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General Discussion => Computers & Gadgets & Tech => Topic started by: Henry88 on March 07, 2012, 12:14:49 PM

Title: the future of broadband Thread
Post by: Henry88 on March 07, 2012, 12:14:49 PM
Quote
The slow death of DSL will cause the rapid rise of expensive broadband for underserved areas if Verizon’s Fusion home broadband service is any indication. Verizon on Tuesday launched its long-planned home broadband service powered by its LTE wireless network — trading slow in-ground copper for expensive airwaves on its end. And the consumer? They trade unlimited slow broadband from a wire for faster service that’s going to cost a pretty penny.
So what is this wireless panacea?

Verizon’s HomeFusion Broadband uses Verizon’s LTE network to offer homes broadband speeds of 5-12 Mbps for downloading and 2-5 MBps for uploading. For most users, this will be better than the older DSL speeds, which are about 6 Mbps close to the node but slow as you travel further away from the telco’s central office. Verizon will pop a small a cylinder packed with antennas on the side of your house in order to deliver the service, which comes with the same caps and pricing plans Verizon currently offers its cellular customers. And that’s really the rub.

All of the plans are usage-based, which changes the broadband paradigm from one of limited bits to limited bytes. Verizon’s plans begin at $59.99 of monthly access for 10 GB of data, and there is a $200 installation charge. If you consider that an hour of watching Netflix consumes about 1 gigabyte, you’re looking at about 8-10 hours of TV a month.

To be fair, Verizon says it is marketing this as an alternative for consumers in broadband-limited markets, where DSL or satellite might be the only options. In the case of satellite broadband, consumers also have caps and limited plans that cost a lot, so this compares somewhat favorably to those. But so far, HomeFusion Broadband will be available beginning later this month in Birmingham, Ala., Dallas and Nashville, Tenn., which are not exactly satellite country. Additional markets will follow.
So what’s this about the death of DSL?

Verizon may have started out as a collection of wireline telephone companies, but it has been rapidly abandoning its legacy copper by selling off its DSL businesses to Frontier Communications, Fairpoint and even the Carlyle Group. The plan, as we said back then, was to get rid of high-cost copper lines and come in later with wireless broadband that delivered better speeds. From an economics perspective, Verizon spent between $19 billion and $22 billion laying fiber to 16.5 million homes in the last few years. But it has invested a total of $22.3 billion billion in the last three years building its wireless network, which covers more than 285 million customers (all of that is not LTE spending and coverage). And those customers are likely to pay more per month and get less in terms of the data they transmit over the network.

AT&T seems to be learning from Verizon’s tactics. It recently hinted that it would sell its unimproved DSL lines (“unimproved” means they aren’t part of the fiber-to-the-node U-Verse deployment), according to Dave Burstein, editor of DSLPrime, an industry newsletter. This is, of course, after AT&T CEO Randall Stephenson admitted that DSL was an “obsolete” technology (although AT&T later tried to clarify its way out of that situation). And it makes sense. Why would AT&T want to keep DSL and its maintenance headaches around when it can offer a higher-dollar triple-play service on U-Verse and wireless access to those who can’t get anything else?
Faster, Pricier and Not Better

The problem with this transition from DSL in rural areas over to wireless, and the general loss of broadband players, can be summed up in one word: caps.

With HomeFusion, customers that may have had DSL are paying more for speed, but they are also giving up on all-you-can-eat broadband. That will put more people under the sway of caps since AT&T, Comcast(cmsca), Charter and smaller players all have caps on broadband service.

This is commonly thought to protect their pay TV businesses, because you can’t watch hours of HD television on a capped connection without somehow busting through your cap. But there’s a lot more to it. As Verizon notes in its press release for HomeFusion, the router can connect up to four wired and at least 20 wireless devices inside the home, using Wi-Fi. We’re moving to a society where everything is consumed via broadband, from our entertainment to our work, from our home automation to our security.

And once we’re there, the idea of letting that flow of traffic pass by without taking some cut from it is painful for operators that grew up charging people by the minute. In their eyes the byte is the new minute, and by golly, consumers will pay for it. As DSL and older connection technologies die, telcos want the unlimited plans that helped broadband succeed to die with it.

http://gigaom.com/broadband/why-verizon-is-killing-dsl-cheap-broadband/

very cute indeed

Title: Re: the future of broadband Thread
Post by: MrTorso on March 07, 2012, 01:44:51 PM
Great! Can't wait to be gouged!  Right now I have Verizon DSL because I refuse to deal with companies that have caps. I DL and stream a lot per month. I get 3mb down an while it is painfully slow compared to cable it is far cheaper ($38 a month) ad I don't have to worry about my account being suspended or cancelled for using to much bandwidth.
Title: Re: the future of broadband Thread
Post by: MartyS (Gromit) on March 07, 2012, 02:21:40 PM
 I just switched last fall from 3mbps DSL to cable, the real DSL speed was 2.8mbps and just wasn't cutting it for streaming video anymore.  I thought I'd have an issue with the 250GB cap but have only come close to it one month so far.  Price for 15mbps cable is only $5 a month more than the DSL.

 If verizon had offered 6mbps DSL I would have stayed, really only need 6 to do streaming.  My line stats were fine for 10mbps DSL but since they put fios in my area they stopped upgrading the DSL equipment, no one can get over 3mbps around here.  They really are neglecting the copper lines now.  Fios has no cap but even the cheapest plan is too expensive for what I need.
Title: Re: the future of broadband Thread
Post by: anais.jude on March 07, 2012, 02:39:48 PM
As someone who has loved a smart phone and lost it....I will take getting Data Plan raped ANYDAY.


I miss you, iPhone! *sniffle* Ahhh, iPhonely
Title: Re: the future of broadband Thread
Post by: Henry88 on March 07, 2012, 08:16:02 PM
Quote
Verizon Wireless today announced "HomeFusion Broadband," a totally uncompetitive home broadband service that delivers pretty good 4G speeds to the residents of Birmingham, Alabama, at the punitive price of $59.99 for a mere 10GB.

Nobody who's ever dealt with home broadband thinks that 10GB is an acceptable amount of monthly data for a high-speed, primary home connection. Cell phone carriers get away with low data caps in large part because they aren't primary home connections; buried in most mobile data contracts is a warning not to use the system as your primary Internet link.

Verizon's cap is lower than almost any other service designed for homes, and it's lower than the average broadband user consumes. AT&T says its average U-Verse user gobbles up about 21GB per month, as a justification for imposing a 150GB or 250GB monthly cap. Verizon, meanwhile, caps neither its DSL nor its FiOS at all.

Verizon's $50 for 10GB is half the price of what the company usually charges for mobile-phone data, and on phones, that's the industry standard. But that just shows how mobile-phone data paradigms can't replace a roomy home broadband connection. If phone-level data caps come to our homes, we'd have to give up most of our current ways of using the Internet, never mind future ones.

At home, we use the Internet very differently than we do when we're on the move. We watch video on big screens. We download albums full of music. We play games. We Skype for hours on end. We use several devices in the same house, on the same connection. According to our calculations, you'll be able to use up Verizon's HomeFusion Broadband cap in about six hours of Netflix. Per month. That's all you get.

Internet services are only going to become more data-hungry with time, too. Just look at our TVs, getting larger and higher-resolution. Look at Google and Apple serving up video to them; look at the various Internet-connected gadgets we're buying, and how they all connect to your home Wi-Fi, all at once.

We in the U.S. desparately need more home broadband competition. We have some of the highest broadband prices in the world, largely because of a lack of competition. As The Economist reported in 2010, the U.S. measures poorly in almost every gauge of broadband speed, cost, and penetration. But a service so limited that you can only use it six hours a month doesn't help the problem one bit.

Verizon Tries to Snow the FCC
There's one provider HomeFusion competes well with, of course: HughesNet. HughesNet is the much-beloved, much-despised satellite Internet system people in deep rural America use, and it charges high rates for low data caps because of the inherent high cost of satellite connections. Verizon is describing HomeFusion as a product for cities and suburbs, though, not for deep rural areas.

Yes, you could argue that Verizon's solution would be good for "light users," some small percentage of the population willing to gently sip their Internet as they check their email twice a day or whatever. I know those people exist. Some of them are on HughesNet. But the HughesNet subscribers I know generally chafe at their data caps; they rightfully think their limited Internet is a second-class service compared to what people in metro areas get.

I'm not sure Verizon intends to sell a single subscription here. Its audience is more likely members of Congress and FCC commissioners. You see, up until recently Verizon's parent company was working to build out a true home broadband solution: its award-winning FiOS, a fiber-optic system with great speed and roomy capacity.

But that came to an end in December when Verizon decided to enter a deal with cable companiesto buy some unused wireless spectrum of theirs. In exchange, it seems - though Verizon of course would deny a quid pro quo - the company decided to build out no more FiOS after the next few years, and to just resell cable Internet.

The cable spectrum buy hasn't cleared the government, though, and the FCC has been looking harshly upon wireless deals that appear to reduce competition, like the failed AT&T/T-Mobile merger. So HomeFusion is a smokescreen, a scrim, a paper banner that says "Hey, we aren't out of the competitive broadband business!" If this is their offering, they are absolutely out of the competitive broadband business.

What About the Spectrum Crunch?
The HomeFusion announcement is also odd considering that Verizon has been whining very loudly about how it doesn't have enough spectrum and about how we're on the verge of the mobile Internet becoming a massive traffic jam.

Verizon refuses to make research on its own spectrum usage public, resulting in a long string of hilarious rants from The Verge's mobile editor, Chris Ziegler, on Twitter.

"I can't think of any other industry where it's acceptable to be this vague about how you're using a national resource," he tweeted, and then, later, "this hot dog is made out of [REDACTED]. we estimate that if you don't allow us to acquire oscar meyer, we'll be out of hot dogs by 2015." Oh, just go look at the whole feed.

If Verizon is running out of spectrum, it shouldn't be introducing a new home broadband product. It also shouldn't be afraid to show the public how efficiently it's using its spectrum, if the company wants more. And if Verizon is interested in home broadband competition, it shouldn't be introducing a service with such a limited data cap that it doesn't compete.

At the moment, this all just looks like a transparent land grab, with no benefit for Americans at the end of it.

http://www.pcmag.com/article2/0,2817,2401196,00.asp

a double standard if i ever saw one
Title: Re: the future of broadband Thread
Post by: anais.jude on March 07, 2012, 08:28:43 PM
As someone who has loved a smart phone and lost it....I will take getting Data Plan raped ANYDAY.


I miss you, iPhone! *sniffle* Ahhh, iPhonely

If you get pregnant from being data plan raped, Santorum wouldn't let you have an abortion. Just FYI.

MotherF*%$er!!!
Title: Re: the future of broadband Thread
Post by: MrTorso on March 07, 2012, 08:59:17 PM
I just switched last fall from 3mbps DSL to cable, the real DSL speed was 2.8mbps and just wasn't cutting it for streaming video anymore.  I thought I'd have an issue with the 250GB cap but have only come close to it one month so far.  Price for 15mbps cable is only $5 a month more than the DSL.

 If verizon had offered 6mbps DSL I would have stayed, really only need 6 to do streaming.  My line stats were fine for 10mbps DSL but since they put fios in my area they stopped upgrading the DSL equipment, no one can get over 3mbps around here.  They really are neglecting the copper lines now.  Fios has no cap but even the cheapest plan is too expensive for what I need.

Yeah I am like 1500 feet too far away for the 7mb DSL.  Last month I downloaded about 150GB just from USENET. That's not counting any streaming or ON DEMAND stuff I do with the satellite dish or any of the other web stuff. If I had the fast connection i used to when I lived in AZ I routinely hit 300-400GB a month. Comcast's cap rules are so draconian. They can and will just cut you off. How about an overage fee? Nope. For a long time they wouldn't tell you what the cap was, and until a couple years ago they didn't even have a system to tell you how much you used. 
Title: Re: the future of broadband Thread
Post by: Sideswipe on March 07, 2012, 09:51:15 PM
As someone who has loved a smart phone and lost it....I will take getting Data Plan raped ANYDAY.


I miss you, iPhone! *sniffle* Ahhh, iPhonely

If you get pregnant from being data plan raped, Santorum wouldn't let you have an abortion. Just FYI.

MotherF*%$er!!!

Your mutant verizon baby is a gift from god!  You should be proud to have that abomination inside you.
Title: Re: the future of broadband Thread
Post by: Henry88 on March 29, 2012, 02:53:57 PM
Quote
After we'd scooped early details on the project in 2010, Verizon earlier this month officially unveiled their new "HomeFusion" fixed residential LTE service. Offering 5 to 12 megabits per second on the downlink and 2 to 5 Mbps on the uplink, Home Fusion will come in $60 (10 GB cap), $90 (20 GB cap) and $120 (30 GB plan) flavors. Each tier comes with a whopping $10 per gigabyte overage penalty -- something that's not going to place very nice with HD Netflix happy households.

Verizon initially announced that the service would first appear in Birmingham, Dallas and Nashville, but today noted it's now live in Terre Haute, Birmingham, Alabama, El Cajon, California, Nashville, Tennessee, Dallas, Texas and Roanoke, Virginia.

Click for full size
Verizon's announcement also notes that customers who sign up for Home Fusion will receive double their usual data allotment for the first two months "as they settle into using HomeFusion Broadband." Verizon pretty wisely doesn't want early product impressions focused on the second mortgage you may have to take out to pay your bandwidth bill.

Verizon states they're working with Asurion for installs, and that subscribers will have to pay a $200 one-time equipment fee. The press release gives a little more detail on the in-home setup and the "cantenna" which will be affixed to users' homes:

Verizon Wireless’ high-speed 4G LTE network is delivered to a cylinder-shaped antenna which transmits the signal to an in-home broadband router. The antenna is professionally installed outside a customer’s residence and is equal in size to a five-gallon paint bucket. The device delivers Verizon’s 4G LTE signal to the broadband router and allows the customer to connect up to four wired and at least 20 wireless devices in the household.
While it hasn't seen much mainstream press attention, this is a fairly massive play for Verizon, who we've noted for several years has been planning to use LTE for their real national power play for some time. While the service likely won't pose a competitive threat to cable, it will pose a massive competitive threat to satellite broadband (which suffers from slow speeds, low daily usage caps and high prices) and rural DSL, which for many users remains stuck at between 1.5 and 3 Mbps downstream.

Factor in Verizon's partnership with cable and their streaming video partnership with RedBox and you may start to understand the kind of nationwide brand powerplay Verizon's been quietly working on the last several years.

http://www.dslreports.com/shownews/Verizon-Home-Fusion-LTE-Service-Arrives-119016?nocomment=1
Title: Re: the future of broadband Thread
Post by: Smith Dr John Smith on March 29, 2012, 04:20:53 PM
$120 for only 30 gigs?  That's not much.  i means you download more then one or two movies or let's say a video game comes out with a big new DLC level and you are over your cap for the month in just a few days to a week.
Title: Re: the future of broadband Thread
Post by: MartyS (Gromit) on March 29, 2012, 09:58:33 PM
Not to mention $10 per gig after you hit the cap, so that $3 HD TV show from iTunes will run you an extra 10 bucks just to download it.  That plan would cost me about $1300 a month at my current usage.

And the antenna is the size of a 5 gallon paint bucket?  That's as insane as the pricing...
Title: Re: the future of broadband Thread
Post by: RVR II on March 30, 2012, 05:35:54 AM
That's why I'll get what I need through my desktop then compress it and transfer it to my phone to watch when ever I feel like it :-X
Title: Re: the future of broadband Thread
Post by: Smith Dr John Smith on March 30, 2012, 07:20:44 AM
Not to mention $10 per gig after you hit the cap, so that $3 HD TV show from iTunes will run you an extra 10 bucks just to download it.  That plan would cost me about $1300 a month at my current usage.

And the antenna is the size of a 5 gallon paint bucket?  That's as insane as the pricing...

Yeah are people really signing up for this?  I know comcast gets a lot of flak and too be fair my friend's comcast is not the fastest internet I have ever seen but he pays one flat rate and doesn't have limit on how much he uses the internet,so that still sounds like a better deal to me.
Title: Re: the future of broadband Thread
Post by: Henry88 on March 30, 2012, 08:24:38 AM
Not to mention $10 per gig after you hit the cap, so that $3 HD TV show from iTunes will run you an extra 10 bucks just to download it.  That plan would cost me about $1300 a month at my current usage.

And the antenna is the size of a 5 gallon paint bucket?  That's as insane as the pricing...

Yeah are people really signing up for this?  I know comcast gets a lot of flak and too be fair my friend's comcast is not the fastest internet I have ever seen but he pays one flat rate and doesn't have limit on how much he uses the internet,so that still sounds like a better deal to me.

the people Verizon is gunning for don't no any better   
Title: Re: the future of broadband Thread
Post by: MrTorso on March 30, 2012, 08:33:06 AM
Not to mention $10 per gig after you hit the cap, so that $3 HD TV show from iTunes will run you an extra 10 bucks just to download it.  That plan would cost me about $1300 a month at my current usage.

And the antenna is the size of a 5 gallon paint bucket?  That's as insane as the pricing...

Yeah are people really signing up for this?  I know comcast gets a lot of flak and too be fair my friend's comcast is not the fastest internet I have ever seen but he pays one flat rate and doesn't have limit on how much he uses the internet,so that still sounds like a better deal to me.

the people Verizon is gunning for don't no any better


Aren't they gunning for the people that can't get cable? I would assume this is for rural areas that can't get lines to their houses.
Title: Re: the future of broadband Thread
Post by: RVR II on March 30, 2012, 08:50:21 AM
Aren't they gunning for the people that can't get cable? I would assume this is for rural areas that can't get lines to their houses.
If that's the case, my parents need that as their DSL is just gawd-awful slow but there's no way they would pay exorbitant costs through Verizon.. :-\
Title: Re: the future of broadband Thread
Post by: MartyS (Gromit) on March 30, 2012, 09:33:26 AM
Aren't they gunning for the people that can't get cable? I would assume this is for rural areas that can't get lines to their houses.
If that's the case, my parents need that as their DSL is just gawd-awful slow but there's no way they would pay exorbitant costs through Verizon.. :-\

The different plans are what's really crazy, you'd be better off just getting the cheapest one and paying the overage just for the months you go over.  Since you aren't going to be able to do much more than email and surfing the web on any of the plans.  Going from a 10GB cap to a 30GB cap really doesn't let you do a lot more.

I can see it being a good option if you've got a DSL line that drops out a lot, so you can have a stable connection.  But I feel bad for people that have stable 1mbps DSL and switch to this because they hype the speed, then get their first bill and go bankrupt... 
Title: Re: the future of broadband Thread
Post by: Henry88 on March 30, 2012, 11:17:04 AM
Quote
BIRMINGHAM, Ala., March 19, 2012 /PRNewswire via COMTEX/ -- As access to skilled workers becomes increasingly vital to the U.S. economy, AT&T* is launching a quarter-billion-dollar campaign to help more students graduate from high school ready for careers and college, and to ensure the country is better prepared to meet global competition.

According to a March 19, 2012 report by Civic Enterprises, the Everyone Graduates Center, America's Promise Alliance and the Alliance for Excellent Education, Alabama has seen a .7 percentage increase in 2009 graduation rates, compared with data from 2002.

AT&T Aspire, already among the most significant U.S. corporate educational initiatives with more than $100 million invested since 2008, will tackle high school success and college/career readiness for students at risk of dropping out of high school through a much larger, "socially innovative" approach. Social innovation goes beyond traditional philanthropy - which typically involves only charitable giving - to also engage people and technology to bring different approaches, new solutions and added resources to challenging social problems. The Aspire effort already has impacted more than one million U.S. high school students, helping them prepare for success in the workplace and college.

The greatly expanded effort centers on a new, $250 million financial commitment planned over 5 years. AT&T Aspire will build on that commitment by using technology to connect with students in new and more effective ways, such as with interactive gamification, Web-based content and social media. The company will also tap the innovation engine of the AT&T Foundry to look for fresh or atypical approaches to educational obstacles. Finally, AT&T Aspire will capitalize on the power of personal connections in the form of mentoring, internships and other voluntary efforts that involve many of AT&T's approximately 260,000 employees.

Between now and April 18, 2012, AT&T is also encouraging Alabama organizations to submit applications to pre-qualify for funding through the Local High School Impact Initiative Requests for Proposals (RFPs). AT&T is most interested in funding local programs that have strong, evidence-based practices grounded in the What Works Clearinghouse Dropout Prevention: A Practice Guide and data-driven outcomes demonstrated to improve high school graduation rates. More information on the RFP process is available at www.att.com/education-news (click on the "Aspire Local Impact RFP" option).

"AT&T Aspire works toward an America where every student graduates high school equipped with the knowledge and skills to strengthen the nation's workforce," AT&T Chairman and CEO Randall Stephenson said while announcing the extended commitment during a keynote address at the second annual Building a Grad Nation Summit. The Washington, D.C., event convened by America's Promise Alliance ( http://www.americaspromise.org/ ), Civic Enterprises ( http://www.civicenterprises.net/home.html ), The Everyone Graduates Center at Johns Hopkins University ( www.every1graduates.org/ ), and the Alliance for Excellent Education ( http://www.all4ed.org/ ) brings together nearly 1,200 U.S. leaders to discuss progress and challenges in ending the high school dropout crisis.

Lacking a high school degree is a serious issue in the United States, where one in four students - more than 1 million each year - drops out, according to a March 19, 2012, report by Civic Enterprises, the Everyone Graduates Center, America's Promise Alliance and the Alliance for Excellent Education. AT&T is the lead sponsor of this report. Education experts believe that the lack of a high school degree significantly worsens job prospects in a rapidly changing, increasingly sophisticated job market.

And, if dropouts find jobs, they earn less. On average, a high school dropout earns 25 percent less during the course of his or her lifetime compared with a high school graduate and 57 percent less than a college graduate with a bachelor's degree.[1]

The situation poses a serious risk to American competitiveness as corporations struggle to find talent, especially in the math and sciences fields. The dropout rate, along with inadequate training and education, is keeping many high-paying Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM) jobs from being filled. And the situation is expected to worsen as STEM jobs grow a projected 17 percent by 2018. Workers in these positions typically earn 26 percent more than those in non-STEM positions.[2]

Although the problem is serious, there are signs of progress according to the report issued today:

The high school graduation rate increased by 3.5 percentage points nationally from 2001 to 2009.

In 2001, the rate was 72.0 percent; by 2009, it had risen to 75.5 percent. From 2002 to 2009, six states experienced large gains in their graduation rates; 14 states made moderate gains; and four states made modest gains (note:2002 was the first year that state data became available.)

And the number of "dropout factory" high schools (a high school where 12th-grade enrollment is 60 percent or less than the 9th-grade enrollment three years previously) dropped from 2,007 to 1,550 from 2002 to 2010 - a 23 percent decrease.

The new and expanded AT&T commitment builds on the work AT&T Aspire has completed in the last four years. AT&T and the AT&T Foundation have invested more than $100 million in Aspire since 2008 - and more than $923 million since 1984 in education.

AT&T Aspire will build on that success by focusing on:

Technology

Collaborating with innovators, educators and other companies at the AT&T Foundry ( www.att.com/foundry ) to blaze new ground in developing solutions to improve education. For example, the company will sponsor challenges or contests for mobile application developers to create cutting-edge solutions to complex problems in our educational system. A June "hackathon" in Palo Alto, Calif., is the first scheduled education/technology development event.

Expanding strategic alliances with organizations that specialize in developing and marketing new interactive learning tools which better engage today's students.

Incorporating gamification, the Internet, video and social media into educational programs.

Enabling students in underserved communities to explore careers before graduation through internships in areas related to 21st-century skills.

Collaborating on a revolutionary nationwide initiative with GameDesk ( http://www.gamedesk.org/ ), pioneers in game-based and digital learning, aimed at transforming traditional instruction and equalizing education for all students.

People

Because AT&T employees have asked for more opportunities to engage with students and contribute to their success, AT&T will launch the Aspire Mentoring Academy later this year. The academy will enable employees to help students at risk of dropping out of school succeed in the classroom and in life.

Building on the success of AT&T's first Job Shadow initiative ( http://www.att.com/gen/corporate-citizenship?pid=11547 ) with Junior Achievement ( http://www.ja.org/ ), the next evolution for Job Shadow will create a program in which employee-student teams learn work/life skills, explore real business problems and form lasting relationships. The initial Job Shadow initiative already has involved 100,000 U.S. students, including 3,362 in Alabama

AT&T employees will provide skills-based mentoring, which pairs them with students based on shared interests to encourage and support career path development.

Inspiring more AT&T customers, companies and stakeholders to step up to the challenge of addressing the education crisis.

Communities

Deepening the financial commitment to local education-focused groups that deliver results.

Especially groups that embrace social innovation, focus on 21st-century skills, or focus on STEM disciplines for students in underserved communities.

Making local contributions to community organizations that specialize in helping students and improving the quality of education.

"It will take all of us working together and supporting the hard work of the education community to continue to improve graduation rates and preparedness for careers and college," Fred McCallum President AT&T Alabama said. "American business has an enormous stake in the success of our students. It's time to commit more innovation and resources to the task."

Cautionary Language Concerning Forward-Looking StatementsInformation set forth in this news release contains financial estimates and other forward-looking statements that are subject to risks and uncertainties, and actual results may differ materially. A discussion of factors that may affect future results is contained in AT&T's filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission. AT&T disclaims any obligation to update or revise statements contained in this news release based on new information or otherwise.

*AT&T products and services are provided or offered by subsidiaries and affiliates of AT&T Inc. under the AT&T brand and not by AT&T Inc.

About AT&TAT&T Inc. T +0.21% is a premier communications holding company and one of the most honored companies in the world. Its subsidiaries and affiliates - AT&T operating companies - are the providers of AT&T services in the United States and around the world. With a powerful array of network resources that includes the nation's fastest mobile broadband network, AT&T is a leading provider of wireless, Wi-Fi, high speed Internet, voice and cloud-based services. A leader in mobile broadband and emerging 4G capabilities, AT&T also offers the best wireless coverage worldwide of any U.S. carrier, offering the most wireless phones that work in the most countries. It also offers advanced TV services under the AT&T U-verse® and AT&T |DIRECTV brands. The company's suite of IP-based business communications services is one of the most advanced in the world. In domestic markets, AT&T Advertising Solutions and AT&T Interactive are known for their leadership in local search and advertising.

Additional information about AT&T Inc. and the products and services provided by AT&T subsidiaries and affiliates is available at http://www.att.com . This AT&T news release and other announcements are available at http://www.att.com/newsroom and as part of an RSS feed at www.att.com/rss . Or follow our news on Twitter at @ATT.

About Philanthropy at AT&TAT&T Inc. T +0.21% is committed to advancing education, strengthening communities and improving lives. Through its philanthropic initiatives and working with other organizations, AT&T has a long history of supporting projects that create learning opportunities; promote academic and economic achievement; and address community needs. In 2011, more than $115 million was contributed through corporate-, employee- and AT&T Foundation-giving programs.

[1] "The College Payoff," Georgetown University Center on Education and Workforce [August 2011]

[2] "STEM: Good Jobs Now and for the Future," U.S. Department of Commerce Economics and Statistics Administration [July 2011]

http://www.marketwatch.com/story/att-announces-additional-aspire-grants-to-help-improve-alabamas-dropout-rate-2012-03-19

a tad older
Title: Re: the future of broadband Thread
Post by: Henry88 on May 23, 2012, 07:22:01 PM
Quote
U.S. schools will need broadband speeds of 100 Mbps per 1,000 students and staff members by the 2014-15 school year in order to meet a growing demand for Web-based instruction and a skyrocketing number of student-owned Web devices, according to a report by a trade group representing state education agencies.

The report, The Broadband Imperative, recommends schools increase their broadband speeds to 1 Gbps per 1,000 students and staff by 2017-18. Internal WANs connecting schools within districts should be 1 Gbps by 2014-15 and 10 Gbps by 2017-18, said the report, released Monday by the State Educational Technology Directors Association (SETDA).

Schools are moving away from viewing Internet instruction as an add-on to traditional teaching, said Christine Fox, director of educational leadership and research at SETDA. Many schools are beginning to embrace online textbooks, video conferencing and online collaboration tools, she said during a press conference in Washington.

Broadband access has to be "ubiquitous and the broadband robust," said Fox, co-author of the new report. Broadband has become a "necessary utility" instead of an add-on, she added.

Schools must prepare for a large number of concurrent broadband users as more classrooms work Internet-based learning into their daily activities, Fox said. "Students shouldn't go to school and wonder if they turn on the light, is it going to dim the light in another room?" she said. "They also shouldn't wonder, if they go to download a video, is it going to slow the access to the classroom across the hall?"

For high-definition video streaming, each student needs 4 Mbps of download speed, the report said. For group videoconferencing on Skype, students need speeds of double that, the report said.

Students at Lawrence Township Public Schools in New Jersey now use videoconferencing to learn French from Canadian students, said Andrew Zuckerman, director of instructional services for the district. Students rely on the Internet for research and collaboration throughout the day, he said.

"We can no longer use 20th-century skills to teach 21st-century learners," Zuckerman added.

Within the next 13 months, the state of Maine will have more Web-enabled devices available for students than it has students, according to Jeff Mao, learning technology policy director at the Maine Department of Education. Maine began providing laptops to seventh-graders in 2002, he said, and schools often purchase the used Apple laptops after their leases expire.

In some Maine schools, there are now 1,400 concurrent broadband users, Mao said. "Fourteen hundred concurrent users are not going to live on a 10-megabit pipe, they're not going to live on a 50 -- they need a much more robust Internet connection," he said.

http://www.computerworld.com/s/article/9227379/Education_group_Schools_need_100_Mbps_per_1_000_broadband_users
Title: Re: the future of broadband Thread
Post by: Henry88 on May 29, 2012, 08:47:29 PM
Quote
An Ohio startup company has raised $200 million to fund gigabit-per-second broadband projects in six university communities across the U.S., the company announced Wednesday.

Gigabit Squared will work with the University Community Next Generation Innovation Project (Gig.U), a coalition of 30 universities focused on improved broadband, to select six communities in which to build the ultra-fast broadband networks, they said. The two organizations will select winning communities between November and the first quarter of 2013, Mark Ansboury, president of Gigabit Squared, said during a press conference.

The new project comes at an important time, when many commercial broadband providers have stopped deploying next-generation networks, said Blair Levin, executive director of Gig.U and lead author of the U.S. Federal Communications Commission's 2010 national broadband plan.

The strong backing for Gigabit Squared proves that, "yes, America needs an upgrade, and that, yes, there are investors and innovators willing to step up to get it done," Levin said.

High-speed broadband requires a new business model, Ansboury said. "It's time for a departure from the strategies of the past, strategies that merely looked a fulfilling current demand," he said.

The new Gigabit Neighborhood Gateway Program will focus on using broadband to drive innovations in education, health care, public safety and other sectors, Ansboury said. Many of the innovations that will come from the ultra-fast networks will be ideas that founders of the program can't anticipate, he said.

The program will create demonstration projects in Gig.U communities to serve as models for other regional broadband networks, Ansboury said. The new networks will use an open architecture.

The new program has partnerships with several companies, including Corning, G4S, Juniper Networks, Alcatel Lucent, Ericson and Level 3, Ansboury said. Funding comes from private sources.

The project will focus on creating a self-funding service that doesn't depend on government funding or subsidies, Levin said. "We're very excited about the notion that the private sector is stepping up to this, because it can build that sustainable model," he said.

http://www.computerworld.com/s/article/9227409/Groups_launch_gigabit_per_second_broadband_project?taxonomyId=80
Title: Re: the future of broadband Thread
Post by: Smith Dr John Smith on May 30, 2012, 03:48:45 AM
Quote
An Ohio startup company has raised $200 million to fund gigabit-per-second broadband projects in six university communities across the U.S., the company announced Wednesday.

Gigabit Squared will work with the University Community Next Generation Innovation Project (Gig.U), a coalition of 30 universities focused on improved broadband, to select six communities in which to build the ultra-fast broadband networks, they said. The two organizations will select winning communities between November and the first quarter of 2013, Mark Ansboury, president of Gigabit Squared, said during a press conference.

The new project comes at an important time, when many commercial broadband providers have stopped deploying next-generation networks, said Blair Levin, executive director of Gig.U and lead author of the U.S. Federal Communications Commission's 2010 national broadband plan.

The strong backing for Gigabit Squared proves that, "yes, America needs an upgrade, and that, yes, there are investors and innovators willing to step up to get it done," Levin said.

High-speed broadband requires a new business model, Ansboury said. "It's time for a departure from the strategies of the past, strategies that merely looked a fulfilling current demand," he said.

The new Gigabit Neighborhood Gateway Program will focus on using broadband to drive innovations in education, health care, public safety and other sectors, Ansboury said. Many of the innovations that will come from the ultra-fast networks will be ideas that founders of the program can't anticipate, he said.

The program will create demonstration projects in Gig.U communities to serve as models for other regional broadband networks, Ansboury said. The new networks will use an open architecture.

The new program has partnerships with several companies, including Corning, G4S, Juniper Networks, Alcatel Lucent, Ericson and Level 3, Ansboury said. Funding comes from private sources.

The project will focus on creating a self-funding service that doesn't depend on government funding or subsidies, Levin said. "We're very excited about the notion that the private sector is stepping up to this, because it can build that sustainable model," he said.

http://www.computerworld.com/s/article/9227409/Groups_launch_gigabit_per_second_broadband_project?taxonomyId=80

And if it turns out anything like current highspeed the highest speeds you will not be able to get the highest speeds in the US despite it being developed here.
Title: Re: the future of broadband Thread
Post by: Henry88 on May 31, 2012, 09:43:47 AM
Quote
Verizon Communications is putting the pedal to the metal on its FiOS service with a new 300Mbps option next month, offering a majority of its customers a wild Internet ride, though it hasn't said how much that ride will cost.

The company said Wednesday it will refresh its portfolio of services next month, introducing four new speed tiers. The most eye-catching will be the top plan, with 300Mbps (bits per second) downstream and 65Mbps upstream. With that grade of service, subscribers will be able to download a two-hour high-definition movie in 2.2 minutes and upload five minutes of HD home video in 31 seconds, according to Verizon. The fastest FiOS service now is 150Mbps downstream and 35Mbps upstream, with TV and voice, for $199.99 per month.

When it comes to national-scale broadband services, the 300Mbps service won't have any competition on the speed front. The large U.S. cable operators don't offer any services faster than about 100Mbps, and rival carrier AT&T, which doesn't build fiber all the way to homes with its competing U-Verse service, tops out at 24Mbps.

However, even the faster FiOS won't bring the U.S. to the forefront of global broadband. A survey of fiber service providers released last September by the Organization for Economic Development (OECD) showed operators offering 1Gbps speeds in Slovenia, Japan, Turkey and Sweden, and one in Norway advertising 400Mbps service.

Localized projects in the U.S. also are hitting the 1Gbps mark, or will when they go live. The most closely watched example is Google's fiber buildout in the twin cities of Kansas City, Missouri, and Kansas City, Kansas. The company said last month that it had laid 100 miles of fiber there, though it hasn't given a firm commercial launch date or pricing for its service. Google's experimental fiber network in a residential area at Stanford University is already live with 1Gbps service.

Last week, a coalition of universities said it had raised $200 million to build gigabit-speed fiber networks in six university communities. Small ISPs, including Sonic.net in California and GWI in Maine, also have built local gigabit networks.

FiOS runs over a fiber network that goes all the way to subscribers' homes and businesses, avoiding the lower capacity of copper wires. The theoretical capacity of a strand of fiber is almost limitless, and Verizon has gradually increased the speeds it offers. The 300Mbps Internet service will be available by itself or as part of bundles with TV and voice.

 

Also next month, Verizon will increase the upstream speeds on two of its tiers, introduce a new 75Mbps/35Mbps tier, and stop offering its 35Mbps and 25Mbps tiers for new subscribers. Verizon's 50Mbps plan will go from 20Mbps to 25Mbps upstream, and its 150Mbps service will go from 35Mbps to 65Mbps upstream.

http://www.computerworld.com/s/article/9227587/Verizon_boosting_FiOS_top_speed_to_300Mbps
Title: Re: the future of broadband Thread
Post by: MrTorso on May 31, 2012, 05:22:40 PM
I would love to have FIOS. It is all around me except for my town. So annoying.
Title: Re: the future of broadband Thread
Post by: MartyS (Gromit) on May 31, 2012, 06:48:34 PM
If they priced it closer to cable I'd switch, but it's almost twice as expensive on every speed tier.  Since cable here has pretty consistent speed all the time the only advantage for me is the upload is way faster, but I don't really need that so it's not worth the extra cost.  I rarely go close to the Comcast cap so there's another reason it's not worth it.
Title: Re: the future of broadband Thread
Post by: Henry88 on June 06, 2012, 10:15:20 PM
http://qwest.centurylink.com/legal/highspeedinternetsubscriberagreement/files/HSI_Subscriber_Agreement_ENG_v34_080811.pdf

Drop down to page 16 section 17 "Arbitration"
Title: Re: the future of broadband Thread
Post by: Henry88 on June 13, 2012, 09:00:44 PM
Quote
Recently, many U.S. Internet service providers have fallen in line with their international counterparts in capping monthly residential broadband usage. A new study by a Georgia Tech researcher, conducted during an internship at Microsoft Research, shows such pricing models trigger uneasy user experiences that could be mitigated by better tools to monitor data usage through their home networks.

Home users, the study found, typically manage their capped broadband access against three uncertainties -- invisible balances, mysterious processes and multiple users -- and these uncertainties have predictable impacts on household Internet use and can force difficult choices on users. Given the undeniable trend in both Internet norms (such as cloud-based applications) and home-entertainment delivery toward greater broadband requirements, the study seeks to create awareness and empathy among designers and researchers about the experience of Internet use under bandwidth caps.

Marshini Chetty, a postdoctoral researcher in Georgia Tech's School of Interactive Computing, interviewed 12 households in South Africa, a country in which broadband caps were universal until February 2010. Typically, the caps set by South African ISPs are severe with some plans only offering 1 GB of data per month. At the time of the study, the caps ranged up to 9GB of data, far lower than the 150GB-250GB caps set by U.S. providers.

What Chetty and her collaborators found were coping mechanisms built into South Africans' daily lives in order to manage their online activities under the caps. For example, some would routinely "top up" their accounts (pay additional fees for incremental cap increases), while others would visit family members to use their Internet accounts, or switch from desktop connectivity to smartphones. And with few (if any) ways for customers to monitor Internet usage throughout the month, their access often would be cut off in the middle of performing an online activity.

"People's behavior does change when limits are placed on Internet access -- just like we've seen happen in the smartphone market -- and many complain about usage-based billing, but no one has really studied the effects it has on consumer activity," said Chetty, who earned her Ph.D. in computer science from Georgia Tech in 2011. "We would also hear about people 'saving' bandwidth all month and then binge downloading toward the end of their billing period."

"Mysterious processes" refers to customers' inability to determine which applications are eating up their bandwidth, ranging from being unaware that streaming video or downloading songs consumes much more data than normal web browsing, to not knowing that many background applications (such as automatic software updates) count against the monthly cap.

"We were surprised to learn that many of the households we studied chose not to perform regular software updates in order to manage their cap," Chetty said. "This activity can be benign for some applications, inadvisable for others and downright dangerous in certain cases. For example, not installing security patches on your system can leave you vulnerable to viruses and other sorts of cyber attacks." Chetty suggested that the frequency of such risky behaviors among the broader population of metered/capped Internet users should be assessed via follow-up scientifically representative surveys.

Finally, in households with multiple Internet users, it can be difficult for the heads of the household to manage overall activity when they are not fully aware of each member's Internet use. As with other consumable resources in a household, from milk to hot water, the apportionment of "fair" amounts of bandwidth reflects family practices and requires a fair bit of nuance, varying by family style and composition.

"As ISPs move more toward usage-based pricing, we need to keep in mind the reactive behaviors that consumers adopt and the consequences of those behaviors. Because when you have broadband caps, you will use the Internet differently," Chetty said. "This study was performed in South Africa, and although the caps are higher in the United States, there are still instances where people are hitting them. So if you're going to have caps, you should empathize with your users and offer ways for customers to see how their data are being used and who is using them." More tools are becoming available, from ISPs, within operating systems and from third parties; but this is one of the first academic studies that systematically reveals why there is a demand for such tools, and why they are important to users.

The study's findings are summarized in the paper, "'You're Capped!' Understanding the Effects of Bandwidth Caps on Broadband Use in the Home," which Chetty will present on May 10 at the 2012 ACM SIGCHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (CHI 2012), being held May 5-10 in Austin, Texas. Chetty's coauthors include Beki Grinter, professor in the Georgia Tech School of Interactive Computing, and Richard Banks, A.J. Bernheim Brush and Jonathan Donner from Microsoft Research. The paper is one of nine Georgia Tech entries in the main program of CHI 2012.

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/05/120507113748.htm
Title: Re: the future of broadband Thread
Post by: gavind on June 21, 2012, 10:03:30 AM
Quote
Recently, many U.S. Internet service providers have fallen in line with their international counterparts in capping monthly residential broadband usage. A new study by a Georgia Tech researcher, conducted during an internship at Microsoft Research, shows such pricing models trigger uneasy user experiences that could be mitigated by better tools to monitor data usage through their home networks.

Home users, the study found, typically manage their capped broadband access against three uncertainties -- invisible balances, mysterious processes and multiple users -- and these uncertainties have predictable impacts on household Internet use and can force difficult choices on users. Given the undeniable trend in both Internet norms (such as cloud-based applications) and home-entertainment delivery toward greater broadband requirements, the study seeks to create awareness and empathy among designers and researchers about the experience of Internet use under bandwidth caps.

Marshini Chetty, a postdoctoral researcher in Georgia Tech's School of Interactive Computing, interviewed 12 households in South Africa, a country in which broadband caps were universal until February 2010. Typically, the caps set by South African ISPs are severe with some plans only offering 1 GB of data per month. At the time of the study, the caps ranged up to 9GB of data, far lower than the 150GB-250GB caps set by U.S. providers.

What Chetty and her collaborators found were coping mechanisms built into South Africans' daily lives in order to manage their online activities under the caps. For example, some would routinely "top up" their accounts (pay additional fees for incremental cap increases), while others would visit family members to use their Internet accounts, or switch from desktop connectivity to smartphones. And with few (if any) ways for customers to monitor Internet usage throughout the month, their access often would be cut off in the middle of performing an online activity.

"People's behavior does change when limits are placed on Internet access -- just like we've seen happen in the smartphone market -- and many complain about usage-based billing, but no one has really studied the effects it has on consumer activity," said Chetty, who earned her Ph.D. in computer science from Georgia Tech in 2011. "We would also hear about people 'saving' bandwidth all month and then binge downloading toward the end of their billing period."

"Mysterious processes" refers to customers' inability to determine which applications are eating up their bandwidth, ranging from being unaware that streaming video or downloading songs consumes much more data than normal web browsing, to not knowing that many background applications (such as automatic software updates) count against the monthly cap.

"We were surprised to learn that many of the households we studied chose not to perform regular software updates in order to manage their cap," Chetty said. "This activity can be benign for some applications, inadvisable for others and downright dangerous in certain cases. For example, not installing security patches on your system can leave you vulnerable to viruses and other sorts of cyber attacks." Chetty suggested that the frequency of such risky behaviors among the broader population of metered/capped Internet users should be assessed via follow-up scientifically representative surveys.

Finally, in households with multiple Internet users, it can be difficult for the heads of the household to manage overall activity when they are not fully aware of each member's Internet use. As with other consumable resources in a household, from milk to hot water, the apportionment of "fair" amounts of bandwidth reflects family practices and requires a fair bit of nuance, varying by family style and composition.

"As ISPs move more toward usage-based pricing, we need to keep in mind the reactive behaviors that consumers adopt and the consequences of those behaviors. Because when you have broadband caps, you will use the Internet differently," Chetty said. "This study was performed in South Africa, and although the caps are higher in the United States, there are still instances where people are hitting them. So if you're going to have caps, you should empathize with your users and offer ways for customers to see how their data are being used and who is using them." More tools are becoming available, from ISPs, within operating systems and from third parties; but this is one of the first academic studies that systematically reveals why there is a demand for such tools, and why they are important to users.

The study's findings are summarized in the paper, "'You're Capped!' Understanding the Effects of Bandwidth Caps on Broadband Use in the Home," which Chetty will present on May 10 at the 2012 ACM SIGCHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (CHI 2012), being held May 5-10 in Austin, Texas. Chetty's coauthors include Beki Grinter, professor in the Georgia Tech School of Interactive Computing, and Richard Banks, A.J. Bernheim Brush and Jonathan Donner from Microsoft Research. The paper is one of nine Georgia Tech entries in the main program of CHI 2012.

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/05/120507113748.htm

" Bandwidth Caps Create User Uncertainty" This is broadband gone 100 times difficult. Movies will be so much hard to download  :(

Title: Re: the future of broadband Thread
Post by: Henry88 on June 22, 2012, 07:10:27 PM
Quote
Technology permeates the modern lifestyle, but large swaths of people are missing out on the revolution, even in developed nations like the U.S.

Google's executive chairman Eric Schmidt pointed out over two-thirds of the world's population do not have Internet access, building on an earlier comment he made at the Mobile World Congress earlier this year. At a conference in Israel, Schmidt explored the limits to the current technological landscape.

"The World Wide Web has yet to live up to its name," Schmidt said, calling for outreach to communities lacking access to the Internet.

Who are these people Schmidt worries will be left behind? In the U.S., the southern states of Mississippi, Alabama, Arkansas and Tennessee have broadband subscription rates far lower than the rest of the country, pointing to a lack of Internet access. In rural areas, 1 in 10 rural households have no broadband available, meaning the best they could get is archaic and unreliable dial-up Internet.

The lagging rates of access correlate to low median incomes, suggesting a relationship between low-income households and limited Internet connections. This also means school districts lower on the socio-economic ladder suffer from poor access as well.

The Hechinger Report, which focuses on education news, highlighted how some rural U.S. schools are coping with the Internet deficiency, trying to wire their facilities so students can learn about vital technologies on campus despite their potential lack of access at home.

While some schools are so tuned in to technology they are pushing the limits by experimenting with high-tech tracking systems, others struggle to find funds for basic computers, a problem the tech industry is stepping up to discuss.

For example, Apple's initiative to get iPads into schools may help level the growing divide. The Cupertino company partnered with educational textbook purveyor McGraw Hill to lower the prices of school materials, which may open more doors for rural schools strapped for cash and looking for more affordable tech solutions.

Still, even with Apple's plans to digitize education for the masses and President Obama's educational tech initiative pushing digital textbooks, there's a lot of work to do to bring large pockets of the U.S. up to speed.

The U.S. is ranked 12th for Internet access, possibly because of the lack of competition -- 96 percent of Americans have access to two or less providers. Moreover, high-speed Internet access is more expensive than it needs to be, as Americans pay twice as much per megabyte than places like South Korea and Japan, which have made more concerted efforts to get their countries up to speed.

Globally, many developing countries have even more extreme Internet limits. USAID described the situation in Central America and the Caribbean, where access hovers at 30 percent. Obama announced a program called Broadband of the Partnership Americas, which focuses on improving Internet capabilities in Latin America, but the situation there is indicative of access levels across the globe in rural, developing nations.

In both developing nations and developed nations like the U.S. with connectivity hurdles, this lack of access continues to bog down populations who need technology to bolster their economies and educational opportunities.

Schmidt pointed out a very real problem, and the next step is beefing up Internet connectivity both domestically and globally, which will require serious efforts from governments, corporations and citizens alike. Governments may choose to introduce initiatives, but they will need the cooperation of broadband distributors, especially in the U.S., where prices are far above what they need to be.

Schmidt noted that the Internet will not magically fix the socioeconomic injustice, but widespread access is necessary to level the playing field. Internet access may not be synonymous with opportunity, but it is an integral part of the modern economy, and people without it are likely to stay at a disadvantage.

Unless changes are made, this problem may exacerbate the widening income gap in the U.S. by perpetuating poverty, since limited Internet access translates into limited educational and employment opportunities.

http://www.mobiledia.com/news/154529.html
Title: Re: the future of broadband Thread
Post by: Smith Dr John Smith on June 22, 2012, 08:42:59 PM
Quote
Technology permeates the modern lifestyle, but large swaths of people are missing out on the revolution, even in developed nations like the U.S.

Google's executive chairman Eric Schmidt pointed out over two-thirds of the world's population do not have Internet access, building on an earlier comment he made at the Mobile World Congress earlier this year. At a conference in Israel, Schmidt explored the limits to the current technological landscape.

"The World Wide Web has yet to live up to its name," Schmidt said, calling for outreach to communities lacking access to the Internet.

Who are these people Schmidt worries will be left behind? In the U.S., the southern states of Mississippi, Alabama, Arkansas and Tennessee have broadband subscription rates far lower than the rest of the country, pointing to a lack of Internet access. In rural areas, 1 in 10 rural households have no broadband available, meaning the best they could get is archaic and unreliable dial-up Internet.

The lagging rates of access correlate to low median incomes, suggesting a relationship between low-income households and limited Internet connections. This also means school districts lower on the socio-economic ladder suffer from poor access as well.

The Hechinger Report, which focuses on education news, highlighted how some rural U.S. schools are coping with the Internet deficiency, trying to wire their facilities so students can learn about vital technologies on campus despite their potential lack of access at home.

While some schools are so tuned in to technology they are pushing the limits by experimenting with high-tech tracking systems, others struggle to find funds for basic computers, a problem the tech industry is stepping up to discuss.

For example, Apple's initiative to get iPads into schools may help level the growing divide. The Cupertino company partnered with educational textbook purveyor McGraw Hill to lower the prices of school materials, which may open more doors for rural schools strapped for cash and looking for more affordable tech solutions.

Still, even with Apple's plans to digitize education for the masses and President Obama's educational tech initiative pushing digital textbooks, there's a lot of work to do to bring large pockets of the U.S. up to speed.

The U.S. is ranked 12th for Internet access, possibly because of the lack of competition -- 96 percent of Americans have access to two or less providers. Moreover, high-speed Internet access is more expensive than it needs to be, as Americans pay twice as much per megabyte than places like South Korea and Japan, which have made more concerted efforts to get their countries up to speed.

Globally, many developing countries have even more extreme Internet limits. USAID described the situation in Central America and the Caribbean, where access hovers at 30 percent. Obama announced a program called Broadband of the Partnership Americas, which focuses on improving Internet capabilities in Latin America, but the situation there is indicative of access levels across the globe in rural, developing nations.

In both developing nations and developed nations like the U.S. with connectivity hurdles, this lack of access continues to bog down populations who need technology to bolster their economies and educational opportunities.

Schmidt pointed out a very real problem, and the next step is beefing up Internet connectivity both domestically and globally, which will require serious efforts from governments, corporations and citizens alike. Governments may choose to introduce initiatives, but they will need the cooperation of broadband distributors, especially in the U.S., where prices are far above what they need to be.

Schmidt noted that the Internet will not magically fix the socioeconomic injustice, but widespread access is necessary to level the playing field. Internet access may not be synonymous with opportunity, but it is an integral part of the modern economy, and people without it are likely to stay at a disadvantage.

Unless changes are made, this problem may exacerbate the widening income gap in the U.S. by perpetuating poverty, since limited Internet access translates into limited educational and employment opportunities.

http://www.mobiledia.com/news/154529.html

So after ten years some one finally noticed that people like me can't get highspeed .  All I can say is that it is about time.
Title: Re: the future of broadband Thread
Post by: Henry88 on August 25, 2012, 04:50:28 PM
this is so neat

http://www.carlsonwireless.com/products/ruralconnect-ip.html
Title: Re: the future of broadband Thread
Post by: Henry88 on May 14, 2013, 05:28:55 PM
Quote
Sprint Nextel Corp. (S)’s bid for Clearwire Corp. (CLWR), slated for an investor vote on May 21, won the endorsement of Egan-Jones Ratings Co., which joined Institutional Shareholder Services Inc. in supporting the deal.

“Based on our review of publicly available information on strategic, corporate governance and financial aspects of the proposed transaction, Egan-Jones views the proposed transaction to be a desirable approach,” the Haverford, Pennsylvania-based shareholder-advisory firm said today in a report.

The endorsement lends fresh support to the deal following ISS’s stamp of approval last week. The two firms disagreed with another proxy adviser, Glass, Lewis & Co., which recommended that investors vote no on Sprint’s $2.97-a-share offer. Sprint, which already owns slightly more than 50 percent of Clearwire, is trying to acquire the remaining stake for $2.2 billion.

“These recommendations affirm the conclusion of a rigorous multiyear strategic review and reinforce the board’s unanimous belief that this combination is the best strategic alternative for Clearwire’s minority stockholders, delivering certain, fair and attractive value,” Bellevue, Washington-based Clearwire said today in an e-mailed statement.

Sprint and Clearwire reached the deal in December after their four-year joint venture struggled to build a nationwide wireless Internet provider. Sprint, based in Overland Park, Kansas, is now planning to use Clearwire’s spectrum to bolster its own network.


http://www.businessweek.com/news/2013-05-13/clearwire-says-egan-jones-has-joined-iss-in-endorsing-sprint-bid
Title: Re: the future of broadband Thread
Post by: Henry88 on October 02, 2013, 01:23:26 PM
Quote
Just two short weeks ago, IT Expo and the collocated Super Wi-Fi & Shared Spectrum Summit wrapped up in Las Vegas, Nevada. The multifaceted Conference continues to grow as the “premier business communications and technology event,” and Carlson Wireless has been an involved participant and sponsor from the beginning. This year, our very own Jim Carlson was pleased to serve as an expert on three panel sessions at the Super Wi-Fi Summit, which were:

1. Commercial Rollout of White Spaces in Kenya, South Africa, U.S., India, Brazil, Nigeria, and Kazakhstan

2. Bring On the New White Space Radios: Battle of the Devices: Show & Tell Round One

3. White Space Radios Deliver 50Mbps

Although Carlson has served as a panelist on TV White Space development at Super Wi-Fi Summits in the past, this year was probably the most exciting--as we are closer to FCC certification than ever before.

With that in mind, the “Battle of the Devices” session proved to be an interesting mix of competition--yet collaboration--between White Space radio manufacturers including Carlson, Adaptrum, KTS, and 6Harmonics. With two manufacturers on the panel commercially certified (KTS and Adaptrum) and the others anxiously waiting their own certification, one might be surprised to hear that the overall tone between these would-be “competitors” sounded a lot more like industry collaborators--a testament to the collective nature of White Space technologies and spectrum sharing.

“I want to start off by saying there is no battle here,” Jim continued, “we all stand here because we share a passion and a dream of what TV White Space can do.”

With this in mind, it is no wonder that many find Shared Spectrum/White Spaces to be a disruptive technology, as the top manufacturers in the field are well aware of the innovative benefits that healthy competition and low barriers to market entry promote. It is the avid diligence of everyone in the industry that has led to rapid device advancements and increased trial deployments, all of which continue to prove that White Spaces will truly change global discourse and bridge the digital divide.

Now, as White Space industry leaders, we all look to the FCC to join our “team,” and demonstrate their commitment to “promoting competition, innovation, and investment in broadband services” and “encouraging the highest and best use of spectrum domestically and internationally**” by certifying White Space devices for commercial use. This proactive move will surely induce similar regulatory decisions abroad-- opening modern communications to the billions without access.


http://www.carlsonwireless.com/blog/trade-shows/322-it-exposuper-wi-fi-a-shared-spectrum-summit.html
Title: Re: the future of broadband Thread
Post by: Henry88 on January 20, 2014, 09:16:54 AM
its has been  approved

http://www.carlsonwireless.com/ruralconnect/
Title: Re: the future of broadband Thread
Post by: Variety of Cells on February 22, 2014, 12:46:57 PM
After an incredibly annoying process where Time Warner cable kept refusing to tell me how much they would charge for a service upgrade after the 12 month promotional period ended, I finally got them to tell me over text chat, and then proceeded to upgrade my connection. 

I upgraded to Ultimate, their fastest speed, which I was told was 50 Mbps.  However, after installing the new modem I purchased I'm getting a pretty consistent 110 Mbps, which is awesome.  Such a huge difference from the 20 Mbps I previously had.  I can now stream 4k video without a hitch, and I can download a 17 gig game in about 25 minutes.  Mixed with my router's QoS features that give bandwidth priority to streaming video, I no longer have to worry about slow internet speeds.

20 to 100 Mbps seems like night and day to me, so the jump up to gigabit internet must be insane.  That 17 gig game would download in less than 3 minutes.  Crazy.
Title: Re: the future of broadband Thread
Post by: RandyMistie on June 02, 2014, 07:17:11 PM
I assert that there is no future for broadband. It all requires electricity and that will end in the next few decades. The only reasonable fuel for the future is Nuclear power but you hippies won't let us use it, because some babies might be born deformed.... WAAAAH!

Solar Energy sucks. It is dirty power. Surges, brown outs, you can't run central air, or a microwave.... oh, you can run a fan, awesome!

Wind, same thing. Dirty power weak power. Hydrogen cells are a horrifying myth...

Just use it up and burn it out. Lay down and die, that's my advice. I wish I could be alive to see the chocking, burning end with the hills on fire... wow... but, not in my lifetime.... possibly...

And... scene!

Grumpy Old man on Broadband -- Act One, Scene One!
Title: Re: the future of broadband Thread
Post by: RVR II on June 03, 2014, 09:43:05 AM
So Gigabit is coming to my town (in the states) this year and will be around $99 per month for residential service (higher for businesses)..
I've already received a couple letters from my ISP (the only one in town cause they have a monopoly) stating that I've gone over my allowed data package by nearly double the amount and that I could be fined if I continue to go over my data usage ::)
This gigabit service may/may not keep the internet police off my back but it's something I may have to get :-\

Then I come to Mexico where the slow-ass 'dial-up' modems are still king for internet access and cable modems are just starting to move into the area; starting price: around $1200 Pesos (approx $92 dollars)  :grr:
OH FOR FUCKS SAKES!! :angry:
Title: Re: the future of broadband Thread
Post by: MartyS (Gromit) on June 03, 2014, 10:57:06 AM
So Gigabit is coming to my town (in the states) this year and will be around $99 per month for residential service (higher for businesses)..
I've already received a couple letters from my ISP (the only one in town cause they have a monopoly) stating that I've gone over my allowed data package by nearly double the amount and that I could be fined if I continue to go over my data usage ::)
This gigabit service may/may not keep the internet police off my back but it's something I may have to get :-\

Have they run the fiber down your street yet?  Gigabit is talked up in a lot of places but ends up only being available in small areas where they run the fiber.

Quote
Then I come to Mexico where the slow-ass 'dial-up' modems are still king for internet access and cable modems are just starting to move into the area; starting price: around $1200 Pesos (approx $92 dollars)  :grr:
OH FOR FUCKS SAKES!! :angry:

Is that the monthly cost or the modem cost?  That's only a little high for a modem but way high for a monthly bill.
Title: Re: the future of broadband Thread
Post by: RVR II on June 03, 2014, 11:36:02 AM
So Gigabit is coming to my town (in the states) this year and will be around $99 per month for residential service (higher for businesses)..
I've already received a couple letters from my ISP (the only one in town cause they have a monopoly) stating that I've gone over my allowed data package by nearly double the amount and that I could be fined if I continue to go over my data usage ::)
This gigabit service may/may not keep the internet police off my back but it's something I may have to get :-\

Have they run the fiber down your street yet?  Gigabit is talked up in a lot of places but ends up only being available in small areas where they run the fiber.

Actually no.. They are supposed to be running it in downtown and i'm only a half mile from downtown so I don't know if it will even reach my locale this year or not :-\
Quote
Then I come to Mexico where the slow-ass 'dial-up' modems are still king for internet access and cable modems are just starting to move into the area; starting price: around $1200 Pesos (approx $92 dollars)  :grr:
OH FOR FUCKS SAKES!! :angry:
Quote
Is that the monthly cost or the modem cost?  That's only a little high for a modem but way high for a monthly bill.
That's the total monthly cost, including the modem.
It's considered 'state of the art' so they charge ridiculous prices >:(
Title: Re: the future of broadband Thread
Post by: Henry88 on June 22, 2014, 09:06:51 PM
AT&T Can 'Say Anything': AT&T IP Transition Trials and the Direct TV Merger Documents Contradict Previous Broadband Commitments.
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/bruce-kushnick/att-can-say-anything-att_b_5490714.html
Title: Re: the future of broadband Thread
Post by: RVR II on July 07, 2014, 12:40:53 PM
Looks like YouTube and Netflix are blaming the ISPs for their crappy speeds and I tend to agree.. :o

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/07/07/youtube-streaming_n_5563913.html?ncid=fcbklnkushpmg00000042
Title: Re: the future of broadband Thread
Post by: Henry88 on July 29, 2014, 08:00:38 PM
Six Ways Big Telecom Tries to Kill Community Broadband
http://motherboard.vice.com/read/six-ways-big-telecom-tries-to-kill-community-broadband
Title: Re: the future of broadband Thread
Post by: RVR II on July 29, 2014, 08:09:56 PM
Quote
Online piracy will no longer be a criminal offence in the USA The American government has now decided to decriminialise the piracy of films, music and games – meaning that users caught downloading and sharing pirated material will no longer be fined or prosecuted. Starting in 2015, those caught pirating material online will receive four letters telling the individual that they have committed an illegal offence….and, well that’s it. The reason for the change in policy is that the government have found the current punishment plans to be largely unworkable – and pretty sensibly so. Ofcom recently released figures stating that almost a quarter of all downloads in the USA were of something pirated – which would be a hell of a lot of people to prosecute. While after next year individuals will no longer be fined or prosecuted, the government says it will still continue to try and stop the funding of pirating sites, but overall – it seems like our government has given up the fight against online piracy. For the rest of us – its time to dig out that Jack Sparrow costume and get on the rum.

See More : http://mogul.ws/online-piracy-will-no-longer-be-a-criminal-offence-in-the-usa/
Title: Re: the future of broadband Thread
Post by: Henry88 on July 30, 2014, 04:28:06 PM
Now you can tell the FCC to overturn state limits on municipal broadband
http://arstechnica.com/business/2014/07/now-you-can-tell-the-fcc-to-overturn-state-limits-on-municipal-broadband/
Title: Re: the future of broadband Thread
Post by: Sideswipe on July 30, 2014, 04:43:10 PM
Quote
Online piracy will no longer be a criminal offence in the USA The American government has now decided to decriminialise the piracy of films, music and games – meaning that users caught downloading and sharing pirated material will no longer be fined or prosecuted. Starting in 2015, those caught pirating material online will receive four letters telling the individual that they have committed an illegal offence….and, well that’s it. The reason for the change in policy is that the government have found the current punishment plans to be largely unworkable – and pretty sensibly so. Ofcom recently released figures stating that almost a quarter of all downloads in the USA were of something pirated – which would be a hell of a lot of people to prosecute. While after next year individuals will no longer be fined or prosecuted, the government says it will still continue to try and stop the funding of pirating sites, but overall – it seems like our government has given up the fight against online piracy. For the rest of us – its time to dig out that Jack Sparrow costume and get on the rum.

See More : http://mogul.ws/online-piracy-will-no-longer-be-a-criminal-offence-in-the-usa/

I find this hard to believe.  Are there any official sources?
Title: Re: the future of broadband Thread
Post by: RVR II on July 30, 2014, 05:28:08 PM
Quote
Online piracy will no longer be a criminal offence in the USA The American government has now decided to decriminialise the piracy of films, music and games – meaning that users caught downloading and sharing pirated material will no longer be fined or prosecuted. Starting in 2015, those caught pirating material online will receive four letters telling the individual that they have committed an illegal offence….and, well that’s it. The reason for the change in policy is that the government have found the current punishment plans to be largely unworkable – and pretty sensibly so. Ofcom recently released figures stating that almost a quarter of all downloads in the USA were of something pirated – which would be a hell of a lot of people to prosecute. While after next year individuals will no longer be fined or prosecuted, the government says it will still continue to try and stop the funding of pirating sites, but overall – it seems like our government has given up the fight against online piracy. For the rest of us – its time to dig out that Jack Sparrow costume and get on the rum.

See More : http://mogul.ws/online-piracy-will-no-longer-be-a-criminal-offence-in-the-usa/

I find this hard to believe.  Are there any official sources?
Just that link in the bottom of the quote.. I didn't research it further
Title: Re: the future of broadband Thread
Post by: Sideswipe on July 30, 2014, 05:32:20 PM
Cant find anything to corroborate.  Don't get your hopes up, pirates.
Title: Re: the future of broadband Thread
Post by: Henry88 on August 15, 2014, 06:27:00 PM
Cities, States Face Off On Municipal Broadband
http://www.govtech.com/local/Cities-States-Face-Off-On-Municipal-Broadband.html

City, state and federal governments are fighting over Chattanooga’s effort to bring broadband to rural consumers
http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/govbeat/wp/2014/08/12/city-state-and-federal-governments-are-fighting-over-chattanoogas-effort-to-bring-broadband-to-rural-consumers/
Title: Re: the future of broadband Thread
Post by: Henry88 on September 08, 2014, 09:05:27 AM
If there's Internet in hell, there will be no net neutrality
http://www.networkworld.com/article/2603681/microsoft-subnet/if-theres-internet-in-hell-there-will-be-no-net-neutrality.html
Title: Re: the future of broadband Thread
Post by: Henry88 on September 25, 2014, 04:26:55 PM
AT&T Won't Improve Tennessee Broadband, Won't Let Anyone Else
http://www.dslreports.com/shownews/ATT-Wont-Improve-Tennessee-Broadband-Wont-Let-Anyone-Else-130571
Title: Re: the future of broadband Thread
Post by: Henry88 on October 31, 2014, 04:18:24 PM
Americans pay more for slower Internet
http://money.cnn.com/2014/10/31/technology/internet-speeds/index.html
Title: Re: the future of broadband Thread
Post by: Henry88 on November 24, 2014, 08:54:30 AM
Next Century Cities Broadband Coalition Presses for Municipal Self Determination
http://www.govexec.com/state-local/2014/11/next-century-cities-chattanooga-broadband-gigabit/99320/
Title: Re: the future of broadband Thread
Post by: Henry88 on January 14, 2015, 05:01:58 PM
President Obama wants towns to take on private broadband providers in push for faster Internet access
http://www.nydailynews.com/news/politics/obama-municipalities-provide-internet-speed-push-article-1.2078146
Title: Re: the future of broadband Thread
Post by: Variety of Cells on January 14, 2015, 07:08:18 PM
Soooo happy that my new building has FIOS available and I was able to say fuck off to Time Warner. Paying $50 for 75 up and down, which is half the $100 promotional price I was paying for 100 down and 10 up. 
Title: Re: the future of broadband Thread
Post by: Henry88 on January 30, 2015, 05:33:12 PM
FCC raises broadband definition to 25Mbps, Chairman mocks ISPs
http://www.extremetech.com/mobile/198583-fcc-raises-broadband-definition-to-25mbps-chairman-mocks-isps

Mayors of Boston, Seattle, KC, others: No more muni broadband restrictions, please
http://www.networkworld.com/article/2877268/lan-wan/mayors-of-boston-seattle-kc-others-no-more-muni-broadband-restrictions-please.html
Title: Re: the future of broadband Thread
Post by: Henry88 on February 26, 2015, 11:00:14 AM
FCC ruling overturns state laws preventing municipal broadband expansion
http://www.fiercetelecom.com/story/fcc-ruling-overturns-state-laws-preventing-municipal-broadband-expansion/2015-02-26
Title: Re: the future of broadband Thread
Post by: RVR II on February 26, 2015, 11:10:20 AM
YAY!!  :highfive:
Title: Re: the future of broadband Thread
Post by: Henry88 on February 26, 2015, 06:26:43 PM
Tennessee Broadband Battle: FCC, Legislature Square Off Over Municipal Utility Bid
http://www.govtech.com/network/Tennessee-Broadband-Battle-FCC-Legislature-Square-Off-Over-Municipal-Utility-Bid-to-Expand-Gig-Territory-.html

As Big As Net Neutrality? FCC Votes To Kill State Imposed Internet Monopolies
http://www.fastcompany.com/3042895/as-big-as-net-neutrality-fcc-takes-aim-at-state-imposed-internet-monopolies
Title: Re: the future of broadband Thread
Post by: Henry88 on February 28, 2015, 03:46:58 PM
FCC says cities should be free to run decent ISPs. And Republicans can't stand it
http://www.theregister.co.uk/2015/02/28/fcc_ruling_on_staterun_internet/
Title: Re: the future of broadband Thread
Post by: Henry88 on March 25, 2015, 08:36:52 PM
Tennessee Sues FCC for Axing Municipal Broadband Ban
http://www.pcmag.com/article2/0,2817,2478700,00.asp

Tennessee fights for its right to squash municipal broadband expansion
http://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/2015/03/tennessee-fights-for-its-right-to-squash-municipal-broadband-expansion/

Tennessee sues FCC: Giving cities free rein to provide their own broadband is 'unlawful'
http://www.theregister.co.uk/2015/03/25/tennessee_sues_fcc_chattanooga/

Tennessee sues FCC over Internet law, hurting one of its own cities: Chattanooga
http://money.cnn.com/2015/03/25/technology/tennessee-fcc-internet/index.html

Title: Re: the future of broadband Thread
Post by: MartyS (Gromit) on June 30, 2015, 11:43:11 PM
So Cisco is acquiring OpenDNS.  Not sure that's good for the internet....
Title: Re: the future of broadband Thread
Post by: Henry88 on July 19, 2015, 06:07:05 PM
 Governor creates broadband office to spread high-speed Internet in Alabama
http://www.al.com/news/index.ssf/2015/07/governor_creates_broadband_dev.html

 ;D
Title: Re: the future of broadband Thread
Post by: Henry88 on August 22, 2017, 05:00:46 PM
How Washington Gridlock Delays High-Speed Broadband to Rural U.S.
https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/how-washington-gridlock-delays-high-speed-broadband-to-rural-u-s/

Don't Forget Rural America In Open Internet Debate
https://www.forbes.com/sites/realspin/2017/08/22/rural-america-open-internet/#520fc1c83b03