/v/oirGw9xeCHQ

BTW, how perfect is that John Carpenter-style synth-soundtrack!
Title: Re: LoC #64: Top 52 Scientists
Post by: Russell on September 23, 2012, 05:17:43 PM
I just hope William Birkin doesn't appear on this list. :P
Title: Re: LoC #64: Top 52 Scientists
Post by: Johnny Unusual on September 23, 2012, 07:54:26 PM
Tycho Brahe is a good choice, but I didn't vote for him largely because I didn't know much about him beyond elements of his reputation for being pants-crapping insane.
Title: Re: LoC #64: Top 52 Scientists
Post by: goflyblind on September 24, 2012, 02:24:43 PM
33

(http://i1172.photobucket.com/albums/r567/listocrap64/planck_zpscee18c88.jpg)
Max Planck

40 points - 2 lists - Highest Position: 3 (CJones)

Short Biography

Max Planck was a German theoretical physicist. He achieved habilitation in 1880, and became an unpaid private lecturer in Munich, while working on thermodynamics. His greatest discovery came when he turned to the so-called UV catastrophe. He had been commissioned by electric companies to create maximum light from lightbulbs with minimum energy.


Major Discovery

Planck is the founder of quantum mechanics. He was looking to explain blackbody radiation (light that shines from a perfect emitter), and found that if the energy was emitted in discrete parts, he was able to properly predict the distribution of intensity. It cannot be overstated that this was a monumental discovery. Up until then, it was thought that the energy of a body was a continuous variable. However, Planck himself did not like the idea of discrete values for the energy of a body. He assumed this was some sort of gimmick, an act of desperation, and that a better explanation would come in time. He was wrong in this assumption, however, and his discovery stands at the centre of quantum theory.


Up Next: This next scientist really revs my (electric) engine.
Title: Re: LoC #64: Top 52 Scientists
Post by: goflyblind on September 24, 2012, 02:25:00 PM
32

(http://i1172.photobucket.com/albums/r567/listocrap64/faraday_zps36b1104f.jpg)
Michael Faraday

13 points - 4 lists - Highest Position: 7 (CJones)

Short Biography

Michael Faraday was an English physicist. Although Faraday received little formal education he was one of the most influential scientists in history, and historians of science refer to him as having been the best experimentalist in the history of science. He became strongly interested in science when he attended public lectures by Humphry Davy and John Tatum. During these lectures, he took notes, and bound the notes into a book. Faraday sent this book to Davy, gaining favour with the eminent chemist, who hired him as a secretary. On a lecture tour with Davy, Faraday was so mistreated by Davy's wife that he nearly gave up and went home alone. Thankfully for us, he did not, and was able to meet with the scientific elite of Europe.


Major Discovery

While he began as a chemist (in the American sense, not a pharmacist), Faraday's greatest works were in the field of experimental electromagnetism. However, he did make a few major discoveries in chemistry, such as benzene (which is the simplest petrochemical, and makes up most plastics and a common gasoline additive), the liquefaction of gasses, and even inventing an early form of a bunsen burner.

Faraday first foray into electromagnetism involved building a voltaic pile to decompose epsom salt into its constituents of magnesium, sulphur, and oxygen. On hearing of the discovery uniting electricity with magnetism by Ørsted, Faraday constructed his first electromagnetic motor. Sadly, in his excitement to publish the results, he forgot to acknowledge the work of his mentor, Davy, and as a result was given poor assignments by Davy. However, he continued in his work and discovered experimentally one of Maxwell's equations (called Faraday's law), which states that a changing magnetic field produces an electric field. Faraday also contributed to theoretical electromagnetism by describing electric and magnetic field as having lines of force. This allows physicists to visualize and map out these fields without having to set up complicated experiments to measure them. Finally, he also showed that charge lives on the outside of conductors, giving us the concept of Faraday cages.


Up Next: Who you gonna call? Our next scientist, maybe?
Title: Re: LoC #64: Top 52 Scientists
Post by: goflyblind on September 24, 2012, 02:25:22 PM
30 (tie)

(http://i1172.photobucket.com/albums/r567/listocrap64/venkman_zps92391664.jpg)
Peter Venkman

44 points - 2 lists - Highest Position: 3 (Cole Stratton)

Portrayed By: Bill Murray (film), Lorenzo Music (animated series), Dave Coulier (animated series)

Short Biography

Peter Venkman is a fictional character from the Ghostbusters franchise. He is a parapsychologist and member of the Ghostbusters. He holds PhDs in both parapsychology and psychology. Originally his professional interests were focused on paranormal phenomena like ESP; he appeared not to believe in ghosts until he actually saw one. In the movies, he is characterized by his flippant persona, his approach to his profession as a scientific charlatan, and his womanizing demeanor. Venkman serves as the front man for the group. He admitted that even his high school grad class voted him "Most Likely to Become A Game Show Host."

http://www.youtube.com/v/j2nYqyfDMnQ

http://www.youtube.com/v/sEbSABWJiJc

http://www.youtube.com/v/roiRpwv9zFs

http://www.youtube.com/v/G-b-CfHbPGQ


Up Next: The next scientist has, I think, the saddest eyes of anyone ever.
Title: Re: LoC #64: Top 52 Scientists
Post by: goflyblind on September 24, 2012, 02:25:46 PM
30 (tie)

(http://i1172.photobucket.com/albums/r567/listocrap64/oppenheimer_zps0bb2c7dd.jpg)
J. Robert Oppenheimer

44 points - 4 lists - Highest Position: 2 (anais.butterfly)

Short Biography

Julius Robert Oppenheimer was an American theoretical physicist. Oppenheimer's greatest achievement was probably as the driving organizing force behind the Manhattan Project, the American effort in World War II to construct an atomic bomb. Sadly, as a convoluted result of this effort, he was persecuted by the American government, who stripped him of all security clearance and made it more difficult for him to do further research. Oppenheimer was seen by most of the scientific community as a martyr to McCarthyism, an intellectual and liberal who was unjustly attacked by warmongering enemies, symbolic of the shift of scientific creativity from academia into the military. Wernher von Braun summed up his opinion about the matter with a quip to a Congressional committee: "In England, Oppenheimer would have been knighted." However, Oppenheimer reacted bitterly to his portrayal a martyr. He said, "The whole damn thing was a farce, and these people are trying to make a tragedy out of it."


Major Discovery

While, arguably, his most important role was as the organizer of the Manhattan Project, Oppenheimer contributed significant advances to the fields of astrophysics, general relativity, and quantum mechanics. Working with Tolman and Volkoff, they found an upper limit for the mass of a neutron star of roughly two solar masses, beyond which it must form a black hole (or, possibly, a strange star). Working with Born, they found a way of breaking up the quantum mechanical wave-functions of complicated molecules into electronic and nuclear parts, vastly simplifying the calculations. He also provided early work on cosmic ray showers that would lead to the general description of quantum tunnelling by Born. Further, with one of his doctoral students, he developed a process to artificially create radioactive isotopes by deuteron bombardment. Finally, with Snyder, Oppenheimer showed that the runaway gravitational collapse of a sufficiently massive star must occur when there is no more nuclear fuel, resulting in a black hole.

http://www.youtube.com/v/l8w3Y-dskeg


Up Next: "Yeah, like I'm gonna do science in the five thousand dollar robotic suit. Come on!"
Title: Re: LoC #64: Top 52 Scientists
Post by: goflyblind on September 24, 2012, 02:26:15 PM
29

(http://i1172.photobucket.com/albums/r567/listocrap64/stark_zpsd7fe2780.jpg)
Tony Stark

45 points - 4 lists - Highest Position: 1 (ScottotD)

Portrayed By: Robert Downey Jr. (film), Adrian Pasdar (animated series), Adrian Petriw (animated series), Eric Lewis (animated series)

Short Biography

Tony Stark is a character in the Marvel Universe. He is a billionaire and a multi-field genius. Tony the son of wealthy industrialist and head of Stark Industries. After his parents are killed in a plane accident, he inherits his father's company. While observing the effects of his experimental technologies on the American war effort, Tony Stark is injured by a booby trap and captured by the enemy led by Wong-Chu, who then orders him to design weapons. However, Stark's injuries are dire and shrapnel is moving towards his heart. His fellow prisoner, Ho Yinsen, a Nobel Prize-winning physicist whose work Stark had greatly admired during college, constructs a magnetic chest plate to keep the shrapnel from reaching Stark's heart, keeping him alive. In an attempt to stop other people from misusing his designs, Stark goes about disabling other armored heroes and villains who are using suits based on the Iron Man technology, the designs of which were stolen by his enemy Spymaster. His quest to destroy all instances of the stolen technology severely hurts his reputation as Iron Man. Tony Stark is an inventive genius whose expertise in the fields of mathematics, physics, chemistry, and computer science rivals that of Reed Richards, Hank Pym, and Bruce Banner, and his expertise in electrical engineering and mechanical engineering surpasses even theirs. He is regarded as one of the most intelligent characters in the Marvel Universe. He graduated with advanced degrees in physics and engineering at the age of 17 from Massachusetts Institute of Technology.


Major Discovery

Stark uses his personal fortune not only to outfit his own armor, but also to develop weapons for S.H.I.E.L.D. and other technologies such as the Quinjets used by the Avengers, and the image inducers used by the X-Men. Later on, Stark expands on his armor designs and begins to build his arsenal of specialized armors for particular situations such as for stealth and space travel. Iron Man possesses powered armor that gives him superhuman strength and durability, flight, and an array of weapons. The armor is invented and worn by Stark. In addition to the general-purpose model he wears, Stark has developed several specialized suits for space travel, deep-sea diving, stealth, and other special purposes. The most recent models of Stark's armor, beginning with the Extremis Armor, are now stored in the hollow portions of Stark's bones, and the personal area networking implement used to control it is implanted in his forearm, and connected directly to his central nervous system. At one point, Stark's armor becomes sentient despite fail-safes to prevent its increasingly sophisticated computer systems from doing so. Initially, Stark welcomes this "living" armor for its improved tactical abilities. However, the armor begins to grow more aggressive, killing indiscriminately and eventually desiring to replace Stark altogether. In the final confrontation on a desert island, Stark suffers another heart attack. The armor sacrifices its own existence to save its creator's life, giving up essential components to give Stark a new, artificial heart.

(http://i1172.photobucket.com/albums/r567/listocrap64/iron-man_zps350fadaf.jpg)


Up Next (Tomorrow): Science Frauds! And then, glayvin!
Title: Re: LoC #64: Top 52 Scientists
Post by: Johnny Unusual on September 24, 2012, 04:35:41 PM
30 (tie)

(http://i1172.photobucket.com/albums/r567/listocrap64/venkman_zps92391664.jpg)
Peter Venkman
Not the Ghostbuster I picked... mostly because the one I picked actually knew about the science he proclaimed to know.

29

(http://i1172.photobucket.com/albums/r567/listocrap64/stark_zpsd7fe2780.jpg)
Tony Stark

45 points - 4 lists - Highest Position: 1 (ScottotD)

Not one of my super-hero picks, but a fine choice nonetheless.
33

(http://i1172.photobucket.com/albums/r567/listocrap64/planck_zpscee18c88.jpg)
Max Planck
Definitely one of the ones, along with Tycho Brahe, that I'd like to read more about.  I know the name, but I admit, I know little about his accomplishments aside from being namechecked in sci-fi.

32

(http://i1172.photobucket.com/albums/r567/listocrap64/faraday_zps36b1104f.jpg)
Michael Faraday
So how long was he Michael?
Title: Re: LoC #64: Top 52 Scientists
Post by: goflyblind on September 24, 2012, 04:38:26 PM
Michael Faraday

So how long was he Michael?

nearly seventy-six years. :P
Title: Re: LoC #64: Top 52 Scientists
Post by: Johnny Unusual on September 24, 2012, 05:37:02 PM
Michael Faraday

So how long was he Michael?

nearly seventy-six years. :P

You're no fun.
Title: Re: LoC #64: Top 52 Scientists
Post by: goflyblind on September 25, 2012, 10:46:32 AM
Wait a minute, that's not right...

Science is a human endeavour. As such, it can be subject to human errors. The wonderful thing about it, though, is that it is usually self-correcting. Scientists are always testing previous knowledge to ensure that it holds up to all available evidence. When something is found to be blatantly wrong, it is dismissed from the collection of scientific knowledge. Sometimes, though, everyone wants something to be true so badly that they ignore rational thought and objective evidence and celebrate the wrong answer. With that in mind, I give you some of the Most Interesting Scientific Frauds.

(http://i1172.photobucket.com/albums/r567/listocrap64/piltdown_zps752a434b.jpg)
The first one was sent in by three people: The Piltdown Man (1912) was presented as a set of fossilized remains, intended to show that the earliest form of human life began in England, rather than in Africa. It was not discovered as a forgery until forty years later, though its veracity was in doubt from the very beginning. The bones were apparently given to Charles Dawson, though the identity of the forger is still in question. The fossil itself consisted of three distinct parts: the skull of a medieval human, the lower jaw bone of an orang-utan, and fossilized chimpanzee teeth.

(http://i1172.photobucket.com/albums/r567/listocrap64/Archaeoraptor_zpsa2b027df.jpg)
"Archaeoraptor" is the generic name informally assigned in 1999 to a fossil from China in an article published in National Geographic magazine. The magazine claimed that the fossil was a "missing link" between birds and terrestrial theropod dinosaurs. Even prior to this publication there had been severe doubts about the fossil's authenticity. It led to a scandal when evidence demonstrated it to be a forgery through further scientific study. The forgery was constructed from rearranged pieces of real fossils from different species. Zhou et al. found that the head and upper body actually belong to a specimen of the primitive fossil bird Yanornis. A 2002 study found that the tail belongs to a small winged dromaeosaur, Microraptor, named in 2000. The legs and feet belong to an as yet unknown animal. The scandal brought attention to illegal fossil deals conducted in China. It also highlighted the need for close scientific scrutiny of purported "missing links" published in journals which are not peer-reviewed. The fossil scandal has been used by creationists to cast doubt on evolutionary theory. Although "Archaeoraptor" was a forgery, many true examples of feathered dinosaurs have been found and demonstrate the evolutionary connection between birds and other theropods.

(http://i1172.photobucket.com/albums/r567/listocrap64/wakefield_zps26ec03ab.jpg)
Andrew Wakefield was an English surgeon and medical researcher. He led a study that purported to show a link between the measles-mumps-rubella vaccine and autism. Since then, the paper has been shown to be false, and was withdrawn from publication. However, the idea caught on and has led to a decrease in the number of people (children especially) who are vaccinated, causing outbreaks of the diseases worldwide. A very good summary of the story (in comic strip form) is given at: http://tallguywrites.livejournal.com/148012.html

The next three instances all have to do with one thing: press conferences. In these cases, scientists are either too excited by their supposed discovery, or flat out lying. Cold fusion is the room-temperature nuclear fusion that was supposed to produce vast amounts of energy with very little input energy. It gained attention after reports in 1989 by Stanley Pons and Martin Fleischmann, then one of the world's leading electrochemists, that their apparatus had produced anomalous heat ("excess heat"), of a magnitude they asserted would defy explanation except in terms of nuclear processes. Many scientists tried to replicate the experiment with the few details available. Hopes fell with the large number of negative replications, the withdrawal of many positive replications, the discovery of flaws and sources of experimental error in the original experiment, and finally the discovery that Fleischmann and Pons had not actually detected nuclear reaction byproducts. The lead scientist on a study that could overturn the Big Bang decided to tell the world, through interviews and press release, that the Universe didn't start with a Big Bang, it started with a big chill. The paper discussing the result comes to no such grandiose conclusion, and none of the journalists reporting the story seemed to notice the difference. A good summary of the divergence is given here (http://arstechnica.com/science/2012/08/why-you-dont-overturn-the-big-bang-via-a-media-interview/). Most recently, a study was produced that found that GMO crops cause cancer in mice. Again, though, we have a case where the scientists involved went to the press first, without letting others in their field properly examine the results. A nice summary of the dustup is given here (http://arstechnica.com/science/2012/09/anti-gmo-researchers-used-science-publication-to-manipulate-the-press/).

This last fraud is more a case of a practical joke that went on too long rather than anything malicious, but the event is still somewhat troubling. The Sokal affair involves a publishing hoax perpetrated by Alan Sokal, a physicist who studies the interplay between statistical mechanics and quantum field theory. In 1996, Sokal published a paper titled "Transgressing the Boundaries: Towards a Transformative Hermeneutics of Quantum Gravity" in Social Text, which proposed that quantum gravity is a social and linguistic construct. On its date of publication, Sokal revealed in Lingua Franca (a magazine about intellectual and literary life in academia) that the article was a hoax, identifying it as "a pastiche of Left-wing cant, fawning references, grandiose quotations, and outright nonsense . . . structured around the silliest quotations [by postmodernist academics] he could find about mathematics and physics". The resultant academic and public quarrels concerned the scholarly merit, or lack thereof, of humanistic commentary about the physical sciences; the influence of postmodern philosophy on social disciplines in general; academic ethics, including whether Sokal was right or wrong to deceive the editors and readers of Social Text; and whether the journal had exercised the appropriate intellectual rigor before publishing the pseudoscientific article. In 1996, Social Text did not conduct peer review because its editors believed that an editorial open policy would stimulate more original, less conventional research. The editors argued that, in that context, Sokal's article was a fraudulent betrayal of their trust. Moreover, they further argued that scientific peer review does not necessarily detect intellectual fraud and other instances of published poor science. After the Sokal Hoax, Social Text established an article peer review process.


And now, back to the (hopefully) good scientists, mmm-whai!
Title: Re: LoC #64: Top 52 Scientists
Post by: goflyblind on September 25, 2012, 10:47:03 AM
27 (tie)

(http://i1172.photobucket.com/albums/r567/listocrap64/frink_zps5679e18d.jpg)
John Frink

47 points - 3 lists - Highest Position: 5 (Gunflyer)

Portrayed By: Hank Azaria (animated series)

Short Biography

John Frink is a fictional scientist in the animated series The Simpsons. He is generally depicted as Springfield's stereotypical nerdy, mad, and socially inept scientist, inventor, and mathematician. Frink is a college professor at Springfield Heights Institute of Technology and runs his own astronomical observatory. In the 1960s, Professor Frink made napalm to drop on Da Nang. He once predicted that computers would be so large and so expensive that only the five richest kings of Europe would own them.


Major Discoveries

While Professor Frink acts as a consultant on all matters scientific, his main pursuit is that of inventor. Among his most interesting inventions are:
 - Hamburger Earmuffs
 - Gamble-Tron 2000
 - Radio-Controlled Aeroplane for Babies
 - Run Away House
 - 77X42 Super Sour Ball
 - Intra-Bovine Ice Cream Maker
 

http://www.youtube.com/v/ggXmKPMaHMo

http://www.youtube.com/v/SB2_MvK3yEg

http://www.youtube.com/v/dRSCp3tYdZk


Up Next: Surely, this next entry must be joking!
Title: Re: LoC #64: Top 52 Scientists
Post by: goflyblind on September 25, 2012, 10:47:35 AM
27 (tie)

(http://i1172.photobucket.com/albums/r567/listocrap64/feynman_zps1e5804ea.jpg)
Richard Feynman

47 points - 3 lists - Highest Position: 2 (goflyblind)

Short Biography

Richard Feynman was an American theoretical physicist and computer scientist. Feynman was a late talker; by his third birthday he had yet to utter a single word. The young Feynman was heavily influenced by his father, who encouraged him to ask questions to challenge orthodox thinking. During his graduate education, he decided to take a biology class, and had to present on the anatomy of a cat. Not knowing the proper term for an anatomical chart, he asked the librarian if they had "a map of a cat." His first seminar was attended by Henry Russell, Einstein, Pauli, and von Neumann, something that would probably make me faint. Once, while feeling frustrated with and burned out on physics, he was ready to give up on research and simply teach physics and read Arabian Nights for the rest of his life. All it took to get him back into the fold was a wobbling plate, thrown in the Cornell cafeteria. He noted that the logo on the plate spun around the plate faster than the wobble, and decided to calculate the exact expression that described the relation between the logo and the plate. At the Manhattan Project, Feynman was sought out by physicist Niels Bohr for one-on-one discussions. He later discovered the reason: most of the other physicists were too in awe of Bohr to argue with him. Feynman had no such inhibitions, vigorously pointing out anything he considered to be flawed in Bohr's thinking. Feynman said he felt as much respect for Bohr as anyone else, but once anyone got him talking about physics, he would become so focused he forgot about social niceties.


Major Discoveries

Feynman made so many contributions to physics and mathematics (like von Neumann) that it makes all physics students rather frustrated and sad. At the Manhattan Project, Feynman was in charge of the (human and mechanical) computer division. When the project started using and IBM punch-card computer, he devised a way of parallelizing calculations so they could be performed much more quickly. Feynman's Nobel Prize work was in the field of quantum electrodynamics, which describes the interaction of photons with electrons. His most impressive contribution to scientific knowledge would have to be the combination of the path integral formulation of quantum mechanics (a generalization of the action formulation of classical mechanics) and Feynman diagrams (diagrams used as short-hand for particle interactions). Feynman diagrams themselves present possibly the most elegant notation in all of science, giving a very visual representation of the ways in which particles interact. Partly as a way to bring publicity to progress in physics, Feynman offered $1000 prizes for two of his challenges in nanotechnology, claimed by William McLellan and Tom Newman, respectively. He was also one of the first scientists to conceive the possibility of quantum computers. Feynman played an important role on the Presidential Rogers Commission, which investigated the Challenger disaster. During a televised hearing, Feynman demonstrated that the material used in the shuttle's O-rings became less resilient in cold weather by immersing a sample of the material in ice-cold water. The commission ultimately determined that the disaster was caused by the primary O-ring not properly sealing due to extremely cold weather at Cape Canaveral.


http://www.youtube.com/v/lytxafTXg6c

http://www.youtube.com/v/iMDTcMD6pOw

http://www.youtube.com/v/zSZNsIFID28

http://www.youtube.com/v/wLaRXYai19A

http://www.youtube.com/v/_MmpUWEW6Is


Up Next: Turns out, this next scientist isn't the centre of the Universe.
Title: Re: LoC #64: Top 52 Scientists
Post by: goflyblind on September 25, 2012, 10:47:58 AM
26

(http://i1172.photobucket.com/albums/r567/listocrap64/copernicus_zps0b0fc6ce.jpg)
Nicolaus Copernicus

51 points - 4 lists - Highest Position: 7 (lassieface)

Short Biography

Nicolaus Copernicus was a Polish astronomer active in the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries. Copernicus began his studies at the University of Kraków in the heyday of the Kraków astronomical-mathematical school, acquiring the foundations for his subsequent mathematical achievements. Copernicus' four years at Kraków played an important role in the development of his critical faculties and initiated his analysis of the logical contradictions in the two most popular systems of astronomy—Aristotle's theory of homocentric spheres, and Ptolemy's mechanism of eccentrics and epicycles—the surmounting and discarding of which constituted the first step toward the creation of Copernicus' own doctrine of the structure of the universe.  Despite urgings from many quarters, Copernicus delayed publication of his book, perhaps from fear of criticism—a fear delicately expressed in the subsequent dedication of his masterpiece to Pope Paul III. Scholars disagree on whether Copernicus' concern was limited to possible astronomical and philosophical objections, or whether he was also concerned about religious objections. Legend has it that the first printed copy of De revolutionibus was placed in his hands on the very day that he died, allowing him to take farewell of his life's work. He is reputed to have awoken from a stroke-induced coma, looked at his book, and then died peacefully.


Major Discovery

Copernicus' major contribution to science was a comprehensive heliocentric model of the Universe. Though he wasn't the first to come up with the idea, he did provide a more compelling and complete model than had come previously. Copernicus held that the Earth is another planet revolving around the fixed sun once a year, and turning on its axis once a day. But while Copernicus put the Sun at the center of the celestial spheres, he did not put it at the exact center of the universe, but near it. Copernicus' system used only uniform circular motions, correcting what was seen by many as the chief inelegance in Ptolemy's system. Unfortunately, his reliance on circular motion meant that he had to introduce epicycles (smaller circular orbits around the larger circular orbit) and his model ended up still being quite complicated. Despite this, however, his model was sufficiently detailed and well-argued that it was the first heliocentric model that was seriously considered by European scientists. Unfortunately again, this did not come until over a hundred and fifty years after his death and required the contributions of Galileo, Kepler, and Newton to bring about widespread acceptance.


Up Next: This next scientist showed us that we're all peas in a pod. At least, I think that's what he meant.
Title: Re: LoC #64: Top 52 Scientists
Post by: goflyblind on September 25, 2012, 10:48:16 AM
25

(http://i1172.photobucket.com/albums/r567/listocrap64/mendel_zps89beebf9.jpg)
Gregor Mendel

53 points - 4 lists - Highest Position: 5 (Pak-Man)

Short Biography

Gregor Mendel was a nineteenth century Silesian friar and biologist. He is viewed as the father of modern genetics. During his childhood, Mendel worked as a gardener and studied beekeeping. He studied practical and theoretical philosophy as well as physics at the University of Olomouc.


Major Discovery

Gregor Mendel, who is known as the "father of modern genetics", was inspired by both his professors at the University of Olomouc and his colleagues at the monastery to study variation in plants, and he conducted his study in the monastery's experimental garden. Between 1856 and 1863 Mendel cultivated and tested some twenty-nine thousand pea plants. This study showed that one in four pea plants had purebred recessive alleles, two out of four were hybrid and one out of four were purebred dominant. His experiments led him to make two generalizations, the Law of Segregation and the Law of Independent Assortment, which later became known as Mendel's Laws of Inheritance. Mendel's work was rejected at first, and was not widely accepted until after he died. During his own lifetime, most biologists held the idea that all characteristics were passed to the next generation through blending inheritance, in which the traits from each parent are averaged together. Instances of this phenomenon are now explained by the action of multiple genes with quantitative effects. Charles Darwin tried unsuccessfully to explain inheritance through a theory of pangenesis. It was not until the early 20th century that the importance of Mendel's ideas was realized. The combination of Mendelian genetics with Darwin's theory of natural selection resulted in the modern synthesis of evolutionary biology.


Up Next: Always respect the chemistry.
Title: Re: LoC #64: Top 52 Scientists
Post by: goflyblind on September 25, 2012, 10:48:42 AM
24

(http://i1172.photobucket.com/albums/r567/listocrap64/white_zps9c9f0d9c.jpg)
Walter White

54 points - 3 lists - Highest Position: 5 (Cole Stratton)

Portrayed By: Bryan Cranston (television)

Short Biography

Walter White is a fictional character and the main protagonist of the American television drama series Breaking Bad. Once a promising chemist who was one of the founding members of the fictional "Gray Matter Technologies", Walter left the company for personal reasons and became an unhappy and disillusioned high school chemistry teacher. After being diagnosed with inoperable lung cancer, he resorts to manufacturing methamphetamine to ensure his family's financial security when he dies. As the series progresses, Walter gradually becomes dangerous and takes on a more villainous role.


Major Discoveries

As a graduate student at Caltech, Walt contributed to research that helped a team win a Nobel Prize in Chemistry. After graduate school, Walter founded the firm Gray Matter Technologies with Elliott Schwartz, his former classmate and close friend, though he secretly feels that his work was stolen from him and bitterly blames Elliott for his lot in life. Walt's main scientific achievement, beyond the unspecified research for Gray Matter Technologies, is his ultra-pure blue crystal meth. Thanks to his expert knowledge in chemistry and increasingly powerful underworld investors, he is able to scale production to vast amounts, effectively (and sometimes literally) killing the competition.


http://www.youtube.com/v/sGN3SBVIjjA

Spoiler: this one's a bit gory (click to show/hide)

http://www.youtube.com/v/_wkYoQZRFKk

Can we embed Dailymotion clips? I can't find the actual flash file from here: http://www.dailymotion.com/video/xtbinx_cbp_shortfilms


Up Next: Such a big forehead for a physicist! Must be where he absorbs all the brain power from those around him.
Title: Re: LoC #64: Top 52 Scientists
Post by: goflyblind on September 25, 2012, 10:49:07 AM
23

(http://i1172.photobucket.com/albums/r567/listocrap64/bohr_zps6c3bc0d5.jpg)
Niels Bohr

59 points - 3 lists - Highest Position: 4 (lassieface)

Short Biography

Niels Bohr was a Danish physicist in the early- to mid-nineteenth century. Bohr mentored and collaborated with many of the top physicists of the century at his institute in Copenhagen. He was part of the British team of physicists working on the Manhattan Project. In 1903, Bohr enrolled as an undergraduate at Copenhagen University, initially studying philosophy and mathematics. In 1905, prompted by a gold medal competition sponsored by the Royal Danish Academy of Sciences and Letters, he conducted a series of experiments to examine the properties of surface tension, using his father's laboratory in the university, familiar to him from assisting there since childhood. His essay won the prize, and it was this success that decided Bohr to abandon philosophy and adopt physics (apparently money and prizes are all it takes for someone to become a physicist). The Bohr–Einstein debates were a series of public disputes about quantum mechanics between Albert Einstein and Niels Bohr, who were two of its founders. Their debates are remembered because of their importance to the philosophy of science. Despite their differences of opinion regarding quantum mechanics, Bohr and Einstein had a mutual admiration that was to last the rest of their lives.


Major Discovery

Bohr's greatest contribution to science is his model of the atom, which describes electrons as held to discrete orbits around the atom's nucleus. Working from this, he further described how the chemical properties of an element are determined by the electrons in the outermost orbit. He also developed the Copehagen Interpretation of quantum mechanics, which says that quantum mechanics does not represent the true state of a system, but describes only probabilities associated with the wave function of various states. This interpretation does suffer some defects, mostly notably the requirement of an "observer" (something which collapses the wave function, like interaction with another particle), but has been wildly successful at describing how much of quantum mechanics works. It did, however, lead to some nice quips, with Einstein's saying "I, at any rate, am convinced that He does not throw dice." and "Do you really think the moon isn't there if you aren't looking at it?", while Bohr, in response, said "Einstein, don't tell God what to do."


Up Next: I want to say one word to you. Just one word. Are you listening? Ellipses.
Title: Re: LoC #64: Top 52 Scientists
Post by: goflyblind on September 25, 2012, 10:49:28 AM
22

(http://i1172.photobucket.com/albums/r567/listocrap64/kepler_zps4b11f211.jpg)
Johannes Kepler

61 points - 5 lists - Highest Position: 6 (Imrahil, lassieface)

Short Biography

Johannes Kepler was an astronomer from the 16th and 17th centuries. He was born in 1571 in Weil der Stadt. His work began by publishing in favour of the heliocentric model, using a geometric argument that the orbits of the planets corresponded to various regular polygons. He worked for Tycho Brahe, from who he learned the importance of meticulous record-keeping in astronomical observation. Upon Brahe's death, Kepler stole those records and used them in his greatest scientific achievement. In addition to being an astronomer and mathematician, Kepler had to defend his mother on charges of witchcraft.


Major Discovery

Kepler's major contribution to scientific knowledge was the realization that the orbits of planets around the sun were not circular, as had been assumed up to that point, but were in fact elliptical. Despite working for Brahe, he was unable to reconcile a geocentric model of the Universe with the observations in Brahe's data. Kepler made two more discoveries with regards to planetary motion: a line joining the planet with the sun sweeps out equal areas during equal time intervals; and the square of the orbital period of a planet is directly proportional to the cube of the semi-major axis of its orbit. Kepler further made detailed observations of a supernova, determining that it must be further than any of the planets, and the Rudolphine Tables which provide tables of planet and star positions.


Up Next: Our next entry keeps getting confused with his creation. I'll bet Mr. Kleenex knows how he feels.
Title: Re: LoC #64: Top 52 Scientists
Post by: goflyblind on September 25, 2012, 10:50:06 AM
21

(http://i1172.photobucket.com/albums/r567/listocrap64/frankenstein_zps553aedc0.jpg)
Victor Frankenstein

64 points - 6 lists - Highest Position: 8 (Kete)

Portrayed By: Colin Clive (film), Peter Cushing (film), Donald Pleasence (film), Kenneth Branagh (film), and many others

Short Biography

Victor Frankenstein is a fictional character, the protagonist of the 1818 novel Frankenstein; or, The Modern Prometheus, written by Mary Shelley. He is a scientist who, after studying chemical processes and the decay of living beings, gains an insight into the creation of life and gives life to his own creature. While many subsequent film adaptations have portrayed Frankenstein as the prototypical "mad scientist", the novel portrayed him as a tragic figure. As a young man, Frankenstein is interested in the works in alchemists such as Cornelius Agrippa, Paracelsus, and Albertus Magnus, and he longs to discover the fabled elixir of life. He loses interest in both these pursuits and in science as a whole after seeing the remains of a tree struck by lightning; however, at the University of Ingolstadt, Frankenstein develops a fondness for chemistry, and becomes obsessed with the idea of creating life in inanimate matter through artificial means, leaving university to pursue this goal for the next two years. Assembling a humanoid creature perhaps by the use of a chemical, apparatus or a combination of both, Frankenstein successfully brings it to life, but he is suddenly horrified by his actions as it awakens. He abandons and flees his creation, who disappears and soon embarks upon a journey of vengeance that results in the death of Frankenstein's younger brother, William. The creature approaches Frankenstein and begs him to create a female companion for him; Frankenstein agrees, but ultimately destroys this creation, aghast at the idea of a race of monsters. Frankenstein pursues the "fiend" or "daemon" (as he calls his creation) to the Arctic with the intent of destroying it; he ultimately fails in his mission, as he falls through an ice floe and contracts severe pneumonia. He is rescued by a ship undergoing an expedition to the North Pole, but dies after relating his tale to the ship's captain, Robert Walton. His creature, upon discovering the death of its creator, is overcome by sorrow and vows to commit suicide by burning himself alive in "the Northernmost extremity of the globe"; he then disappears, never to be seen or heard from again.


http://www.youtube.com/v/8H3dFh6GA-A

http://www.youtube.com/v/HZ-OrfJHHro


Up Next (Tomorrow): The start of the top twenty! Billions and billions of words have been used to describe our next entry.
Title: Re: LoC #64: Top 52 Scientists
Post by: ColeStratton on September 25, 2012, 11:41:59 AM
I didn't have Victor...

Same here...

PUT. THE CANDLE. BACK.
Title: Re: LoC #64: Top 52 Scientists
Post by: goflyblind on September 25, 2012, 11:49:53 AM
im, you didn't have any incarnation of frankenstein. ??? but thanks for giving me a minor heart attack. :)
Title: Re: LoC #64: Top 52 Scientists
Post by: Kete on September 25, 2012, 12:11:08 PM
I can't believe I forgot Walter White.
Title: Re: LoC #64: Top 52 Scientists
Post by: Tripe on September 25, 2012, 12:16:46 PM
22

(http://i1172.photobucket.com/albums/r567/listocrap64/kepler_zps4b11f211.jpg)
Johannes Kepler
And now this can be posted:

(http://www.harkavagrant.com/history/tychosm.png)

EDIT: And, if you enjoyed that one, I'm pretty sure there's another that can show up a little later (there's actually three chances for it to work). :)
Title: Re: LoC #64: Top 52 Scientists
Post by: Darth Geek on September 25, 2012, 12:25:31 PM
It did, however, lead to some nice quips, with Einstein's saying "I, at any rate, am convinced that He does not throw dice." and "Do you really think the moon isn't there if you aren't looking at it?", while Bohr, in response, said "Einstein, don't tell God what to do."

I had heard the first two quotes, but never the third. That's awesome.
Title: Re: LoC #64: Top 52 Scientists
Post by: Johnny Unusual on September 25, 2012, 08:37:48 PM
Forgot Frink, Yay for Frankenstein and I'm not really familiar with the other entries, although they all sound interesting (Yes, I'll watch Breaking Bad someday.  Get off my back!)  I guess I am relatively knowledgable about Copernicus, but just the basic, common knowledge stuff.  That said, all good entries and all interesting reads.  I also liked the collection of Frauds.

BTW, I can't decide between my favourite low-hanging fruit of Neils Bohr mockery.

Is it...

"Welcome to the Boring World of Neils Bohr." - Simpsons

or

"That guy is a total bore, and a big fan of Neils Bohr; the most aptly named of all Danish physicists." - Strong Bad
Title: Re: LoC #64: Top 52 Scientists
Post by: Darth Geek on September 25, 2012, 09:11:30 PM
Glad to see so many real scientist make it. I am sure the top slots will largely be fictional, though.
Title: Re: LoC #64: Top 52 Scientists
Post by: goflyblind on September 26, 2012, 11:00:04 AM
20

(http://i1172.photobucket.com/albums/r567/listocrap64/sagan_zps927603e4.jpg)
Carl Sagan

67 points - 6 lists - Highest Position: 2 (Imrahil)

Short Biography

Carl Sagan was an American astronomer, astrophysicist, cosmologist, author, science popularizer, and science communicator in astronomy and natural sciences. He spent most of his career as a professor of astronomy at Cornell University where he directed the Laboratory for Planetary Studies. He published more than 600 scientific papers and articles and was author, co-author or editor of more than 20 books. He advocated scientifically skeptical inquiry and the scientific method, pioneered exobiology and promoted the Search for Extra-Terrestrial Intelligence (SETI). He wanted to learn what stars were, since none of his friends or their parents could give him a clear answer: "I went to the librarian and asked for a book about stars ...And the answer was stunning. It was that the Sun was a star but really close. The stars were suns, but so far away they were just little points of light ...The scale of the universe suddenly opened up to me. It was a kind of religious experience. There was a magnificence to it, a grandeur, a scale which has never left me. Never ever left me."


Major Discoveries

Sagan's contributions were central to the discovery of the high surface temperatures of the planet Venus. As a visiting scientist to NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, he contributed to the first Mariner missions to Venus, working on the design and management of the project. Mariner 2 confirmed his conclusions on the surface conditions of Venus in 1962. Sagan was among the first to hypothesize that Saturn's moon Titan might possess oceans of liquid compounds on its surface and that Jupiter's moon Europa might possess subsurface oceans of water. This would make Europa potentially habitable. Europa's subsurface ocean of water was later indirectly confirmed by the spacecraft Galileo. The mystery of Titan's reddish haze was also solved with Sagan's help. The reddish haze was revealed to be due to complex organic molecules constantly raining down onto Titan's surface. Sagan is best known, however, for his research on the possibilities of extraterrestrial life, including experimental demonstration of the production of amino acids from basic chemicals by radiation.


http://www.youtube.com/v/wupToqz1e2g

http://www.youtube.com/v/iE9dEAx5Sgw

http://www.youtube.com/v/DI9ImScQGAo

http://www.youtube.com/v/hLkC7ralR30

http://www.youtube.com/v/MlikCebQSlY


Up Next: I'm guessing this next entry already has a patent on any idea I'm ever going to come up with.
Title: Re: LoC #64: Top 52 Scientists
Post by: goflyblind on September 26, 2012, 11:00:25 AM
19

(http://i1172.photobucket.com/albums/r567/listocrap64/edison_zps335673ed.jpg)
Thomas Edison

68 points - 8 lists - Highest Position: 11 (Pak-Man, CJones)

Short Biography

Thomas Edison was an American inventor and businessman. Dubbed "The Wizard of Menlo Park" (now Edison, New Jersey) by a newspaper reporter, he was one of the first inventors to apply the principles of mass production and large-scale teamwork to the process of invention, and because of that, he is often credited with the creation of the first industrial research laboratory. Edison became a telegraph operator after he saved three-year-old Jimmie MacKenzie from being struck by a runaway train. Jimmie's father, station agent J.U. MacKenzie of Mount Clemens, Michigan, was so grateful that he trained Edison as a telegraph operator.


Major Discoveries

Thomas Edison began his career as an inventor in Newark, New Jersey, with the automatic repeater and his other improved telegraphic devices, but the invention that first gained him notice was the phonograph in 1877. His first phonograph recorded on tinfoil around a grooved cylinder, but had poor sound quality and the recordings could be played only a few times. Edison's major innovation was the first industrial research lab, which was built in Menlo Park, New Jersey. It was built with the funds from the sale of Edison's quadruplex telegraph. Menlo Park became the first institution set up with the specific purpose of producing constant technological innovation and improvement. Edison was legally attributed with most of the inventions produced there, though many employees carried out research and development under his direction. His staff was generally told to carry out his directions in conducting research, and he drove them hard to produce results. Building on the contributions of other developers over the previous three quarters of a century, Edison made improvements to the idea of incandescent light, and entered the public consciousness as "the inventor" of the lightbulb, and a prime mover in developing the necessary infrastructure for electric power. Edison's true success, like that of his friend Henry Ford, was in his ability to maximize profits through establishment of mass-production systems and intellectual property rights. George Westinghouse and Edison became adversaries because of Edison's promotion of direct current (DC) for electric power distribution instead of the more easily transmitted alternating current (AC) system invented by Nikola Tesla and promoted by Westinghouse. Unlike DC, AC could be stepped up to very high voltages with transformers, sent over thinner and cheaper wires, and stepped down again at the destination for distribution to users. AC replaced DC in most instances of generation and power distribution, enormously extending the range and improving the efficiency of power distribution. Though widespread use of DC ultimately lost favor for distribution, it exists today primarily in long-distance high-voltage direct current transmission systems. Low-voltage DC distribution continued to be used in high-density downtown areas for many years but was eventually replaced by AC low-voltage network distribution in many of them.


Up Next: Our next entry is electrifying.
Title: Re: LoC #64: Top 52 Scientists
Post by: goflyblind on September 26, 2012, 11:00:59 AM
18

(http://i1172.photobucket.com/albums/r567/listocrap64/franklin_zpsc526084c.jpg)
Benjamin Franklin

72 points - 5 lists - Highest Position: 3 (Mrs. Dick Courier)

Short Biography

Benjamin Franklin was one of the Founding Fathers of the United States. A noted polymath, Franklin was a leading author, printer, political theorist, politician, postmaster, scientist, musician, inventor, satirist, civic activist, statesman, and diplomat. At age 17, Franklin ran away to Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, seeking a new start in a new city. When he first arrived he worked in several printer shops around town. In 1727, Benjamin Franklin, then 21, created the Junto, a group of "like minded aspiring artisans and tradesmen who hoped to improve themselves while they improved their community." The Junto was a discussion group for issues of the day; it subsequently gave rise to many organizations in Philadelphia. Reading was a great pastime of the Junto, but books were rare and expensive. The members created a library, initially assembled from their own books. This did not suffice, however. Franklin then conceived the idea of a subscription library, which would pool the funds of the members to buy books for all to read.


Major Discoveries

Franklin was a prodigious inventor. Among his many creations were the lightning rod, glass armonica, Franklin stove, bifocal glasses and the flexible urinary catheter. Franklin never patented his inventions; in his autobiography he wrote, "... as we enjoy great advantages from the inventions of others, we should be glad of an opportunity to serve others by any invention of ours; and this we should do freely and generously." His inventions also included social innovations, such as paying forward. Franklin's fascination with innovation could be viewed as altruistic; he wrote that his scientific works were to be used for increasing efficiency and human improvement. He was the first to label electric charge as positive and negative respectively, and he was the first to discover the principle of conservation of charge. Franklin was, along with his contemporary Leonhard Euler, the only major scientist who supported Christiaan Huygens' wave theory of light, which was basically ignored by the rest of the scientific community. In the 18th century Newton's corpuscular theory was held to be true; only after Young's famous slit experiment were most scientists persuaded to believe Huygens' theory.


(http://www.harkavagrant.com/history/franklinfinal.png)


Up Next: The next entry is positively glowing.
Title: Re: LoC #64: Top 52 Scientists
Post by: goflyblind on September 26, 2012, 11:01:17 AM
17

(http://i1172.photobucket.com/albums/r567/listocrap64/curie_zps0ea54e4e.jpg)
Marie Curie

74 points - 6 lists - Highest Position: 3 (anais.butterfly)

Short Biography

Marie Skłodowska-Curie was a French-Polish physicist and chemist. She was the first woman to win a Nobel Prize, the only woman to win in two fields, and the only person to win in multiple sciences. She was also the first female professor at the University of Paris, and became the first woman to be entombed on her own merits in the Panthéon in Paris. Unable to enrol in a higher education institution due to being a female, she and her sister Bronisława became involved with the Flying University, a clandestine teaching institution, teaching a pro-Polish curriculum in defiance of the Russian authorities, and also willing to admit female students. Later, in Paris, she attended the University of Paris, studying physics, chemistry, and mathematics. She was known for her honesty and moderate life style. Having received a small scholarship in 1893, she returned it in 1897 as soon as she begun earning her keep. She gave much of her first Nobel Prize money to friends, family, students and research associates. In an unusual decision, Marie intentionally refrained from patenting the radium-isolation process, so that the scientific community could do research unhindered. She insisted that monetary gifts and awards were given to the scientific institutions she was affiliated with, rather than herself. She and her husband often refused awards and medals. Albert Einstein is reported to have remarked that she was probably the only person who was not corrupted by the fame that she had won.


Major Discovery

Marie had begun her scientific career in Paris with an investigation of the magnetic properties of various steels, commissioned by the Society for the Société d'encouragement pour l'industrie nationale. Marie decided to look into uranium rays as a possible field of research for a thesis. She used an innovative technique to investigate samples. She discovered that uranium rays caused the air around a sample to conduct electricity. Using this technique, her first result was the finding that the activity of the uranium compounds depended only on the quantity of uranium present. She had hypothesized that the radiation was not the outcome of some interaction of molecules, but must come from the atom itself. This hypothesis was an important step in disproving the ancient assumption that atoms were indivisible. In her systematic search for other substances beside uranium salts that emitted radiation, by 1898, Marie had found that the element thorium likewise, was radioactive. In July 1898, Marie and her husband published a paper together, announcing the existence of an element which they named "polonium", in honour of her native Poland. On 26 December 1898, the Curies announced the existence of a second element, which they named "radium" for its intense radioactivity – a word that they coined. Her first Nobel Prize was awarded for her work on radioactivity, while her second was for her discovery of new elements. Writes Cornell University professor L. Pearce Williams, "The result of the Curies' work was epoch-making. Radium's radioactivity was so great that it could not be ignored. It seemed to contradict the principle of the conservation of energy and therefore forced a reconsideration of the foundations of physics. On the experimental level the discovery of radium provided men like Ernest Rutherford with sources of radioactivity with which they could probe the structure of the atom. As a result of Rutherford's experiments with alpha radiation, the nuclear atom was first postulated. In medicine, the radioactivity of radium appeared to offer a means by which cancer could be successfully attacked."


Up Next: Meep!
Title: Re: LoC #64: Top 52 Scientists
Post by: goflyblind on September 26, 2012, 11:01:43 AM
16

(http://i1172.photobucket.com/albums/r567/listocrap64/honeydew_zps9de2a480.jpg)
Bunsen Honeydew

82 points - 7 lists - Highest Position: 6 (Darth Geek)

Portrayed By: Dave Goelz (television and film)

Short Biography and Discoveries

Dr. Bunsen Honeydew is the resident scientist on The Muppet Show, and the host of the Muppet Labs sketches. In season one of The Muppet Show he worked alone, but in season two, his assistant Beaker was added to the show. Bunsen is always eager to show off his latest scientific discovery, but his excitement about progress tends to render him short-sighted. Beaker usually ends up being harmed by Dr. Honeydew's inventions. Bunsen Honeydew's name comes from the scientific instrument called the Bunsen burner, and the shape of his head, which looks like a honeydew melon.

He has appeared in every Muppet movie, often with a large role contributing to the film's plot. In The Muppet Movie, Kermit the Frog meets Bunsen and Beaker in an old ghost town, where Honeydew shows off his latest invention, "Insta-Grow Pills," which can temporarily make things grow bigger. In The Muppet Christmas Carol, Bunsen and Beaker portray charity workers. In Muppets from Space, Bunsen invents a number of devices for the Muppets to use when they rescue Gonzo.

http://www.youtube.com/v/4QrelL9fOjY

http://www.youtube.com/v/w9SWB1usr0M

http://www.youtube.com/v/VRvmqSu6YMo

http://www.youtube.com/v/Mggl7cC8iys

http://www.youtube.com/v/EFebGZ7FJQQ


Up Next: Give this next entry a lever, and he might just move the world.
Title: Re: LoC #64: Top 52 Scientists
Post by: goflyblind on September 26, 2012, 11:02:48 AM
15

(http://i1172.photobucket.com/albums/r567/listocrap64/archimedes_zps1e90c876.jpg)
Archimedes

85 points - 5 lists - Highest Position: 3 (Compound)

Short Biography

Archimedes of Syracuse was a Greek mathematician, physicist, engineer, inventor, and astronomer. Although few details of his life are known, he is regarded as one of the leading scientists in classical antiquity. During his youth, Archimedes may have studied in Alexandria, Egypt, where Conon of Samos and Eratosthenes of Cyrene were contemporaries. He referred to Conon of Samos as his friend, while two of his works have introductions addressed to Eratosthenes. The last words attributed to Archimedes are "Do not disturb my circles", a reference to the circles in the mathematical drawing that he was supposedly studying when disturbed by the Roman soldier. The tomb of Archimedes carried a sculpture illustrating his favorite mathematical proof, consisting of a sphere and a cylinder of the same height and diameter. Archimedes had proven that the volume and surface area of the sphere are two thirds that of the cylinder including its bases.


Major Discoveries

The most widely known anecdote about Archimedes tells of how he invented a method for determining the volume of an object with an irregular shape. According to Vitruvius, a votive crown for a temple had been made for King Hiero II, who had supplied the pure gold to be used, and Archimedes was asked to determine whether some silver had been substituted by the dishonest goldsmith. Archimedes had to solve the problem without damaging the crown, so he could not melt it down into a regularly shaped body in order to calculate its density. While taking a bath, he noticed that the level of the water in the tub rose as he got in, and realized that this effect could be used to determine the volume of the crown. For practical purposes water is incompressible, so the submerged crown would displace an amount of water equal to its own volume. By dividing the mass of the crown by the volume of water displaced, the density of the crown could be obtained. This density would be lower than that of gold if cheaper and less dense metals had been added. Archimedes then took to the streets naked, so excited by his discovery that he had forgotten to dress, crying "Eureka!". The test was conducted successfully, proving that silver had indeed been mixed in. The Greek writer Athenaeus of Naucratis described how King Hiero II commissioned Archimedes to design a huge ship, the Syracusia, which could be used for luxury travel, carrying supplies, and as a naval warship. The Syracusia is said to have been the largest ship built in classical antiquity. Since a ship of this size would leak a considerable amount of water through the hull, the Archimedes screw was purportedly developed in order to remove the bilge water. Archimedes' machine was a device with a revolving screw-shaped blade inside a cylinder. It was turned by hand, and could also be used to transfer water from a low-lying body of water into irrigation canals. The Archimedes screw is still in use today for pumping liquids and granulated solids such as coal and grain. The Claw of Archimedes is a weapon that he is said to have designed in order to defend the city of Syracuse. Also known as "the ship shaker," the claw consisted of a crane-like arm from which a large metal grappling hook was suspended. When the claw was dropped onto an attacking ship the arm would swing upwards, lifting the ship out of the water and possibly sinking it. The 2nd century AD author Lucian wrote that during the Siege of Syracuse, Archimedes destroyed enemy ships with fire. Centuries later, Anthemius of Tralles mentions burning-glasses as Archimedes' weapon. The device, sometimes called the "Archimedes heat ray", was used to focus sunlight onto approaching ships, causing them to catch fire. Archimedes was able to use infinitesimals in a way that is similar to modern integral calculus. Through proof by contradiction, he could give answers to problems to an arbitrary degree of accuracy, while specifying the limits within which the answer lay. Using this method, he was able to calculate the value of π to within less than a percent, and the square root of three to within 0.00002 percent. He introduced this result without offering any explanation of the method used to obtain it.


Up Next: This next scientist wants you to wash your hands. Seriously. Do it now.
Title: Re: LoC #64: Top 52 Scientists
Post by: goflyblind on September 26, 2012, 11:03:09 AM
14

(http://i1172.photobucket.com/albums/r567/listocrap64/pasteur_zpsf1b37c58.jpg)
Louis Pasteur

91 points - 5 lists - Highest Position: 4 (Mrs. Dick Courier)

Short Biography

Louis Pasteur was a french chemist and microbiologist. Louis Pasteur was an average student in his early years, but he was gifted in drawing and painting. His pastels and portraits of his parents and friends, made when he was 15, were later kept in the museum of the Pasteur Institute in Paris. He obtained both a bachelor of arts degree and a bachelor of science degree. After serving briefly as professor of physics at Dijon Lycée, he became professor of chemistry at the University of Strasbourg, where he met and courted Marie Laurent. Together they had five children, only two of whom survived to adulthood; the other three died of typhoid. These personal tragedies inspired Pasteur to try to find cures for diseases such as typhoid.


Major Discovery

In Pasteur's early work as a chemist, he resolved a problem concerning the nature of tartaric acid. He was the first to demonstrate the chirality (that there are two possible orientations) of the molecule, by showing that light passed through a solution containing the molecule rotates depending on the chriality. Pasteur is most well-known for promoting vaccination as a valid form of preventing disease, coining the term "vaccine" in the first place. He created a vaccine for anthrax in cattle, cholera in chickens, and rabies in humans. Pasteur was devoted to his research, with Axel Munthe writing of the rabies vaccine research: "Pasteur himself was absolutely fearless. Anxious to secure a sample of saliva straight from the jaws of a rabid dog, I once saw him with the glass tube held between his lips draw a few drops of the deadly saliva from the mouth of a rabid bull-dog, held on the table by two assistants, their hands protected by leather gloves." Pasteur demonstrated fermentation is caused by the growth of micro-organisms, and the emergent growth of bacteria in nutrient broths is not due to spontaneous generation, but rather to biogenesis. Because of his study in germs, Pasteur encouraged doctors to sanitize their hands and equipment before surgery. Prior to this, few doctors or their assistants practiced these procedures.


Up Next: The next entry is part of a team, and he does some sort of super-science.
Title: Re: LoC #64: Top 52 Scientists
Post by: goflyblind on September 26, 2012, 11:05:14 AM
13

(http://i1172.photobucket.com/albums/r567/listocrap64/venture_zpsa631fd33.jpg)
Thaddeus Venture

95 points - 6 lists - Highest Position: 1 (Pak-Man)

Portrayed By: James Urbaniak (animated series)

Short Biography

Thaddeus "Rusty" Venture is a fictional character in the animated series Venture Brothers. He is the father of the Venture twins. A pill popper, he constantly lives in the shadow of his famous father Dr. Jonas Venture, from whom he inherited Venture Industries. There is some question as to his actual degree of ability in the nebulously defined field of super-science. In fact, in "The Incredible Mr. Brisby", amusement park tycoon Roy Brisby accuses Dr. Venture of not having a doctorate at all. While Dr. Venture desperately wishes to emerge from his father's shadow, ultimately his knack for cutting corners proves his undoing, with his shoddy attempts at genuine technological innovation typically resulting in utter debacle (serving as the premise for several episodes). Dr. Venture is shown to have attended college with Brock, Pete White, Baron Underbheit and The Monarch, but he never graduated, apparently receiving "honorary degrees" from several Tijuana community colleges. Dr. Venture seems to dislike his sons; it seems ambiguous whether he actually cares for them at all. However, in Season 4 it is revealed that Dr. Venture sees a lot of himself in Dean and in fact, loves his son. His sons have died on multiple occasions and he keeps cloning them and has not tried to cash in on the process. His childhood time with the original team Venture has had an undeniably traumatizing effect on him, and he still wakes up at night with nightmares of his worst adventures. He takes pills to manage his erratic psyche, hallucinations and stress.


http://www.youtube.com/v/uu4QJagx0hI

http://www.youtube.com/v/Mr2jz3q_P-A

http://www.youtube.com/v/cArysRFkF-c

http://www.youtube.com/v/mn88hl1Iz64

http://www.youtube.com/v/ykEGtwJuZIs


Up Next: Deep hurting!
Title: Re: LoC #64: Top 52 Scientists
Post by: goflyblind on September 26, 2012, 11:05:40 AM
12

(http://i1172.photobucket.com/albums/r567/listocrap64/forrester_zpsec7cb739.jpg)
Clayton Forrester

99 points - 7 lists - Highest Position: 2 (Darth Geek)

Portrayed By: Trace Beaulieu

Short Biography

Clayton Deborah Susan Forrester is a fictional character in the television show Mystery Science Theater 3000. He is portrayed as a typical "mad scientist". Growing up, he was part of the evil version of Cub Scouts, Evilos. Forrester's high school career was typified by a series of humiliations, presumably contributing to his rather deranged personality. Frequently teased by classmates, he received a "shameful expulsion" from the Chess Club, suffered a "shameful shower incident" during his sophomore year, got rejected by the Swing Choir, was frequently victimized by book-dumpings after typing class, was forced to do power sit-ups in gym, and received "the revulsion, scorn, and rejection of all the pretty girls." At some point, he was struck by lightning, resulting in the white streak in his hair and mustache. While earning his doctorate, Forrester took some undergraduate courses in Super-Villainry, and at some point he joined the Fraternal Order of Mad Science. He was a frequent attendee of the Mad Scientist Convention, although he lost the convention's invention contest each year (on one occasion his entry, "the More Painful Mouse Trap," was met only with laughter). In response to his rejections, he has blown up the convention center twice and once used incendiaries to not "actually make the building blow up, it just made it burn...really quickly." After completing his doctorate, he obtained work at the prestigious Gizmonic Institute. At GI, he conducted experiments in sensory deprivation on an ordinary Joe(l). However, Joel escaped, and so Dr. F experimented on GI's handyman, Mike.


Major Discovery

While working at Gizmonic Institute, Forrester and his assistant sent Joel (and later Mike) cheesy movies which he was forced to watch, in order to find a movie that would drive people mad and allow him to take over the world. In response, Joel built several robot friends to keep him company, and keep himself from being driven mad. During Joel's time on MST3K, Forrester participated in Invention Exchanges with Joel and the 'bots. Some of Dr. F's more interesting inventions include:
 - the Limb Lengthener
 - Deep 13 Sweet toothpaste, which creates cavities
 - Johnny Longtorso, an action figure whose body parts are each sold separately
 - Unhappy Meals, fast food meals that contain unfortunate surprises.
 - the Re-Comfy Bike
 - Beanbag pants, perfect for lounging at a discussion salon
 - the Self-Image Printers that reveal a person's true persona


http://www.youtube.com/v/R88T3ZHbvDM

http://www.youtube.com/v/zQb7wIyQwAs

http://www.youtube.com/v/ZrkhSc28ql8


Up Next: The next entry is probably the second-biggest name in twentieth century physics.
Title: Re: LoC #64: Top 52 Scientists
Post by: goflyblind on September 26, 2012, 11:06:01 AM
11

(http://i1172.photobucket.com/albums/r567/listocrap64/hawking_zpsda77ce0c.jpg)
Stephen Hawking

107 points - 6 lists - Highest Position: 1 (Johnny Unusual)

Short Biography

Stephen Hawking is a British theoretical physicist, mathematician, and author, who works mainly in mathematical relativity. He is confined to a wheelchair as a result of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, which began when he was a graduate student at Cambridge, though he continues to work as a physicist to this day nearly forty years after diagnosis. Hawking has named his secondary school mathematics teacher Dikran Tahta as an inspiration, and originally wanted to study the subject at university. However, Hawking's father wanted him to apply to University College, Oxford, which his father had attended. As University College did not have a mathematics fellow at that time, they did not accept applications from students who wished to study that discipline. Therefore, Hawking applied to study natural sciences with an emphasis in physics. While at Oxford, he coxed a rowing team, which helped ease his immense boredom at the university. His physics tutor, Robert Berman, later said "It was only necessary for him to know that something could be done, and he could do it without looking to see how other people did it. ... his mind was completely different from all of his contemporaries". He has appeared as himself on, Star Trek: The NExt Generation, The Big Bang Theory, The Simpsons, and Futurama.


Major Discovery

Hawking's most significant contribution to physics is through the Singularity theorems he developed along with Roger Penrose and G. F. R. Ellis. These describe, in highly mathematical terms, conditions necessary for black holes and the start or end of the Universe. By combining quantum field theory with general relativity in a very specific way (this isn't generally possible, which causes no end of problems in theoretical physics), and found that black holes emit radiation, eventually named Hawking radiation. He is most well-known to the general public as an author, where his writings popularize the ideas of general relativity through the publication of A Brief History of Time (the best-selling science book of all time), Black Holes and Baby Universes and Other Essays, and The Universe in a Nutshell.

http://www.youtube.com/v/OmzwuYj5w1U

http://www.youtube.com/v/Nda7w487yU0


Up Next (Tomorrow): Watch out, we've got a real badass (scientist) up next.
Title: Re: LoC #64: Top 52 Scientists
Post by: Tripe on September 26, 2012, 11:31:27 AM
40
(http://i1172.photobucket.com/albums/r567/listocrap64/babbage_zpsec29dc00.jpg)
Charles Babbage
Dammit, I knew I'd missed a few:

(http://www.harkavagrant.com/history/babbagefinal.png)

And, since I somehow think she'll not be showing up now:

(http://www.harkavagrant.com/history/lovelacesm.png)
Title: Re: LoC #64: Top 52 Scientists
Post by: Pak-Man on September 26, 2012, 11:54:02 AM
Darn. Both Bunsen Honeydew and Dr. Forrester were on the original list that I lost, and I forgot to include them when I resubmitted. CURSE YOU, SESSION TIMEOUTS!
Title: Re: LoC #64: Top 52 Scientists
Post by: Tripe on September 26, 2012, 03:50:16 PM
I'm hoping there will be some redress of that in the top ten....

And, being familiar with the intertubes, I think my hopes may be met.
Title: Re: LoC #64: Top 52 Scientists
Post by: Tripe on September 26, 2012, 05:02:30 PM
Oh yes, he was an absolute turd, but I think more people are coming to see that now.
Title: Re: LoC #64: Top 52 Scientists
Post by: Russell on September 26, 2012, 05:33:04 PM
Man, Sagan got beat by that immoral douchebag of a huckster Thomas Edison? You guys suck.
Don't blame me. I didn't vote for im... ;)
Title: Re: LoC #64: Top 52 Scientists
Post by: Johnny Unusual on September 26, 2012, 08:11:38 PM
That reminds me I forgot the Edison Twins...

http://www.youtube.com/v/3CMAK0N3U8k
Title: Re: LoC #64: Top 52 Scientists
Post by: Darth Geek on September 26, 2012, 08:13:10 PM
I am surprised to see Dr. Forrester only at #12.
Title: Re: LoC #64: Top 52 Scientists
Post by: Johnny Unusual on September 26, 2012, 08:34:15 PM
16

(http://i1172.photobucket.com/albums/r567/listocrap64/honeydew_zps9de2a480.jpg)
Bunsen Honeydew

82 points - 7 lists - Highest Position: 6 (Darth Geek)
On my list.  And he accomplished more with no eyes than most have with 2.  Mostly it involved killing beaker, but they are accomplishments nonetheless.

15

(http://i1172.photobucket.com/albums/r567/listocrap64/archimedes_zps1e90c876.jpg)
Archimedes

85 points - 5 lists - Highest Position: 3 (Compound)

Also the inventor of the fake beard.  I'll admit, he captured my attention mostly based on his nudity filled anecdote, but it is a good story to teach water displacement and he came up a lot in my physics classes in high school when talking about the "seven inventions".  Also, The Quest of the Delta Knights is terrible.

13

(http://i1172.photobucket.com/albums/r567/listocrap64/venture_zpsa631fd33.jpg)
Thaddeus Venture

95 points - 6 lists - Highest Position: 1 (Pak-Man)
Portrayed By: James Urbaniak (animated series)
Short Biography
Sure, his dad was the real brains, but for all his sins, I can sympathize with him more.


12
(http://i1172.photobucket.com/albums/r567/listocrap64/forrester_zpsec7cb739.jpg)
Clayton Forrester
I got to admit, I want a re-comfybike.  It's like a snuggy for the road!

11

(http://i1172.photobucket.com/albums/r567/listocrap64/hawking_zpsda77ce0c.jpg)
Larry Flint

107 points - 6 lists - Highest Position: 1 (Johnny Unusual)

A fucking cool guy and a great wit.  I've never read his stuff, but just hearing him talk about physics is always an eye-opening experience and is able to articulate wonderfully not only his ideas but also the weight and scope of them.  Of course, that's mostly in speeches and soundbytes.  I'm sure while he's also interesting in his writing, it's probably more daunting.  Also, he's a Red Dwarf fan, so number one with a bullet for me.
Title: Re: LoC #64: Top 52 Scientists
Post by: Johnny Unusual on September 26, 2012, 08:37:10 PM
I am surprised to see Dr. Forrester only at #12.

That's because he's a naughty boy.  Naughty naughty naughty.
Title: Re: LoC #64: Top 52 Scientists
Post by: Rainbow Dash on September 26, 2012, 10:01:42 PM
Wish I had sent some votes in for this.

Carl Sagan is criminally low.  Edison should be disqualified for being a thief.

Hope you don't disappoint on Werner Von Braun, Sergei Korolev and Harrison Schmitt people!
Title: Re: LoC #64: Top 52 Scientists
Post by: Darth Geek on September 26, 2012, 10:17:05 PM
16

(http://i1172.photobucket.com/albums/r567/listocrap64/honeydew_zps9de2a480.jpg)
Bunsen Honeydew

82 points - 7 lists - Highest Position: 6 (Darth Geek)
On my list.  And he accomplished more with no eyes than most have with 2.  Mostly it involved killing beaker, but they are accomplishments nonetheless.
  One of my favorite parts of those segments on the Muppet Show was that the inventions didn't ALWAYS fail. Just whatever backfire would cause the most damage to Beaker.
  The best example of this (annd probably my favorite one of all time) was Fireproof Paper. Which did NOT work, and cought on fire. Followed by the use of Flammable Water, which DID work, and cought on fire.

http://www.youtube.com/v/FnblmZdTbYs?version=3&hl=en_US
Title: Re: LoC #64: Top 52 Scientists
Post by: Darth Geek on September 26, 2012, 10:18:43 PM

11
(http://i1172.photobucket.com/albums/r567/listocrap64/hawking_zpsda77ce0c.jpg)
Larry Flint
:clap: :clap:
Title: Re: LoC #64: Top 52 Scientists
Post by: CJones on September 27, 2012, 07:20:03 AM
Wish I had sent some votes in for this.

Carl Sagan is criminally low.  Edison should be disqualified for being a thief.

Hope you don't disappoint on Werner Von Braun, Sergei Korolev and Harrison Schmitt people!

von Braun is high on my list. However, having a father who works at Redstone Arsenal in Huntsville means I hear a lot about him.

Carl Sagan didn't even occur to me.

Marie Curie was the only female I had. Now I do wish I had included Ada Lovelace also.
Title: Re: LoC #64: Top 52 Scientists
Post by: Tripe on September 27, 2012, 07:21:58 AM
Now I do wish I had included Ada Lovelace also.
So do I. :)
Title: Re: LoC #64: Top 52 Scientists
Post by: goflyblind on September 27, 2012, 10:30:37 AM
Top Ten Time! :highfive:

http://www.youtube.com/v/AcS3NOQnsQM
Title: Re: LoC #64: Top 52 Scientists
Post by: goflyblind on September 27, 2012, 10:31:02 AM
10

(http://i1172.photobucket.com/albums/r567/listocrap64/tyson_zps640bfad4.jpg)
Neil deGrasse Tyson

115 points - 8 lists - Highest Position: 1 (Mrs. Dick Courier)

Short Biography

Neil deGrasse Tyson is an American astrophysicist and science communicator. He is currently the Frederick P. Rose Director of the Hayden Planetarium at the Rose Center for Earth and Space and a research associate in the department of astrophysics at the American Museum of Natural History. At the age of nine, Neil visited the Hayden planetarium (where he would one day become the director) and found that "so strong was that imprint [of the night sky] that I'm certain that I had no choice in the matter, that in fact, the universe called me." He attended the Bronx High School of Science (which I didn't know was a thing until now; so jealous). His love of astronomy deepened so much so that Carl Sagan attempted to woo him into studying at Cornell, though he ended up going to Harvard.


Major Discovery

While he has done research as an astronomer--observational astrophysics, mostly--Neil is best-known as a popularizer of science. He speaks so well of science, I'll just let him go right ahead and do it


http://www.youtube.com/v/9D05ej8u-gU

http://www.youtube.com/v/3_F3pw5F_Pc

http://www.youtube.com/v/jfDNl0IQ7T4

http://www.youtube.com/v/6RjW5-4IiSc
(the video is out of alignment on this one, but the speech is so good, who cares)

http://www.youtube.com/v/wiOwqDmacJo

http://www.youtube.com/v/aadYN5OPKN8

http://www.youtube.com/v/h1iJXOUMJpg


Up Next: Who you gonna call? Our next scien--wait, I've already used that one. I know: don't cross the streams!
Title: Re: LoC #64: Top 52 Scientists
Post by: goflyblind on September 27, 2012, 10:31:41 AM
9

(http://i1172.photobucket.com/albums/r567/listocrap64/spengler_zps2c25a1dd.jpg)
Egon Spengler

117 points - 6 lists - Highest Position: 2 (Cole Stratton, ScottotD, Pak-Man)

Portrayed By: Harold Ramis (films and video games), Maurice LaMarche (animated series)

Short Biography

Egon Spengler is a fictional character and member of the Ghostbusters. In his spare time, he collects spores, molds, and fungus. He doesn't express his emotions well and has described himself as "always serious." His childhood may have been normal in many regards, but one strange fact is that he didn't play with toys. Egon said that his parents did not believe in toys. He was given part of  a Slinky once, but he straightened it. He is a former professor of parapsychology at Columbia University. Although book smart, Spengler does not have much social ability, as demonstrated by his stiff interactions with the Ghostbusters' secretary Janine Melnitz, and his reliance on Peter as spokesperson for the group. He is the technical and theoretical leader of the team, creating their equipment. He also once attempted self-trepanation, but was stopped by Peter Venkman. As Venkman told Spengler "This reminds me of the time you tried to drill a hole in your head," to which Spengler replied, "That would have worked if you hadn't stopped me." According to the 2009 Video Game, Spengler sleeps an average of 14 minutes per day, leaving him "a lot of time to work."


Major Discovery

Spengler's major discoveries were in the technology which allowed the detection and storage of paranormal psychic energy. These devices include the PKE meter, the proton pack, the ghost trap, and the storage grid. Egon puts few restraints on the scope of his paranormal research. This is evident in Ghostbusters II, as he conducts experiments in his lab in which he deliberately incites couples to argue. When the mood slime is being tested, Egon sleeps with it in order to check its response to nurturing behavior. Science tends to take precedence over people's well being, as Egon is rather detached in his instructions regarding psychological experiments with couples and children in the second movie.

http://www.youtube.com/v/D3v_ogRaTf4

http://www.youtube.com/v/pzaQjS1JstY


Up Next: Beetles! Oh, and something about the multitudinous forms of life. But mostly beetles.
Title: Re: LoC #64: Top 52 Scientists
Post by: goflyblind on September 27, 2012, 10:32:12 AM
8

(http://i1172.photobucket.com/albums/r567/listocrap64/darwin_zps1d75911f.jpg)
Charles Darwin

130 points - 7 lists - Highest Position: 1 (Imrahil)

Short Biography

Charles Darwin was an English naturalist in 19th century England. He apprenticed as a Doctor with his father, before going to the University of Edinburgh Medical School with his brother Erasmus in October 1825. He found lectures dull and surgery distressing, so neglected his studies. In Darwin's second year he joined the Plinian Society, a student natural history group whose debates strayed into radical materialism. He assisted Robert Edmond Grant's investigations of the anatomy and life cycle of marine invertebrates, and presented at the Plinian his own discovery that black spores found in oyster shells were the eggs of a skate leech. This neglect of medical studies annoyed his father, who shrewdly sent him to Christ's College, Cambridge, for a Bachelor of Arts degree as the first step towards becoming an Anglican parson. Inspired with "a burning zeal" to contribute to natural philosophy, Darwin planned to visit Tenerife with some classmates after graduation to study natural history in the tropics. However, it was suggested to Darwin that he be gentleman naturalist for a self-funded place with captain Robert FitzRoy, more as a companion than a mere collector, on HMS Beagle which was to leave in four weeks on an expedition to chart the coastline of South America. The voyage lasted almost five years and, as FitzRoy had intended, Darwin spent most of that time traipsing about, investigating geology and making natural history collections, while the Beagle surveyed and charted coasts. It was upon returning to England that he began to collect his observations into a cohesive idea, and pursued further investigations. Darwin was also obsessed with beetles.


Major Discoveries

Darwin's major contribution was that of evolution by natural selection. In essence, an organism that is better adapted to its environment will survive to reproduce, thus ensuring its legacy for at least one generation. Though he was unable to describe how the traits of the parents were passed on to the children, the general framework was--and continues to be--wildly successful in describing life on Earth. Darwin also made many discoveries throughout the voyage of the Beagle. At Punta Alta in Patagonia he made a major find of fossil bones of huge extinct mammals in cliffs beside modern seashells, indicating recent extinction with no signs of change in climate or catastrophe. He identified the little known Megatherium by a tooth and its association with bony armour which had at first seemed to him like a giant version of the armour on local armadillos. The finds brought great interest when they reached England. When the Beagle reached home, Darwin was already a celebrity in scientific circles as earlier Henslow had fostered his former pupil's reputation by giving selected naturalists a pamphlet of Darwin's geological letters. Darwin was a prolific writer. Even without publication of his works on evolution, he would have had a considerable reputation as the author of The Voyage of the Beagle, as a geologist who had published extensively on South America and had solved the puzzle of the formation of coral atolls, and as a biologist who had published the definitive work on barnacles. While On the Origin of Species dominates perceptions of his work, The Descent of Man and The Expression of the Emotions in Man and Animals had considerable impact, and his books on plants including The Power of Movement in Plants were innovative studies of great importance, as was his final work on The Formation of Vegetable Mould through the Action of Worms.


(http://www.harkavagrant.com/history/YoungDarwin.jpg)


Up Next: An actual renaissance man.
Title: Re: LoC #64: Top 52 Scientists
Post by: Tripe on September 27, 2012, 10:35:04 AM
8

(http://i1172.photobucket.com/albums/r567/listocrap64/darwin_zps1d75911f.jpg)
Charles Darwin
I liked his Granddad better.
Title: Re: LoC #64: Top 52 Scientists
Post by: goflyblind on September 27, 2012, 10:35:31 AM
7

(http://i1172.photobucket.com/albums/r567/listocrap64/davinci_zps60f850ba.jpg)
Leonardo da Vinci

139 points - 8 lists - Highest Position: 2 (Mrs. Dick Courier)

Short Biography

Leonardo di ser Piero da Vinci was an Italian Renaissance polymath: painter, sculptor, architect, musician, scientist, mathematician, engineer, inventor, anatomist, geologist, cartographer, botanist, and writer. His genius, perhaps more than that of any other figure, epitomized the Renaissance humanist ideal. Leonardo has often been described as the archetype of the Renaissance Man, a man of "unquenchable curiosity" and "feverishly inventive imagination". Leonardo was educated in the studio of the renowned Florentine painter, Verrocchio. Much of his earlier working life was spent in the service of Ludovico il Moro in Milan. He later worked in Rome, Bologna and Venice, and he spent his last years in France at the home awarded him by Francis I. He has been parodied in the Discworld series of novels as Leonard of Quirm, who doodles terrifying war machines in the corners of his drawings on anatomy or submarines. He also appears on Futurama as an alien bent on revenge against his fellow aliens.


Major Discovery

Renaissance humanism recognized no mutually exclusive polarities between the sciences and the arts, and Leonardo's studies in science and engineering are as impressive and innovative as his artistic work. These studies were recorded in 13,000 pages of notes and drawings, which fuse art and natural philosophy, made and maintained daily throughout Leonardo's life and travels, as he made continual observations of the world around him. Leonardo's approach to science was an observational one: he tried to understand a phenomenon by describing and depicting it in utmost detail and did not emphasize experiments or theoretical explanation. Since he lacked formal education in Latin and mathematics, contemporary scholars mostly ignored Leonardo the scientist. Leonardo made over 200 pages of drawings and many pages of notes towards a treatise on human anatomy. Leonardo also studied and drew the anatomy of many animals, dissecting cows, birds, monkeys, bears, and frogs, and comparing in his drawings their anatomical structure with that of humans. He also made a number of studies of horses. When he fled to Venice in 1499 he found employment as an engineer and devised a system of moveable barricades to protect the city from attack. He also had a scheme for diverting the flow of the Arno River. Leonardo's journals include a vast number of inventions, both practical and impractical. They include musical instruments, hydraulic pumps, reversible crank mechanisms, finned mortar shells, and a steam cannon. For much of his life, Leonardo was fascinated by the phenomenon of flight, producing many studies of the flight of birds as well as plans for several flying machines, including a light hang glider and a machine resembling a helicopter. Leonardo's treatment of light in paintings such as The Virgin of the Rocks and the Mona Lisa was to change forever the way in which artists perceived light and used it in their paintings. Of all Leonardo's scientific legacies, this is probably the one that had the most immediate and noticeable effect.

http://www.youtube.com/v/IpL-Nz5RQyY


Up Next: Our next scientist has some good news. Everyone listen up.
Title: Re: LoC #64: Top 52 Scientists
Post by: goflyblind on September 27, 2012, 10:35:54 AM
6

(http://i1172.photobucket.com/albums/r567/listocrap64/farnsworth_h_zps6abec626.jpg)
Hubert J. Farnsworth

148 points - 9 lists - Highest Position: 4 (Pak-Man)

Portrayed By: Billy West (animated series)

Short Biography

Hubert J. Farnsworth was born April 9th 2851 2841 in New New York's nerdiest slum, Hell's Laboratory. A precocious child, young Hubert learned to read while he was still in diapers -- at age 8. And before long he blossomed into a greasy teenager. After 14 years of graduate school, Farnsworth settled into the glamorous life of a scientist: Fast cars, trendy nightspots, beautiful women -- the Professor designed them all working out of his tiny, one-room apartment. For 50 years he worked at Mom's Friendly Robot Company, where he created the first robot capable of qualifying for a boat loan. And even as he nears his 150th birthday, the Professor retains the fiery passion of youth.


Major Discovery

Farnsworth's major contributions were in the world of robotics, where he created the basis for all 30th century robots. He has nearly perfected cloning, except that he must remember when to move the clone to a larger tank. He has also constructed a Smell-O-Scope, which allows the user to smell distant objects. Among his other inventions are
 - a universal translator whose output is in the dead language French
 - QT McWhiskers
 - Fing-Longer
 - Makeup for dogs
 - engines that use dark matter as fuel
 - an Electronium hat that increases the intelligence of the wearer
 - the What-If machine


http://www.youtube.com/v/1D1cap6yETA

http://www.youtube.com/v/Q2iMES08D44

http://www.youtube.com/v/wIeDeI3K-1k

I need to get one of these for my office:
http://www.youtube.com/v/ZCZbb85R0B0

http://www.youtube.com/v/XqcaaUtPdAo

http://www.youtube.com/v/_P1bu4HUAMs


Up Next: Oh, sure, in 1985, plutonium is available in every drug store, but on this list, it's a little hard to come by.
Title: Re: LoC #64: Top 52 Scientists
Post by: goflyblind on September 27, 2012, 10:36:15 AM
5

(http://i1172.photobucket.com/albums/r567/listocrap64/brown_zps94486267.jpg)
Dr. Emmett Brown

161 points - 10 lists - Highest Position: 1 (Cole Stratton)

Portrayed By: Christopher Lloyd (films and video games), Dan Castellaneta (animated series)

Short Biography

Emmett Brown grew up with a love of science, after reading Verne as a child. Unfortunately, he was forced into working for his father at the courthouse. Later, he worked as a professor of physics at Hill Valley University until he was dismissed for refusing to work on certain research projects. Brown took on unsavoury patrons so that he could continue his research, which would come back to haunt him.


Major Discovery

Doc Brown's greatest achievement is one that so many scientists have searched for: time travel. He did this by creating the flux capacitor. The original concept, that the flux capacitor causes a dispersal of the time flux, came to him after he fell of a toilet. He was able to construct the device into a Delorean DMC-12, because "if you're gonna build a time machine into a car, why not do it with some style?" When he became stuck in 1885, he was able to re-construct the flux capacitor and attach it to a steam locomotive. The train was then used like a time-travelling Winnebago to transport the Doc and his new family throughout time.


http://www.youtube.com/v/I5cYgRnfFDA

http://www.youtube.com/v/Or7P9jfhcZ0

http://www.youtube.com/v/wFaXTcR4dtE


Up Next: The internet loves him. Also, without him the internet might not have come around.
Title: Re: LoC #64: Top 52 Scientists
Post by: goflyblind on September 27, 2012, 10:36:57 AM
4

(http://i1172.photobucket.com/albums/r567/listocrap64/tesla_zps958543ff.jpg)
Nikola Tesla

166 points - 9 lists - Highest Position: 1 (Darth Geek, Tripe Hound Redux, Kete)

I don't think anything I could possibly write here can top what The Oatmeal wrote (http://theoatmeal.com/comics/tesla). So click on that link, but be warned: there is some swearing.

Although,
(http://www.harkavagrant.com/history/teslafinal.png) (http://www.harkavagrant.com/)

(http://www.harkavagrant.com/history/marconism.png) (http://www.harkavagrant.com/)


Up Next: This next scientist described wine as "Light held together by moisture."
Title: Re: LoC #64: Top 52 Scientists
Post by: goflyblind on September 27, 2012, 10:37:30 AM
3

(http://i1172.photobucket.com/albums/r567/listocrap64/galileo_zps28851ebe.jpg)
Galileo Galilei

172 points - 9 lists - Highest Position: 2 (lassieface, CJones)

Short Biography

Galileo was born in Pisa in 1564. At the insistence of his father, he enrolled as a medical student at the University of Pisa rather than entering the priesthood. He was to come into strong conflict with the church, however, during his scientific career. His rejection of geocentrism (the idea that the Earth was at the centre of the Universe) led to house arrest, and the banning of his works from publication.


Major Discoveries

Though he didn't invent the telescope, Galileo was perhaps the first to turn one to the heavens. In doing so, he discovered that Jupiter had moons--the Galilean moons: Io, Europa, Ganymede and Callisto--and provided proof that not all objects in the solar system orbited the Earth. This, along with is observations of the phases of Venus, reinforced the idea of heliocentrism. He also used Kepler's supernova as proof against Aristotle's assertion that the skies were immutable. He was also the first to recognize sunspots. His contributions to physics include the idea that gravity affects bodies based solely on their mass, and that pendulums of equal length will have the same period regardless of their initial amplitude.

http://www.youtube.com/v/BFnh7s4i-Jo


Up Next: "Do not worry about your difficulties in Mathematics. I can assure you mine are still greater."
Title: Re: LoC #64: Top 52 Scientists
Post by: goflyblind on September 27, 2012, 10:37:57 AM
2

(http://i1172.photobucket.com/albums/r567/listocrap64/einstein_zps15b26eae.jpg)
Albert Einstein

174 points - 11 lists - Highest Position: 1 (Gunflyer)

Short Biography

Albert Einstein was born in 1879 in Ulm, Germany. He grew up with a passion for models, mathematics, and reading. As a young man, he worked at the patent office, examining mostly electrical transmission and mechanical time-synchronization patents.


Major Discoveries

The year was 1905. In that year, Einstein published works that would transform our understanding of physics. His annus mirabilis papers discussed four topics:
1. the photoelectric effect, which describes how light can displace electrons in a material, causing a current to flow when light is shone on a metal. To explain this, he invoked the idea of quanta of light--discrete packets of light called photons;
2. brownian motion, which is the apparently random motion of particles in a fluid. This was due, he explained, to the particles colliding with atoms. It provided empirical evidence that atoms were real objects as well as establishing fluid mechanics and statistical mechanics;
3. special theory of relativity, which describes an absolute speed limit and the equivalence of the results of physical experiments in all inertial reference frames (ie. observers that are moving with constant velocity with respect to each other);
4. the equivalence of mass and energy. This is the one most people are familiar with. The actual form of the equation is E^2 = p^2*c^2 + m^2*c^4, which relates the total energy of a body, E, with its mass, m, and its momentum, p. Ten years later, Einstein furthered our understanding of gravity with his general theory of relativity, which relates acceleration, mathematical curvature, and gravity. If we know how a space is described mathematically, we can calculate how bodies moving through the space will interact.


(http://zs1.smbc-comics.com/comics/20100704.gif) (http://www.smbc-comics.com/index.php?db=comics&id=1928)

http://www.youtube.com/v/nC5a0ceUzak

http://www.youtube.com/v/Eurlpk3trA8


Up Next: "If I have seen further it is by standing on ye sholders of Giants."
Title: Re: LoC #64: Top 52 Scientists
Post by: goflyblind on September 27, 2012, 10:38:28 AM
1

(http://i1172.photobucket.com/albums/r567/listocrap64/newton_zpsf5a50e8a.jpg)
Isaac Newton

210 points - 11 lists - Highest Position: 1 (lassiface, D.B. Barnes, CJones)

Short Biography

Newton was born on Christmas 1642* in Lincolnshire. At the end of his University education, he decided to return home to avoid the Black Plague. It was then that he developed his most influential scientific ideas. Due to these revolutionary ideas, he enjoyed some celebrity. He was appointed to the Royal Mint he uncovered and prosecuted rampant forgery. Though he is most well-known for his scientific and mathematical work, he wrote more--and spent more time--on the subject of alchemy than any other topic. Newton was often known to claim priority on many discoveries presented to him. He would often say that he had made the same discovery years earlier, but had neglected to publish, or had lost the papers.


Major Discoveries

The biggest contribution made by Newton to science would have to be the infinitesimal calculus. This mathematical invention has allowed the description of any continuous process to be codified and calculated. Though there is continued debate on who first came up with calculus (either Newton or Gottfried Leibniz), Newton did provide a more complete description. Unfortunately for him, though, Leibniz's notation and methods were more convenient. Newton also gave us a much deeper understanding of optics and mechanics, and provided a description of gravity which is sufficient to send astronauts to the Moon.


(http://zs1.smbc-comics.com/comics/20091119.gif) (http://www.smbc-comics.com/index.php?db=comics&id=1704)

http://www.youtube.com/v/danYFxGnFxQ


* Julian calendar, or 4 January 1643 Gregorian.
Title: Re: LoC #64: Top 52 Scientists
Post by: goflyblind on September 27, 2012, 10:39:00 AM
Some Final Thoughts

So that's the countdown. I hope everyone had a good time. I enjoyed running the list, though I think it might be a while before I try my hand at another one. I forgot, when submitting the idea, that I'd have to do all the write-ups (even if it was mostly just copy-n-paste from the intertubes).

There were a few scientists I was disappointed not to see place higher, including Emmy Noether (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Emmy_Noether), Alan Turing (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alan_Turing), Walter Bishop (http://fringe.wikia.com/wiki/Walter) (a collection of Walter quotes (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_bk8VfK7TRM)), and Évariste Galois (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Évariste_Galois). Also, someone voted for Edward Teller, which to me seems like voting for Brutus or Judas when the topic is "friends" :P . Again, thanks for letting me host the Top Fifty-Two Scientists LoC. I've added the whole countdown at the end of this post.

I would like to leave you with an illustrated quote from an astronomer and science popularizer who didn't appear on anyone's list. It's a rather huge image, so you'll have to click on it to read it clearly.

(http://maxcdn.zenpencils.com/comics/2012-06-05-philplait.jpg)

zen pencils (http://zenpencils.com/comic/52-phil-plait-welcome-to-science/)

Spoiler: The Whole List (click to show/hide)
Title: Re: LoC #64: Top 52 Scientists
Post by: ScottotD on September 27, 2012, 10:41:23 AM

4

(http://data.whicdn.com/images/20798607/david-bowie-performing-the-jean-genie-on-top-of-the-pops-in-1973-628166943_large.jpg)
Nikola Tesla
6

(http://i1172.photobucket.com/albums/r567/listocrap64/farnsworth_h_zps6abec626.jpg)
Hubert J. Farnsworth

If only he'd invented the Fing-Longer, he would be number 1... oh my, yes.



Title: Re: LoC #64: Top 52 Scientists
Post by: Tripe on September 27, 2012, 10:42:16 AM
Man, Sagan got beat by that immoral douchebag of a huckster Thomas Edison? You guys suck.

I'm hoping there will be some redress of that in the top ten....

And, being familiar with the intertubes, I think my hopes may be met.

And indeed

4

(http://i1172.photobucket.com/albums/r567/listocrap64/tesla_zps958543ff.jpg)
Nikola Tesla
They were. :)
Title: Re: LoC #64: Top 52 Scientists
Post by: Tripe on September 27, 2012, 10:46:02 AM
Nice work, here's mine:

1. Nikola Tesla
2. Stephen Hawking
3. Erasmus Darwin (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Erasmus_Darwin)
4. Heron of Alexandria (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Heron_of_Alexandria)
5. Auguste Marie Louis Nicolas and  Louis Jean Lumière (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lumi%C3%A8re_brothers)
6. Thomas Henry Huxley (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thomas_Henry_Huxley)
7. Patrick Moore (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Patrick_Moore)
8. Neil deGrasse Tyson
9. Carl Sagan   
10. Isaac Newton
11. Prof. Heinz Wolff (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Heinz_Wolff)
12. Gregor Mendel
13. Charles Babbage
14. Augusta Ada King, Countess of Lovelace (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ada_Lovelace)
15. Karl Popper (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Karl_popper)
16. Johannes Kepler
17. Heddy Lamar (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Heddy_Lamarr#Frequency-hopping_spread-spectrum_invention)
18. Isambard Kingdom Brunel (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Isambard_Kingdom_Brunel)
19. Charles Darwin
20. Magnus Pyke (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Magnus_Pyke)
21. Albert Einstein
22. Johnny Ball (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Johnny_Ball)
23. Richard Dawkins (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Richard_Dawkins)
24. Tycho Brahe
25. Brian May (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brian_may#Astrophysics)

EDIT: Now with colour-coding and hyperlinks and stuff.
Title: Re: LoC #64: Top 52 Scientists
Post by: Kete on September 27, 2012, 10:56:39 AM
It's fitting that Newton and Einstein are the top two.  Perhaps when someone finds out how to combine Newton's physics with Einstein's physics, that person will be placing number 1.
Title: Re: LoC #64: Top 52 Scientists
Post by: Tripe on September 27, 2012, 10:57:35 AM
I definitely should have thought of Turing; he's really important to the philosophical side of science (as well as a potent political figure showing that prejudice can screw you over even when you've been vital to a nation's well being).
Title: Re: LoC #64: Top 52 Scientists
Post by: goflyblind on September 27, 2012, 10:58:44 AM
It's fitting that Newton and Einstein are the top two.  Perhaps when someone finds out how to combine Newton's physics with Einstein's physics, that person will be placing number 1.

newtonian gravity, at least, shows up as the linear (i.e. first) approximation of general relativity.
Title: Re: LoC #64: Top 52 Scientists
Post by: Kete on September 27, 2012, 11:08:46 AM
Here's my list.  I actually did 50 (sort of.  I did top 25 real and top 25 fictional/pop culture, then melded them together)

1   Nikolai Tesla
2   Emmet Lathrop Brown
3   Isaac Newton
4   Clayton Deborah Susan Forrester
5   Albert Einstein
6   Thaddeus S. Rusty Venture
7   Louis Pasteur
8   Victor Frankenstein
9   Galileo Galilei
10   Hubert J Farnsworth

11   William Shockley
12   Dexter
13   Leonardo Da Vinci
14   Egon Spengler

15   Alexander Fleming
16   Dr. Manhattan
17   Thomas Edison
18   Abram Terger
19   Gustav Kirchhoff
20   Bruce Wayne
21   Alessandro Volta
22   Adam Savage
23   Aristotle
24   Bill Nye

25   Alan Turing
26   Bruce Banner
27   Heinrich Hertz
28   Don "Mr Wizard" Herbert
29   Niels Bohr
30   Charles Xavier
31   Nicolaus Copernicus
32   Montgomery Scott
33   Charles Darwin
34   Walter Bishop
35   Max Planck
36   Hank McCoy
37   Joseph Fourier
38   Tony Stark
39   Erwin Schrodinger

40   Cal Meacham
41   Madam Curie
42   Doctor Krieger
43   Michael Faraday
44   Peter Parker
45   Werner Heisenberg
46   Jordy Laforge
47   Wilhelm Roentgen
48   Jamie Hyneman
49   Philo Farnsworth

50   Cyrus Smith

I really wish I had remembered Walter White.  For some reason I didn't include any modern day astrophysicists (Tyson, Hawking, Sagan).  I think because in my mind they existed somewhere between real and pop culture.  I should have included all three.

I'm surprised that Dexter, Scotty, and Krieger didn't make it.  I also think that William Shockley (Transistor) and Alexander Fleming (Penicillin) should have made it because their work had huge impacts on our lives.

Good list!!
Title: Re: LoC #64: Top 52 Scientists
Post by: Kete on September 27, 2012, 11:11:27 AM
I actually did 50 (sort of.  I did top 25 real and top 25 fictional/pop culture, then melded them together)

Although, Tesla was number 1 on both my real and fictional lists.
Title: Re: LoC #64: Top 52 Scientists
Post by: ColeStratton on September 27, 2012, 11:32:10 AM
Good times. Here's my list -- mostly fictitious, but some real folks are in there, too!

1.   Dr. Emmett Brown (Back to the Future)
2.   Dr. Egon Spengler (Ghostbusters)
3.   Dr. Peter Venkman (Ghosbusters)

4.   Dr. Raymond Stantz (Ghosbusters)
5.   Walter White (Breaking Bad)
6.   Station (Bill & Ted’s Bogus Journey)
7.   Dr. Sam Beckett (Quantum Leap)
8.   Dr. Bunsen Honeydew (The Muppets)
9.   Q (James Bond series)
10.   Professor Frink (The Simpsons)
11.   Buckaroo Banzai (The Adventures of Buckaroo Banzai)

12.   Steve Jobs
13.   Bill Nye the Science Guy
14.   Neil Degrasse Tyson
15.   Thomas Edison
16.   Philo Farnsworth

17.   Dian Fossey
18.   Mr. Wizard
19.   Dr. Hank “The Beast” McCoy (X-Men)
20.   Professor Roy Hinkley (Gilligan’s Island)
21.   Professor Phillip Brainard (The Absent Minded Professor)
22.   Ian Malcolm (Jurassic Park)
23.   The Time Traveller (H.G. Wells’ The Time Machine)
24.   Frederick Frankenstein (Young Frankenstein)
25.   Dr. Horrible (Dr. Horrible’s Singalong Blog)

And, yes...I put Station on there
(http://i45.tinypic.com/6xzszm.jpg)
Title: Re: LoC #64: Top 52 Scientists
Post by: Pak-Man on September 27, 2012, 11:37:56 AM
Heh. So did I!

1. Dr. Rusty Venture (Venture Bros.)
2. Dr. Egon Spengler (Ghostbusters)
3. Dr. Emmit "Doc" Brown (Back to the Future)
4. Professor Hubert Farnsworth (Futurama)
5. Gregor Mendel (Father of Genetics)

6. Professor E. Gadd (Luigi's Mansion)
7. Philo Farnsworth (Inventor of the electric television)
8. Benjamin Franklin (Founding Father AND Inventor!)

9. Mordin Solus (Mass Effect 2)
10. Dr. Frankenstein (Frankenstein)
11. Thomas Alba Edison (Inventor)

12. Dr. Wily (Mega Man)
13. Krang (Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles)
14. Copernicus (Astrology dude extraordinaire)
15. Frylock (Aqua Teen Hunger Force)
16. Sir Isaac Newton (Physicist)
17. Doctor Mindbender (G.I. Joe)
18. Wallace (Wallace and Grommit)
19. Perceptor (Transformers)
20. Station (Bill and Ted's Bogus Journey)
21. Beast (X-Men)
22. Albert Einstein (E=MC^2)
23. Tony Stark (Iron Man)

24. Dr. Andonuts (Earthbound)
25. Baxter Stockman (Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles)
Title: Re: LoC #64: Top 52 Scientists
Post by: Darth Geek on September 27, 2012, 12:36:10 PM
Glad to see Egon make it so high on the list. He was always my favorite Ghostbuster.


1. Nikola Tesla
2. Dr. Forrester
3. Dr. Insano
4. Doc Brown
5. Albert Einstein
6. Dr. Bunsen Honeydew (and Beeker)
7. Leonardo DeVinci
8. Egon Spengler
9. Archimedes
10. Benjemin Franklin
11. Dr. Farnsworth
12. Bill Nye the Science Guy
13. Dr. Herbert West
14. Isaac Newton
15. Galileo
16. Mythbuster crew (Adam Savage, Jamie Hyneman)
17. Thomas Edison
18. Dilbert
19. Tony Stark
20. Wallace (Wallace & Gromit)
21. Dr. Horrible
22. Dr. Bruce Banner
23. Wilbur and Orville Wright
24. Randall Peltzer(Gremlins)
25. Sheldon Cooper
Title: Re: LoC #64: Top 52 Scientists
Post by: ScottotD on September 27, 2012, 12:58:19 PM
1. Tony Stark (Iron Man)
2. Egon Spengler (Ghostbusters)
3. Doctor Pretorius (Bride of Frankenstein)
4. Adam Savage (Mythbusters)
5. Peter Venkman (Ghostbusters)
6. Buckeroo Banzai (The Adventures of Buckaroo Banzai Across the 8th Dimension)
7. Bruce Banner (The Hulk)
8. Doctor Clayton Forrester (MST3k)
9. Dr. Bunsen Honeydew (The Muppet Show)
10. Dr Frankenstein (Young Frankenstein)
11. Herbert West (Re-Animator)
12. Prof. Farnsworth (Futurama)
13. Dr. Strangelove (Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb)
14. Dr Frankenstein (Frankenstein)
15. Jamie Hyneman (Mythbusters)
16. Professor Frink (The Simpsons)
17. Dr. Krieger (Archer)
18. Dr. Emmett Brown (Back to the Future)
19. Dr. Josef Heiter (The Human Centipede (First Sequence))
20. Dr. Horrible (Dr. Horrible's Sing-a-Long blog)
21. Dr. Brundle (The Fly)
22. Dr. Evil (Austin Powers)
23. Dr. Venture (Venture Brothers)
24. Dr. Raymond Stantz (Ghostbusters)
25. Batman ('cause Batman's a Scientist)
Title: Re: LoC #64: Top 52 Scientists
Post by: lassieface on September 27, 2012, 01:14:09 PM
1. Isaac Newton
2. Galileo Galilei
3. Albert Einstein
4. Neils Bohr
5. Charles Darwin
6. Johannes Kepler
7. Nicolaus Copernicus
8. Plato
9. Louis Pasteur
10. Stephen Hawking
11. Pythagoras
12. Erwin Schrodinger
13. Edwin Hubble
14. Aristotle
15. Marie Curie
16. Richard Feynman
17. Leonardo Da Vinci
18. Nikola Tesla
19. Robert Goddard
20. Michael Faraday
21. Thomas Edison
22. Alfred Wegener
23. Jonas Salk
24. Gregor Mendel
25. James Watson

I'm to lazy to bold the ones that were in the list. Definitely had more physicists than just about any other field.
Title: Re: LoC #64: Top 52 Scientists
Post by: Darth Geek on September 27, 2012, 01:15:36 PM
12. Erwin Schrodinger
I wasn't sure if he was on my list. But when I looked, turns out he wasn't.
Title: Re: LoC #64: Top 52 Scientists
Post by: Johnny Unusual on September 27, 2012, 01:25:27 PM
Here's my list.

1. Stephen Hawking
2. Nicholai Tesla
3. Neil Degrasse Tyson
4. Reed Richards (AKA Mr Fantastic)
5. Dr. Doom
6. Dr. Octopus
7. Charles Darwin
8. Professor Hubert Farnsworth (Futurama)
9. Dr. Horrible
10. Hank McCoy (AKA The Beast)
11. Egon Spangler
12. Dr. Thaddeus “Rusty” Venture
13. Archimedes
14. Dr. Hank Pym (AKA Ant-Man)
15. Victor Frankenstein
16. Dexter (Dexter’s Laboratory)
17. The Brain (Pinky & the Brain)
18. Albert Einstein
19. Doc Brown (Back to the Future)
20. Doctor Will Magnus
21. Dr. Bunsen Honeydew
22. Winifred Burkle
23. Bill Nye
24. Professor Utonium
25. Dr. Clayton Forrestor (MST3k)

Got to say, a little disappointed Mr. Fantastic didn't make the list, especially since he's so... um... the adjective seems to elude me.
Title: Re: LoC #64: Top 52 Scientists
Post by: Tripe on September 27, 2012, 01:26:39 PM
"up his own arse"?

Wait, that's more than one word, yeah I've no idea what word you were thinking of.
Title: Re: LoC #64: Top 52 Scientists
Post by: Pak-Man on September 27, 2012, 01:28:46 PM
The awesome thing is, with his powers, he literally could be!
Title: Re: LoC #64: Top 52 Scientists
Post by: Johnny Unusual on September 27, 2012, 01:48:34 PM
Mine:
19. Ichio Kaku

He's one I've been meaning to learn more about.  He makes learning fun!


Quote
15. Karl Popper (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Karl_popper)

The inventor of the jalapeno popper.

Great work on the list, Golfy.  I'll put it up on the Masterlist in the next week or so.
Title: Re: LoC #64: Top 52 Scientists
Post by: goflyblind on September 27, 2012, 01:54:46 PM
Quote
15. Karl Popper (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Karl_popper)

The inventor of the jalapeno popper.

if only people had voted for plato, inventor of the plate. :-\


Great work on the list, Golfy.  I'll put it up on the Masterlist in the next week or so.

:D 8)
Title: Re: LoC #64: Top 52 Scientists
Post by: anais.butterfly on September 27, 2012, 02:21:06 PM
1) Erwin Schrodinger
2) J. Robert Oppenheimer – He has become death, the destroyer of worlds
3) Marie Curie – Granted her greatest feet was being turned into a radioactive monster in Bart Simpson’s mind
4) Johannes Gutenberg – He invented the printing press and reading is my favorite thing ever (although I refuse to vote for whomever invented the Kindle)
5) Nikola Tesla
6)Leonardo da Vinci
7) Albert Einstein
 8 ) Sir Isaac Newton
9) Charles Darwin (although, as a woman, I say F**K evolution because of the menstrual cycle)
10) Aristotle
11) Walter White (Breaking Bad)
12) Dr. Sam Beckett (Quantum Leap)
13) Doc Emmett Brown (Back to the Future)
14) Gaius Baltar (Battlestar Gallatica)
15) Dr. Hubert Farnsworth (Futurama)
16) Dr. Ian Malcolm (Jurassic Park)
17) Dr. Venture (The Venture Brothers)
18) Copernicus
19) Carl Sagan
20) Alfred Nobel
21) Bunson Honeydew
22) Victor Frankenstein
23) Dana Scully
24) Benjamin Franklin
25) Thomas Edison
Title: Re: LoC #64: Top 52 Scientists
Post by: CJones on September 27, 2012, 06:58:56 PM
My submission for Scientists LoC. I guess von Braun didn't make it after all. I'd honestly never heard of any of this stuff about Edison being a jerk until now. And I'm surprised Tesla ranked so high. Probably a connection there., if that article is to be believed.

1 Issac Newton - He came up with all those Laws of Physics that people (eventually) took for granted for centuries. Turned out later he was only slightly wrong. Also, Calculus.
2 Galileo Galilei - "Might I suggest that we AREN'T the center of the universe". Apparently that didn't go over so well.
Actually I think I got Coppernicus and Galileo mixed up a little here. 
3 Max Plank - You know you're a big name scientist when you have a Universal Constant named after you.
4 Albert Einstein - Yeah, E=mc^2 and all that. What I'm impressed by is that he took the known fact that the speed of light is a constant, compared it with Newton's Laws, and realized,"This doesn't really work". Thus: Relativity.
5 Charles Babbage - Designed the first computer... A century before computers existed. Everything was gears, rods and levers, and it was never actually built. But the design was astonishly similar to how modern CPU's operate.
6 Wernher von Braun - German defector who led the design of the Saturn 5 rocket. Yeah, the one that went to the moon
7 Michael Faraday - You know all those little electric motors and servos? You can thank Faraday for those.
8 Archimedes
9 Marie Curie
10 Werner Heisenburg
11 Thomas Edison
12 Leonardo da Vinci
13 Richard Feynman
14 Steven Hawking
15 Neil DeGrasse Tyson
16 Johannes Kepler
17 Thomas Hunt Morgan (The fruit fly guy. He took Medel's theories of inheritance, applied it to generations of fruit flies, and used those results to work out how genes works, and how they're carried on chromosomes. In my mind I kinda combined Morgan and Mendel, and so forgot Mendel's contributions. Together, they founded modern genetics. 
18 Johann Carl Friedrich Gauss (Few people realize just how much stuff he was involved in. He was a child prodigy at mathematics. Plus, who do you think the Gauss Rifle is named after?)
19 Christian Doppler (Doppler effect, duh)
20 Guglielmo Marconi
21 Nicola Tesla
22 The Doctor (from Doctor Who) I am amazed this didn't make it.
23 Dr. Frankenstein
24 Jonas Venture Sr.
25 The Brain (from Pinky and the Brain)
Title: Re: LoC #64: Top 52 Scientists
Post by: Johnny Unusual on September 27, 2012, 08:43:14 PM
My submission for Scientists LoC. I guess von Braun didn't make it after all. I'd honestly never heard of any of this stuff about Edison being a jerk until now. And I'm surprised Tesla ranked so high. Probably a connection there., if that article is to be believed.

1 Issac Newton - He came up with all those Laws of Physics that people (eventually) took for granted for centuries. Turned out later he was only slightly wrong. Also, Calculus.
[/i]

Leibniz?

22 The Doctor (from Doctor Who) I am amazed this didn't make it.


In what way is he a scientist?  I thought about it and dismissed it. Bodging up a few gadgets here and there does not a scientist make.  Might as well have put MacGyver on.

I left him out for the same reason I left out Sam Beckett.  They are characters with a tremendous amount of scientific knowledge, but while they are scientists (I believe Pertwee was UNIT's "science consultant" or some such title), they are really more in the adventurer mold, traveling through time and solving problems  Which reminds me, I might suggest top 50 adventurers down the line (which would again, consist of real and fictional characters).
Title: Re: LoC #64: Top 52 Scientists
Post by: Tripe on September 27, 2012, 08:46:34 PM
Now, Rassilon, he was a scientist!

Also, I wrote about the Newton/Leibniz calculus kerffufle, will link to it on the morrow. :)
Title: Re: LoC #64: Top 52 Scientists
Post by: Johnny Unusual on September 27, 2012, 08:51:39 PM
Wow, a three way scientist fight?  And this guy was involved?

(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/thumb/1/1e/Calculus_savate.png/220px-Calculus_savate.png)
Title: Re: LoC #64: Top 52 Scientists
Post by: Rainbow Dash on September 27, 2012, 08:51:51 PM
Hope you don't disappoint on Werner Von Braun, Sergei Korolev and Harrison Schmitt people!

:(
Title: Re: LoC #64: Top 52 Scientists
Post by: Tripe on September 28, 2012, 08:46:35 AM
Also, I wrote about the Newton/Leibniz calculus kerffufle, will link to it on the morrow. :)

Here we go (http://asknickipedia.wordpress.com/2008/12/24/one-for-winnie-cooper/)
Title: Re: LoC #64: Top 52 Scientists
Post by: Compound on September 28, 2012, 10:38:31 AM
1. Norman Borlaug
2. Isaac Newton
3. Archimedes
4. Leonardo da Vinci

5. Galileo
6. Euclid
7. Neils Bohr
8. Edward Teller
9. Max Planck

10. Gregor Mendel
11. Linus Pauling
12. Ben Franklin
13. Louis Pasteur
14. Tycho Brahe
15. Michael Faraday
16. Enrico Fermi
17. Carl Sagan
18. Robert Oppenheimer

19. Charles Lyell
20. Aristotle
21. Guglielno Marconi
22. Alexander Fleming
23. James Watson
24. Francis Crick
25. Thomas Cech

And "Save a billion lives and no one knows your fucking name" continues to hold true.
Title: Re: LoC #64: Top 52 Scientists
Post by: Tripe on September 28, 2012, 10:58:06 AM
1. Norman Borlaug
Great #1