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General Discussion => General (Off-Topic) Discussion => Topic started by: Johnny Unusual on September 22, 2011, 08:39:40 PM

Title: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: Johnny Unusual on September 22, 2011, 08:39:40 PM
OK, who's thirsty?  You voted for them, and now you have our top 50 drinks!  It wasn't easy compiling all the info you gave me and in some cases I had to make a few tough calls about what counted as the same and what was different, so I hope you feel that you are well represented in the list.

So let's begin with the first few, which I hope wet your whistle!
Title: Re: LoC: Top 64 Beverages
Post by: Johnny Unusual on September 22, 2011, 08:44:33 PM
50 – Margarita
(http://www.dietsinreview.com/diet_column/wp-content/uploads/2008/05/raspberry-margarita.jpg)
23 points
1 of 16 lists
Top Vote: #3 Anias.La.Conelita


The margarita is a cocktail consisting of tequila mixed with orange-flavoured liqueur and lime or lemon juice, often served with salt on theglass rim. It is the most common tequila-based cocktail in the United States. The drink is served shaken with ice, on the rocks, blended with ice (frozen margarita) or without ice (straight up).

There is no solid proof who "invented" the Margarita. The most accepted of all stories is that the Margarita was invented in October 1941, at Hussong's Cantina in Ensenada, Mexico, by bartender Don Carlos Orozco. One slow afternoon, Don Carlos was experimenting with mixing new drinks when a prestigious visitor arrived: Margarita Henkel, the daughter of a German ambassador, who lived with her husband Roy Parodi near the city in Rancho Hamilton. Don Carlos offered the drink to Margarita, and named it after her for being the first person to taste it. He concocted a mixture of equal parts tequila, orange liqueur and lime, served over ice in a salt-rimmed glass.

Another common story related the Margarita being invented a few years earlier at the Rancho La Gloria Hotel, halfway between Tijuana and Rosarito, Mexico, by Carlos "Danny" Herrera, for a former Ziegfeld dancer named Marjorie King. This story was related by Herrera and also by bartender Albert Hernandez, who is acknowledged for popularizing the Margarita in San Diego after 1947, at the La Plaza restaurant in La Jolla. Hernandez claimed the owner of La Plaza, Morris Locke, knew Herrera and visited Mexico often.

The most plausible explanation, however, is that the Margarita is merely a popular American drink, the Daisy, remade with tequila instead of brandy, which became popular during Prohibition as people drifted over the border for alcohol. There is an account from 1936 of Iowa newspaper editor James Graham finding such a cocktail in Tijuana, years before any of the other Margarita "creation myths". Margarita is Spanish for Daisy. It is likely that Orozco and Herrara merely perfected the "Tequila Daisy".

 
Drink Recipe - TURQUOISE MARGARITA

Ingredients:
•   3 Oz. Margarita Mix
•   1 1/2 Oz.  Tequila
•   1 Oz. Blue Curaçao
•   Lime Wedge
•   Dash Rose's Lime Juice
Mixing instructions:
Mix all ingredients (except lime wedge) with ice in a shaker or blender. Pour into a chilled Margarita or cocktail glass, the rim of which has been rimmed with salt. Garnish with lime wedge.

And now… Margarita!
http://www.youtube.com/v/GGAS5iw1thA
Title: Re: LoC: Top 64 Beverages
Post by: Johnny Unusual on September 22, 2011, 09:11:30 PM
50 – Old-Fashioned
(http://www.esquire.com/cm/esquire/images/4B/OldFashioned-002-de1.jpg)
23 points
1 of 16 lists
Top Vote: #3 Cole Stratton


The Old Fashioned is a type of cocktail made by muddling dissolved sugar with bitters then adding alcohol, such as jenever, whiskey, or brandy, and a twist of citrus rind. The name references the combination's age: it is possibly the first drink to be called a cocktail. It is traditionally served in a short, round, 8–12 US fl oz (240–350 ml) tumbler-like glass, called an Old Fashioned glass, named after the drink.

The Old Fashioned is one of six basic drinks listed in David A. Embury's classic The Fine Art of Mixing Drinks.

The first documented definition of the word "cocktail" was in response to a reader's letter asking to define the word in the May 6, 1806, issue of The Balance and Columbia Repository in Hudson, New York. In the May 13, 1806, issue, the paper's editor wrote that it was a potent concoction of spirits, bitters, water, and sugar; it was also referred to at the time as a bittered sling.

The first alleged use of the specific name "Old Fashioned" was for a Bourbon whiskey cocktail in the 1880s, at the Pendennis Club, a gentlemen’s club in Louisville, Kentucky. The recipe is said to have been invented by a bartender at that club, and popularized by a club member and bourbon distiller, Colonel James E. Pepper, who brought it to the Waldorf-Astoria Hotel bar in New York City. The "Old Fashioned" was the favorite cocktail of President Harry S Truman and his wife Bess.

Preparation of a drink quite similar to an Old Fashioned is mentioned in chapter 18 in the Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (1884), second paragraph.


 
Drink Recipes - Old-Fashioned… uh, that I suppose

Ingredients:
2 oz bourbon whiskey
2 dashes Angostura® bitters
1 splash water
1 tsp sugar
1 maraschino cherry
1 orange wedge

Mix sugar, water and angostura bitters in an old-fashioned glass. Drop in a cherry and an orange wedge. Muddle into a paste using a muddler or the back end of a spoon. Pour in bourbon, fill with ice cubes, and stir.

 http://www.youtube.com/v/oEr7ym4-r5I
Title: Re: LoC: Top 64 Beverages
Post by: Johnny Unusual on September 22, 2011, 09:18:37 PM
50 – Orange Crush
(http://warrenkinsella.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/04/2580787973_80790bfa31.jpg)
23 points
1 of 16 lists
Top Vote: #3 Johnny Unusual


Crush is a carbonated soft drink brand, originally marketed as an orange soda, which was invented by California beverage and extract chemist Neil C. Ward. Most flavors of Crush are caffeine-free.

In 1911, Clayton J. Howell, president and founder of the Orange Crush Company, partnered with Neil C. Ward and incorporated the company. Ward perfected the process of blending ingredients to create the exclusive formula that yielded the zesty, all-natural orange flavor of Orange Crush. Howell was not new to the soft drink business, having earlier introduced Howell’s Orange Julep. Soft drinks of the time often carried the surname of the inventor along with the product name. Howell sold the rights to use his name in conjunction with his first brand; therefore, Ward was given the honors: Crush was first premiered as Ward's Orange Crush. Originally, Orange Crush included orange pulp in the bottles, giving it a "fresh squeezed" illusion even though the pulp was added rather than remaining from squeezed oranges. Pulp has not been in the bottles for decades.

Crush was purchased by Procter & Gamble in 1980 (with the exception of the Canadian rights, which were purchased in 1984). Procter & Gamble only manufactured "bottler's base," which was a concentrate consisting of flavor and color. 1 milliliter of bottler's base was combined with syrup and carbonated water to create a 12 ounce bottle of Crush. In 1989, Cadbury Schweppes acquired Crush USA from Procter & Gamble Co. Cadbury Schweppes spun off its United States beverage business as Dr Pepper Snapple Group in 2008.

The Crush brand and trademark are currently owned by Dr Pepper Snapple Group of Plano, Texas. Crush is also popular in Canada, where it is distributed by subsidiary Canada Dry Mott's. It is distributed by various Pepsi bottlers, the biggest being the Pepsi Bottling Group Canada.

Other countries where Crush is sold are Argentina, Colombia, Chile, Guatemala, Lebanon, Mexico, Panama, Peru, Syria, Uruguay and at one time Costa Rica, Ecuador and Bolivia. In some countries of Latin America the Crush brand is distributed by the Coca-Cola Company, using the same colors and bottles as Fanta.

Several flavors (Grape, Cream Soda, Lime, Orange) are available at most stores throughout North America; however, others are distributed only within small markets. Pineapple Crush and Birch Beer Crush, for instance, is relatively easy to obtain in both can and single serving bottle in the Canadian province of Newfoundland and Labrador and in Fort McMurray, Alberta. This will soon change, as the Pepsi Bottling Group has recently announced they would begin distributing Crush in a majority of their territory in the United States, followed less than a month later by Pepsi Americas' announcement that they would follow suit in most of their territory. The changeover in distribution became official in late January and early February 2009, with the Pepsi bottlers taking over the Crush rights in those areas and the bottling rights to Hawaiian Punch (which the Pepsi bottlers in those areas had handled prior to 2009) going to the bottlers of Dr Pepper and 7 Up.

 
Drink-Based Recipe – Orange Crush Icing

1/2 stick butter
3/4 box powdered sugar
3 oz. cream cheese
1/4 c. of Orange Crush (perhaps less)

Mix cream cheese and butter well. Add sugar and enough of the liquid for icing to spread well.

 http://www.youtube.com/v/2BvXBwtrs_k
Title: Re: LoC: Top 64 Beverages
Post by: Johnny Unusual on September 22, 2011, 09:25:29 PM
50 – Captain Morgan Private Stock
(http://www.captainmorgan.com/en-us/img/products/drink-privatestock-detail.png)
23 points    
1 of 16 lists
Top Vote: #3 Sarcasm Made Easy


Warning: Description Purely Promotional:  If you're anything like the Captain, only your most valued crew members will get to share this great liquid! Captain Morgan ® Private Stock is made from the finest of Captain Morgan’s reserves, married with a richer blend of mellow island spices. Aged in oak for at least 2 years, it's perfect for sipping and savoring on the rocks with a twist of lime.
ABV: 40%

 
Drink Recipe – Private Stock on the Rocks

Ingredients
1.5 oz. Captain Morgan ® Private Stock
Preparation
Add Captain Morgan ® Private Stock in ice-filled cocktail glass
Serving Facts
Captain Morgan ® Private Stock contains 0.6 oz. of alcohol per serving.

 http://www.youtube.com/v/m2q1bmK34EI
Title: Re: LoC: Top 64 Beverages
Post by: Johnny Unusual on September 22, 2011, 09:26:22 PM
50 – Adirondack caffeine free cola
(http://www.allbulkfoods.com/images/catalog/458206.jpg)
23 points
1 of 16 lists
Top Vote: #3 Shodan


Adirondack Beverages is a soda company in the New York state area. They produce many flavors of carbonated beverages including a cola named Adirondack Cola and a line of low-calorie drinks under the label Waist Watcher, which is licensed by Weight Watchers International.

 
Drink-Based Recipe – ???

Sorry, couldn’t find a one.  If Shodan has one…

http://www.youtube.com/v/uTk7BQNu3fs
Title: Re: LoC: Top 64 Beverages
Post by: Johnny Unusual on September 22, 2011, 09:32:23 PM
50 – Coca-Cola Zero
(http://www.smh.com.au/ffximage/2006/01/24/300_cokezero.jpg)
23 points
1 of 16 lists
Top Vote: #3 BBQ Platypus


Coca-Cola Zero or Coke Zero is a product of the Coca-Cola Company. It is a low-calorie (0.75 calories per liter) variation of Coca-Cola specifically marketed to males, who were shown to associate 'diet' drinks with women.

The Coca-Cola Zero logo has generally featured the script Coca-Cola logo in red with white trim on a black background, with the word "zero" underneath in lower case in the geometric typeface Avenir (or a customised version of it). Some details have varied from country to country. The British logo, for example, originally had the "o" taking a spiral form. In the U.S., the letters decline in weight over the course of the word.

All versions of Coke Zero sold in various countries are based on the same flavoring formula, and all are carbonated and caffeinated (excepting caffeine free) However, the exact combination of artificial sweeteners and preservatives used vary from market to market.

 
Drink-Based Recipe – Coke Zero Cupcakes

Ingredients
1 Box of Cake mix (any flavor)
10 oz of Coke Zero (or Sprite Zero)
2 Egg whites

Directions
Combine egg whites, cake mix, and your choice of drink into a mixing bowl. Mix well (for about 5 minutes) or until all lumps are out. Pour into cupcake pan as usual, filling each about 1/2 full. Bake cupcakes for about 20 minutes, at 350 degrees.

Makes 24 cupcakes


Great combinations:
Cherry Coke Zero and White Cake Mix
Sprite Zero and Red Velvet Cake Mix
Coke Zero and Yellow Cake Mix

I think this might actually be a Axe Body Spray ad
http://www.youtube.com/v/j7LMZJ_Fb1g
Title: Re: LoC: Top 64 Beverages
Post by: Johnny Unusual on September 22, 2011, 09:35:48 PM
OK, that's it for tonight, but expect to see more quite soon.  But me, I need some shut eye.
Title: Re: LoC: Top 64 Beverages
Post by: gojikranz on September 22, 2011, 09:52:21 PM
glad to see the list is up.  nothing from mine yet (though orange crush is similar too bad all orange soda couldnt overcome their differences and unite to get higher up).
Title: Re: LoC: Top 64 Beverages
Post by: sarcasm_made_Easy on September 22, 2011, 10:06:54 PM
darn Pstock deserved to be way further up the list.  Cest le vie. 

Also im saying this now:

You cant copyright a drink, this all goes back to the Harvey Wallbanger case of 78. 
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: Johnny Unusual on September 23, 2011, 07:36:29 AM
49 – Mountain Dew
(http://typophile.com/files/2s0k0nk_5405.jpg)
23 points    
2 of 16 lists
Top Vote: #14 Sarcasm Made Easy


Mountain Dew (currently stylized as MTN Dew) is a citrus-flavored carbonated soft drink brand produced and owned by PepsiCo. The original formula was invented in the 1940s by two Tennessee beverage bottlers, Barney and Ally Hartman, and was first marketed in Marion, VA, Knoxville and Johnson City, Tennessee. A revised formula was created by Bill Bridgforth in 1958. The Mountain Dew brand and production rights were acquired by the Pepsi-Cola company in 1964, at which point its distribution expanded more widely across the United States.

Between the 1940s and 1980s, Mountain Dew consisted of a single Citrus-flavored version. Diet Mountain Dew was introduced in 1988, followed by Mountain Dew Red which was introduced - and discontinued - in 1988. While Mountain Dew Red was short-lived, it represented the beginning of a long-term trend of Mountain Dew being produced in different flavor variations. This product line extension trend has continued in the 2000s, with expansion into specialty, limited time production, and retailer-specific (Taco Bell, 7-Eleven) variations of Mountain Dew.

Production was first extended to the U.K. in 1996, though this initial debut was short-lived as it was phased out in 1998. The product returned to the U.K. under the name "Mountain Dew Energy" in 2010 and returned to the Republic of Ireland in Spring 2011.  As of 2009, Mountain Dew represented a 6.7 percent share of the overall carbonated soft drinks market in the U.S. Its competition includes Vault, Mello Yello, and Sun Drop; Mountain Dew accounts for 80 percent of citrus soft drinks sold within the U.S.

 
Drink Recipe – Magic Mountain Dew

1 1/2 oz Absolut® Citron vodka
1 1/2 oz triple sec
3 oz Mountain Dew® citrus soda

Pour the Absolut Citron vodka and triple sec into a cocktail shaker half-filled with ice cubes. Shake well, and strain into a highball glass filled with ice cubes. Top with mountain dew, stir briefly and serve.

http://www.youtube.com/v/9adrZlv2VHA
Title: Re: LoC: Top 64 Beverages
Post by: Darth Geek on September 23, 2011, 07:39:15 AM
50 – Margarita
I'm not a drinker, so Margarita just makes me think of the great song lyric "Margaritas at the midnight buffet!" in Muppets Treasure Island.  :D
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: Johnny Unusual on September 23, 2011, 12:20:19 PM
48 – Grapefruit Juice
(http://static.howstuffworks.com/gif/lipitor-5.jpg)
23 points
2 of 16 lists
Top Vote: #13 Gojikranz


Grapefruit juice is the fruit juice from grapefruits. It is rich in Vitamin C and ranges from sweet-tart to very sour. Variations include white grapefruit, pink grapefruit and ruby red grapefruit juice.

Grapefruit juice, and grapefruit in general, is a potent inhibitor of the cytochrome P450 CYP3A4 enzyme, which can impact the metabolism of a variety of drugs, increasing their bioavailability. In some cases, this can lead to a fatal interaction with drugs like astemizole or terfenadine. The effect of grapefruit juice with regard to drug absorption was originally discovered in 1989. However, the effect became well-publicized after being responsible for a number of deaths due to overdosing on medication. However, the first published report on grapefruit drug interactions was in 1991 in the Lancet entitled "Interactions of Citrus Juices with Felodipine and Nifedipine." and was the first reported food-drug interaction clinically.

Recently some researchers have shown that furanocoumarins rather than flavonoids are the ingredients causing the various drug interactions.

Drugs that may be affected include oxycodone, diazepam, alprazolam, lorazepam, midazolam, carbamazepine (Tegretol), ciclosporin, lovastatin, methadone, dextromethorphan,simvastatin, pravastatin, felodipine, ketamine, sildenafil(Viagra), and caffeine, as well as a number of antihistamines including astemizole and terfenadine.

Grapefruit juice has also been reported to increase both the bioavailability of some benzodiazepines, (such as diazepam) and greatly slow the rate of metabolisation. An easy way to tell if a medication may be affected by grapefruit juice is by researching whether another known CYP3A4 inhibitor drug is already contraindicated with the active drug of the medication in question. Examples of such known CYP3A4 inhibitors include cisapride (Propulsid), erythromycin, itraconazole (Sporanox), ketoconazole (Nizoral), and mibefradil(Posicor).

The flavonoid existing in highest concentration in grapefruit juice is naringin, which in humans is metabolised to naringenin. Other flavonoids exist in grapefruit juice in lower concentrations as well. Orange juice does not contain naringin in as high a concentration, instead containing hesperetin. It is sometimes recommended as a substitute. Juice of limesand Seville oranges can also inhibit drug metabolism, however, as can apple juice with some drugs.

 
Drink-Based Recipe – Gin and Juice

2 oz gin
2 oz grapefruit juice
3 oz orange juice
1 slice lime

Pour all ingredients into shaker. Fill a highball glass almost full of ice cubes, and dump ice into shaker. Shake well and pour drink into highball glass. Garnish with a slice of lime.


http://www.youtube.com/v/o9JwgBG2RJY
Title: Re: LoC: Top 64 Beverages
Post by: Thrifty on September 23, 2011, 12:46:44 PM
Coca-Cola Zero or Coke Zero is a product of the Coca-Cola Company. It is a low-calorie (0.75 calories per liter) variation of Coca-Cola specifically marketed to males, who were shown to associate 'diet' drinks with women.

"Peggy, we came here to get food for the Super Bowl, not your feminine products.  Diet soda?"
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: anais.jude on September 23, 2011, 02:29:17 PM
You misspelled my name :(
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: CJones on September 23, 2011, 03:07:32 PM
Grapefruit juice, and grapefruit in general, is a potent inhibitor of the cytochrome P450 CYP3A4 enzyme, which can impact the metabolism of a variety of drugs, increasing their bioavailability. In some cases, this can lead to a fatal interaction with drugs like astemizole or terfenadine. The effect of grapefruit juice with regard to drug absorption was originally discovered in 1989. However, the effect became well-publicized after being responsible for a number of deaths due to overdosing on medication. However, the first published report on grapefruit drug interactions was in 1991 in the Lancet entitled "Interactions of Citrus Juices with Felodipine and Nifedipine." and was the first reported food-drug interaction clinically.

Recently some researchers have shown that furanocoumarins rather than flavonoids are the ingredients causing the various drug interactions.

Drugs that may be affected include oxycodone, diazepam, alprazolam, lorazepam, midazolam, carbamazepine (Tegretol), ciclosporin, lovastatin, methadone, dextromethorphan,simvastatin, pravastatin, felodipine, ketamine, sildenafil(Viagra), and caffeine, as well as a number of antihistamines including astemizole and terfenadine.

Grapefruit juice has also been reported to increase both the bioavailability of some benzodiazepines, (such as diazepam) and greatly slow the rate of metabolisation. An easy way to tell if a medication may be affected by grapefruit juice is by researching whether another known CYP3A4 inhibitor drug is already contraindicated with the active drug of the medication in question. Examples of such known CYP3A4 inhibitors include cisapride (Propulsid), erythromycin, itraconazole (Sporanox), ketoconazole (Nizoral), and mibefradil(Posicor)

Holy crap, I didn't know that. I take Temazepam, a Benzodiazipine, but my doctor refuses to give me enough of it to sleep more than a few hours a night. Maybe I should try drinking this. Then again, the afore mentioned deaths make me nervous...

And I'd like to try Captain Morgan Private Stock but it's way too expensive for me.
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: sarcasm_made_Easy on September 23, 2011, 03:09:17 PM
Its like 20-30 bucks.  I drink it straight up, has a very vanilla type of flavor but not over powering. 
Title: Re: LoC: Top 64 Beverages
Post by: D.B. Barnes on September 23, 2011, 11:45:43 PM
50 – Margarita
(http://www.dietsinreview.com/diet_column/wp-content/uploads/2008/05/raspberry-margarita.jpg)
23 points
1 of 16 lists
Top Vote: #3 Anias.La.Conelita


Used to drink tons of these back in the day. A blender, mix, and Tequila never made a better match for a party in my opinion. I guess why I didn't include it was the negative memories of heart burn from the lime mixer. I much preferred the strawberry or even peach. Much less acidic an alcoholic delivery system.

Sorry Anais, I should've more properly had your back on this one.
Title: Re: LoC: Top 64 Beverages
Post by: D.B. Barnes on September 24, 2011, 12:25:26 AM
50 – Old-Fashioned
(http://www.esquire.com/cm/esquire/images/4B/OldFashioned-002-de1.jpg)
23 points
1 of 16 lists
Top Vote: #3 Cole Stratton


I've heard of it. Never had it. I'm sure I'd be a fan of it. Sounds tasty.
Title: Re: LoC: Top 64 Beverages
Post by: D.B. Barnes on September 24, 2011, 12:30:50 AM
50 – Orange Crush
(http://warrenkinsella.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/04/2580787973_80790bfa31.jpg)
23 points
1 of 16 lists
Top Vote: #3 Johnny Unusual


Yeah, this is problematic. But it is what it is. There are quite a few gradations (or what just feels best on your tongue) of it, so we will get the best of the best. Have faith in the list.
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: D.B. Barnes on September 24, 2011, 01:03:21 AM
48 – Grapefruit Juice
(http://static.howstuffworks.com/gif/lipitor-5.jpg)
23 points
2 of 16 lists
Top Vote: #13 Gojikranz


Drugs that may be affected include oxycodone, diazepam, alprazolam, lorazepam, midazolam, carbamazepine (Tegretol), ciclosporin, lovastatin, methadone, dextromethorphan,simvastatin, pravastatin, felodipine, ketamine, sildenafil(Viagra), and caffeine, as well as a number of antihistamines including astemizole and terfenadine.

Grapefruit juice has also been reported to increase both the bioavailability of some benzodiazepines, (such as diazepam) and greatly slow the rate of metabolisation. An easy way to tell if a medication may be affected by grapefruit juice is by researching whether another known CYP3A4 inhibitor drug is already contraindicated with the active drug of the medication in question. Examples of such known CYP3A4 inhibitors include cisapride (Propulsid), erythromycin, itraconazole (Sporanox), ketoconazole (Nizoral), and mibefradil(Posicor).

No shit?  :D

Had good ol' Grapefruit Juice at #16.

Cheers!
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: gojikranz on September 24, 2011, 01:17:14 AM
grape fruit juice is one of those things that i hated for a long time, then one day i just woke up and decided i liked it.  it was kinda weird cranberry juice was a similar revelation for me. 
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: Johnny Unusual on September 24, 2011, 01:18:22 AM
47 – Tequila
(http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-keRCZdyAGGk/Td4wD57PVeI/AAAAAAAAAAo/ZUedJVnIjd0/s1600/tequila.jpg)
24 points
1 of 16 lists
Top Vote: #2 Anais.La.Conejita


Tequila is a spirit made from the blue agave plant, primarily in the area surrounding the city of Tequila, 65 kilometres (40 mi) northwest of Guadalajara, and in the highlands (Los Altos) of the western Mexican state of Jalisco.

The red volcanic soil in the surrounding region is particularly well suited to the growing of the blue agave, and more than 300 million of the plants are harvested there each year. Agave tequila grows differently depending on the region. Blue agaves grown in the highlands region are larger in size and sweeter in aroma and taste. Agaves harvested in the lowlands, on the other hand, have a more herbaceous fragrance and flavor.

Mexican laws state that tequila can be produced only in the state of Jalisco and limited regions in the states of Guanajuato, Michoacán,Nayarit, and Tamaulipas. Mexico has claimed the exclusive international right to the word "tequila", threatening legal actions against manufacturers in other countries.

Tequila is most often made at a 38–40% alcohol content (76–80 proof), but can be produced between 35–55% alcohol content (70–110 proof). Though most tequilas are 80 proof, many distillers will distill to 100 proof and then dilute it with water to reduce its harshness. Some of the more well respected brands distill the alcohol to 80 proof without using additional water as a dilutant.

Tequila was first produced in the 16th century near the location of the city of Tequila, which was not officially established until 1656. The Aztec people had previously made a fermented beverage from the agave plant, which they called octli (later, and more popularly called pulque), long before the Spanish arrived in 1521. When the Spanish conquistadors ran out of their own brandy, they began to distill agave to produce North America's first indigenous distilled spirit.

Some 80 years later, around 1600, Don Pedro Sánchez de Tagle, the Marquis of Altamira, began mass-producing tequila at the first factory in the territory of modern-day Jalisco. By 1608, the colonial governor of Nueva Galicia had begun to tax his products.

The tequila that is popular today was first mass-produced in the early 19th century in Guadalajara, Mexico.

Don Cenobio Sauza, founder of Sauza Tequila and Municipal President of the Village of Tequila from 1884–1885, was the first to export tequila to the United States,[6] and shortened the name from "Tequila Extract" to just "Tequila" for the American markets. Don Cenobio's grandson Don Francisco Javier gained international attention for insisting that "there cannot be tequila where there are no agaves!" His efforts led to the practice that real tequila can only come from the State of Jalisco.

Since the late 1990s, the spirit's worldwide popularity has led to some important developments:
   The purchase of Herradura by Brown-Forman for $776 million in September 2006.
   A new NOM (Norma Oficial Mexicana) for tequila (NOM-006-SCFI-2005) was issued in 2006, and among other changes, introduced a category of tequila called "extra añejo" or "ultra-aged" which must be aged a minimum of 3 years.
   The purchase of the Sauza and El Tesoro brands by massive holding company Fortune Brands.
Although some tequilas have remained as family owned brands, most well-known tequila brands are owned by large multinational corporations. However, there are over 100 distilleries making over nine hundred brands of tequila in Mexico and over 2,000 brand names have been registered (2009 Statistics). Due to this, each bottle of tequila contains a serial number (NOM) depicting which distillery the tequila was produced in. Because there are only so many distilleries, multiple brands of tequila come from the same location.

The Tequila Regulatory Council of Mexico originally did not permit flavored tequila to carry the tequila name. In 2004, the Council decided to allow flavored tequila to be called tequila, with the exception of pure agave tequila, which still could not be flavored.

A one-liter bottle of limited-edition premium tequila was sold for $225,000 in July 2006 in Tequila, Jalisco, by the company Tequila Ley .925. The bottle which contains the tequila is a two-kilo display of platinum and gold. The manufacturer has received the Certificate from Guinness World Records for the most expensive bottle of spirit ever sold.

In 2009, Mexican scientists discovered a method to produce tiny, nanometric size, synthetic diamonds from 80-proof (40% alcohol) tequila. This process involves heating the tequila to over 800 degrees C (1,400 degrees F) to break its molecular structure and be vaporised. The tequila particles are then settled upon steel or silicon trays to form a thin and pure uniform layer. Extremely cheap to produce and far too small for jewels, the results are hoped to have numerous commercial and industrial applications such as in computer chips or cutting instruments.

 
Drink Recipe – Tequila Feugo

Traditional Mexican flavors highlight your favorite premium tequila in this spicy shot. Serves one.
Prep Time: 2 minutes
Total Time: 2 minutes
Ingredients:
•   1 1/2 oz premium tequila
•   1 teaspoon hot chile sauce
•   1 teaspoon lime juice
•   1 dash onion powder
•   1 lime wedge
•   kosher salt
•   1 jalapeno ring
Preparation:
Use lime wedge to moisten 1/2 the brim of the shooter glass. Dip the moistened brim in salt. In a shaker or a glass, mix the lime juice, tequila, onion powder and hot chile sauce. Blend well. Pour the mixture into the shot glass and garnish the edge with a jalapeno ring.
Follow the shot with the lime wedge.

http://www.youtube.com/v/UVKsd8z6scw
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: Johnny Unusual on September 24, 2011, 01:21:11 AM
47 – Surly Darkness
(http://www.ratebeer.com/beerimages/full_size/65289.jpg)
24 points
1 of 16 lists
Top Vote: #2 BBQ Platypus


The Surly Brewing Company is a Brooklyn Center, Minnesota-based craft brewery. Surly has a projected production of over 15,000 barrels in 2010. As of June 2010, Surly is only available in and around the Minneapolis – Saint Paul metropolitan area.

Surly's brewing system is a 30 beer barrel (BBL) Sprinkman, one of four identical systems produced by Sprinkman of Wisconsin.

Surly Brewing Co. founder Omar Ansari had been homebrewing since 1994. After apprenticing at New Holland Brewing Company in Michigan and enlisting Todd Haug of Minneapolis's Rock Bottom Brewery, Surly Brewing began brewing in Brooklyn Center.

In February 2011, Surly announced that it intended to open a restaurant and beer garden, which was expected to cost US$20 million. The new facility would also increase its brewing capacity to approximately 100,000 barrels. This type of installation was not in line with Minnesota's liquor laws, however. With the help of the Surly Nation, dedicated fans of the brewery's beer, some members of the Minnesota Legislature were convinced to propose changes in order to allow it. Minnesota's three-tier liquor sales system, would not allow breweries to distribute their beer for retail sale and sell on the brewery's premises, as a brewpub does. After just a few months, changes to Minnesota's liquor laws that would dismantle this three-tier system, and allow Surly to open their facility, were passed in an omnibus liquor bill introduced by Rep. Jenifer Loon (R - Eden Prairie) and Sen. Linda Scheid (DFL - Brooklyn Park). Known as the Surly Bill, this bill was signed into law by Governor Mark Dayton on May 25, 2011.

This massive Russian Imperial Stout brings waves of flavors; chocolate, cherries, raisins, coffee, and toffee. We add a touch of hops to make this delicious brew even tastier.
STYLE: Russian Imperial Stout/American Double Stout
MALT: Pale Ale, Golden Promise , Crystal, Dark Crystal, Oats, Black, Chocolate, Roast
SUGAR: Belgian Dark Candi Sugar
HOPS: Columbus, Amarillo, Simcoe
YEAST: English Ale

 
Drink Recipe – ???

Any ideas BBQ?


http://www.youtube.com/v/KrT-EM273hw
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: Johnny Unusual on September 24, 2011, 01:22:35 AM
47 – Gentleman Jack
(http://www.niagaradutyfree.com/images/whiskey-gentleman_jack_DetailsImage.JPG)
24 points
1 of 16 lists
Top Vote: #2 D.B. Barnes


Gentleman Jack is a brand of Tennessee whiskey produced by the Jack Daniel Distillery. It was introduced to the American market in 1988 as a "superpremium" brand, a step above the company's regular Jack Daniel's, which is a premium brand.

The Gentleman Jack brand was introduced to strengthen the company's share among consumers, who were drinking less liquor overall but had moved to more upscale brands, a development noted by many liquor manufacturers in the United States in the late 1980s and early 1990s. It is twice filtered through charcoal, as opposed to a single filtering for normal Jack Daniel's. A celebration unveiling Gentleman Jack was held on 30 September 1988 when 1,000 guests were invited to the company's headquarters in Lynchburg, Tennessee. They could not actually partake of the new product because Lynchburg is in a dry county.

Gentleman Jack is the drink of preference of such celebrities as Marcella Hazan.
 
Drink Recipe – The Perfect Gentleman

The Perfect Gentleman
2 oz of Gentleman Jack® Rare Tennessee Whiskey
¼ oz dry vermouth
½ oz of sweet vermouth
Dash of bitters
Shake ingredients with ice and strain into a Manhattan glass. Garnish with a maraschino cherry or lemon twist.

For a dry version; delete the sweet vermouth
For a sweet version; delete the dry vermouth

http://www.funnyordie.com/embed/123a03fe7c
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: Johnny Unusual on September 24, 2011, 01:24:54 AM
47 – Tomato Juice
(http://simplyrecipes.com/photos/tomato-juice.jpg)
24 points
1 of 16 lists
Top Vote: #2 Monty


Tomato juice is a juice made from tomatoes. It is usually used as a beverage, either plain or in cocktails such as a Bloody Mary or Michelada.

Tomato juice was first served as a beverage in 1917 by Edgar Berman at the French Lick Springs Hotel in southern Indiana, when he ran out of orange juice and needed a quick substitute. His combination of squeezed tomatoes, sugar and his special sauce became an instant success as Chicago businessmen spread the word about the tomato juice cocktail.

A recent small scale study has indicated that tomato juice contains a factor (dubbed P3) that inhibits platelets in blood from clumping together and forming blood clots. The authors suggest this might be beneficial to diabetes sufferers. The actual effect of increased intake of tomato juice by diabetics has never been studied.

Tomato juice also contains the antioxidant lycopene. Scientific studies have suggested that lycopene consumption may protect against prostate cancer, breast cancer, atherosclerosis, and coronary artery disease. Epidemiological research has also shown that lycopene may protect against breast cancer and myocardial infarction (heart attack).

 
Drink Recipe – Vegetable-Tomato Cocktail
 

Ingredients:
•   2 bowls juice of tomato
•   1 leafy celery, chopped
•   2-3 parsley
•   2 slices lemon
•   1 slice green chili
•   1 slice onion
•   1/4 tsp low fat dressing
•   1/2 tsp honey
Directions:
•   Blend all the ingredients until evenly mixed.
•   For 3-4 serving

 http://www.youtube.com/v/YIJBwBbLMMc
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: Johnny Unusual on September 24, 2011, 01:26:57 AM
47 – Irish Breakfast Tea
(http://lh3.ggpht.com/CapandKettle/R7uFlLv7ozI/AAAAAAAAADg/K-GOzsD6RRM/s800/2008-01-30AdagioIrishBreakfast0312.jpg)
24 points
1 of 16 lists
Top Vote: #2 Tripe Hound Redux


Irish breakfast tea is a blend of several black teas, most often Assam teas and, less often, other types of black tea. Many tea producers make Irish breakfast tea blends specifically for the US market. In Ireland, it is not referred to as "Irish breakfast tea", but simply as "tea", being the popular regional style. It is consumed throughout the day and evening. The Irish brands, such as Lyon's, Nambarrie's and Barry's, are heavily weighted toward Assam. Due to its strength, Irish breakfast tea is commonly served with milk, but some prefer to drink it straight or with lemon or sugar. In Ireland, most people drink tea with milk.
 
Drink Recipe – Irish Breakfast Tea Latte

8-oz good Irish breakfast tea, hot
3 tbsp honey
4-oz milk

Pour very hot tea over orange zest into a large mug or measuring cup. Allow to steep for 1-2 minutes, then stir in vanilla syrup and strain out orange zest.

Steam milk, or heat it in the microwave and whisk until very frothy, and pour it into the sweetened tea.

Serve immediately.


Oh.  It’s a small child.  Playing with a tea cup.  That’s a good reason to call the video Irish Breakfast Tea…
http://www.youtube.com/v/ObrOMHdojF4
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: BBQ Platypus on September 24, 2011, 07:29:35 AM
Drink Recipe – ???[/b][/u]
Any ideas BBQ?

Not really, no.  I'm not really a beer snob.  I waited in line for it pretty much on the advice of my roommate.  Neither of us had anything better to do that day.  Totally worth it, though.
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: anais.jude on September 24, 2011, 07:33:01 AM
My list was greatly influenced by being in Mexico. BEfore I got here Rum was my only hard liqour of choice
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: Tripe on September 24, 2011, 07:35:51 AM
http://www.youtube.com/v/ObrOMHdojF4
Weird, looks like me as a nipper.

Drink Recipe – ???[/b][/u]
Any ideas BBQ?
Not really, no.  I'm not really a beer snob.  I waited in line for it pretty much on the advice of my roommate.  Neither of us had anything better to do that day.  Totally worth it, though.
Find a nice and powerful cider and make a kind of snake bite out of it?
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: D.B. Barnes on September 24, 2011, 10:53:51 AM
47 – Tequila
24 points
1 of 16 lists
Top Vote: #2 Anais.La.Conejita


This was the first hard alcohol I ever drank in any significant amount. Significant as in downing a fifth with two other kids. Tried to ride my bike home. Crashed probably ten times. Once I got home, I fell down and broke a lamp, waking my mom and sister. My horrified mom dragged me into the shower with my clothes still on where I proceeded to vomit. Good times. I can't believe I can even remember one minute of this experience but I can.

Anyway, I wasn't able to even smell tequila for years without getting nauseous, but starting drinking a lot of margaritas in college, and even got to the point where I could do shots. Although there was always that feeling I was gonna wretch after doing a shot. I stopped drinking the stuff years ago.

What is this? My Life With Booze? The Booze Chronicles?!?
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: sarcasm_made_Easy on September 24, 2011, 10:58:38 AM
i would read the booze chronicles lol

Quote
there was always that feeling I was gonna wretch after doing a shot

That's with most hard liquor shots.  I now realize that this stuff is not made to shoot.  If you are gonna drink it straight, sip. 

Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: Tripe on September 24, 2011, 11:01:03 AM
47 – Tequila
24 points
1 of 16 lists
Top Vote: #2 Anais.La.Conejita


This was the first hard alcohol I ever drank in any significant amount. Significant as in downing a fifth with two other kids. Tried to ride my bike home. Crashed probably ten times. Once I got home, I fell down and broke a lamp, waking my mom and sister. My horrified mom dragged me into the shower with my clothes still on where I proceeded to vomit. Good times. I can't believe I can even remember one minute of this experience but I can.

Anyway, I wasn't able to even smell tequila for years without getting nauseous, but starting drinking a lot of margaritas in college, and even got to the point where I could do shots. Although there was always that feeling I was gonna wretch after doing a shot. I stopped drinking the stuff years ago.

What is this? My Life With Booze? The Booze Chronicles?!?
It's like the progeny of a drunken tryst between Normal Rockwell and Charles Bukowski.
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: sarcasm_made_Easy on September 24, 2011, 11:19:35 AM
They can not have progeny :) 
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: Tripe on September 24, 2011, 11:20:17 AM
Which is where part of the joke lies....
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: D.B. Barnes on September 24, 2011, 11:22:03 AM
i would read the booze chronicles lol

Quote
there was always that feeling I was gonna wretch after doing a shot

That's with most hard liquor shots.  I now realize that this stuff is not made to shoot.  If you are gonna drink it straight, sip. 

To a certain extent, yes. Although, at least for me, there's just something about the smell and taste of tequila that makes it rise to the top of the vomit-inducing potential scale. It's quite possible that initial bad experience traumatized my senses.

What is this? My Life With Booze? The Booze Chronicles?!?
It's like the progeny of a drunken tryst between Normal Rockwell and Charles Bukowski.

 :D
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: Tripe on September 24, 2011, 11:25:22 AM
(http://www.artchive.com/artchive/r/rockwell/rockwell_runaway.jpg)
"Wh-what do you sssay to anosser coplashot eh?"

"I like yerthinking off officerr"
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: D.B. Barnes on September 24, 2011, 11:27:42 AM
47 – Surly Darkness


This massive Russian Imperial Stout brings waves of flavors; chocolate, cherries, raisins, coffee, and toffee.

Jesus. Is this a beer or a fucking Whitman's Sampler?!?

Seriously though, I'd like to try this.


 :D again, Tripe!
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: Johnny Unusual on September 24, 2011, 11:39:19 AM
(http://www.artchive.com/artchive/r/rockwell/rockwell_runaway.jpg)
"Wh-what do you sssay to anosser coplashot eh?"

"I like yerthinking off officerr"


For some reason, the guy in the centre is close to my mental approximation of what Bukowski looked like.  Checking out actual pictures of Charles, he kind of looks like if Rondo Hatton and Werner Hertzog had a baby and he grew up and played the Wolfman.
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: D.B. Barnes on September 24, 2011, 11:52:57 AM
47 – Gentleman Jack
(http://www.niagaradutyfree.com/images/whiskey-gentleman_jack_DetailsImage.JPG)
24 points
1 of 16 lists
Top Vote: #2 D.B. Barnes


Okay, I know this isn't super high-end stuff, but damn it's good. I'm pretty much whiskey's jail bitch and Jack Daniels has always been my weapon of choice. It has sort of a macabre appeal to it. I mean, how many photos of dead rock stars have you seen with them clutching a bottle of JD? There was a period during which I exclusively drank Jack & Coke, nothing else. Well, nothing else alcoholic anyway. I first sprung for the Gentleman Jack because I wanted a sipping whiskey and figured it would be smoother. It did not disappoint.

I'll now share with you my super-secret cocktail recipe:

Two fingers of Gentleman Jack in a lowball
Repeat


Quote
The Gentleman Jack brand was introduced to strengthen the company's share among consumers, who were drinking less liquor overall but had moved to more upscale brands...

Well, I fit one of those demographic traits.
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: MontyServo on September 25, 2011, 01:18:00 AM
47 – Tomato Juice
24 points
1 of 16 lists
Top Vote: #2 Monty


What?  No love for Tomato Juice?

I usually put a dash of hot sauce in mine.  And sometimes I will mix it with some cheap beer and hot sauce.  Good stuff.
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: D.B. Barnes on September 25, 2011, 01:38:23 AM
47 – Tomato Juice
24 points
1 of 16 lists
Top Vote: #2 Monty


What?  No love for Tomato Juice?

I usually put a dash of hot sauce in mine.  And sometimes I will mix it with some cheap beer and hot sauce.  Good stuff.

I kinda like tomato juice, but it just never seems to present itself on its own. Of course, I don't exactly search it out.

However, combine that shit with vodka, some other shit, and a big-ass shrimp, I'm absolutely on board!

Cheers!
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: Johnny Unusual on September 25, 2011, 02:11:58 AM
46 – Corona
(http://journeytom.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/07/corona.jpg)
25 points
1 of 16 lists
Top Vote: #1 Anais.La.Conejita


Corona Extra, better known as Corona and labeled as Coronita in Spain, is a brand of pale lager owned and produced by Cerveceria Modelo at a number of breweries in Mexico. It is one of the best-selling beers in Mexico and is one of the top-selling beers worldwide. Corona beer is available in over 170 countries.

In the United States, Canada, Australia and the United Kingdom, Corona is commonly served with a wedge of citrus fruit, usually lime or sometimes lemon, inserted into the neck of the bottle, adding tartness and flavor.

In the United States, Corona Extra is the top selling imported beer.
 
Drink Recipe – Cherry Corona

1/2 oz maraschino cherry juice
12 oz Corona® Extra lager

Pour the maraschino cherry juice into a bottle of Corona Extra lager, shake gently before drinking.
 
http://www.youtube.com/v/XToHkp3mVZ8
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: Johnny Unusual on September 25, 2011, 02:13:52 AM
 
46 – Bacon-Infused Bourbon
(http://img.wonderhowto.com/images/gfx/gallery/634460104574853743.jpg)
25 points
1 of 16 lists
Top Vote: #1 Cole Stratton

From Summitsips.com:

Every once in a while something that sounds crazy in a cocktail actually works, if you are open to the idea. One such concept is Bacon Infused Bourbon. It’s seems ridiculous at first, but when you consider sweet caramel and maple syrup flavors sometimes characterize a good bourbon, you start to think about breakfast and how a side of bacon tastes so good next to your pancakes! Does it still sound silly? Well, maybe if I break it down a bit, it will make a little more sense. What we are talking about is neither sweet nor sour, not salty or bitter—it’s the fifth fundamental flavor that the Japanese call umami.

Umami, or savoriness, is considered by eastern cultures as an important component of taste in their cuisine. It is the flavor produced by amino acids such as glutamate that we normally associate with beef, mushrooms or that “rich” character found in stews and some fermented foods. Although it isn’t often discussed in regular western culture, umami is widely recognized as a flavor descriptor in the culinary world. Naturally, ideas born in the kitchen can be carried over to the bar, and that’s what we are doing here.

In addition to capturing rich meaty flavors, the smokiness that typifies cured bacon is equally important in our infusion. That is why I recommend finding an extremely smokey bacon to start out. You can pick any bacon that you like, but the stronger the flavors the better. Benton’s Smoked Country Bacon is supposed to be very good for this. I used a delicious smoke house bacon I found at our local farmers market. It’s a thick-cut, organic product that is absolutely wonderful as a breakfast side, in an egg casserole or sprinkled over fresh salad greens. Whatever you use, plan to eat a good, healthy portion of bacon, because all we need is the fat!

That’s right, the process of infusing umami into bourbon is called fat-washing. The idea is simple. Cook your bacon as you normally would and reserve the rendered fat. You need about a third of a cup of fat for the process. Place it into a jar while it’s still hot, and fill the jar with bourbon. Let it cool, then freeze it for 24 hours. Filter it and you are done. It’s that simple.

 
Drink Recipe – Bacon-Infused Old-Fashioned

INGREDIENTS
12 strips bacon (enough to render 3-4 oz of fat)
26 oz bottle bourbon

DIRECTIONS

Fry bacon in frying pan, then pour off bacon fat into 2-litre empty bucket. Pour in entire bottle of bourbon; set bottle aside. Stir mixture, then allow to sit at room temperature for six hours. Place bucket in freezer for about two hours so that fats can separate from alcohol and become solid.
Remove fatty solids from top of mixture; this is the first filtration. Strain through coffee filter into empty bourbon bottle, using a funnel. Makes 12 2-oz drinks.

Splatt says that a "slightly unctuous mouthfeel" is desirable, but warns that you can have too much of a good thing. She suggests a third filtration, through a Brita filter (it's not just for water), if you find the fat too noticeable.
For the drink:
1/2 oz maple syrup
dash or two (to taste) of bitters
2 oz bacon-infused bourbon
1 orange twist to garnish

Place syrup and bitters in Old Fashioned glass. Add ice if desired. Add bourbon and garnish with twist. Makes 1 drink.

http://www.youtube.com/v/jkBoXXyEhLs
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: Johnny Unusual on September 25, 2011, 02:16:04 AM
46 – Buttermilk
(http://www.europeancuisines.com/images/cuinneog_buttermilk.jpg)
25 points    
1 of 16 lists
Top Vote: #1 Monty


Buttermilk refers to a number of dairy drinks. Originally, buttermilk was the liquid left behind after churning butter out of cream. It also refers to a range of fermented milk drinks, common in warm climates (e.g., Middle East, Pakistan, India, or the Southern United States) where fresh milk would otherwise sour quickly. It is also popular in Scandinavia and the Netherlands, despite the colder climates.

Buttermilk may also refer to a fermented dairy product produced from cow's milk with a characteristically sour taste caused by lactic acid bacteria. This variant is made in one of two ways: cultured buttermilk is made by adding lactic acid bacteria (Streptococcus lactis) to milk;Bulgarian buttermilk is created with a different strain of bacteria called Lactobacillus bulgaricus, which creates more tartness.

Whether traditional or cultured, the tartness of buttermilk is due to the presence of acid in the milk. The increased acidity is primarily due to lactic acid, a byproduct naturally produced by lactic acid bacteria while fermenting lactose, the primary sugar found in milk. As lactic acid is produced by the bacteria, the pH of the milk decreases and casein, the primary protein in milk, precipitates causing the curdling or clabbering of milk. This process makes buttermilk thicker than plain milk. While both traditional and cultured buttermilk contain lactic acid, traditional buttermilk tends to be less viscous whereas cultured buttermilk is more viscous.

Originally, buttermilk was the liquid left over from churning butter from cream. Traditionally, before cream could be skimmed from whole milk, it was left to sit for a period of time to allow the cream and milk to separate. During this time, the milk would be fermented by the naturally occurring lactic acid-producing bacteria in the milk. This facilitates the butter churning process since fat from cream with a lower pH will coalesce more readily than that from fresh cream. The acidic environment also helps prevent potentially harmful microorganisms from growing, increasing shelf-life. However, in establishments that used cream separators, the cream would hardly be acidic at all.

In the Indian subcontinent, buttermilk is taken to be the liquid left over after extracting butter from churned yogurt (dahi). Today, this is called traditional buttermilk. Traditional buttermilk is still common in many Indo-Pakistani households but rarely found in western countries. In Southern India and most areas of the Punjab, buttermilk with added water, sugar and/or salt, asafoetida, and curry leaves is given at stalls in festival times.

Commercially available cultured buttermilk is pasteurized and homogenized (if 1% or 2% fat) milk which has been inoculated with a culture of lactic acid bacteria to simulate the naturally occurring bacteria found in the old-fashioned product. Some dairies add colored flecks of butter to cultured buttermilk to simulate the residual pieces of butter that can be left over from the churning process of traditional buttermilk.

Condensed buttermilk and Dried buttermilk have increased in importance in the food industry. Such solids are used in ice cream manufacture. Adding specific strains of bacteria to pasteurized milk allows more consistent production.

In the early 1900s, cultured buttermilk was labeled artificial buttermilk, to differentiate it from traditional buttermilk, which was known as natural or ordinary buttermilk.

Acidified buttermilk is a related product that is made by adding a food-grade acid (such as lemon juice) to milk.

 
Drink-Based Recipe – Buttermilk Fried Chicken Recipe


INGREDIENTS
•   1 (3 pound) fryer (see Wikipedia on the difference between broilers, fryers, and roasting birds), cut into pieces
•   2 cups buttermilk
•   1 large onion, sliced
•   1/4 cup chopped mixed fresh herbs (parsley, tarragon, thyme) or a teaspoon each of the dried herbs.
•   1/2 teaspoon paprika
•   1/2 teaspoon cayenne pepper
•   2 cups flour
•   1/2 teaspoon garlic salt
•   1/2 teaspoon onion salt
•   1 teaspoon cayenne pepper
•   Salt and pepper
•   2 cups grapeseed oil, or other high smoke-point oil such as canola oil, or peanut oil
METHOD

1 Soak chicken overnight (at least 8 hours and up to two days) in buttermilk with onions, herbs, paprika, and cayenne pepper. (Regarding the use of buttermilk, my mother has had good results from soaking chicken in plain yogurt instead of buttermilk.)

2 Drain in colander, leaving some herbs on chicken. In a large paper or plastic (sturdy) bag, mix flour with seasonings. Meanwhile, heat 2 cups oil in a large, heavy-bottomed skillet (cast iron, stainless steel, or anodized aluminum - something that can take the heat) on medium high heat until a pinch of flour starts to sizzle when dropped in the hot oil (but not so hot that the pan is smoking). Remember when working with hot oil, always have a pan lid close by.

3 Place chicken pieces in bag with flour and shake until thoroughly coated. Add chicken to hot pan and fry on 1 side for 12-15 minutes, until golden brown, and then use tongs to turn the pieces over and fry for another 10-12 minutes, again until golden brown.
Be careful to keep the oil hot enough to fry the chicken, but not so high as it burns the chicken. To do this on our electric stove we have to alternate the settings between high to medium high several times while we are cooking.

4 Use tongs to remove chicken from pan. Place on a rack over a cookie sheet or broiling pan for the excess oil to drain. Add more salt and pepper to taste.

BONUS BUTTERMILK FRIED CHICKEN RECIPE!
http://www.youtube.com/v/uxEhH6MPH28
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: Johnny Unusual on September 25, 2011, 02:18:48 AM
46 – Cherry Vanilla Dr. Pepper
(http://www.falsecognate.org/images/cherry_dr_pepper.jpg)
25 points
1 of 16 lists
Top Vote: #1 Pak Man

   
Cherry Vanilla Dr Pepper (began 2004) was released in some areas on October 15, 2004. The beverage tastes similar to Dr Pepper but has stronger cherry and vanilla flavors added. Cherry Vanilla Dr Pepper was the first drink in the planned "Soda Fountain Classics" line of beverages from Dr Pepper, a range of drinks designed to taste similar to popular soda fountain drinks from the 1950s. It is now only available in select areas of the U.S. It was available in Canada for a short period of time, but it ceased production as of mid-2007. It became available again in mid-2008 after Diet Cherry Chocolate Dr Pepper ceased production.
 

Drink Recipe – Cherry Vanila Dr. Pepper

Make your own… with Booze!

1 oz Amaretto
4 oz Rum
2 drops Vanilla Extract
8 oz Dr. Pepper
Best served in a Collins Glass.
Directions

Pour all ingredients into a collins glass. Stir, and serve

 http://www.youtube.com/v/cXwOIPt9ZQM
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: Johnny Unusual on September 25, 2011, 02:21:35 AM
46 – Ovaltine
(http://ovalgon.dodososo.com/enertine/ovaltine.jpg)
25 points
1 of 16 lists
Top Vote: #1 Shodan


Ovaltine is a brand of milk flavoring product made with malt extract (except the blue packaging in the US), sugar (except in Switzerland),cocoa, and whey. Ovaltine, a registered trademark of Associated British Foods, is made by Wander AG, a subsidiary of Twinings which acquired the brand from Novartis in 2003, except in the United States, where Nestlé acquired the rights separately from Novartis later on.


Ovaltine was developed in Berne, Switzerland, where it is known by its original name, Ovomaltine (from ovum, Latin for "egg", and malt, originally its main ingredients). Soon after invention the factory moved out to the village of Neuenegg a few kilometres west of Berne, where it is still produced.

Ovomaltine was exported to Britain in 1909; it was a misspelling in the trademark registration that led to the name being shortened to Ovaltine in English-speaking markets. A factory was built in Kings Langley which exported to the United States as well. By 1915 Ovaltine was being manufactured in Villa Park, Illinois, for the US market. Originally advertised as consisting solely of "malt, milk, eggs, flavored with cocoa", the formulation has changed over the decades, and today several formulations are sold in different parts of the world. In the US, after purchasing the US rights, Nestlé changed the formulation bringing its flavor profile very close to that of another Nestlé chocolate milk flavoring product, Nesquik.

The popular chocolate malt version is a powder which is mixed with hot or cold milk as a beverage. Malt Ovaltine (a version without cocoa) and Rich Chocolate Ovaltine (a version without malt) are also available in some markets. Ovaltine has also been available in the form of chocolate bars, chocolate Easter eggs, parfait, cookies, and breakfast cereals, where it is only the brand name that connects the cereals with the chocolate drink.

Ovaltine also manufactured PDQ Chocolate Flavor Beads, PDQ Choco Chips and Egg Nog Flavored PDQ, which are no longer available. These drink mixes were very popular from the 1960s to the 1980s. Ovaltine discontinued the PDQ products about 1995 or 1996.

The US children's radio series Little Orphan Annie (1931–1940) and Captain Midnight (1938–1949), and the subsequent Captain Midnight TV series (1954–1956), were sponsored by Ovaltine. They had promotions in which listeners could save proofs-of-purchase from Ovaltine jars to obtain radio premiums, like "secret decoder ring" badges or pins that could be used to decode messages in the program. Kids from the time may remember that "Ovaltine" is an anagram for "Vital One". Villa Park, Illinois, was home to the Ovaltine factory until the company's purchase and withdrawal in 1988. The Villa Park Historical Society maintains a permanent exhibit of Ovaltine advertising and memorabilia. The old factory was converted to loft apartments keeping the original floors and wall exposed.

A radio program aimed at five- to fourteen-year-olds, The League of Ovaltineys, was broadcast to Great Britain by Radio Luxembourg on Sunday evenings at 5:30 PM. Beginning in 1934, it was broadcast until 1940 and the German occupation of Luxembourg and again after World War II ended into the 1950s. Like the US programme, listeners could obtain badges, pins, and secret codes. The Ovaltineys' advertising jingle was regarded as one of the most successful jingles of the era.
 
Drink-Based Recipe – Ovaltine Brownies

1 cup sugar
2 eggs
1/2 tsp vanilla
1/4 tsp salt
1/2 c butter
1/2 cup flour
1 and 1/3 cup rich chocolate ovaltine
1/4 tsp baking powder

Mix sugar, eggs and vanilla. Cream with butter. Add dry ingredients until well blended. Grease pan (8x11) and bake at 350 for 35-40 minutes approximately. They have a yummy crusty top and sides, while the middle is squishy, chocolately goodness. I like to cut two, put ice cream in the middle and freeze for a short while.

They tend to get a little chewy around the edges while the middle is still soft, so the recipe isn't perfect, but still yummy.
 
http://www.youtube.com/v/x5SR0PkZxzw
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: Johnny Unusual on September 25, 2011, 02:23:23 AM
 
46 – Lapsang Souchong Tea
(http://www.theteasmith.com/merchant2/graphics/00000001/Lapsang%20Souchong.jpg)
25 points
1 of 16 lists
Top Vote: #1 Tripe Hound Redux


Lapsang souchong (Chinese: 拉普山小種/正山小种,; pinyin: lāpǔshān xiǎozhǒng; Pe̍h-ōe-jī: l a̍p-pho•-san sió-chéng; literally "Small plant from Lapu mountain"; cantonese: làaipóusàan síujúng) is a black tea (Camellia sinensis) originally from the Wuyi region of theChinese province of Fujian. It is sometimes referred to as smoked tea (熏茶). Lapsang is distinct from all other types of tea because lapsang leaves are traditionally smoke-dried over pinewood fires, taking on a distinctive smoky flavour.

The name in Minnan means "smoky sub-variety." Lapsang souchong is a member of the Wuyi Bohea family of teas. The story goes that the tea was created during the Qing era when the passage of armies delayed the annual drying of the tea leaves in the Wuyi hills. Eager to satisfy demand, the tea producers sped up the drying process by having their workers dry the tea leaves over fires made from local pines.

Lapsang souchong from the original source is increasingly expensive, as Wuyi is a small area and there is increasing interest in this variety of tea.
 
Drink Recipe – Lapsang souchong With Chocolate Sauce

1.   2 cups heavy cream
2.   1 tablespoon Lapsang souchong tea leaves
3.   3/4 pound bittersweet chocolate, coarsely chopped
4.   Salt
1.   Scald the cream in a medium saucepan. Remove from the heat and stir in the tea. Cover and let stand for 1 hour. Strain the cream through a fine sieve set over a clean saucepan and bring to a simmer over moderate heat. Remove from the heat and stir in the chocolate and a pinch of salt. Whisk until the chocolate is smooth. Let cool slightly. The sauce should be thick but somewhat pourable.
MAKE AHEAD The sauce can be stored overnight at room temperature.
 
http://www.youtube.com/v/UmgY5jijXOs
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: MontyServo on September 25, 2011, 02:45:11 AM
46 – Buttermilk
25 points    
1 of 16 lists
Top Vote: #1 Monty


I sort of figured that I would be the only person to list Buttermilk.  It is certainly an acquired taste.  I don't drink it that often, but I still consider it the best.  I usually will add a pinch of seasoning to it for an added kick.


Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: gojikranz on September 25, 2011, 02:53:24 AM
46 – Cherry Vanilla Dr. Pepper
(http://www.falsecognate.org/images/cherry_dr_pepper.jpg)
25 points
1 of 16 lists
Top Vote: #1 Pak Man

   

hmmm i probably meant this when i said cherry dr pepper on my list or is there a just cherry dr pepper?  who knows anyways i like this variation of dr pepper as well.
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: Tripe on September 25, 2011, 05:09:46 AM
46 – Lapsang Souchong Tea
(http://www.theteasmith.com/merchant2/graphics/00000001/Lapsang%20Souchong.jpg)
25 points
1 of 16 lists
Top Vote: #1 Tripe Hound Redux


Lapsang souchong (Chinese: 拉普山小種/正山小种,; pinyin: lāpǔshān xiǎozhǒng; Pe̍h-ōe-jī: l a̍p-pho•-san sió-chéng; literally "Small plant from Lapu mountain"; cantonese: làaipóusàan síujúng) is a black tea (Camellia sinensis) originally from the Wuyi region of theChinese province of Fujian. It is sometimes referred to as smoked tea (熏茶). Lapsang is distinct from all other types of tea because lapsang leaves are traditionally smoke-dried over pinewood fires, taking on a distinctive smoky flavour.
And the best stuff uses pine needles as the fuel for the drying fire. I love the flavour of smoke. One of my favourite breakfasts is slightly burnt toast and honey with Lapsang tea (which I put milk in, because it's tea ;))

It's also the best tea for tasseomancy, because the smoky aroma adds to the drama of the thing. :)
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: CJones on September 25, 2011, 10:19:23 AM
Its like 20-30 bucks.  I drink it straight up, has a very vanilla type of flavor but not over powering. 

I just bought some for $28. You're right, it is very vanilla-y, and pretty darn good. But Barcardi, while nowhere near as good, is less than half as expensive.

So far nothing from my list has shown up. I expect we'll see several of them near the top though.
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: sarcasm_made_Easy on September 25, 2011, 10:20:35 AM
Its like 20-30 bucks.  I drink it straight up, has a very vanilla type of flavor but not over powering. 

I just bought some for $28. You're right, it is very vanilla-y, and pretty darn good. But Barcardi, while nowhere near as good, is less than half as expensive.

So far nothing from my list has shown up. I expect we'll see several of them near the top though.

True but i prefer the spiced rum anyways.  If your gonna mix stuff i just would buy regular capt :) 
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: Johnny Unusual on September 25, 2011, 11:12:53 AM
46 – Cherry Vanilla Dr. Pepper
(http://www.falsecognate.org/images/cherry_dr_pepper.jpg)
25 points
1 of 16 lists
Top Vote: #1 Pak Man

   

hmmm i probably meant this when i said cherry dr pepper on my list or is there a just cherry dr pepper?  who knows anyways i like this variation of dr pepper as well.

I'm pretty confident that there is cherry Dr. Pepper, even if it's in an unofficial capacity.  THAT'S why you got to do your research!
There's only one small tie left.  Tomorrow I'l post 45-41 and then 10 per day.
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: sarcasm_made_Easy on September 25, 2011, 05:55:19 PM
Dr pepper has a ton of flavors i am pretty damn sure they have both cherry and cherry vanilla.  

Ps jonny i am gonna have to try that alcoholic version seems good.  I might have to plan a bender with this list next weekend :)
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: Tripe on September 25, 2011, 05:57:17 PM
Correct (http://www.drpepper.com/text/products/drpeppercherry/), they do (http://www.drpepper.com/text/products/cherryvanilladrpepper/)
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: Pak-Man on September 25, 2011, 06:44:41 PM
Yeah. I love Cherry Dr. Pepper and have a fridge stocked with it right now. Cherry Vanilla is no longer available in our area, and the taste of vanilla really added to the experience. I miss it.
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: D.B. Barnes on September 25, 2011, 11:19:48 PM
46 – Corona
(http://journeytom.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/07/corona.jpg)
25 points
1 of 16 lists
Top Vote: #1 Anais.La.Conejita


Okay, I understand your list was greatly influenced by your lengthy stay south of the border, but really? THIS is your favorite out of that experience?!?

It's a marginally-alcoholic, thirst quencher at best. If this is really your favorite beverage, then I back off my comment, but, is this this truly your favorite beverage?
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: D.B. Barnes on September 25, 2011, 11:34:54 PM
46 – Ovaltine
(http://ovalgon.dodososo.com/enertine/ovaltine.jpg)
25 points
1 of 16 lists
Top Vote: #1 Shodan


Nestle Quik was never allowed in house growing up. We got Ovaltine instead. Was it even healthier? I don't know. All I know is when I went to friends' houses, we slammed some Quik and when my friends came to my house, they were presented with a nice glass of Ovaltine, to which they replied in little-kid speak: "What the fuck is this shit?!?" It was embarrassing. And I don't even know how much sugar is in Ovaltine compared to Quik. I assume Quik is higher, but I don't know. Frankly, I don't wanna know at this point.

I did eventually grow to genuinely like it. But I won't lie, when I got Quik at my friends' houses, it was like smoking meth compared to gobbling cross-tops.
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: D.B. Barnes on September 25, 2011, 11:42:35 PM
46 – Bacon-Infused Bourbon
(http://img.wonderhowto.com/images/gfx/gallery/634460104574853743.jpg)
25 points
1 of 16 lists
Top Vote: #1 Cole Stratton

This is a thing I've never heard of before. This is also too much work to do on my own, but I would like to try it. Next time I'm in a bar, I'll order this, and when the bartender balks, I'll fly into a rage that will either get me a free drink or get my ass kicked in a back alley. I prefer the former.
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: gojikranz on September 26, 2011, 02:02:19 AM
Yeah. I love Cherry Dr. Pepper and have a fridge stocked with it right now. Cherry Vanilla is no longer available in our area, and the taste of vanilla really added to the experience. I miss it.

yes i checked my local store we only have cherry and regular nowadays.  but i do recall the cherry vanilla with fondness.

but my favorite variation was the berry dr pepper.  holy moly that was good.
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: Johnny Unusual on September 26, 2011, 05:01:34 AM
 
45 – Pineapple Juice
(http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_vN64CvktjBQ/TIFD-NI4lCI/AAAAAAAAAIw/_idmiHlp4wM/s1600/pineapple-juice.jpg)
25 points
2 of 16 lists
Top Vote: #8 Cole Stratton


Information from pineapplejuice.com
Fresh pineapple juice is extremely nutritious, as it contains many essential vitamins and minerals, such as vitamin C, Thiamine, vitamin B6, Manganese, Potassium, Magnesium, and even a little Calcium and protein. Processed pineapple juice can be nutritious as well, however during the processing procedure it's usually mixed with large volumes of sugar, as well as many other unhealthy synthetic preservatives. To maximize the health benefits of consuming this juice, we highly recommend that you drink pineapple juice made fresh from the juicer. If you don't have a juicer, you are really missing out on a fun and delicious way to improve your overall diet. In the paragraphs below we'll outline why drinking pineapple juice is healthy, and exactly what it contains that your body needs.

Eight ounces of pineapple juice contains as much as 75% of the daily recommended allowance of vitamin C. As most of you are already aware, vitamin C is vital to increasing the body's natural resistance to disease, especially during periods of excessive physically activity. Vitamin C is also crucial in promoting cell growth and development, as well as tissue repair. Without vitamin C, our bodies could not produce collagen, an essential protein responsible for the creation of our skin, scar tissue, ligaments, tendons, and blood vessels. There are many common and readily available fruits and vegetables that contain this important vitamin, in addition to pineapples. To really up your daily dosage, juice your pineapple with oranges, strawberries, broccoli, cantaloupe, papaya, blueberries, lemons, or cranberries.

Eight ounces of pineapple juice also contains roughly 20% of the daily recommended allowance of Potassium. Potassium is an important mineral that helps maintain proper kidney functions. It is also a natural electrolyte, which are essential components within your body that conduct electricity. Other benefits of healthy levels of Potassium include overall heart health, steady muscle contraction, and proper digestive functions. Recent studies have also concluded that high blood pressure could be related to not maintaining high enough levels of Potassium in the diet. In addition to pineapples, there are many other fruits and vegetables that contain large amounts of Potassium. For a healthy dose of this essential mineral, try juicing your pineapple with bananas, oranges, cantaloupe, kiwi fruit, cherries, or apricots.

In addition to vitamin C and Potassium, an eight ounce glass of pineapple juice also contains roughly 20% of the daily recommended allowance of Thiamine. Thiamine is a water soluble vitamin within the B group of vitamins. One of the primary functions of this vitamin is to convert carbohydrates into raw energy. It's also extremely important in maintaining a healthy nervous system, and heart. There are not many fruits and vegetables that contain large volumes of Thiamine, as it's particularly found in whole grains and eggs. To maximize your intake of it, you can juice your pineapple with asparagus, cauliflower, oranges, or strawberries. Another intake alternative would be to skip the juicer altogether, and use a blender to make an oatmeal, flax seed, orange, and pineapple smoothie.

Lastly we're going to discuss vitamin B6. One eight ounce glass of pineapple juice contains roughly 12% of the daily recommended allowance of vitamin B6. Vitamin B6 is another water soluble vitamin, which is essential in maintaining a large spectrum of healthy bodily functions. These functions include red blood cell metabolism, nervous and immune system wellness, as well as blood sugar regulation. Like Potassium, large quantities of vitamin B6 are not found in most fruits and vegetables, as it's primarily based in cereals, grains, beans, roast beef, fish, and avocado. It will be hard to attain a large dosage without consuming a large volume of juice. I have however made a pineapple, avocado, and rolled oats smoothie, using orange juice as the base. It tasted great, and I recommend giving it a try.

 
Drink Recipe – Cinderella

The taste of tropical fruit comes to life in this refreshing mocktail. If you'd like a more elegant looking Cinderella, cut all of the juices and ginger ale in half and serve it in a chilled cocktail glass. Garnish with both pineapple and orange slices and don't forget that little paper umbrella for an extra finishing touch.
Ingredients:
•   1 oz lemon juice
•   1 oz orange juice
•   1 oz pineapple juice
•   2 oz Ginger ale
•   dash of grenadine
•   pineapple and orange slices for garnish
Preparation:
1.   Pour the juices into a cocktail shaker with ice cubes.
2.   Shake well.
3.   Strain into a chilled collins glass filled with ice.
4.   Garnish with the slices of pineapple and/or orange.
 
http://www.youtube.com/v/k6BUIlgpybU
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: Tripe on September 26, 2011, 05:06:26 AM
Gah! Death Juice! Death Juice!
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: Johnny Unusual on September 26, 2011, 05:18:41 AM
Then you haven't had the fortune of Pineapple Juice made from fresh Thai pineapples.  Mmm, tangy!
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: Tripe on September 26, 2011, 05:20:52 AM
No, because it would kill me, I know it tastes nice but anaphylaxis is a wee bit high of a price to pay for tasty beverages. :)
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: Johnny Unusual on September 26, 2011, 06:50:57 AM
44 – Mexican Coca-Cola
(http://2.bp.blogspot.com/_OJl6ATsGFco/TT3pHXz4GNI/AAAAAAAAHrY/oAZ_AT4t3Uw/s1600/gg.jpg)
25 points
2 of 16 lists
Top Vote: #2 Cole Stratton
Preferred serving: from a glass bottle (Cole Stratton)


Mexican Coke (informally "MexiCoke") is Coca-Cola that is made and bottled in Mexico. Although intended for consumption in Mexico, Mexican Coke has become very popular in the United States because of a flavor that Mexican Coke fans call "a lot more natural tasting." This "more natural" taste can be partially attributed to the use of refined cane sugar in Mexican Coke, as opposed to the high-fructose corn syrup found in nearly all soft drinks bottled in the United States because of tariffs on imported sugar. Mexican Coke is also bottled in a thick glass bottle.

Noted preferred serIn taste tests, tasters have noted that the Mexican Coke has "a more complex flavor with an ineffable spicy and herbal note" and that it contained something "that darkly hinted at root beer or old-fashioned sarsaparilla candies." Some have suggested that the flavor resembles that of the kola nut. Tasters have also commented that the Mexican Coke lacks the acidic, chemical taste of American Coke and that it "tastes a lot more like a naturally sweet beverage such as juice."

Mexican Coke is bottled in a thick 355 mL or 500 mL glass bottle, which some have described in contrast to the American Coke plastic bottles as being "more elegant, with a pleasingly nostalgic shape." Also, instead of having a paper label stuck onto the bottle, the Mexican label is built inside of the glass, with a smaller external nutritional facts sticker.

Mexican Coke is becoming more widely carried throughout the United States, appearing in some chain grocery stores such as Publix, Kroger, Wal-Mart (as well as Sams Club), Costco, WinCo Foods, Sack 'n Save, and Target, along with local ethnic grocery stores. Certain branches of the Circle K convenience store chain carry the drink as well. In addition these stores may also sell imported Fanta orange soda with refined cane sugar along side this Coke type. The World of Coca-Cola also sells Mexican Coke in its gift store, giving a subtle nod from the Atlanta headquarters to the beverage's popularity in the United States. Mexican Coke has become so popular that a website, WhereToFindMexicanCoke.com, dedicated to listing Mexican Coke retail store locations has sprung up.

 
Drink-Based Recipe – Mexican Coca Cola Chicken


2 pounds chicken wings, wings and drummettes separated
1/4 cup soy sauce
2 tablespoons canola oil
2 tablespoons dry sherry or Chinese rice wine
3/4 cup Mexican Coca-Cola (not diet or anything flavored!)
2 scallions, chopped
A few pinches of freshly ground black pepper

1. Put the chicken wings in a large bowl and pour half of the soy sauce on top. Turn the wings so they are well-coated and allow them to marinate for 10 to 15 minutes at room temperature.
2. Heat a wok or large skillet over medium-high heat. Sear the chicken wings until they are golden brown on each side but not cooked through, about 5 to 8 minutes. Pour in the other half of the soy sauce, the sherry, and the Coke and bring the liquid to a simmer. Simmer the wings for 15 to 20 minutes, until the liquid is reduced to a glaze.
3. Either sprinkle the scallions into the wok and stir them with the chicken wings and sauce, or save them for garnish. Season the chicken with black pepper. Transfer the chicken to a plate, garnish with scallions if you did not used them already, and serve.
 
http://www.youtube.com/v/ceMAtjxtDl0
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: Johnny Unusual on September 26, 2011, 07:40:45 AM
 
43 – Ecto-Cooler
(http://www.x-entertainment.com/articles/0822/1.jpg)
26 points
2 of 16 lists
Top Vote: #1 Team RAD
Preferred Variant: Fake Ecto-Cooler from the Ghostbuster Chicago Division (Darth Geek)


Ecto-Cooler was a product tie-in with the cartoon series The Real Ghostbusters, based on the 1984 live-action film, Ghostbusters. Hi-C struck a deal in 1987 to promote the series by developing a drink. Expected to last only as long as the series, the drink was successful beyond expectations and continued after the series' 1991 cancellation to be produced for more than a decade. The Ecto-Cooler box featured The Real Ghostbusters character Slimer, as did the commercials. Slimer left the box sometime around 1997, but Minute Maid did not discontinue the product until 2001, at which point it was renamed Shoutin' Orange Tangergreen. Slimer was replaced on the packaging by a similar-looking blob of lips. The product was still noted as ecto cool on many store receipts. In 2006, Shoutin' Orange Tangergreen was renamed Crazy Citrus Cooler. In 2007, Crazy Citrus Cooler was discontinued. In 2011, a Chicago Ghostbusters group made a recipe that was said to taste exactly like the original.

 
Drink Recipe – Aforementioned Chicago-style Ecto-Cooler


1 Packet Kool Aid/Flavor Aid Orange
1 Packet Kool Aid/Flavor Aid Tangerine
3/4 Cup Orange Juice (No Pulp)
3/4 Cup Tangerine Juice/1 can mashed Mandarin Oranges
1/3 scoop Countrytime Lemonade (Reg or Pink)
1 1/2 Cups Sugar
Green and blue food coloring for color.

Most of these items are easy to find. To find the Kool Aid, visit Kraft's Product Locatorand search for both the orange and tangerine flavors. For the Flavor Aid, I suggest here to find both flavors: Mix-And-Match Any 2 flavors of Flavor Aid - MyBrands.com

For the Tangerine Juice (If you don't wanna mash the tangerines yourself) Check Noble Juice's locator site to find the juice in your area: Where to Find Noble Juice at NobleJuice.com

1) In a 1 Gallon pitcher, start by putting in your orange juice and tangerine juice. If you happen to be using the Mandarin oranges as a juice source, be sure to strain the pulp out unless you so wish it.


2) After your juices are in, put in the packets of Flavor Aid and the 1/3 scoop of Lemonade mix and mix up the concentrate. The Lemonade is used to make the mixture slightly more bitter to give it the zing the original Ecto-Cooler had. You may have to adjust to get it to your taste.


3) Add water, put in your sugar and stir until dissolved. Again, if you're using Countrytime Lemonade, sugar is already added to the mixture so you might have to adjust for your personal taste by adding more sugar than the stated 1 1/2 cups.

4) Add your food coloring. The red in the Flavor Aid is deep enough to skew the color of the green, but with enough drops, you can make it green. It won't be that happy bright green we remember, but at least it'll be green. You also want to add a few drops of the blue in the mix to get it a more even green.
 
http://www.youtube.com/v/KdARlTpw_Y0
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: Johnny Unusual on September 26, 2011, 07:42:17 AM
 
42 – Monster Energy
(http://frankpaulgambino59.files.wordpress.com/2010/03/monster-energy-drink2.jpg)
26 points
3 of 16 lists
Top Vote: #11 Gojikranz

Monster Energy is an energy drink that was launched by Hansen Natural in 2002.
Monster Energy is marketed and distributed by Hansen Natural a listed company of Corona, California. Though it is not widely advertised in the media, Monster receives a large amount of recognition from its sponsorship of various sporting events. Hansen Natural Corporation announced a distribution agreement with Anheuser-Busch in the U.S. and Grupo Jumex in Mexico. Hansen Natural Corporation announced a distribution deal with PepsiCo Canada in February of 2007. Contracts with existing distributors were bought out in these markets. In Germany Pepsi is the Producer and it is available there since summer/fall 2010. It is distributed in Australia by Schweppes as Coca-Cola Amatil manufactures Mother energy drink, which is an exclusive energy drink sold only in Australia and New Zealand


 
Drink Recipe – Absolute Monster


4 oz Absolut® vanilla vodka
4 oz Monster® energy drink
4 oz ice cubes

Combine the Absolut vanilla vodka, Monster energy drink and ice cubes in a blender. Blend until slushy, pour into a highball glass, and serve.
 
http://www.youtube.com/v/gdFBnCfRC7A
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: Johnny Unusual on September 26, 2011, 07:43:04 AM
41 – Coca-Cola Vanilla
(http://wtfoodge.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/04/vanilla-coke.jpg)
27 points
2 of 16 lists
Top Vote: #9 Pak-Man

Coca-Cola Vanilla is the limited relaunch of the formerly produced Vanilla Coke soft drink from the early 2000s. Vanilla Coke is a vanilla flavored version of Coca-Cola Classic.

The Coca-Cola Company announced in early 2002 that Vanilla Coke would be introduced initially in the United States with distribution starting May 15, 2002, followed by a rollout in Canada. The introduction of vanilla flavor was hailed by The Coca-Cola Company as "the greatest innovation since Diet Coke in 1983".

In November 2005, after slumping sales, The Coca-Cola Company announced that Vanilla Coke would be discontinued in North America andGreat Britain by the end of the year.

In January 2006 Coca-Cola launched Black Cherry Vanilla Coke and Diet Black Cherry Vanilla Coke, a fusion of Cola, Black Cherry and Vanilla Flavors.

In 2007 Coca-Cola Vanilla was re-introduced in the U.S. with new packaging and with several new variants.


 
Drink Recipe – Jack’s Vanilla Coke


2 oz Jack Daniel's® Tennessee whiskey
1 tsp vanilla
11 oz Coca-Cola®

Pour the ingredients into a tall glass, and add 3 - 5 ice cubes. Stir with a stirrer to get the vanilla off the bottom.

 
 
http://www.youtube.com/v/L69vsH3RTpo
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: Johnny Unusual on September 26, 2011, 07:46:05 AM
OK, that's the list for today. Short, I know, but tomorrow we will have 10 a day.  Without revealing too much expect alcohol, juices and some brand name products.
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: gojikranz on September 26, 2011, 07:59:39 AM
oh man ecto cooler.  classic loved that as a kid.
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: sarcasm_made_Easy on September 26, 2011, 09:11:04 AM
Been any interesting and diverse list so far. 
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: Thrifty on September 26, 2011, 09:18:49 AM
Ovaltine?  Why do they call it Ovaltine?  The jar is round.  The glass is round.  They should call it Roundtine.

I love Ovaltine, though everyone else I know hates it, especially my parents.
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: Darth Geek on September 26, 2011, 09:19:18 AM
oh man ecto cooler.  classic loved that as a kid.
Definitely check out the Chicago Ghostbusters recipe, then, it's really good.
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: ColeStratton on September 26, 2011, 01:48:21 PM
46 – Bacon-Infused Bourbon
(http://img.wonderhowto.com/images/gfx/gallery/634460104574853743.jpg)
25 points
1 of 16 lists
Top Vote: #1 Cole Stratton

This is a thing I've never heard of before. This is also too much work to do on my own, but I would like to try it. Next time I'm in a bar, I'll order this, and when the bartender balks, I'll fly into a rage that will either get me a free drink or get my ass kicked in a back alley. I prefer the former.

This is seriously the best thing ever. I've infused a couple of bottles worth--it's a process, but worth it. I keep it in the freezer, and often make the PDT old-fashioned with it (we call it the Lumberjack Old Fashioned--the combo of the bacon bourbon with maple syrup, orange rind and orange bitters is beyond tasty). We use Four Roses bourbon, which is about 25 bucks a bottle.

Speaking of PDT--if you're ever in New York, you gotta go! PDT stands for Please Don't Tell (you can find info on Yelp--so much for secrecy!). It's a hidden speakeasy in the Village. You make a reservation starting at 3pm the day you want to go--it's inside of Crif Dogs. There's a phone booth in the corner, you pick up the receiver and tell them you have a reservation, and then the wall of the phone booth opens up and---cool bar! They have amazing cocktails from some of the city's best mixologists--in addition to the bacon bourbon drink, they have things like the Paddington, which features orange marmalade. They also have a special gourmet hot dog menu, where chefs like WD40's Wiley Dufrene have contributed to the menu. It's a little pricey (drinks are $14, I believe), but go and have 1 or 2 and enjoy the experience. They don't overcrowd it--everyone has a seat!
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: sarcasm_made_Easy on September 26, 2011, 02:02:56 PM
That sounds like an awesome place to drink, it also sounds like where maxwell smart would go.
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: D.B. Barnes on September 26, 2011, 02:13:48 PM
That does sound fantastic. I'd totally pretend I was a spy and wear an Adam Chance yellow cardigan.
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: Tripe on September 26, 2011, 02:50:56 PM
an Adam Chance yellow cardigan.
I had to look that up because when I read that name I think of this bloke

(http://i224.photobucket.com/albums/dd141/corrinemil/suggestive-Adam-Chance.gif)

From the british soap opera (and a show produced in my neck fo the woods) Crossroads, I'd post a vid of it but I think Victoria Wood did a better job of distilling it's "charms":

http://www.youtube.com/v/dqTznu59InY
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: CJones on September 26, 2011, 05:02:32 PM
That's interesting about Mexican Coke, I've never heard of that. My parents are always going on about how much better Coke used to be back when it used sugar instead of corn syrup. My father says it just tastes like carbonated Karo Syrup now. I've never had any, however not too long ago, Dr Pepper was making an anniversary edition that was made with sugar (for the same price as the regular stuff to boot). And yes, it was definitely much better. They must have stopped though because I can't find it any more.

Still haven't seen anything from my list.
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: spaceforarent on September 26, 2011, 06:19:27 PM
That's interesting about Mexican Coke, I've never heard of that. My parents are always going on about how much better Coke used to be back when it used sugar in stead of corn syrup. My father says it just tastes like carbonated Karo Syrup now. I've never had any, however not too long ago, Dr Pepper was making an anniversary edition that was made with sugar (for same price as the regular stuff to boot). And yes, it was definitely much better. They must have stopped though because I can't find it any more.

Still haven't seen anything from my list.
Not sure where you're from, but if you happen to have the grocery chain Wegmans they sell it there, along with Mexican Fanta at some (I saw it in Buffalo, NY but not around here (Syracuse)). Other grocery stores have started selling it around here as well. Definitely worth a try if you like Coke.
Pepsi and Mountain Dew come out with a Throwback version every once in a while, which is made with sugar instead of HFCS. I don't normally drink Pepsi, even less so Mountain Dew, but I'll usually pick up a few bottles when they're available.
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: MontyServo on September 26, 2011, 07:54:39 PM
That's interesting about Mexican Coke, I've never heard of that. My parents are always going on about how much better Coke used to be back when it used sugar in stead of corn syrup. My father says it just tastes like carbonated Karo Syrup now. I've never had any, however not too long ago, Dr Pepper was making an anniversary edition that was made with sugar (for same price as the regular stuff to boot). And yes, it was definitely much better. They must have stopped though because I can't find it any more.

Still haven't seen anything from my list.
Not sure where you're from, but if you happen to have the grocery chain Wegmans they sell it there, along with Mexican Fanta at some (I saw it in Buffalo, NY but not around here (Syracuse)). Other grocery stores have started selling it around here as well. Definitely worth a try if you like Coke.
Pepsi and Mountain Dew come out with a Throwback version every once in a while, which is made with sugar instead of HFCS. I don't normally drink Pepsi, even less so Mountain Dew, but I'll usually pick up a few bottles when they're available.

Also, at certain times of the year, you can get real sugar Coke here in the States.  Coke puts out "Kosher Coca Cola" in 2 Liter bottles, and it is made with real sugar instead of corn syrup.  


Quote from: http://consumerist.com/2010/03/kosher-coke-is-here-for-passover.html
Passover might not be starting until next week, but Coca Cola has already begun distributing 2-liter bottles of its kosher formula, which replaces high fructose corn syrup with sugar, to stores around the country. I know because I've got some chilling in the fridge.

If you're unfamiliar with the kosher coke and want to find it on the shelves of your grocery store, look for 2-liter bottles with yellow caps stamped like the one in the picture here. You can also double check the ingredients label. If you see "sucrose" instead of HFCS, then you're probably on the right track.

Kosher Coke is very popular among lovers of real-sugar sodas, who will occasionally stock up on bottles to save for the rest of the year.

So you can keep an eye out for that as well in your stores.

Here is the Wiki info:

Quote
Kosher Coca-Cola

Kosher Coca-Cola produced for Passover is sold in 2-liter bottles with a yellow cap marked with an OU-P, indicating that the Orthodox Jewish Union certifies the soda as Kosher for Passover, or with a white cap with a CRC-P indicating that the certification is provided by the Chicago Rabbinical Council.

While the usual Coca-Cola formula is kosher (the original glycerin from beef tallow having been replaced by vegetable glycerin), during Passover Ashkenazi Jews do not consume Kitniyot, which prevents them from consuming high fructose corn syrup (HFCS).

Even sugar-based formulae would still require certification of both the formula and the specific bottling plant, as the strictures of Kashrut on Passover are far higher and more complicated than usual kosher observance.
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: Compound on September 26, 2011, 08:01:28 PM
That's interesting about Mexican Coke, I've never heard of that.

Check your grocery store's "ethnic" isle. Around here they've got the Asian, Italian, kosher and hispanic related foodstuffs in the same isle, and our local chains usually have a few bottles of drinks from Mexico, including coke, stashed there. The local Walmarts also stick the Qwik in that isle, for some reason.
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: Compound on September 26, 2011, 08:10:27 PM
That sounds like an awesome place to drink, it also sounds like where maxwell smart would go.

It also sounds a lot like Milwaukee's Safe House bar, which used to be the place to hang out at Gen Con.  You needed a password to get in, or else you had to perform something embarrassing before you could get in.  This was, of course, broadcast to the folks inside the bar. Still, it's a Bond-styled spy bar. How can you not love it?
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: Johnny Unusual on September 26, 2011, 09:42:09 PM
Sadly, Ecto-Cooler and Mexican Coke have never touched my lips.  Probably won't have the opportunity to try the Coke, but I might try making the fake Ecto-Cooler sometime.
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: Johnny Unusual on September 27, 2011, 08:12:04 AM
Surge protector in housemate's room is busted, so I won't be able to get the list going until tomorrow or later tonight.  If tomorrow, I'll make up for it with 20 entries.
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: Thrifty on September 27, 2011, 10:13:47 AM
So this didn't make the list?

(http://failblog.files.wordpress.com/2011/09/epic-fail-photos-sticker-placement-fail1.jpg)
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: sarcasm_made_Easy on September 27, 2011, 10:43:01 AM
heh maybe it did its just further along :)
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: D.B. Barnes on September 27, 2011, 11:13:38 AM
So this didn't make the list?

(http://failblog.files.wordpress.com/2011/09/epic-fail-photos-sticker-placement-fail1.jpg)

I want a Snake Juice machine.

(http://nymag.com/daily/entertainment/tumblr_ll44u06MGa1qzua91o1_500.gif)
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: Johnny Unusual on September 27, 2011, 03:05:02 PM
40 – Vodka
(http://images.free-extras.com/pics/s/smirnoff_vodka-946.jpg)
29 points
2 of 16 lists
Top Vote: #7 BBQ Platypus

Vodka (Polish: wódka, Russian: водка) is a distilled beverage. It is composed primarily of water and ethanol with traces of impurities and flavorings. Vodka is made by distillation of fermented substances such as grains, potatoes, or sometimes fruits.

Traditionally prepared vodkas had an alcoholic content of 38% by volume. Today, the standard Polish, Russian and Lithuanianvodkas are 40% abv (80 proof), although many non-export Russian brands are sold at 38%. The European Union has established a minimum of 37.5% alcohol by volume content for any European vodka to be named as such. Products sold as vodka in theUnited States must have an alcoholic content of 40% or more. Homemade vodka, referred to as "samogon" in Russia and Ukraine, sometimes has an ABV as high as 62%.

Vodka is traditionally drunk neat in the vodka belt countries of Eastern Europe and around the Baltic Sea. It is also commonly used in cocktails and mixed drinks, such as the Bloody Mary, the Screwdriver, the Sex on the Beach, the White Russian, the Black Russian, the vodka tonic, and the vodka martini.


 
Drink Recipe – Accomplice


Ingredients:
•   1 oz simple syrup
•   2 oz Stolichnaya vodka
•   1/2 oz fresh lemon juice
•   Champagne
•   3 strawberries
•   superfine sugar for rimming
Preparation:
1.   Muddle three strawberries and simple syrup in acocktail shaker.
2.   Add the vodka and lemon juice.
3.   Shake well.
4.   Strain into a sugar-rimmed martini glass.

 
 
http://www.youtube.com/v/5p0QtJMKt1s
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: D.B. Barnes on September 27, 2011, 03:37:53 PM
40 – Vodka
(http://images.free-extras.com/pics/s/smirnoff_vodka-946.jpg)
29 points
2 of 16 lists
Top Vote: #7 BBQ Platypus


In high school, we used to score the 1.75L plastic bottles of Kamchatka. Not only was it dirt-cheap, but the plastic bottle came in handy when it was invariably dropped on the kitchen floor. We'd mix with just about any kind of juice: cranberry, orange, pineapple, tomato, grapefruit, lime, lemon, corn, green peppers, chili *sigh* onions.
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: Johnny Unusual on September 27, 2011, 04:19:59 PM
39 –Dr. Pepper Cherry
(http://s3.amazonaws.com/bzzagent-bzzscapes-prod/dr-pepper-snapple-group---news-releases-0-1-2-3-4-lrg.png)
29 points
2 of 16 lists
Top Vote: #5 Pak Man

Dr Pepper Cherry (began 2009) was released in some areas around February 2009. The beverage tastes similar to Dr Pepper, but has stronger cherry flavor added. Variety comes in both regular and diet versions. Gene Simmons of the band Kiss was chosen to be the variation's spokesman, with a commercial circulating on television in March/April, 2009 featuring Kiss's song "Calling Dr. Love" ("Trust me, I'm a doctor" claims Simmons in the commercial).


 
Drink-Based Recipe – Dr. Pepper Cherry Marshmallow Cake


INGREDIENTS:
2 cans Dark sweet cherries, pitted, drained, reserving syrup
***Jell-O Mixture***
3/4 cup Reserved cherry syrup
1/4 cup Dr. Pepper
1 package Cherry Jell-O, 3-oz size
1/8 teaspoon almond extract
***Batter***
1 package yellow cake mix
1 package Cherry Jell-O, 3-oz size
1/2 cup vegetable oil
3/4 cup Dr. Pepper
4 eggs
2 cups miniature marshmallows


PREPARATION:
Arrange cherries evenly on bottom of a greased 9 x 13 pan.

Preheat oven to 350F.

In a small saucepan, combine the cherry syrup, cherry Jell-O and Dr. Pepper; gently heat until Jell-O is dissolved. Add almond extract and cool slightly.

Batter: In a large mixing bowl, combine yellow cake mix, 1 pack cherry Jell-O, oil, eggs and Dr. Pepper. Beat on high for 3-4 minutes. Pour cooled Jell-O mixture over cherries in pan. Sprinkle evenly with the miniature marshmallows and then carefully and evenly spread the batter mix over the marshmallows. Bake for 40-45 minutes. Cool on rack for 45 minutes. Chill 3-4 hours.
 
 
http://www.youtube.com/v/qHpeWAnncv8
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: Johnny Unusual on September 27, 2011, 04:24:27 PM
38 – Milk
(http://www.acidrefluxsymptomsnow.com/images/milk.jpg)
29 points
3 of 16 lists
Top Vote: #9 Gojikranz

Milk is a white liquid produced by the mammary glands of mammals. It is the primary source of nutrition for young mammals before they are able to digest other types of food. Early-lactation milk contains colostrum, which carries the mother's antibodies to the baby and can reduce the risk of many diseases in the baby. The precise components of raw milk vary by species and by a number of other factors, but it contains significant amounts of saturated fat, protein and calcium as well as vitamin C. Cow's milk has a pH ranging from 6.4 to 6.8, making it slightly acidic.

In many cultures of the world, especially the Western world, humans continue to consume milk beyond infancy, using the milk of other animals (especially cattle, goats and sheep) as a food product. For millennia, cow's milk has been processed into dairy products such as cream, butter, yogurt, kefir, ice cream, and especially the more durable and easily transportable product, cheese. Modern industrial processes produce casein, whey protein, lactose, condensed milk, powdered milk, and many other food-additive and industrial products.

Humans are an exception in the natural world for consuming milk past infancy, despite the fact that many humans show some degree (some as little as 5%) of lactose intolerance, a characteristic that is more prevalent among individuals of African or Asian descent. The sugar lactose is found only in milk, forsythia flowers, and a few tropical shrubs. The enzyme needed to digest lactose, lactase, reaches its highest levels in the small intestines after birth and then begins a slow decline unless milk is consumed regularly. On the other hand, those groups who do continue to tolerate milk often have exercised great creativity in using the milk of domesticated ungulates, not only of cattle, but also sheep, goats, yaks, water buffalo, horses, reindeers and camels. The largest producer and consumer of cattle and buffalo milk in the world is India.


Humans first learned to regularly consume the milk of other mammals following the domestication of animals during the Neolithic Revolution or the invention of agriculture. This development occurred independently in several places around the world from as early as 9000–7000 BC in Southwest Asia to 3500–3000 BC in the Americas. The most important dairy animals—cattle, sheep and goats—were first domesticated in Southwest Asia, although domestic cattle has been independently derived from wild auroch populations several times since. Initially animals were kept for meat, and archaeologist Andrew Sherratt has suggested that dairying, along with the exploitation of domestic animals for hair and labor, began much later in a separate secondary products revolution in the 4th millennium BC. Sherratt's model is not supported by recent findings, based on the analysis of lipid residue in prehistoric pottery, that show that dairying was practiced in the early phases of agriculture in Southwest Asia, by at least the 7th millennium BC.

From Southwest Asia domestic dairy animals spread to Europe (beginning around 7000 BC but not reaching Britain and Scandinavia until after 4000 BC), and South Asia (7000–5500 BC). The first farmers in central Europe and Britain milked their animals. Pastoral andpastoral nomadic economies, which rely predominantly or exclusively on domestic animals and their products rather than crop farming, were developed as European farmers moved into the Pontic-Caspian steppe in the 4th millennium BC, and subsequently spread across much of the Eurasian steppe. Sheep and goats were introduced to Africa from Southwest Asia, but African cattle may have been independently domesticated around 7000–6000 BC. Camels, domesticated in central Arabia in the 4th millennium BC, have also been used as a dairy animal in North Africa and the Arabian peninsula. In the rest of the world (i.e., East and Southeast Asia, the Americas and Australia) milk and dairy products were historically not a large part of the diet, either because they remained populated by hunter-gatherers who did not keep animals or the local agricultural economies did not include domesticated dairy species. Milk consumption became common in these regions comparatively recently, as a consequence of European colonialism and political domination over much of the world in the last 500 years.

In 1863, French chemist and biologist Louis Pasteur invented pasteurization, a method of killing harmful bacteria in beverages and food products.

In 1884, Doctor Hervey Thatcher, an American inventor from New York, invented the first glass milk bottle, called 'Thatcher's Common Sense Milk Jar', which was sealed with a waxed paper disk. Later, in 1932, plastic-coated paper milk cartons were introduced commercially as a consequence of their invention by Victor W. Farris.

 
Drink-Based Recipe – Milk Pizza Dough


1 pouch (8 g) of instant (rapid rise) dry yeast
2 tsp (10 ml) sugar
1 1/4 cup (310 ml) warm milk
3 tbsp (45 ml) melted butter
About 3 cups (750 ml) unbleached all-purpose flour
1 tsp (5 ml) salt
instructions
In a large bowl, mix yeast, sugar, warm milk (do not bring to a boil) and melted butter.
Let rest 10 minutes to allow yeast to activate. Foam will form along the surface.
Mix flour and salt. Gradually add to bowl, mixing with a fork, and eventually with your hands if using a fork becomes difficult. Incorporate flour until dough is consistent and fairly firm.
Flour a work surface and knead the dough, adding a bit of flour until dough no longer sticks. To knead, fold and flatten the dough for roughly 5 minutes, using the palm of your hand or fist.
Place dough ball in a bowl greased with butter, cover, and allow dough to rise in a warm, draft-free location. The dough must double in volume. This should take about 45 minutes.
Deflate the dough prior to working it according to the chosen recipe.

http://www.youtube.com/v/ufhZ2yUHj9Y
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: Johnny Unusual on September 27, 2011, 04:30:04 PM
37 – Cranberry Juice
(http://topnews.in/health/files/cranberry-juice.jpg)
29 points
3 of 16 lists
Top Vote: #3 Gojikranz

Cranberry juice is the juice of the cranberry. Commercially, it is sold in either as a pure juice, which is quite tart, or, more commonly, as cranberry juice "cocktail" or "drink" , in blends with other juices, such as apple or grape, or mixed with water and corn syrup, sugar, or an artificial sweetener (such as aspartame or sucralose). These may also be blended with other juices or flavors. The term, when used on its own, almost always refers to a sweetened drink.

Cranberry juice cocktail is sometimes used as a mixer with alcoholic drinks such as a Cape Codder (1+1/2 ounces of vodka to 4 ounces cranberry juice) or non-alcoholic drinks such as the Bog Grog (2 parts Chelmsford ginger ale [or regular ginger ale] to 3 parts cranberry juice).

Cranberry juice is known to have various health benefits. These include:
   Cranberry juice contains phytochemicals, which may help prevent cancer and cardiovascular disease.
   Cranberry juice is high in oxalate, and has been suggested to increase the risk for developing kidney stones, although more recent studies have indicated it may lower the risk.
Cranberry Juices are usually free from artificial colourings, making them suitable for those who do not consume food dyes.

A known claim is that cranberry juice may help prevent and relieve the symptoms of urinary tract infections by primary and secondary means. The primary means works on the bacteria directly by altering the molecular structure of the fimbriae on the pathogenic strains of the bacteria that cause the infections. The properties of the proanthocyanidins in cranberries prevents the bacteria from adhering to the surface of the bladder and urinary tract. The secondary means works indirectly on the bacteria by changing the intravesical pH (the pH of the bladder's contents) making it more acidic.

However, results from recent randomized controlled trials have been disappointing. A trial of 319 college women with an acute UTI, failed to show that drinking cranberry juice (8 oz of 27% twice daily) would reduce the incidence of a second UTI. Another study performed in The Netherlands randomised 221 women to receive either co-trimoxazole or cranberry capsules. That study found that the antibiotics were superior to cranberry capsules, but were associated with an increase in antibiotic resistance. However, in an accompanying editorial, the dose of cranberries used in the study was criticised for being too low.

Although cranberry juice may help prevent growth of bacteria, its pH may be as acidic as 2.3–2.5, which is more acidic than most soft drinks, which could potentially dissolve tooth enamel over time.
 
Drink Recipe – Cranberry Juice Cocktail


1 lb cranberries
5 cups water
salt
2 - 3 slices oranges
1/2 cup sugar

Wash the cranberries and put them into a nonreactive saucepan with the water, a pinch of salt and if you wish, the orange slices. Cook over medium heat until all the berries burst -- about 10 minutes.

Pour the fruit and liquid into a cheesecloth-lined sieve. Strain the juice to the saucepan, add the sugar and boil for two or three minutes.

Taste and add more sugar if it is needed. Cool and chill the juice before serving

http://www.youtube.com/v/ORuv1E-71TA
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: Johnny Unusual on September 27, 2011, 04:38:06 PM
36 – Tea
(http://trainer2go.net/Blog/wp-content/uploads/2011/03/white-tea.jpg)
30 points
3 of 16 lists
Top Vote: #5 Gojikranz

Tea is the agricultural product of the leaves, leaf buds, and internodes of various cultivars and sub-varieties of the Camellia sinensis plant, processed and cured using various methods. "Tea" also refers to the aromatic beverage prepared from the cured leaves by combination with hot or boiling water, and is the common name for the Camellia sinensis plant itself. After water, tea is the most widely consumed beverage in the world. It has a cooling, slightly bitter, astringent flavour which many enjoy.

The term herbal tea usually refers to infusions of fruit or herbs containing no actual tea, such as rosehip tea or chamomile tea. Alternative terms for this are tisane or herbal infusion, both bearing an implied contrast with tea. This article is concerned exclusively with preparations and uses of the tea plant, Camellia sinensis, the Minnan word for which is the etymological origin of the English word tea.

Tea plants are native to East and South Asia and probably originated around the point of confluence of the lands of northeast India, north Burma, southwest China, and Tibet. Although tales exist in regard to the beginnings of tea being used as a beverage, no one is sure of its exact origins. The usage of tea as a beverage was first recorded in China, with the earliest records of tea consumption with records dating back to the 10th century BC. It was already a common drink during Qin Dynasty (around 200 BC) and became widely popular during Tang Dynasty, when it was spread to Korea and Japan. Trade of tea by the Chinese to Western nations in the 19th century spread tea and the tea plant to numerous locations around the world.

Tea was imported to Europe during the Portuguese expansion of the 16th century, at which time it was termed chá. In 1750, tea experts traveled from China to the Azores Islands, and planted tea, along with jasmines and mallows, to give the tea aroma and distinction. Both green tea and black tea continue to grow in the islands, that are the main supplier to continental Portugal. Catherine of Braganza, wife of Charles II, took the tea habit to Great Britain around 1660, but it was not until the 19th century Britain that tea became as widely consumed as it is today. In Ireland, tea had become an everyday beverage for all levels of society by the late 19th century, but it was first consumed as a luxury item on special occasion such as religious festivals, wakes, and domestic work gatherings such as quiltings.

 
Drink Recipe – Tea Thyme Soup

From Cat Tea Corner.com:
5 cups vegetable stock, broth, or bouillon
4 large cloves garlic, minced or pressed
3 teaspoons dried thyme, lightly crushed
3 cups chopped broccoli, fresh or frozen
1/2 pound (8 ounces) small shells, wagon wheels, fusilli, or other macaroni shapes
1 cup steepd green tea at regular strength
juice of one lemon (about 2 Tablespoons)
1/8 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper or to taste
additional salt to taste (optional)
Combine the stock, garlic, and thyme in a heavy saucepan and bring to a boil. Stir in the broccoli and macaroni, reduce heat, and simmer until the macaroni is just at the al dente stage of tenderness, about eight to twelve minutes depending on the shape chosen. Stir in the tea and heat through for about a minute. Remove from heat and stir in the lemon juice and pepper, and adjust the salt if necessary. Serve immediately and piping hot.
Variation:
   Substitute other chopped cruciferous vegetables (cabbage, cauliflower, Brussels sprouts, kohlrabi) for all or part of the broccoli.
> For a main dish soup, add 1/2 pound firm tofu, diced, or 1 cup cooked or canned beans, rinsed well drained, with the green tea.

http://www.youtube.com/v/6t5XOINJaFU
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: D.B. Barnes on September 27, 2011, 04:38:49 PM
38 – Milk
(http://www.acidrefluxsymptomsnow.com/images/milk.jpg)


Back in grade school, we used to steal our moms' Witch Hazel and mix it with milk. We stopped doing this after one of us had to have our stomach pumped.

All characters appearing in this post are fictitious. Any resemblance to real persons, living or dead, is purely coincidental.
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: Johnny Unusual on September 27, 2011, 04:47:09 PM
35 – Sunkist
(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/thumb/8/87/Sunkist_logo_2008.jpg/300px-Sunkist_logo_2008.jpg)
31 points
2 of 16 lists
Top Vote: #6 Psycho Goatee

Sunkist is a brand of orange- and lemonade-flavored soft drink launched in 1979.

Sunkist was first licensed by Sunkist Growers to the General Cinema Corporation, the leading independent bottler of Pepsi-Cola products at the time. The soft drink was the idea of Mark Stevens, who foresaw the potential based on market research which indicated that, worldwide, orange was the third best selling soft drink flavor (largely due to The Coca-Cola Company's Fanta brand).

After extensive R&D during 1977 and early 1978, in which research was conducted on taste, color and carbonation levels, Sunkist made a grand introduction in New York by franchising it to The Coca-Cola Bottling Company of New York, where Edward F. O'Reilly was president. At the time of introduction, Sunkist Soft Drinks had only five key employees: Mark Stevens, President; Peter Murphy, VP Sales; Dr. John Leffingwell, VP R&D; Ray Sissom, VP Finance; and Jim DeDreu, NE Regional Manager. It went national soon thereafter by being franchised mainly to leading Coca-Cola and Pepsi-Cola bottlers. The advertising slogan was "fun, sun and the beach" using TV and radio commercials with the Beach Boys' hit song "Good Vibrations" as the brand's theme. In 1980, Sunkist Orange Soda became the #1 orange soda in the USA and the 10th best selling soft drink. Unlike many other competing orange sodas, Sunkist contains caffeine (41.0mg).

In late 1984, Sunkist Soft Drinks was sold to Del Monte. From late 1986 until 2008, it was produced by Cadbury Schweppesunder license through its Cadbury Schweppes Americas Beverages subsidiary. Following the demerger of Cadbury Schweppes Americas Beverages from Cadbury Schweppes, it is now produced by Dr Pepper Snapple Group in the USA. Sunkist is still the most popular orange soda in the United States. Sunkist (as a carbonated soft drink) is sold in the UK by Vimto Soft Drinks under license from Sunkist Growers. It is also sold in Australia by Schweppes Australia (a subsidiary of Asahi Breweries), but the Australian formulation is caffeine free. In Canada, a decaffeinated version of the orange drink is marketed as C'Plus. The package indicates that there is a small amount of Sunkist Juice.

Dr Pepper Snapple Group also makes a diet version of Sunkist.

    
Drink Recipe – 3 Orange Soda

Ingredients:
•   1 can Sunkist® orange carbonated soft drink
•   2 small scoops orange sherbet
•   2 small scoops vanilla ice cream
•   2 to 4 Tbsp. orange flavored liqueur (optional)
•   Fresh mint leaves, as needed
•   Orange cartwheel slices, as needed
Instructions: (Makes 2 servings)
•   In two 12 oz. soda glasses, divide orange soft drink. Carefully top each with 1 scoop sherbet and vanilla ice cream. Pour orange liqueur over each, as desired. Garnish with orange cartwheel slices and fresh mint.

http://www.youtube.com/v/74JyDmAu9Zw
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: Johnny Unusual on September 27, 2011, 04:55:12 PM
 
34 – Sarsaparilla
(http://www.aldenbates.com/g/sarsaparilla.jpg)
31 points
2 of 16 lists
Top Vote: #4 Pak Man


Smilax regelii is a perennial trailing vine with prickly stems that is native to Central America. Common names include Sarsaparilla Honduran Sarsaparilla, and Jamaican Sarsaparilla. It is known in Spanish as zarzaparrilla, which is derived from the words zarza, meaning "shrub," and parrilla, meaning "little grape vine."

Smilax regelii was thought by Americans to have medicinal properties, and was a popular European treatment for syphilis when it was introduced from the New World. From 1820 to 1910, it was registered in the U.S. Pharmacopoeia as a treatment for syphilis. Modern users claim that it is effective for eczema, psoriasis, arthritis, herpes, and leprosy, along with a variety of other complaints. There is no peer reviewed research available for these claims. There is, however, peer reviewed research suggesting that it has anti-oxidant properties, like many other herbs.

Sarsaparilla is used as the basis for a soft drink, frequently called by the same name, or Sasparilla. It is also a primary ingredient in old fashioned-style root beer, in conjunction with Sassafras, which was more widely available prior to studies of its potential health risks.Sarsaparilla drinks feature widely in American popular culture, particularly in works related to the American West and the pioneer period. Sarsaparilla is not readily available in most countries, although many pubs and most major supermarket chains in the Philippines, Malaysia, the United Kingdom and Australia stock sarsaparilla-flavored soft drinks.

    
Drink Recipe – Old Fashioned Sarsaparilla

Ingredients
3 tablespoons of sarsaparilla root (roughly 1/2 ounce)
1 tablespoon of licorice root
1 qt. water
2-3 teaspoons of dried Stevia leaf (or 3-4 Stevia teabags)
2 qts. carbonated water

Add the sarsaparilla and liquorice to a quart of water and allow to simmer for roughly 45 minutes. Make sure you don't actually allow the mixture to boil because this will make it bitter. Add in the Stevia and simmer for another 15 minutes.

Strain the plant material and put the pan back on the burner. Simmer this at a very low heat and wait for the liquid to reduce to half the level. Take it off the heat and then use a cheesecloth to strain it. You'll then be left with 12 ounces of concentrate which then needs to be refrigerated. Once this is done you can add two ounces and add it to 10 ounces of carbonated water. Then add the Stevia extact to taste, but only if you wish. This will provide you with six big glasses of root beer.

http://www.youtube.com/v/hOaty7FpwMI
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: D.B. Barnes on September 27, 2011, 04:57:29 PM
35 – Sunkist
(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/thumb/8/87/Sunkist_logo_2008.jpg/300px-Sunkist_logo_2008.jpg)
31 points
2 of 16 lists
Top Vote: #6 Psycho Goatee


Man, if the orange sodas were consolidated, they would rule the universe! No, that's simply too much power for orange soda to possess.

Anyway, back in junior high, we used to siphon gas out of neighborhood cars, take a six pack of Sunkist and...sorry, I'll stop.


36 – Tea

http://www.youtube.com/v/6t5XOINJaFU
I love the tea guy!

http://www.youtube.com/v/eOw2X8tty0k?version=3&hl=en_US
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: Johnny Unusual on September 27, 2011, 05:05:17 PM
 
33 – Dirty Martini
(http://1.bp.blogspot.com/_l1mrLnngToY/TRohTLbQPfI/AAAAAAAACPI/AjAtuEtTuSA/s1600/pinkDirtyMartini_2.png)
32 points    
2 of 16 lists
Top Vote: #9 Cole Stratton

The martini is a cocktail made with gin and vermouth, and garnished with an olive or a lemon twist. Over the years, the martini has become one of the best-known mixed alcoholic beverages. H. L. Mencken called the martini "the only American invention as perfect as the sonnet” and E. B. White called it "the elixir of quietude".

IBA specified ingredients: 5.5 cl (1.9 oz.) gin, 1.5 cl (.5 oz.) dry vermouth

Pouring all ingredients into a mixing glass with ice cubes, the ingredients are mixed then strained and served "straight up" (without ice) in a chilled cocktail glass and garnished with either a green olive or a twist of lemon (a strip of the peel, usually squeezed or twisted to express volatile oils onto the surface of the drink).

Although there are many variations, in modern practice the standard martini is a mix of gin coupled with dry vermouth usually in a five-to-one ratio. Shaker mixing is common due to influences of popular culture, notably the fictional spy James Bond, who always asked for his vodka martini to be "shaken, not stirred". However, shaking has a long history. Harry Craddock's Savoy Cocktail Book (1930) prescribes shaking for all its martini recipes.  Noel Coward suggested that a perfect martini should be made by "filling a glass with gin then waving it in the general direction of Italy", meaning the less vermouth added to the gin the better the resulting drink.
 
The dryness of a martini refers to the amount of vermouth used in the drink, with a very dry martini having little or no Vermouth. Conversely, a wet martini has a significant amount of vermouth added.
 
A dirty martini contains a splash of olive brine or olive juice.

The exact origin of the martini is unclear. Numerous cocktails with names and ingredients similar to the modern-day martini were first seen in bar-tending guides of the late 19th century. One popular theory suggests it evolved from a cocktail called the Martinez served at the Occidental Hotel in San Francisco sometime in the early 1860s, which people frequented before taking an evening ferry to the nearby town of Martinez. Alternatively, the people of Martinez say the drink was first created by a bartender in their town. Another theory links the first dry martini to the name of a bartender who concocted the drink at the Knickerbocker Hotel in New York City in 1911 or 1912.
 
But it was Prohibition and the relative ease of illegal gin manufacture that led to the martini's rise as the predominant cocktail of the mid 20th century in the United States. With the repeal of Prohibition, and the ready availability of quality gin, the drink became progressively dryer. In the 1970s and 80s, the martini came to be seen as old-fashioned and was replaced by more intricate cocktails and wine spritzers, but the mid-1990s saw a resurgence in the drink and an explosion of new versions.
Some of the newer versions (e.g., appletini, peach martini, chocolate martini, espresso martini), take their name not from the ingredients, but from the cocktail glass they share with the martini.


    
Drink Recipe – Dirty Martini

2 oz gin
1 tbsp dry vermouth
2 tbsp olive juice
2 olives

1. Place an ice cube and a small amount of water in a cocktail glass. Place in freezer for 2 - 3 minutes.

2. Fill a mixer with all ingredients including garnish. Cover and shake hard 3 - 4 times.

3. Remove cocktail glass from freezer, and empty. Strain contents of the mixer into the cocktail glass, include one of the olives, and serve with a mysterious smile.

Warning: not comfortable for work.
http://www.youtube.com/v/meCzRWF3i0w
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: Johnny Unusual on September 27, 2011, 05:08:47 PM
32 – Jack and Coke
(http://blogs.dallasobserver.com/cityofate/jack-and-coke.jpg)
32 points    
2 of 16 lists
Top Vote: #4 DB Barnes

Jack and Coke is a classic American cocktail made with Jack Daniel's whiskey and Coca-Cola. The drink is usually served in an old-fashioned glass or a Collins glass with ice. In the United Kingdom, the term "JD and Coke" is more common, whereas the widespread term across continental Europe is "Whisky Cola".

According to BeverageBusiness.com, the popularity of the Jack and Coke is on the rise. Mike Keyes, Jack Daniel's Senior Vice President and Global Brand Director, is quoted as saying that "Over time, more of Jack Daniel's is being consumed with mixers, such as Coca-Cola."

The term "Jack and Coke" has been used in combined advertising for Jack Daniel's and Coca-Cola, and several products were created as part of this marketing campaign, including bar signs and taps.

Jack Daniel's released a canned beverage called "Jack Daniel's and cola," a mixed beverage of the same type as Jack and Coke, in several markets in the South Pacific, including Australia and New Zealand.  The beverages have become something of a collector's item in recent years.

Coca-Cola is a popular mixer in many alcoholic beverages, particularly straight spirits. Coke is less sweet than other colas, so less likely to overwhelm the flavor of the spirit.


    
Drink Recipe – Jack and Coke

2 oz Jack Daniel's® Tennessee whiskey
10 oz Coca-Cola®

Pour jack daniels into large glass filled with ice. Pour coca-cola into the glass. Stir lightly.
 
http://www.youtube.com/v/vEr7AZyO29I
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: gojikranz on September 27, 2011, 05:09:46 PM
well theres my cherry dr pepper. 

love straight cranberry juice on ice, but yes my dentist has advised me to watch out.
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: sarcasm_made_Easy on September 27, 2011, 05:12:38 PM
heh the dirty martini, good choice. 

also looking at coles choices i cant help but think of him as a 50s guy from madmen or something. 
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: Johnny Unusual on September 27, 2011, 05:31:35 PM
 
31 – Cognac
(http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-zu_kwceXzms/Tep0bx5BGXI/AAAAAAAABDk/pvEAvSzoV9M/s640/louis-xiii-cognac.jpg)
33 points    
2 of 16 lists
Top Vote: #5 Sarcasm Made Easy

Cognac, named after the town of Cognac in France, is a variety of brandy. It is produced in the wine-growing region surrounding the town from which it takes its name, in the French Departements of Charente and Charente-Maritime.

As an Appellation d'origine contrôlée, in order to bear the name Cognac, the production methods for the distilled brandy must meet specified legal requirements. It must be made from certain grapes; of these, Ugni Blanc, known locally as Saint-Emilion, is the most widely used variety today. It must be distilled twice in copper pot stills and aged at least two years in French oak barrels from Limousin or Tronçais. Most cognacs are aged considerably longer than the minimum legal requirement, because cognac matures in the same way as whiskies and wine when aged in a barrel.

Cognac is made from fruit brandy, called eau de vie in English, produced by doubly distilling the white wines produced in any of the growth areas.

The wine is very dry, acidic, and thin, "virtually undrinkable", but excellent for distillation and aging. It may be made only from a strict list of grape varieties, if it is to carry the name of one of the crus then it must be at least 90% Ugni Blanc (known in Italy as Trebbiano), Folle Blanche and Colombard, although 10% of the grapes used can be Folignan, Jurançon blanc, Meslier St-François (also called Blanc Ramé), Sélect, Montils or Sémillon.[4][5] Cognacs which are not to carry the name of a cru are freer in the allowed grape varieties, needing at least 90% Colombard, Folle Blanche, Jurançon blanc, Meslier Saint-François, Montils, Sémillon, or Ugni Blanc, and up to 10% Folignan or Sélect.

After the grapes are pressed, the juice is left to ferment for two or three weeks, with the region's native, wild yeasts converting the sugar into alcohol; neither sugar nor sulfur may be added. At this point, the resulting wine is about 7 to 8% alcohol.

Distillation takes place in traditionally shaped Charentais copper stills, also known as an alembic, the design and dimensions of which are also legally controlled. Two distillations must be carried out; the resulting eau-de-vie is a colourless spirit of about 70% alcohol.

Once distillation is complete, it must be aged in oak for at least two years before it can be sold to the public. As the cognac interacts with the oak barrel and the air, it evaporates at the rate of about three percent each year, slowly losing both alcohol and water. Because the alcohol dissipates faster than the water, cognac reaches the target 40% alcohol by volume in about four or five decades, though lesser grades can be produced much sooner by diluting the cognac with water, which also makes its flavor less concentrated. Since oak barrels stop contributing to flavor after four or five decades, cognac is then transferred to large glass carboys called bonbonnes, then stored for future blending.

The age of the cognac is calculated as that of the youngest eau-de-vie used in the blend. The blend is usually of different ages and (in the case of the larger and more commercial producers) from different local areas. This blending, or marriage, of different eaux-de-vie is important to obtain a complexity of flavours absent from an eau-de-vie from a single distillery or vineyard. Each cognac house has a master taster (maître de chai), who is responsible for creating this delicate blend of spirits, so that the cognac produced by a company today will taste almost exactly the same as a cognac produced by that same company 50 years ago, or in 50 years' time. In this respect it is similar to the process of blending whisky or non-vintage Champagne to achieve a consistent brand flavor. A very small number of producers, such as Guillon Painturaud and Moyet, do not blend their final product from different ages of eaux-de-vie to produce a 'purer' flavour (a practice roughly equivalent to the production of a single-cask Scotch whisky).  Hundreds of vineyards in the Cognac AOC region sell their own cognac. These are likewise blended from the eaux-de-vie of different years, but they are single-vineyard cognacs, varying slightly from year to year and according to the taste of the producer, hence lacking some of the predictability of the better-known commercial products. Depending on their success in marketing, small producers may sell a larger or smaller proportion of their product to individual buyers, wine dealers, bars and restaurants, the remainder being acquired by larger cognac houses for blending. The success of artisanal cognacs has encouraged some larger industrial-scale producers to produce single-vineyard cognacs.


    
Drink-Based Recipe – Cognac Shrimp

Ingredients
•   1 tablespoon butter
•   1 tablespoon olive oil
•   2 cloves garlic, minced
•   1/2 cup thinly sliced shallots
•   1 pound shrimp, peeled and deveined
•   salt and pepper to taste
•   1 dash dried red pepper flakes (optional)
•   1/4 cup oil-packed sun-dried tomatoes, drained and diced
•   1/2 cup cognac
•   1/2 cup fat free half-and-half
Directions
1.   Heat the butter and olive oil in a skillet over medium-high heat, and saute the garlic and shallots until lightly browned. Stir in shrimp, and season with salt, pepper, and red pepper. Mix in sun-dried tomatoes. Cook and stir 5 minutes, or until shrimp is opaque and lightly browned.
2.   Pour cognac into the skillet, and stir to loosen browned bits from bottom. Reduce heat to low, and stir in half-and-half. Simmer 5 minutes, or until slightly thickened.
 
http://www.youtube.com/v/upllepv4ilc
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: Johnny Unusual on September 27, 2011, 05:50:30 PM
That's it for tonight, but expect more tomorrow morning!
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: sarcasm_made_Easy on September 27, 2011, 06:08:20 PM
woot for cognac :)

Ps loved the video jonny, I knew most of that but it fun and informative. 
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: CJones on September 28, 2011, 03:36:23 AM
I'm assuming you must have combined all varieties of Tea. I voted for Green Tea and Black Tea separately. I drink both. Black Tea tastes better (IMO), but Green Tea is better for you. Black Tea is basically Green Tea that's "gone bad". In other words, the leaves have been removed from the plant without being treated, and allowed to oxidize. Black Tea is what most Americans are familiar with. There's also Oolong Tea, and White Tea, but they're all just different preparations of the same plant.

Tea, especially Green Tea, contains a unique amino acid called Theanine (which you can also buy in capsule form at some health food stores). It's a Glutamate (an excitatory, and pain, neurotransmitter) blocker. It's calming effect counteracts the the effect of the caffeine. Which is why tea, despite containing caffeine, tends to calm you down rather than rev you up.   
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: Tripe on September 28, 2011, 05:00:48 AM
(http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-zu_kwceXzms/Tep0bx5BGXI/AAAAAAAABDk/pvEAvSzoV9M/s640/louis-xiii-cognac.jpg)
Ah Louis XIII, fan-fecking-tastic stuff, wish I could afford a bottle.
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: Johnny Unusual on September 28, 2011, 05:56:04 AM
I'm assuming you must have combined all varieties of Tea. I voted for Green Tea and Black Tea separately. I drink both. Black Tea tastes better (IMO), but Green Tea is better for you. Black Tea is basically Green Tea that's "gone bad". In other words, the leaves have been removed from the plant without being treated, and allowed to oxidize. Black Tea is what most Americans are familiar with. There's also Oolong Tea, and White Tea, but they're all just different preparations of the same plant.

Tea, especially Green Tea, contains a unique amino acid called Theanine (which you can also buy in capsule form at some health food stores). It's a Glutamate (an excitatory, and pain, neurotransmitter) blocker. It's calming effect counteracts the the effect of the caffeine. Which is why tea, despite containing caffeine, tends to calm you down rather than rev you up.   

Black Tea was not put in with Tea.  I just counted the votes that simply said "tea".
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: sarcasm_made_Easy on September 28, 2011, 07:47:30 AM
(http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-zu_kwceXzms/Tep0bx5BGXI/AAAAAAAABDk/pvEAvSzoV9M/s640/louis-xiii-cognac.jpg)
Ah Louis XIII, fan-fecking-tastic stuff, wish I could afford a bottle.

I would LOVE to agree with you, but i have not ever had any.  I am sure that price would make it impossible for me.  Have you actually got to try it?
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: Tripe on September 28, 2011, 07:53:11 AM
Yep, it helps to have, er, how to put this, relatives with means.

I think to buy it in a bar (and here are a few that have it) it's around $100, at least according to xe.com.

It's like Remy turned up to about 15.

I know part of the price of the bottle was a promise of a few refills.
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: Johnny Unusual on September 28, 2011, 08:03:48 AM
 
30 – Cuba Libre
(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/e/e5/Cuba_Libre.jpg/200px-Cuba_Libre.jpg)
33 points    
2 of 16 lists
Top Vote: #4 Sarcasm Made Easy

The Cuba Libre ("Free Cuba") is a highball made of cola, lime, and white rum. This highball is often referred to as a Rum and Coke in the United States and Canada, where the lime juice is optional.

Accounts of the invention of the Cuba Libre vary. One account claims that the drink (Spanish for Free Cuba) was invented in Havana, Cuba around 1901/1902. Patriots aiding Cuba during the Spanish-American War — and, later, expatriates avoiding Prohibition — regularly mixed rum and cola as a highball and a toast to this West Indies island.
 
   According to Bacardi:
The world's second most popular drink was born in a collision between the United States and Spain. It happened during the Spanish-American War at the turn of the century when Teddy Roosevelt, the Rough Riders, and Americans in large numbers arrived in Cuba. One afternoon, a group of off-duty soldiers from the U.S. Signal Corps were gathered in a bar in Old Havana. Fausto Rodriguez, a young messenger, later recalled that Captain Russell came in and ordered Bacardi (Gold) rum and Coca-Cola on ice with a wedge of lime. The captain drank the concoction with such pleasure that it sparked the interest of the soldiers around him. They had the bartender prepare a round of the captain's drink for them. The Bacardi rum and Coke was an instant hit. As it does to this day, the drink united the crowd in a spirit of fun and good fellowship. When they ordered another round, one soldier suggested that they toast ¡Por Cuba Libre! in celebration of the newly freed Cuba. The captain raised his glass and sang out the battle cry that had inspired Cuba's victorious soldiers in the War of Independence.

However, there are some problems with Bacardi's account, as the Spanish-American war was fought in 1898, Cuba's liberation was in 1898, and the Rough Riders left Cuba in September 1898, but Coca-Cola was not available in Cuba until 1900. According to a 1965 deposition by Fausto Rodriguez, the Cuba Libre was first mixed at a Cuban bar in August 1900 by a member of the U.S. Signal Corps, referred to as "John Doe".

   According to Havana Club:
Along with the Mojito and the Daiquiri, the Cuba Libre shares the mystery of its exact origin. The only certainty is that this cocktail was first sipped in Cuba. The year? 1900. 1900 is generally said to be the year that cola first came to Cuba, introduced to the island by American troops. But “Cuba Libre!” was the battle cry of the Cuba Liberation Army during the war of independence that ended in 1898.

    
Drink Recipe – Cuba Libre

2 oz light rum
juice of 1/2 limes
Coca-Cola®

Pour lime juice into a highball glass over ice cubes. Add rum, fill with cola, stir, and serve.

http://www.youtube.com/v/hovHJs0czcs
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: sarcasm_made_Easy on September 28, 2011, 08:21:34 AM
Yep, it helps to have, er, how to put this, relatives with means.

I think to buy it in a bar (and here are a few that have it) it's around $100, at least according to xe.com.

It's like Remy turned up to about 15.

I know part of the price of the bottle was a promise of a few refills.

Want to hear an abomination?  Too bad.  My buddy worked for the disney hotel food and beverage.  One year they were hosting the Xgames.  He was working in the bar (as a server or bartender i dont remember) well during this time he said it was pretty common for these skateboarders and other people involved to come down and order a Louie and coke.  It was a $200 drink then (or because it was at disney hard to tell).  But sheesh i am not paying 200 bucks for a top shelf liquor of that nature just to bury it some sugar water with carbonation. 
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: Tripe on September 28, 2011, 08:29:36 AM
Why in Pan's name would anyone pollute it with fecking coke? Blech.
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: sarcasm_made_Easy on September 28, 2011, 08:31:07 AM
Cause i assume they are dumb ass kids with too much money and not enough supervision
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: Tripe on September 28, 2011, 08:38:35 AM
I'd take the money and give them Mohawk and Coke, I doubt they'd notice.
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: sarcasm_made_Easy on September 28, 2011, 08:50:50 AM
I'd take the money and give them Mohawk and Coke, I doubt they'd notice.

I wouldnt.  I would pour a henny and coke or something of that nature and ring up a louie.  Then after my shift was up i would be enjoying a good amount of louie afterward.
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: Tripe on September 28, 2011, 08:55:29 AM
Mohawk is a cheaper brand than Henny....
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: sarcasm_made_Easy on September 28, 2011, 09:51:50 AM
I just wouldnt imagine disney would have it but we are in the same mind in principle. 
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: Thrifty on September 28, 2011, 09:59:18 AM
Alcoholic beverages are so diverse.  Rum, gin, wine, beer, cognac, brandy, whiskey, vodka, just to name a few of the base drinks without getting into cocktails.  I want to like them, but every time I try any, the taste alone makes me retch.  It tastes like bug spray to me.  The exception is beer, which is sorta bitter and I can sorta enjoy, but not too much because I prefer my drinks be sweet.

Speaking of which, I once drank a liter of watermelon schnapps and eventually started throwing up a chunky red substance.  The experience made my mouth and nose feel like they were on fire.
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: sarcasm_made_Easy on September 28, 2011, 10:25:49 AM
With cognac/brandy its not a bug spray taste (although it is harsh) its a wine taste.  The problem i see with most people is they want to chug these thing.  They are things you sip. You want just enough that you can get the taste.  I also find a snifter helps a bit.  Its potent, but flavorful. 
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: Tripe on September 28, 2011, 10:46:49 AM
Yeah I had that experience with the bottle of Highland Park I brought over when I moved to the US. I poured some for Ann's father and he slammed it back.  ::)

Thrifty, assuming some of my higher picks are shared across lists you might want to try some of the ones coming up. I'll let you know which when they show up., :)
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: Johnny Unusual on September 28, 2011, 10:58:13 AM
29 – Chocolate Milk
(http://toddspain.files.wordpress.com/2011/02/chocolate-milk.jpg)
33 points    
3 of 16 lists
Top Vote: #10 Pak Man


Chocolate milk is a sweetened, usually cold, cocoa-flavored milk drink. It is created when chocolate syrup (or chocolate powder) is mixed with milk (from cows, goats, soy, rice, etc). It can be purchased pre-mixed or made at home with either cocoa powder and a sweetener (such as sugar or a sugar substitute), or with melted chocolate, chocolate syrup, or chocolate milk mix. Other ingredients, such as starch, salt, carrageenan, vanilla, or artificial flavoring may be added. Chocolate milk should be refrigerated like plain milk. A solution is required to blend in the two flavors (milk and chocolate, hence the name of the mixed drink). When chocolate milk begins to spoil, it gives off a coffee-like odor, unlike plain milk. It was invented by Hans Sloane in the late 1680s.

There are many brands of chocolate milk available in pre-mixed packages, including bottles and cartons. Some Swiss brands like Ovaltine and Nesquik can be either heated up or consumed cold. It is also possible to make chocolate milk by pouring milk in a glass, adding cocoa powder, and stirring, although powder does not mix with cold milk as well or as quickly as when using chocolate syrup. Shaking the ingredients in a clean bottle or cocktail shaker can more thoroughly mix the powder and milk.

Variants of chocolate milk are candy-bar themed pre-mixed drinks, which claim to mimic the flavors of popular candy bars such as Milky Way, 3 Musketeers, or Snickers. Other variants include a lactose-free version made using lactose-free milk and flavorings, sugar-free "kids" chocolate milk in powder form, organic chocolate milk (made with organic milk, organic cocoa, and organic cane syrup). This beverage can also be made with soya milk.

    
Drink Recipe – Home Made Chocolate Milk

Ingredients
8oz. 1%low fat milk
1TB. COCOA-UNSWEETEN
1TB. SPLENDA
4oz. WARM WATER

Directions
ADD COCOA AND SPLENDA TO A 12-16oz.GLASS AND MIX LIGHTLY.ADD 4oz. OF WARM WATER TO THE CHOCOLATE MIX AND STIR TILL SMOOTH . ADD MILK ,STIR, AND ENJOY A REAL TREAT.
115CALORIES

MAKES 12OZ.(THE WARM WATER HELPS THE CHOCOLATE MIX WITH THE MILK EASIER)

http://www.youtube.com/v/Ns1V8WLFDQM
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: Johnny Unusual on September 28, 2011, 11:27:02 AM
28 – Red Bull
(http://www.redbull.ca/cs/RedBull/RBImages/000/000/357/682/photo610x343a/Energy.jpg)
33 points    
3 of 16 lists
Top Vote: #2 Team RAD


Red Bull is an energy drink sold by the Austrian Red Bull GmbH, created in 1987 by the Austrian entrepreneur Dietrich Mateschitz. In terms of market share, Red Bull is the most popular energy drink in the world, with 3 billion cans sold each year. Dietrich Mateschitzwas inspired by an already existing drink called Krating Daeng which he discovered in Thailand. He took this idea, and to suit the tastes of Westerners, modified the ingredients, and founded Austrian Red Bull GmbH in partnership with Chaleo Yoovidhya. Chaleo Yoovidhyainvented the Thai energy drink Krating Daeng; in Thai daeng is red, and krating is the reddish brown bovine, gaur, an animal slightly larger than the bison. Red Bull is sold in a tall and slim blue-silver can. Krating Daeng is sold in Thailand and in some parts of Asia in a wider gold can with the name of Krating Daeng or Red Bull Classic. Both are different products produced separately.

Their slogan is "Red Bull gives you wings"[ and the product is aggressively marketed through advertising, tournament sponsorship (Red Bull Air Race, Red Bull Crashed Ice), sports team ownerships (Red Bull Racing, Scuderia Toro Rosso, EC Red Bull Salzburg, FC Red Bull Salzburg, Red Bull New York, RB Leipzig), celebrity endorsements, and with its record label, Red Bull Records, music. In 2009 it was discovered that Red Bull Cola exported from Austria contained trace amounts of cocaine. Red Bull has also been the target of criticism concerning the possible health risks associated with the drink.

Red Bull took many marketing and ingredient ideas from an energy drink in Thailand called Krating Daeng. Dietrich Mateschitz, an Austrian entrepreneur, developed the Red Bull Energy Drink brand. Mateschitz was the international marketing director for Blendax, a toothpaste company, when he visited Thailand in 1982 and discovered that Krating Daeng helped to cure his jet lag. Between 1984 and 1987, Mateschitz worked with TCBG Pharmaceutical (a Blendax licensee) to adapt Krating Daeng for the European market.

At the same time Mateschitz and Chaleo Yoovidhya founded Red Bull GmbH; each investing $500,000 of savings and taking a stake in the new company. Chaleo and Dietrich each held a 49% share of the new company. They gave the remaining 2% to Chaleo's son Chalerm, but it was agreed that Mateschitz would run the company. The product was launched in 1987 in Austria, in a carbonated format.

In 1989, the product was expanded to its first international markets, Hungary and Slovenia. It entered the United States market (via California) in 1997 and the Middle East in 2000. In 2008, Forbes magazine listed both Chaleo and Mateschitz as being the 260th richest persons in the world with an estimated net worth of $4.0 billion.

    
Drink Recipe – Southern Housepatality

Ingredients
1 part Watermelon schnapps
1 Part Southern Comfort
1 Fill Red Bull
Directions
In a shot glass fill half with soco and half watermelon schnapps. then take one coktail glass and fill 3/4 of the way up with red bull then take the shot glass and put it in to the glass of red bull and chug (not sure I recommend the last part)


http://www.youtube.com/v/gOZJtOLX0S8
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: D.B. Barnes on September 28, 2011, 11:40:18 AM
32 – Jack and Coke
(http://blogs.dallasobserver.com/cityofate/jack-and-coke.jpg)
32 points    
2 of 16 lists
Top Vote: #4 DB Barnes


This is a dangerous cocktail. More dangerous than dynamite! It's way to easy to guzzle this. Throw a straw into the mix and things can get away from you in a hurry. And god help you if you're pouring your own; the Jack to Coke ratio has a funny way of evening out the more you imbibe.

It's by far my favorite mixed drink. I love the smell, the color, and especially the taste. I rarely drink these anymore, preferring to sip whiskey rather than consume large amounts. Jack and Cokes pretty much drink themselves.

Quote
Drink Recipe – Jack and Coke
2 oz Jack Daniel's® Tennessee whiskey
10 6 oz Coca-Cola®

Pour Jack Daniels into large glass filled with ice. Pour coca-cola into the glass. Stir lightly.

FIXED!  ;D
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: D.B. Barnes on September 28, 2011, 12:05:53 PM
Cause i assume they are dumb ass kids with too much money and not enough supervision

I think I'd like Noel Coward to be my spiritual spirits supervisor...and no, not because of THAT.


28 – Red Bull
(http://www.redbull.ca/cs/RedBull/RBImages/000/000/357/682/photo610x343a/Energy.jpg)
33 points    
3 of 16 lists
Top Vote: #2 Team RAD


A company I worked for a few years back had Red Bull fridge. I've always been a caffeine lover addict, but always got my fix with coffee or tea. Working late one night, needing a quick boost, and fresh outta meth, I decided to give Red Bull a shot. I'd seen the commercials and knew what it was about, but had never thought to try it. Didn't much care for the taste at first, but that boost! Soon I was slamming cans left and right and even grew to like the taste. My next job lacked the dedicated Red Bull fridge, and since I only ever got them that way, I just stopped drinking it. Never once paid for a single can!

Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: Thrifty on September 28, 2011, 12:22:32 PM
   
Drink Recipe – Home Made Chocolate Milk

Ingredients
8oz. 1%low fat milk
1TB. COCOA-UNSWEETEN
1TB. SPLENDA
4oz. WARM WATER

Directions
ADD COCOA AND SPLENDA TO A 12-16oz.GLASS AND MIX LIGHTLY.ADD 4oz. OF WARM WATER TO THE CHOCOLATE MIX AND STIR TILL SMOOTH . ADD MILK ,STIR, AND ENJOY A REAL TREAT.
115CALORIES

MAKES 12OZ.(THE WARM WATER HELPS THE CHOCOLATE MIX WITH THE MILK EASIER)
I made this once in 1997 and the horrible taste is still with me today.
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: Johnny Unusual on September 28, 2011, 12:23:43 PM
27 – White Russian
(http://www.fineartbartending.ca/cocktail-recipe/cocktail-images/white_russian.jpg)
34 points    
2 of 16 lists
Top Vote: #5 DB Barnes


A White Russian is a sweet cocktail made with vodka, coffee liqueurs (e.g., Kahlúa or Tia Maria), and cream served with ice in an Old Fashioned glass. Other ingredients are often substituted for cream, the most common of which are milk, half and half, Baileys Irish Cream, and vanilla soymilk.

The traditional cocktail known as a Black Russian, which first appeared in 1949, becomes a White Russian with the addition of cream. Neither drink is Russian in origin, but both are so named due to vodka being the primary ingredient. It is unclear which drink begat the other.

The Oxford English Dictionary refers to the first mention of the word "White Russian" in the sense of a cocktail as appearing in California's Oakland Tribune on 21 November 1965. It was placed in the newspaper as an insert: "White Russian. 1 oz. each Southern, vodka, cream."


    
Drink Recipe – White Russian

2 oz vodka
1 oz coffee liqueur
light cream

Pour vodka and coffee liqueur over ice cubes in an old-fashioned glass. Fill with light cream and serve.

 
http://www.youtube.com/v/WeMAEzvcwao
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: Tripe on September 28, 2011, 12:26:43 PM
I make something like that only I replace the cream with amaretto. And it's 2 oz of both of the other ingredients.
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: sarcasm_made_Easy on September 28, 2011, 12:27:49 PM
Im surprised that The Big Lebowski did not get mentioned in the white russian post.  I know several people who suddenly fell in love with this drink due to that movie. 
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: Darth Geek on September 28, 2011, 12:36:58 PM
   
Drink Recipe – Home Made Chocolate Milk

Ingredients
8oz. 1%low fat milk
1TB. COCOA-UNSWEETEN
1TB. SPLENDA
4oz. WARM WATER

Directions
ADD COCOA AND SPLENDA TO A 12-16oz.GLASS AND MIX LIGHTLY.ADD 4oz. OF WARM WATER TO THE CHOCOLATE MIX AND STIR TILL SMOOTH . ADD MILK ,STIR, AND ENJOY A REAL TREAT.
115CALORIES

MAKES 12OZ.(THE WARM WATER HELPS THE CHOCOLATE MIX WITH THE MILK EASIER)
Shouldn't that recipe read:

1. Pour milk into mouth. Do not swollow.
2. Squeeze desired amount of chocolate syrup into mouth. Do not swollow.
3. Close mouth tightly. Shake head vigorously untill mixed (or sufficiantly dizzy).
4. Swollow.
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: sarcasm_made_Easy on September 28, 2011, 12:38:49 PM
Yeah I had that experience with the bottle of Highland Park I brought over when I moved to the US. I poured some for Ann's father and he slammed it back.  ::)

Thrifty, assuming some of my higher picks are shared across lists you might want to try some of the ones coming up. I'll let you know which when they show up., :)

You should try going bar hopping with a bunch of military guys.  Savor is not often a word in the vocabulary
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: Tripe on September 28, 2011, 12:41:30 PM
Yeah, he's ex Air Force
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: sarcasm_made_Easy on September 28, 2011, 12:42:21 PM
Heh WOOOO air force :) did he choke or did he exclaim how smooth it was?
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: Tripe on September 28, 2011, 12:45:18 PM
Half way between those two, with the declaration being all hoarse.

He and his brother spent most of the Vietnam, whatever that was, blitzed on gin in Okinawa (I actually want to do a film about their experiences).
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: D.B. Barnes on September 28, 2011, 12:50:32 PM
27 – White Russian
(http://www.fineartbartending.ca/cocktail-recipe/cocktail-images/white_russian.jpg)
34 points    
2 of 16 lists
Top Vote: #5 DB Barnes


This is a very good "change-of-pace" drink, especially when you're in the mood for something very sweet. More often than not, I'll substitute Baileys for the cream. Also a bit of a dangerous drink as it goes down extremely easy.

Oh, and Johnny. You referenced Marcella Hazan but not The Dude?!?

(http://static.moviefanatic.com/images/gallery/the-dude-with-a-white-russian.jpg)


I once drank a liter of watermelon schnapps and eventually started throwing up a chunky red substance.  The experience made my mouth and nose feel like they were on fire.

That's one for The Booze Chronicles.
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: sarcasm_made_Easy on September 28, 2011, 01:00:27 PM
Half way between those two, with the declaration being all hoarse.

He and his brother spent most of the Vietnam, whatever that was, blitzed on gin in Okinawa (I actually want to do a film about their experiences).

Actually i would love to do this movie, but base it vaguely on my experiences in korea and make it a modern time frame.  The drinking stories would be fun but the whole, there is two wars going on that you joined to help but your overhear nice and safe, angle i think would be interesting.  Granted that would probably be because it was a thought i often had.
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: Tripe on September 28, 2011, 01:06:14 PM
Actually that was exactly it, he, not sure about his brother so much, but he joined up to go to Vietnam but ended up doing administrative stuff in Japan instead.

So, when not doing that he and his brother spent their time hanging out in tea houses and drinking and pawning each others possessions for money to keep doing the other things.

His Japanese was fairly decent so, when he was due to go home he was able to reply to the Anti US protester who chanted "Yankee go home" in Japanese during a rally outside the base with "Next Week Friday". Which would be one of the last scenes I think.

 
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: Johnny Unusual on September 28, 2011, 01:10:32 PM
26 – Wine
(http://www.thedailygreen.com/cm/thedailygreen/images/f5/1-30days-pour-wine-md.jpg)
35 points    
2 of 16 lists
Top Vote: #5 Monty


Wine is an alcoholic beverage, made of fermented fruit juice, usually from grapes. The natural chemical balance of grapes lets them ferment without the addition of sugars, acids, enzymes, or other nutrients. Grape wine is produced by fermenting crushed grapes using various types of yeast. Yeast consumes the sugars in the grapes and converts them into alcohol. Different varieties of grapes and strains of yeasts produce different types of wine.

Wines made from other fruits, such as apples and berries, are normally named after the fruit from which they are produced (for example, apple wine or elderberry wine) and are generically called fruit wine or country wine (not to be confused with the French term vin de pays). Others, such as barley wine and rice wine (i.e., sake), are made from starch-based materials and resemble beer and spirit more than wine, while ginger wine is fortified with brandy. In these cases, the term "wine" refers to the higher alcohol content rather than the production process. The commercial use of the English word "wine" (and its equivalent in other languages) is protected by law in many jurisdictions.

Wine has a rich history dating back thousands of years, with the earliest known production occurring around 8,000 years ago on the territory of modern-day Georgia. It first appeared in the Balkans at about 4500 BC and was very common in ancient Greece, Thrace and Rome. Wine has also played an important role in religion throughout history. The Greek god Dionysus and the Roman equivalent Bacchus represented wine, and the drink is also used in Christian Eucharist ceremonies and the Jewish Kiddush.

Archaeological evidence suggests that the earliest known production of wine, made by fermenting grapes, took place as early as 8,000 years ago in Georgia and 6,100 years ago in Armenia. These locations are all within the natural area of the European grapevine Vitis vinifera.

Through an extensive gene-mapping project in 2006, Dr. McGovern and his colleagues analyzed the heritage of more than 110 modern grape cultivars, and narrowed their origin to a region in Georgia, where also wine residues were discovered on the inner surfaces of 8,000-year-old ceramic storage jars in Shulavari, Georgia. Other notable areas of wine production have been discovered in Greece and date back to 4500 BC. The same sites also contain the world's earliest evidence of crushed grapes. On January 11, 2011 in one of Armenia's Vayots Dzor province cave was found a wine making press dating to approximately 6,000 years ago. Literary references to wine are abundant in Homer (9th century BC, but possibly composed even earlier), Alkman (7th century BC), and others. In Ancient Egypt, six of 36 wine amphoras were found in the tomb of King Tutankhamun bearing the name "Kha'y", a royal chief vintner. Five of these amphoras were designated as from the King's personal estate with the sixth listed as from the estate of the royal house of Aten. Traces of wine have also been found in central Asian Xinjiang, dating from the second and first millennia BC.

The first known mentioning of grape-based wines in India was in the late 4th century BC writings of Chanakya who was the chief minister of Emperor Chandragupta Maurya. In his writings, Chanakya condemns the use of alcohol while chronicling the emperor and his court's frequent indulgence of a style of grape wine known as Madhu.

A 2003 report by archaeologists indicates a possibility that grapes were mixed with rice to produce mixed fermented beverages in China in the early years of the seventh millennium BC. Pottery jars from the Neolithic site of Jiahu, Henan contained traces of tartaric acid and other organic compounds commonly found in wine. However, other fruits indigenous to the region, such as hawthorn, cannot be ruled out. If these beverages, which seem to be the precursors of rice wine, included grapes rather than other fruits, these grapes were of any of the several dozen indigenous wild species of grape in China, rather than from Vitis vinifera, which were introduced into China some 6000 years later.

One of the lasting legacies of the ancient Roman Empire was the viticulture foundation the Romans laid in the lands that today are world renowned wine regions. Areas with Roman garrison towns, like Bordeaux, Trier, and Colchester, the Romans planted vineyards to supply local needs and limit the cost of long distance trading. In medieval Europe, the Roman Catholic Church staunchly supported wine, since they required it for the Mass. Monks in France made wine for years, aging it in caves. An old English recipe that survived in various forms until the 19th century calls for refining white wine from bastard—bad or tainted bastardo wine.

    
Drink Recipe – Red Wine Cooler

4 oz red wine
2 oz lemon-lime soda
2 oz ginger ale

Pour the wine, lemon-lime soda and ginger ale into a highball glass almost filled with ice cubes. Stir well. Garnish with a twist of lemon and a slice of orange, and serve.

 
 
http://www.youtube.com/v/y_S-BmQ4KF0
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: gojikranz on September 28, 2011, 02:37:12 PM

28 – Red Bull
(http://www.redbull.ca/cs/RedBull/RBImages/000/000/357/682/photo610x343a/Energy.jpg)
33 points    
3 of 16 lists
Top Vote: #2 Team RAD


A company I worked for a few years back had Red Bull fridge. I've always been a caffeine lover addict, but always got my fix with coffee or tea. Working late one night, needing a quick boost, and fresh outta meth, I decided to give Red Bull a shot. I'd seen the commercials and knew what it was about, but had never thought to try it. Didn't much care for the taste at first, but that boost! Soon I was slamming cans left and right and even grew to like the taste. My next job lacked the dedicated Red Bull fridge, and since I only ever got them that way, I just stopped drinking it. Never once paid for a single can!



similarly for me i worked on a low budget movie on canada and red bull was drunk liberally for 24 hour shoot days and what not.  its not a great memory of red bull so its not on my list but it did work.  and i have also never bought a can!  i prefer monster or juice mixed energy drinks usually if im looking for that sorta thing.
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: sarcasm_made_Easy on September 28, 2011, 02:40:59 PM
Actually that was exactly it, he, not sure about his brother so much, but he joined up to go to Vietnam but ended up doing administrative stuff in Japan instead.

So, when not doing that he and his brother spent their time hanging out in tea houses and drinking and pawning each others possessions for money to keep doing the other things.

His Japanese was fairly decent so, when he was due to go home he was able to reply to the Anti US protester who chanted "Yankee go home" in Japanese during a rally outside the base with "Next Week Friday". Which would be one of the last scenes I think.

 

That sounds cool but different than my experience.  No one really had a problem with us.  And when they had a problem with the US it was never for reasons Americans would first think of, like the Beef protests. 
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: Tripe on September 28, 2011, 02:44:23 PM
Bear in mind though this was a) the '60s and b)Okinawa where tensions have always run high amongst a fair numbers of the locals.
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: D.B. Barnes on September 28, 2011, 02:44:37 PM

28 – Red Bull
33 points    
3 of 16 lists
Top Vote: #2 Team RAD


A company I worked for a few years back had Red Bull fridge. I've always been a caffeine lover addict, but always got my fix with coffee or tea. Working late one night, needing a quick boost, and fresh outta meth, I decided to give Red Bull a shot. I'd seen the commercials and knew what it was about, but had never thought to try it. Didn't much care for the taste at first, but that boost! Soon I was slamming cans left and right and even grew to like the taste. My next job lacked the dedicated Red Bull fridge, and since I only ever got them that way, I just stopped drinking it. Never once paid for a single can!

similarly for me i worked on a low budget movie on canada and red bull was drunk liberally for 24 hour shoot days and what not.  its not a great memory of red bull so its not on my list but it did work.  and i have also never bought a can!  i prefer monster or juice mixed energy drinks usually if im looking for that sorta thing.

Oh, it works likes a charm. I imagine it's a staple on all movie sets. That shit powered me me through the most ridiculous working situations I've ever been in. I'm talking 60-70 hour weeks, including weekends for what seemed like an eternity. I have some pretty crazed memories associated with that magical crank-in-a-can, including some epic crashes.

Anyway, here's to free Red Bull!   :cheers:
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: sarcasm_made_Easy on September 28, 2011, 02:47:08 PM
Bear in mind though this was a) the '60s and b)Okinawa where tensions have always run high amongst a fair numbers of the locals.


Actually depending on your branch of service you get treated differently.  My cousin spent a large amount of time there and was treated quite good.  The marines are pertty damned unpopular there right now for various reasons. 
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: Tripe on September 28, 2011, 02:48:36 PM
Go back to a) though, it's was much more common to see marching and protests.
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: ColeStratton on September 28, 2011, 03:04:33 PM
heh the dirty martini, good choice. 

also looking at coles choices i cant help but think of him as a 50s guy from madmen or something. 

I have no idea what you are talking about.

(http://i54.tinypic.com/snebk3.jpg)
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: sarcasm_made_Easy on September 28, 2011, 03:12:33 PM
Go back to a) though, it's was much more common to see marching and protests.

No i know what your saying man, i was in asia after all lol.  But if you have been following the news recently the Japan prime minister (ex i think now i would have to check) was having serious issues over a marine base there in okinawa that the locals just did not want.  It was a fairly large issue there, not including the rapes that happened a few years before that. 
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: Johnny Unusual on September 28, 2011, 03:51:43 PM
25 – Chocolate Milkshake
(http://blog.proporta.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/09/chocolatemilkshake.jpg)
35 points    
3 of 16 lists
Top Vote: #4 Johnny Unusual


A milkshake is a sweet, cold beverage which is made from milk, ice cream or iced milk, and flavorings or sweeteners such as fruit syrup or chocolate sauce.

Full-service restaurants, soda fountains, and diners usually prepare and mix the shake "by hand" from scoops of ice cream and milk in ablender or drink mixer using a stainless steel cup. Most fast food outlets do not make shakes by hand with ice cream. Instead, they make shakes in automatic milkshake machines which freeze and serve a premade milkshake mixture consisting of milk, a sweetened flavoring agent, and a thickening agent. There are exceptions such as the US chains Back Yard Burgers, Jack in the Box, Long John Silvers, Hardees,Chick-fil-A, Carl's Jr., and more which do make the shakes by hand with ice cream. Some fast-food restaurants such as Dairy Queen serve milkshakes which are prepared by blending soft-serve ice cream (or ice milk) with sweetened, flavored syrups such as chocolate syrup and fruit-flavored syrup and milk.

When the term "milkshake" was first used in print in 1885, milkshakes were an alcoholic whiskey drink that has been described as a "sturdy, healthful eggnog type of drink, with eggs, whiskey, etc., served as a tonic as well as a treat". However, by 1900, the term referred to "wholesome drinks made with chocolate, strawberry, or vanilla syrups." By the "early 1900s people were asking for the new treat, often with ice cream." By the 1930s, milkshakes were a popular drink atmalt shops, which were the "typical soda fountain of the period... used by students as a meeting place or hangout."

The history of the electric blender, malted milk drinks and milkshakes are interconnected. Before the widespread availability of electric blenders, milkshake-type drinks were more like eggnog, or they were a hand-shaken mixture of crushed ice and milk, sugar, and flavorings.[8]Hamilton Beach's drink mixers began being used at soda fountains in 1911 and the electric blender or drink mixer was invented by Steven Poplawski in 1922. With the invention of the blender, milkshakes began to take their modern, whipped, aerated, and frothy form. Malted milk drinks are made with malted milk powder, which contains dried milk, malted barley and wheat flour. Malted milk powder was invented in 1897 by William Horlick as an easily digested restorative health drink for invalids and children, and as an infant's food.

The use of malted milk powder in milkshakes was popularized in the USA by the Chicago drugstore chain Walgreens. In 1922, Walgreens' employee Ivar "Pop" Coulson made a milkshake by adding two scoops of vanilla ice cream to the standard malted milk drink recipe (milk, chocolate syrup and malt powder). This item, under the name "Horlick's Malted Milk," was featured by the Walgreen drugstore chain as part of a chocolate milk shake, which itself became known as a "malted" or "malt" and became one of the most popular soda-fountain drinks.

The automation of milkshakes developed in the 1930s, after the invention of freon-cooled refrigerators provided a safe, reliable way of automatically making and dispensing ice cream. In 1936, inventor Earl Prince used the basic concept behind the freon-cooled automated ice cream machine to develop the Multimixer, a "five-spindled mixer that could produce five milkshakes at once, all automatically, and dispense them at the pull of a lever into awaiting paper cups."

In the late 1930s, several newspaper articles show that the term "frosted" was used to refer to milkshakes made with ice cream. In 1937, the Denton Journal in Maryland stated that "For a 'frosted' shake, add a dash of your favorite ice cream." In 1939, the Mansfield News in Ohio stated that "A frosted beverage, in the vernacular, is something good to which ice cream has been added. Example par excellence is frosted coffee—that hot, tasty beverage made chilly with ice and frosty with ice cream."
 
By the 1950s, popular places to drink milkshakes were Woolworth's "5 & 10" lunch counters, diners, burger joints, and drugstore soda fountains. These establishments often had neon light signs, checkerboard-patterned linoleum floor tiles, chrome barstools, vinyl booths, formica counter-tops with coin-operated jukeboxes, a board of daily specials, a counter top donut display case, and prominently displayed behind the counter, a shining chrome or stainless steel milkshake mixing machine.
 
These establishments made milkshakes in Hamilton Beach or similar styles of drink mixers, which had spindles and agitators that folded air into the drinks for "smooth, fluffy results" and served them in 12½-ounce tall, "y"-shaped glasses. Soda fountain staff had their own jargon, such as "Burn One All the Way" (chocolate malted with chocolate ice cream), "Twist It, Choke It, and Make It Cackle" (chocolate malted with an egg) "Shake One in the Hay" (a strawberry shake) and a "White Cow" (a vanilla milkshake). In the 1950s, a milkshake machine salesman named Ray Kroc bought exclusive rights to the 1930s-era Multimixer milkshake maker from inventor Earl Prince, and went on to use automated milkshake machines to speed up production at McDonald's restaurants.

In the 1950s, milkshakes were called "frappes", "velvets," "frosted [drinks]", or "cabinets" in different parts of the US. A specialty style of milkshake, the "concrete" was "...a milk shake so thick that the server hands it out the order window upside down, demonstrating that not a drop will drip." In 1952, the Newport Daily News in Rhode Island contained a "Guide For Top Quality ICE CREAM SODAS CABINETS MILK SHAKES", which shows the use of the term "cabinet" in print. An article from 1953 in the Salisbury Times (in the state of Maryland) suggests that shakes can be made in a jar by shaking well. The article states that by adding four large tablespoons of ice cream, the drink becomes a "frosted shake.”

    
Drink Recipe – Banana Chocolate Milkshake

1 cup skim milk
2 tablespoons cocoa
1/3 cup sugar
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
1 medium ripe banana, sliced
8 large ice cubes

Directions

In blender container pour milk. Add cocoa. Cover, blend on low speed until well mixed. Add sugar, vanilla and banana. Cover, blend until smooth.

Add ice cubes, one at a time, blending until thick.

 
http://www.youtube.com/v/pGL2rytTraA
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: Johnny Unusual on September 28, 2011, 03:57:47 PM
24 – Jägermeister
(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/b/bc/Jagermeister_bottle.jpg/250px-Jagermeister_bottle.jpg)
36 points       
2 of 16 lists
Top Vote: #3 Monty

   
Jägermeister  is a German 70-proof digestif made with 56 different herbs and spices. It is the flagship product of Mast-Jägermeister SE, headquartered inWolfenbüttel, south of Braunschweig, Lower Saxony, Germany.

The term Jägermeister was introduced in Germany in 1934 in the new Reichsjagdgesetz (Reich hunting law). The term was applied to senior foresters and gamekeepers in the German civil service. Thus, when the liquor was introduced in 1935, the name was already familiar to Germans. Curt Mast, the original distiller of Jägermeister, was an enthusiastic hunter.

Translated literally, Jägermeister means "hunt-master", combining Jäger (hunter) and Meister (master, in the sense of an accomplished professional). A possible free translation might be gamekeeper.

In parts of Germany (Lower Saxony), it is often humorously called Leberkleister (“liver glue”). The humor plays upon the fact thatLeberkleister is an exact rhyme with Jägermeister. A satirical advertisement which mocks Jägermeister as Leberkleister appeared on the back cover of issue number 70 of the German edition of Mad magazine in February, 1975, under the rubric “Advertisements we’d like to see.”

The Jägermeister logo, which shows the head of a stag with a glowing Christian cross between its antlers, is a reference to the stories of Saint Hubertus and Saint Eustace, patron saints of hunters.

    
Drink Recipe – Jaygo

10 oz strawberry soda
2 oz Jagermeister® herbal liqueur

Stir ingredients together well in a tall glass or cup, and serve.
5% (10 proof)
Serve in: Highball Glass
 
http://www.youtube.com/v/CFecPtZtSu0
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: Johnny Unusual on September 28, 2011, 04:05:25 PM
24 – Absinthe
(http://www.originalabsinthe.com/images/absinthe-verdoyante.jpg)
36 points       
2 of 16 lists
Top Vote: #3 Tripe Hound Redux

   
Absinthe is historically described as a distilled, highly alcoholic (45–74% ABV / 90-148proof) beverage. It is an anise-flavoured spirit derived from herbs, including the flowers and leaves of the herb Artemisia absinthium, commonly referred to as "grande wormwood", together with green anise and sweet fennel. Absinthe traditionally has a natural green colour but can also be colourless. It is commonly referred to in historical literature as "la fée verte" (the "green fairy" in French).

Although it is sometimes mistakenly called a liqueur, absinthe is not bottled with added sugar and is therefore classified as a spirit. Absinthe has a very high level of alcohol by volume but is normally diluted with water when consumed.

Absinthe originated in the canton of Neuchâtel in Switzerland. It achieved great popularity as an alcoholic drink in late 19th- and early 20th-century France, particularly among Parisian artists and writers. Owing in part to its association with bohemian culture, consumption of absinthe was opposed by social conservatives and prohibitionists. Charles Baudelaire, Paul Verlaine, Arthur Rimbaud, Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec, Amedeo Modigliani, Vincent van Gogh, Oscar Wilde, Aleister Crowley and Alfred Jarry were all known drinkers of absinthe.

Absinthe has been portrayed as a dangerously addictive psychoactive drug. The chemical thujone, present in small quantities, was blamed for its alleged harmful effects. By 1915, absinthe had been banned in the United States and in most European countries including France, the Netherlands, Belgium, Switzerland and the Austro-Hungarian Empire. Although absinthe was vilified, it has not been shown that it is any more dangerous than ordinary spirits. Its psychoactive properties, apart from those of alcohol, have been much exaggerated.

A revival of absinthe began in the 1990s, when countries in the European Union began to reauthorize its manufacture and sale. As of February 2008, nearly 200 brands of absinthe were being produced in a dozen countries, most notably in France, Switzerland, Spain, and the Czech Republic.

    
Drink Recipe – ABC

Ingredients
•     1/3 absinthe
•     1/3 Bacardi 151
•     1/3 chartreuse
Instructions
•     Add all ingredients into a shot glass with green Chartreuse last and enjoy.

 
http://www.youtube.com/v/8YfqDpMZEhg
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: Tripe on September 28, 2011, 04:13:42 PM
Off to the gym will comment on this later. :)
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: Johnny Unusual on September 28, 2011, 04:51:27 PM
23 – Orange Pop
(http://media.tumblr.com/tumblr_le64qeWYLe1qeaef9.jpg)
36 points       
3 of 16 lists
Top Vote: #7 Gojikranz

   
Orange soft drinks (called orange soda or orange pop) in certain regions of the US, orangeade in the UK, or the generalized trademark orangina in France) are carbonated orange drinks.

Orange soft drinks (especially those without orange juice) often contain very high levels of sodium benzoate, and this often imparts a slight metallic taste to the beverage. Other additives commonly found in orange soft drinks include rosin and sodium hexametaphosphate.

Orangeade first appeared as a variety of carbonated drink provided in soda fountains in American drugstores in the late 19th century, brands including Miner's and Lash's. A recipe for home made Orangeade appears in editions of Fannie Farmer's cookbook.

    
Drink-Based Recipe – Orange Pop Chicken

INGREDIENTS:
1 1/2 pound boneless, skinless chicken breast halves
1 can (12 ounce size) orange soda
1/2 cup soy sauce


PREPARATION:
Place chicken in crockpot. Combine soy sauce and orange soda. Pour over chicken. Cover; cook on LOW for 5 to 6 hours.

Serve over hot, cooked rice.

 
http://www.youtube.com/v/nW2p7qvyjsg
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: Johnny Unusual on September 28, 2011, 04:56:11 PM
 
22 – Apple Cider
(http://www.newnordic.com/cache/article/image/applecider_INT_web2.jpg)
37 points       
3 of 16 lists
Top Vote: #11 Cole Stratton

Serving Preferences: Hot Spiced (Cole Stratton), Cold (Johnny Unusual)

   
Apple cider (also called sweet cider or soft cider) is the name used in the United States and parts of Canada for an unfiltered, unsweetened, non-alcoholic beverage made from apples. It may be opaque due to fine apple particles in suspension and may be tangier than conventional filtered apple juice, depending on the apples used.

This untreated cider is a seasonally produced drink of limited shelf-life that is typically available only in fall, although it is sometimes frozen for use throughout the year. It is traditionally served on the Halloween,Thanksgiving, and Christmas holidays, sometimes heated and mulled.

While the term cider is used for the fermented alcoholic drink in most of the world, the term hard cider is used in the United States and much of Canada. In the United States, the distinction between plain apple juice and cider is not legally well established.

Some individual states do specify the difference. For example, according to the Massachusetts Department of Agricultural Resources "Apple juice and apple cider are both fruit beverages made from apples, but there is a difference between the two. Fresh cider is raw apple juice that has not undergone a filtration process to remove coarse particles of pulp or sediment. Apple juice is juice that has been filtered to remove solids and pasteurized so that it will stay fresh longer. Vacuum sealing and additional filtering extend the shelf life of the juice." In Canada, the Canadian Food Inspection Agency also regulates "unpasteurized apple cider".


    
Drink Recipe – Spiced Apple Cider

Ingredients
1 tbsp (15 mL) grated orange rind
4 whole cloves
2 pieces cinnamon, (1 inch/2.5 cm)
3 cups (750 mL) apple cider or apple juice
Granulated sugar, (optional)

Preparation:
In small square of double-thickness fine cheesecloth, tie up orange rind, cloves and cinnamon pieces; place in saucepan. Add apple cider; cover and heat over medium heat just until boiling.

Remove from heat; let stand, covered, for 5 minutes. Discard bag; stir in sugar to taste (if using).

 
http://www.youtube.com/v/dEZVZ-2k6Po
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: Darth Geek on September 28, 2011, 04:58:59 PM
Ah yes, Apple Cider. Mmmm. Best Apple Cider in upsate NY is Hollenbecks in Virgil NY. They make spectacular grape juice, too.
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: Johnny Unusual on September 28, 2011, 05:03:15 PM
21 – Mr. Pibb
(http://www.usasoda.com/images/ccpibb21.jpg)
39 points          
2 of 16 lists
Top Vote: #3 Psycho Goatee

Pibb Xtra, previously sold as Mr Pibb, is a soft drink marketed by The Coca-Cola Company. As of 2011, it is sold in most of the United States.

First introduced as "Peppo" to compete against Dr Pepper, the name was changed in 1972 to "Mr. Pibb" after Dr Pepper sued The Coca-Cola Company for trademark infringement. The original test markets for Mr. Pibb in 1972 were located in Waco, Texas, the birthplace of Dr Pepper, though the Dr Pepper company moved to Dublin, Texas soon after creating the drink.

In 1999, BrandGames distributed a video game through various fast food chains such as McDonald's with a meal and a large Mr. Pibb. It featured a cartoon man similar to the cartoon used on the original Mr. Pibb can, whose mission was to escape from a school inhabited by zombies. He defeated the zombies by burping at them and he could increase his burping capacity by drinking Mr. Pibb. This video game was played on a PC using MS-DOS, and was distributed in floppy disk format (3.5" diskette) and (less common) PC CD-ROM.

In 2001, a new formula called Pibb Xtra was introduced with added cinnamon flavor, replacing the original formula in many parts of the United States.

In 2010, the description on the can was changed to "Spicy Cherry Soda."


    
Drink-Based Recipe – Mr Pibb Pralines

Ingredients

1 Cup Granulated Sugar
1 Cup Dark Packed Brown Sugar
1 Cup Marshmellows
2-3 Cups Pecan Halves
Directions
Cook sugars and Mr. Pibb in a saucepan over low heat, stirring constantly, then gradually birng to the soft ball stage (240 degrees F on candy thermometer).

Remove mixture from heat; stir in marshmallows and pecans.

Mix vigorously until marshmallows dissolve.

Quickly drop by tablespoon on wax paper to cool.

Makes 2 dozen pralines.

 
http://www.youtube.com/v/fgvDTY29Kqc
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: Johnny Unusual on September 28, 2011, 05:17:15 PM
OK, that's it for tonight!  Tomorrow: 10 more entries and perhaps a bonus or two!
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: D.B. Barnes on September 28, 2011, 05:20:12 PM
25 – Chocolate Milkshake
35 points    
3 of 16 lists
Top Vote: #4 Johnny Unusual


Only three lists. That's a bit surprising. I loved these ever since I was little; it always seemed like a big treat, with the whipped cream and the cherry. My favorite these days is the one from In-N-Out Burger. Just don't go looking up the Nutritional Facts on this one.

24 – Jägermeister
36 points       
2 of 16 lists
Top Vote: #3 Monty


This and Mudslides are the only booze I ever take shots of anymore, and that's a pretty rare occasion. This is sort of what I imagine Snake Juice would be like if Snake Juice was a real thing. The trouble with this stuff, at least in my experience, is you never start out with it. The idea seems to come up well into the evening when you're judgment is heavily compromised, and then all hell can break loose. By far the worst hangovers I've ever experienced all involved this cold, cough-syrupy temptress.


24 – Absinthe
36 points       
2 of 16 lists
Top Vote: #3 Tripe Hound Redux


Sadly, or perhaps thankfully, I haven't had much experience with this, although I'm attracted to and fascinated by the whole ritual of it. I guess I don't hang out with sophisticated enough drinkers.


23 – Orange Pop
36 points       
3 of 16 lists
Top Vote: #7 Gojikranz


Okay, now I'm just confused.

22 – Apple Cider
37 points       
3 of 16 lists
Top Vote: #11 Cole Stratton

Seems as if the only chance I get to have this is when there are free samples being offered somewhere, like at a Farmer's Market. I like the taste, but I prefer in small amounts due to the sweetness.

21 – Mr. Pibb
39 points          
2 of 16 lists
Top Vote: #3 Psycho Goatee

I can't be completely certain, but I honestly don't think I've ever even tried this.
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: Tripe on September 28, 2011, 06:45:16 PM
(http://www.originalabsinthe.com/images/absinthe-verdoyante.jpg)
Think you could use a different pic? Because....

It is an anise-flavoured spirit derived from herbs, including the flowers and leaves of the herb Artemisia absinthium, commonly referred to as "grande wormwood", together with green anise and sweet fennel.
It's these latter two that give it the dominant flavour and balance out the bitterness copmming from the wormwood. If there's no anise, it's not really Abinthe and without the anise it won't louche.

Absinthe traditionally has a natural green colour but can also be colourless.
It is commonly referred to in historical literature as "la fée verte" (the "green fairy" in French).

Although it is sometimes mistakenly called a liqueur, absinthe is not bottled with added sugar and is therefore classified as a spirit. Absinthe has a very high level of alcohol by volume but is normally diluted with water when consumed.
And should not be set on fire, despite what stupid Czech distillers would have you believe.

Absinthe originated in the canton of Neuchâtel in Switzerland. It achieved great popularity as an alcoholic drink in late 19th- and early 20th-century France, particularly among Parisian artists and writers. Owing in part to its association with bohemian culture, consumption of absinthe was opposed by social conservatives and prohibitionists.
As well as wine producers, funny old world. ;)

Charles Baudelaire, Paul Verlaine, Arthur Rimbaud, Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec, Amedeo Modigliani, Vincent van Gogh, Oscar Wilde, Aleister Crowley and Alfred Jarry were all known drinkers of absinthe.
And in honour of the two in bold, I make a chocolate absinthe ice cream called Cocoa Eclipse. :)

Absinthe has been portrayed as a dangerously addictive psychoactive drug. The chemical thujone, present in small quantities, was blamed for its alleged harmful effects. By 1915, absinthe had been banned in the United States and in most European countries including France, the Netherlands, Belgium, Switzerland and the Austro-Hungarian Empire. Although absinthe was vilified, it has not been shown that it is any more dangerous than ordinary spirits. Its psychoactive properties, apart from those of alcohol, have been much exaggerated.
Absolutely, the only way you get a high from absinthe is if you also get a high from booze (ome can but most don't) the fact it tastes like licorice means the experience is unlike most booze experiences (Ouzo and Sambuca excepted) which can add to the psychological effects I think.

France, Switzerland, Spain, and the Czech Republic.
Good to great, Almost always great, Fair to almost great, utter shite


Drink Recipe – ABC [/b][/u]
Ingredients
•     1/3 absinthe
•     1/3 Bacardi 151
•     1/3 chartreuse
Instructions
•     Add all ingredients into a shot glass with green Chartreuse last and enjoy.
Really? You didn't want to describe the actual ritual? Anyone know how to embed a facebook vid?

Oh and this is a pretty good one from the god old US of A (click on the pic to visit the site)

(http://thegintender.files.wordpress.com/2010/12/vieux_carre.jpg?w=300&h=487) (http://vieuxcarreabsinthe.com/)

And, if I can ever find it and have the money for it I want to try this

(http://www.oxygenee.com/sitebuilder/images/Pernod-Fils-Mar-08-274x368.jpg)

It's supposed to be magnificent, shame the same can't be said for the current product. It's also not predominantly green but reather a orange-amber colour reminiscent of autumnal leaves, which is another of the shade that absinthe used to be famous for. Vieux Carre has a touch of feuille-morte but it's mostly green.
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: Johnny Unusual on September 28, 2011, 06:53:01 PM
Hey man, I know nothing of alcohol.  I'm a teetotaler.  If you want to post some weird Absinthe recipe sex ritual thing, go ahead.  I just picked a random recipe that sounded interesting.  You want to show me the right way to do it, I'll be happy to see it.  Maybe I should have tried to find a Jell-O shot made with absinthe (I'm trying to make a joke, but for all I know that's actually a thing) rather than drop the absinthe ball.
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: Tripe on September 28, 2011, 06:54:59 PM
Well that's why I asked about the video embedding, I actually talked about it in a vid on my Facebook wall but I don't know how to embed it. :)
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: Johnny Unusual on September 28, 2011, 07:12:39 PM
Yeah, I know what you mean.  If it ain't youtube, I can rarely embed.  Feel free to link though.
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: Tripe on September 28, 2011, 07:25:16 PM
Oh,

http://www.facebook.com/v/2126917706007

Simple as that apparently. :)

the picture I'm refering to seems to have disappered from my wall pictures, which is odd. Oh and Mata Hari is not OK, I subsequently discovered.



Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: D.B. Barnes on September 28, 2011, 10:15:23 PM
Oh,

http://www.facebook.com/v/2126917706007

Simple as that apparently. :)

Hey, I remember this. I remember wanting to go out and get all the stuff after watching it, and then I got distracted by a cat GIF or something.

Seriously though, I really do need to do this. The only experience I've had is with Absinthe mixed with other things, which I suppose really isn't the experience at all.
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: sarcasm_made_Easy on September 28, 2011, 10:26:37 PM
Just for the record cognac rules.  hehe im nice and toasty.  NICE.  and.  TOASTY. 
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: D.B. Barnes on September 28, 2011, 11:07:52 PM
Just for the record cognac rules.  hehe im nice and toasty.  NICE.  and.  TOASTY. 

Always a nice place to be.

See, cognac, like absinthe, is another one I've had very little experience with yet would like to dance with. Give me some sipping suggestions, other than the $200/bottle stuff if you don't mind.
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: sarcasm_made_Easy on September 28, 2011, 11:13:24 PM
is twenty ok?  i found this one recently and really love it. 

http://www.bevmo.com/Shop/ProductDetail.aspx?N=40+4294967049+4294967232&area=spirits&ProductID=22180&Ns=Name|0

Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: BBQ Platypus on September 28, 2011, 11:47:37 PM
25 – Chocolate Milkshake
(http://blog.proporta.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/09/chocolatemilkshake.jpg)
35 points    
3 of 16 lists
Top Vote: #4 Johnny Unusual

Was my vote counted among this, or was it considered separate?
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: Tripe on September 29, 2011, 02:20:17 AM
other than the $200/bottle stuff if you don't mind.
$200/bottle? Oh no no no, that's the price for a measure in coke, you don't wan't to know the price of a bottle  ;D
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: Johnny Unusual on September 29, 2011, 05:37:44 AM
25 – Chocolate Milkshake
(http://blog.proporta.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/09/chocolatemilkshake.jpg)
35 points    
3 of 16 lists
Top Vote: #4 Johnny Unusual

Was my vote counted among this, or was it considered separate?

That it was, but looking back, your vote merely said Milkshake and I did not count two very low counting "Vanilla Milkshakes"

Hmm...  What do you think people?  Should I have Milkshake shoot up in the rankings?  It wouldn't be too much trouble to change it.  I think that I initially toed with the idea of separate votes for different milkshakes and consolidating them and I think that BBQ's vote was stuck in the middle.
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: Johnny Unusual on September 29, 2011, 07:14:54 AM
20 – Ginger Ale
(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/0/09/Ginger_ale.jpg/200px-Ginger_ale.jpg)
42 points       
3 of 16 lists
Top Vote: #5 Johnny Unusual


Ginger ale is a carbonated soft drink flavored with ginger. Dr. Thomas Cantrell, an American apothecary and surgeon, claimed to have invented ginger ale and marketed it with beverage manufacturer Grattan and Company. Grattan embossed the slogan "The Original Makers of Ginger Ale" on its bottles. Ginger ale was considered the most popular soft drink in the United States between 1860 and 1930.

 Ginger Ale has a storied history in the United States. Ginger ales come in two varieties: "golden" and "dry". Golden ginger ale is dark colored, generally sweet to taste, with a strong ginger spice flavor. It is the older style and there is little or no difference between this and nonalcoholic versions of ginger beer. Many believe golden ginger ale is a form of ginger beer brought into North America by migrants from Eastern Europe, where it had been known for centuries. Golden ginger ale, like ginger beer, is mainly consumed as a soda type drink in its own right.

Dry ginger ale (paler, and with much less of the ginger "kick") became popular in the United States during the Prohibition era, when it was used as a mixer for alcoholic beverages, as the strong flavor of golden ginger ale was undesirable. Dry ginger ale quickly surpassed golden ginger ale in popularity, and today, golden ginger ale is an uncommon, and usually regional, drink. By contrast, dry ginger ale is produced on a vast scale for national and international consumers.

Vernors, Blenheim, A-Treat, Bull's Head, Chelmsford, Buffalo Rock, Sussex and Red Rock are brands of golden ginger ale. Canada Dry, Schweppes and Seagram's are major brands of dry ginger ale. Dry ginger ale, as a mixer for alcoholic beverages, is a staple on supermarket shelves, in bars, and on airlines. Ginger ale is less commonly sold through vending machines or soda fountains alongside other carbonated soft drinks, but is still popular in some countries such as Canada.

    
Drink Recipe – Shirley Temple

Shirley Temple Cocktail Ingredients
•     8-10 cubes (cracked) Ice
•     2 measures lemon juice
•     1/2 measure grenadine
•     1/2 measure sugar syrup
•     to top up, ginger ale
Instructions
•     Put 4-6 ice cubes into shaker. Pour the lemon juice, grenadine and sugar syrup over the ice and shake well. Half fill a small, chilled glass with remaining ice cubes and strain the cocktail over them. Top with ginger ale and decorate with orange slice and cherry.

http://www.youtube.com/v/y-chiAbi9ss
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: Johnny Unusual on September 29, 2011, 07:27:15 AM
19 – Soy Milk
(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/c/c0/Soy_milk_bottles_3.jpg/250px-Soy_milk_bottles_3.jpg)
42 points       
3 of 16 lists
Top Vote: #3 CJones


Soy milk (also called soya milk, soymilk, soybean milk, or soy juice) and sometimes referred to as soy drink/beverage is a beverage made from soybeans. A stable emulsion of oil, water, and protein, it is produced by soaking dry soybeans and grinding them with water. Soy milk contains about the same proportion of protein as cow's milk: around 3.5%; also 2% fat, 2.9% carbohydrate, and 0.5% ash. Soy milk can be made at home with traditional kitchen tools or with a soy milk machine.

The coagulated protein from soy milk can be made into tofu, just as dairy milk can be made into cheese.

The oldest evidence of soy milk production is from China where a kitchen scene proving use of soy milk is incised on a stone slab dated around AD 25–220. It also appeared in a chapter called Four Taboos (Szu-Hui) in the AD 82 book called Lunheng by Wang Chong, possibly the first written record of soy milk. Evidence of soy milk is rare prior to the 20th century and widespread usage before then is unlikely.

According to popular tradition in China, soy milk was developed by Liu An for medicinal purposes, although there is no historical evidence for this legend. This legend first started in the 12th century and was not clearly stated until late 15th century in Bencao Gangmu, where Li was attributed to the development of tofu with no mention of soy milk. Later writers in Asia and the West additionally attributed development of soy milk to Liu An, assuming that he could not have made tofu without making soy milk. However, it is also likely that Liu An has been falsely attributed to the development of tofu by writers after his time. However, some recent writers attributed Liu An to have developed tofu in 164 BC.


    
Drink-Based Recipe – Soy Milk Pancakes

Ingredients
•   1 cup all-purpose flour
•   1 1/2 tablespoons white sugar
•   2 teaspoons baking powder
•   1/2 teaspoon baking soda
•   1/4 teaspoon salt
•   1 cup vanilla soy milk
•   1 egg, lightly beaten
•   2 teaspoons vegetable oil
•   1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract
•   1/2 teaspoon almond extract

Directions
1.   In a medium bowl, whisk together the flour, sugar, baking powder, baking soda, and salt. In a small bowl, mix the vanilla soy milk, egg, oil, vanilla extract, and almond extract. Pour the soy milk mixture into the bowl with the flour mixture, and whisk together until smooth.

2.   Grease a skillet, and heat over medium low heat. Pour about 1/4 cup batter onto the heated skillet, and cook until bubbly. Flip with a spatula, and continue cooking about 1 minute, until golden brown. Repeat with the remaining batter.

http://www.youtube.com/v/Dep7CH6sans
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: Johnny Unusual on September 29, 2011, 07:35:09 AM
18 – Beer
(http://maxcdn.fooyoh.com/files/attach/images/613/221/227/005/beer.jpg)
47 points       
2 of 16 lists
Top Vote: #1 BBQ Platypus


Beer is the world's most widely consumed and probably oldest alcoholic beverage; it is the third most popular drink overall, after water and tea. It is produced by the brewing and fermentation of sugars, mainly derived from malted cereal grains, most commonly malted barley and malted wheat. Sugars derived from maize (corn) and rice are widely used adjuncts because of their lower cost. Most beer is flavoured with hops, which add bitterness and act as a natural preservative, though other flavourings such as herbs or fruit may occasionally be included. Some of humanity's earliest known writings refer to the production and distribution of beer: the Code of Hammurabi included laws regulating beer and beer parlours, and "The Hymn to Ninkasi", a prayer to the Mesopotamian goddess of beer, served as both a prayer and as a method of remembering the recipe for beer in a culture with few literate people. Today, the brewing industry is a global business, consisting of several dominant multinational companies and many thousands of smaller producers ranging from brewpubs to regional breweries.

The strength of beer is usually around 4% to 6% alcohol by volume (abv) though may range from less than 1% abv, to over 20% abv in rare cases.

Beer forms part of the culture of beer-drinking nations and is associated with social traditions such as beer festivals, as well as a rich pub culture involving activities like pub crawling and pub games such as bar billiards.

Beer is one of the world's oldest prepared beverages, possibly dating back to the early Neolithic or 9500 BC, when cereal was first farmed, and is recorded in the written history of ancient Egypt and Mesopotamia. Archaeologists speculate that beer was instrumental in the formation of civilizations.

The earliest known chemical evidence of beer dates to circa 3500–3100 BC from the site of Godin Tepe in the Zagros Mountains of western Iran. Some of the earliest Sumerian writings found in the region contain references to a type of beer; one such example, a prayer to the goddess Ninkasi, known as "The Hymn to Ninkasi", served as both a prayer as well as a method of remembering the recipe for beer in a culture with few literate people. The Ebla tablets, discovered in 1974 in Ebla, Syria and date back to 2500 BC, reveal that the city produced a range of beers, including one that appears to be named "Ebla" after the city. A beer made from rice, which, unlike sake, didn't use the amylolytic process, and was probably prepared for fermentation by mastication or malting, was made in China around 7000 BC.

As almost any substance containing carbohydrates, mainly sugars or starch, can naturally undergo fermentation, it is likely that beer-like beverages were independently invented among various cultures throughout the world. Bread and beer increased prosperity to a level that allowed time for development of other technology and contributed to the building of civilizations.

Beer was spread through Europe by Germanic and Celtic tribes as far back as 3000 BC, and it was mainly brewed on a domestic scale. The product that the early Europeans drank might not be recognized as beer by most people today. Alongside the basic starch source, the early European beers might contain fruits, honey, numerous types of plants, spices and other substances such as narcotic herbs. What they did not contain was hops, as that was a later addition, first mentioned in Europe around 822 by a Carolingian Abbot and again in 1067 by Abbess Hildegard of Bingen.

In 1516, William IV, Duke of Bavaria, adopted the Reinheitsgebot (purity law), perhaps the oldest food-quality regulation still in use in the 21st century, according to which the only allowed ingredients of beer are water, hops and barley-malt. Beer produced before the Industrial Revolution continued to be made and sold on a domestic scale, although by the 7th century AD, beer was also being produced and sold by European monasteries. During the Industrial Revolution, the production of beer moved from artisanal manufacture to industrial manufacture, and domestic manufacture ceased to be significant by the end of the 19th century. The development of hydrometers and thermometers changed brewing by allowing the brewer more control of the process and greater knowledge of the results.

Today, the brewing industry is a global business, consisting of several dominant multinational companies and many thousands of smaller producers ranging from brewpubs to regional breweries. As of 2006, more than 133 billion liters (35 billion gallons), the equivalent of a cube 510 metres on a side, of beer are sold per year, producing total global revenues of $294.5 billion (£147.7 billion).



    
Drink-Based Recipe – Beer Batter Cod

Tartar Sauce:
1 cup mayonnaise
1 tablespoon Dijon mustard
1 scallion, both white and green parts, minced
1 1/2 teaspoons fresh lemon juice
2 tablespoons minced dilled gherkins
1 tablespoon minced drained capers
2 tablespoons snipped fresh parsley
1 pinch each of salt and black pepper

Cod:
cooking oil, for deep-frying ( about 1 quart)
1 cup all-purpose flour
1/4 cup cornstarch
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 large egg, lightly beaten
1 cup beer, or as needed
2 pounds cod, haddock or hake fillets, cut into approximately 1 1/2" x 3" pieces

Combine all the tartar sauce ingredients in a small bowl. Cover and refrigerate.

Preheat the oven to 200°F.

Cover a cookie sheet with paper towels and top with a wire rack.

In a medium pot or deep fryer, heat 3 inches of oil to 350°F (use a deep frying thermometer if you are using a pot).

Meanwhile, mix the flour and cornstarch with the salt. Whisk in the egg. Slowly add the beer while whisking just until the ingredients are incorporated. Dip the fish pieces in the batter and place on a plate or the wire rack you will be using to drain the fried fish. If you have some batter left over, you can dip the fish in the batter again after the first coat of batter dries on the fish awaiting frying.

Place the fish pieces, two at a time, in the oil. Cook until the fish is done and the crust is lightly golden, about 4 minutes for 3/4 inch thick fillets. Remove the fish with tongs and put on the rack to drain. Sprinkle salt over the hot fish and put the baking sheet in the oven while you cook the other batches.

Serve with the tartar sauce and freshly made french fries.

http://www.youtube.com/v/SCgX4ixCRcQ
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: Johnny Unusual on September 29, 2011, 07:39:02 AM
17 – Lemonade
(http://sacchef.files.wordpress.com/2010/08/lemonade-diet-cleanse.jpg)
48 points       
3 of 16 lists
Top Vote: #8 Johnny Unusual, Monty

Preferred serving: Pink! (Johnny Unusual, Monty)


Lemonade is a lemon-flavored drink, typically made from lemons, water and sugar.

The term can refer to three different types of beverage:

   "Clear" lemonade: In many western European countries, the term limonade, from which the term "lemonade" is derived, originally applied to unsweetened water or carbonated soda water with lemon juice added, although several versions of sugar sweetened limonade have arrived on store shelves.

   "Cloudy" lemonade (UK term): In the US, Canada, and India lemonade refers to a mixture of lemon juice, sugar, and uncarbonated water, although there are many versions which contain artificial flavors instead of actual lemon juice. In India, it is a common household preparation, made using freshly squeezed lemons, granulated sugar, salt, pepper (and other spices according to personal taste) and is invariably consumed fresh.

   "Fizzy" lemonade: In France, the modern use of the term limonade refers to sweet carbonated lemon soft drinks (the uncarbonated version would be called citronnade). Likewise, in the UK, South Africa, Australia and New Zealand the term "lemonade" refers to a colourless, carbonated, sweet soft drink containing either natural or artificial lemon flavour. (This does not include lemon-lime drinks such as Seven-Up and Sprite.)

The French word limonade, which originally meant an unsweetened lemon-flavored water or carbonated soda, has since come to mean "soft drink", regardless of flavor, in many countries.

In the UK, the suffix '-ade' means a 'carbonated sweet soft drink'; hence limeade, orangeade, cherryade, etc. Brown lemonade exists in the Northern Ireland region of the UK.

In the Republic of Ireland, lemonade refers to the carbonated, lemon-flavored soft drink (as in the UK) but is further sub-divided into white (clear) lemonade and red lemonade. White lemonade equates to the colourless fizzy lemonade common in many countries, while red lemonade is particular to Ireland. Red lemonade differs slightly in taste from white lemonade and is either drunk neat or as part of a whiskey mixer.

American-style lemonade exists in the UK as a "homemade" juice (also called lemonade), but is only rarely sold commercially under that name. A carbonated version is commonly sold commercially as "cloudy" or "traditional" lemonade. There are also similar uncarbonated products, lemon squash and lemon barley water, both of which are usually sold as a syrup which is diluted to taste. Traditional lemonade also comes in powder packages. Variations on this form of lemonade can be found worldwide. In India and Pakistan, where it is commonly known as limbu paani or nimbu paani, lemonade may also contain salt and/or ginger juice. Shikanjvi is a traditional lemonade from the India-Pakistan region and can also be flavored with saffron, garlic and cumin.

In Australia and New Zealand, lemonade can also refer to any clear, carbonated soft drink with a primarily lemon flavor; e.g. a lemon-lime soft drink, such as Sprite. Culturally however, with a drink such as Sprite, the flavor is not recognised as "lemon-lime", but just plain "lemonade", although it is still the same flavor as its international counterpart. Other colored (and flavored) soft drinks are sometimes referred to by their color such as "red lemonade" or "green lemonade", implying that "lemonade" is the clear version of its "flavored" counterparts.


    
Drink-Based Recipe – Lemonade

Ingredients
•   6 lemons
•   1 cup white sugar
•   6 cups cold water
Directions
1.   Juice the lemons to make 1 cup of juice. To make your labor easier, FIRMLY roll the lemons between your hand and counter top before cutting in half and juicing.
2.   In a gallon pitcher combine 1 cup lemon juice, 1 cup sugar, and 6 cups cold water. Stir. Adjust water to taste. Chill and serve over ice.

http://www.youtube.com/v/H6Q4s_ZdvAQ
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: Johnny Unusual on September 29, 2011, 07:48:51 AM
16 – Earl Grey
(http://www.lovecoffeeandtea.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/08/Earl-Grey.jpg)
51 points          
3 of 16 lists
Top Vote: #3 Imrahil

Preferred serving: Pink! (Johnny Unusual, Monty)


Earl Grey tea is a tea blend with a distinctive flavour and aroma derived from the addition of oil extracted from the rind of the bergamot orange, a fragrant citrus fruit and is commonly known as "regular tea".

Traditionally the term "Earl Grey" was applied only to black tea; however, today the term is used for other teas that contain oil of bergamot, or a flavour.

The Earl Grey blend is named after 2nd Earl Grey, British Prime Minister in the 1830s and author of the Reform Bill of 1832, who reputedly received a gift, probably a diplomatic perquisite, of tea flavoured with bergamot oil, taken from bergamot, a citrus fruit typical of Southeast Asia and grown commercially in Italy.

According to one legend, a grateful Chinese mandarin whose son was rescued from drowning by one of Lord Grey's men first presented the blend to the Earl in 1803. The tale has no basis in fact, as Lord Grey never set foot in China and the use of bergamot oil to scent tea was then unknown in China. However, this tale is subsequently told (and slightly corrected) on the Twinings website, as "having been presented by an envoy on his return from China".

Jacksons of Piccadilly claim they originated Earl Grey's Tea, Lord Grey having given the recipe to Robert Jackson & Co. partner George Charlton in 1830. According to Jacksons, the original recipe has been in constant production and has never left their hands. Theirs has been based on China tea since the beginning.

According to the Grey family, the tea was specially blended by a Chinese mandarin for Lord Grey, to suit the water at Howick Hall, the family seat in Northumberland, using bergamot in particular to offset the preponderance of lime in the local water. Lady Grey used it to entertain in London as a political hostess, and it proved so popular that she was asked if it could be sold to others, which is how Twinings came to market it as a brand.

    
Drink-Based Recipe – Chocolate Earl Grey Cookies

Ingredients
•   1 cup butter, room temperature
•   1 cup white sugar
•   2 1/2 tablespoons Earl Grey tea, finely ground in a coffee grinder
•   1 teaspoon vanilla extract
•   2 eggs
•   2 cups all-purpose flour
•   2/3 cup unsweetened cocoa powder
•   2 teaspoons baking powder
Directions
1.   Preheat oven to 350 degrees F (175 degrees C).
2.   Cream together butter, sugar, and tea. Beat in vanilla, then eggs, one at a time until incorporated. Sift together flour, cocoa powder, and baking powder; fold into egg mixture until just mixed.
3.   Drop cookies by rounded tablespoonfuls onto a ungreased cookie sheets.
4.   Bake in preheated oven for 8 minutes.

http://www.youtube.com/v/R2IJdfxWtPM
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: Johnny Unusual on September 29, 2011, 07:57:33 AM
15 – Captain Morgan
(http://alannadybus.files.wordpress.com/2011/07/captain_morgan-logo.jpg)
57 points          
3 of 16 lists
Top Vote: #2 Sarcasm Made Easy


Captain Morgan is a brand of rum produced by alcohol conglomerate Diageo. It is named after the 17th-century, Welsh privateer of theCaribbean, Sir Henry Morgan. Since 2011 the label has used the slogan, "To Life, Love and Loot."

In 1944, the Seagram Company started producing rum under the name Captain Morgan Rum Company.

Seagram CEO Samuel Bronfman purchased a distillery named Long Pond from the Jamaican government. Among the buyers of raw rum from the Long Pond distillery was a Kingston pharmacy named Levy Brothers. The Levy family had been purchasing raw rum, adding medicinal herbs and spices, aging, and bottling it. Bronfman liked the rum product and bought the rights to it.

In the 1950s the governments of both the United States and its Puerto Rico commonwealth territory instituted a number of job-creation programs in Puerto Rico. Taxes on rum entering the contiguous 48 states from Puerto Rico were made lower than those on rum coming from foreign countries. At this time both Seagram's and the Bacardi family built large new plants near San Juan. In 1985, Seagrams sold its rum distillery and manufacturing facilities in Camuy and Arecibo -- and doing business as Puerto Rican Destillers -- to Destilería Serrallés, a Puerto Rican concern that had been producing the Don Q brand in Puerto Rico since 1865. As part of the contract Seagrams also licensed to Serralles the rights to produce and distribute the "Captain Morgan" brand in Puerto Rico and the rest of the Caribbean until in 2012.

In 2001, Seagrams sold the "Captain Morgan" brand to Diageo. Diageo made an announcement on June 24, 2008 that it intends to build and operate a new rum distillery on St. Croix, Virgin Islands beginning in 2010 and to source from it beginning at the end of their current supply contract in 2012.

In 1984, Captain Morgan Original Spiced rum was introduced to the United States. Captain Morgan is, by volume, the second largest brand of spirits in the United States, and the seventh largest worldwide. In 2007, 7.6 million 9-liter cases were sold. Most Captain Morgan rum is sold in the United States, Canada, Great Britain, South Africa, and Global Travel.

Although the pirate Henry Morgan is a figure of Jamaican culture, the Seagram's Captain Morgan Rum is labeled as a product of Puerto Rico, whereas the Captain Morgan Rum produced by J. Wray and Nephew Ltd. is labeled as a "product of Jamaica."

In November 2009, the NFL banned a covert ad campaign, allegedly put on by Diageo. It was understood that for each NFL player striking the "Captain Morgan" pose on camera during a regular season game, Diageo would donate $10,000 to the Gridiron Greats (a non-profit which helps retired NFL players with various hardships after leaving the game). The league made this announcement following such a celebration by Brent Celek of the Philadelphia Eagles.

In 2010 two American territories, Puerto Rico and the United States Virgin Islands bickered over plans for the Captain Morgan to move operations to the U.S.V.I under tax incentives. The matter came to a head when it created a debate in the United States Congress over the USVI's attempt to use tax benefits to lure the company to that territory.

    
Drink-Based Recipe – Long Island Spice Tea

Ok add 0.25 oz. Smirnoff Vodka into a cocktail shaker, add 0.25 oz. Gordon’s Gin to the shaker, 0.25 oz. Jose Cuervo tequila to the shaker, add 0.25 oz. of Grand Marnier to the shaker and the piece de resistance – 0.25 oz. of Captain Morgan ® Original Spiced.

Add 1.0 oz. of equal parts water, sugar, fresh lemon juice & fresh limejuice. Give it a shake. Add Cola and pour over ice into a tall glass.

http://www.youtube.com/v/fHLRT9fKD1g
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: D.B. Barnes on September 29, 2011, 08:00:22 AM
Hmm...  What do you think people?  Should I have Milkshake shoot up in the rankings?  It wouldn't be too much trouble to change it.  I think that I initially toed with the idea of separate votes for different milkshakes and consolidating them and I think that BBQ's vote was stuck in the middle.

I just want an explanation (preferably in the form of a 72-slide PowerPoint presentation) of the orange soda situation.  ;D
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: Johnny Unusual on September 29, 2011, 08:26:58 AM
Hmm...  What do you think people?  Should I have Milkshake shoot up in the rankings?  It wouldn't be too much trouble to change it.  I think that I initially toed with the idea of separate votes for different milkshakes and consolidating them and I think that BBQ's vote was stuck in the middle.

I just want an explanation (preferably in the form of a 72-slide PowerPoint presentation) of the orange soda situation.  ;D

I had Orange pop, Orangina, C-Plus and Orange Crush on my list.  Some people gave the names of specific brands, some did not.
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: Pak-Man on September 29, 2011, 08:36:27 AM
Sunkist is the only TRUE orange soda. All the others are just imitators.

Pitch-perfect imitators. :^)
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: sarcasm_made_Easy on September 29, 2011, 08:52:07 AM
WOOO got captain twice on this list :)
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: Darth Geek on September 29, 2011, 09:20:03 AM
20 – Ginger Ale
42 points       
3 of 16 lists
Top Vote: #5 Johnny Unusual


I had Ginger Ale (specifically Canada Dry) at #1 on my list. ALthough since mine didn't go to a full 25 items, the #1 slot would have counted less.
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: Johnny Unusual on September 29, 2011, 10:03:23 AM
I didn't include yours since it was SPECIFICALLY Canada Dry.  I know it sounds like I'm being anal, but never underestimate the rabid passion of brand loyalty.
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: Johnny Unusual on September 29, 2011, 10:20:55 AM
14 – Diet Coca-Cola
(http://weightdiet1.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/04/coke_diet_logo1.jpg)
60 points          
3 of 16 lists
Top Vote: #2 Imrahil
   

Diet Coke (also known as Diet Coca-Cola, Coca-Cola light or Coke Light) is a sugar-free soft drink produced and distributed by The Coca-Cola Company. It was first introduced in the United States on August 9, 1982, as the first new brand since 1886 to use the Coca-Cola trademark. The product quickly overtook the soft drink Tab in sales.

\Diet Coke was sweetened with aspartame after the sweetener became available in the United States in 1983; to save money, this was originally in a blend with saccharin. After Diet Rite cola advertised its 100 percent use of aspartame, and the manufacturer of NutraSweet (then, G.D. Searle & Company) warned that the NutraSweet trademark would not be made available to a blend of sweeteners, Coca-Cola switched the formula to 100 percent NutraSweet. Diet Coke from fountain dispensers still contains some saccharin to extend shelf life.

In other countries, in which cyclamates are not banned (as they were in the U.S. and the United Kingdom in 1970), Diet Coke or Coca-Cola Light may be sweetened with a blend containing cyclamates, aspartame, and acesulfame potassium.

In 2005, under pressure from retailer Wal-Mart (which was impressed with the popularity of Splenda sweetener), the company released a new formulation called "Diet Coke sweetened with Splenda". Sucralose and acesulfame potassium replace aspartame in this version. Early sales were weaker than anticipated; however, Coca-Cola did little advertising for the brand, investing money and advertising in Coca-Cola Zero instead. By late 2009, some distributors had stopped supplying Diet Coke sweetened with Splenda.

Diet Coke does not use a modified form of the Coca-Cola recipe, but instead an entirely different formula. The controversial New Coke, introduced in 1985, used a version of the Diet Coke recipe that contained high fructose corn syrup and had a slightly different balance of ingredients. In 2004, Coca-Cola introduced Coca-Cola C2, which it claims tastes much closer to Coca-Cola but contains half the carbohydrates. In 2005, the company introduced Coca-Cola Zero, a sugar-free variation of regular Coca-Cola.

When Tab was released in 1963, the Coca-Cola Company refused to release a diet soda with the Coca-Cola name, fearing that its flagship brand might suffer. Its rival Pepsi had no such qualms, and after the long-term success of its sugar-free Diet Pepsi (launched in 1964) became clear, Coca-Cola decided to launch a competing sugar-free brand under the Coca-Cola name, which could be marketed more extensively than the more anonymous Tab.

Diet Coke and Diet Pepsi have capitalized on the markets of people who require low sugar regimens, such as diabetics and people concerned with calorie intake. In the UK, a 330 ml can of Diet Coke contains around 1.3 calories (5 kilojoules) compared to 142 calories (595 kJ) for a regular can of Coca-Cola.

    
Drink-Based Recipe – WW Chocolate Cherry Cobbler

Ingredients
Comstock Lite Cherry Pie filling 20 oz
Pillsbury Devils Food Cake Mix
Diet Cherry coke 20 oz
Cool whip free to top each serving


Directions
Put Cherries in Bottom of cake Pan (9X13)
Sprinkle Cake mix on top
Pour diet Cherry coke on top
Bake 350 for 45 minutes or until cake is done
Dip out approx 1/2 cup serving
top with cool whip Free

http://www.youtube.com/v/88wygh5d40o
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: sarcasm_made_Easy on September 29, 2011, 10:48:26 AM
From now on when ever Something gets caught in the spam filter i am going to say it was confiscated by Dapenguin.  You know just to show how long i have been on the forum and cause it sounds cooler.
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: Pak-Man on September 29, 2011, 10:56:52 AM
I'd almost rather deal with the spam than the spam filter sometimes...
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: CJones on September 29, 2011, 11:18:56 AM
I didn't include yours since it was SPECIFICALLY Canada Dry.  I know it sounds like I'm being anal, but never underestimate the rabid passion of brand loyalty.

I take it this means you didn't count any of the beers I voted for as just "beer". I voted for specific brands (including three different styles of Samuel Adams) rather than just beer in general. Cause I found it hard to believe only 2 people voted for beer.

And yay, I finally got a top pick with Soy Milk! I'd love to try that pancake recipe, but I can't eat flour any more. I use a special gluten free pancake mix to make pancakes.

And I was one of the three people who voted for Captain Morgan. Now that I've tried Private Stock though it doesn't seem as good...
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: CJones on September 29, 2011, 11:22:30 AM
Sunkist is the only TRUE orange soda. All the others are just imitators.

Pitch-perfect imitators. :^)


Oh man, I used to drink loads of Sunkist when I was a kid. I can't believe I didn't think of that.
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: D.B. Barnes on September 29, 2011, 11:25:08 AM
19 – Soy Milk
(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/c/c0/Soy_milk_bottles_3.jpg/250px-Soy_milk_bottles_3.jpg)
42 points       
3 of 16 lists
Top Vote: #3 CJones


I drink soy milk, but not on its own; I use it for protein shakes. I don't drink regular milk on its own, either.

18 – Beer
47 points       
2 of 16 lists
Top Vote: #1 BBQ Platypus


I love this beer!

(http://www.savingadvice.com/images/blog/generic-beer.jpg)

16 – Earl Grey
(http://www.lovecoffeeandtea.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/08/Earl-Grey.jpg)
51 points          
3 of 16 lists
Top Vote: #3 Imrahil

My second-favorite kind of tea.
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: sarcasm_made_Easy on September 29, 2011, 11:43:27 AM
I didn't include yours since it was SPECIFICALLY Canada Dry.  I know it sounds like I'm being anal, but never underestimate the rabid passion of brand loyalty.

I take it this means you didn't count any of the beers I voted for as just "beer". I voted for specific brands (including three different styles of Samuel Adams) rather than just beer in general. Cause I found it hard to believe only 2 people voted for beer.

And yay, I finally got a top pick with Soy Milk! I'd love to try that pancake recipe, but I can't eat flour any more. I use a special gluten free pancake mix to make pancakes.

And I was one of the three people who voted for Captain Morgan. Now that I've tried Private Stock though it doesn't seem as good...

It isnt as good, but its great for capt and cokes, something i dont like using something as pricey as Pstock for. 
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: Johnny Unusual on September 30, 2011, 05:20:00 AM
Alright, let's finish this!


13 – Rum
(http://blog.gfbcproductions.biz/wp-content/uploads/2010/03/rum.jpg)
61 points          
3 of 16 lists
Top Vote: #1 Sarcasm Made Easy
   

Rum is a distilled alcoholic beverage made from sugarcane by-products such as molasses, or directly from sugarcane juice, by a process of fermentation and distillation. The distillate, a clear liquid, is then usually aged in oak barrels. Rum can be referred to by descriptors such as “ron viejo” ("old rum") and "ron añejo" ("aged rum").

The majority of the world's rum production occurs in the Caribbean and Latin America (including The Dominican Republic, Martinique, Guatemala, Colombia, Venezuela, Bolivia, Barbados, Jamaica, Trinidad and Tobago, Puerto Rico,U.S. Virgin Islands, Brazil, Haiti, Belize, Grenada, Guyana, and Cuba). Rum is also produced in Australia, Fiji, Mexico,Hawaii, The Philippines, India, Reunion Island, Mauritius, and South Africa.

Light rums are commonly used in cocktails, whereas "golden" and "dark" rums are typically consumed individually (i.e., "straight") or for cooking. Premium rums are also available, made to be consumed either straight or iced.

Rum plays a part in the culture of most islands of the West Indies, and has famous associations with the Royal Navy(where it was mixed with water or beer to make grog) and piracy (where it was consumed as Bumbo). Rum has also served as a popular medium of economic exchange, used to help fund enterprises such as slavery, organized crime, and military insurgencies (e.g., the American Revolution and Australia's Rum Rebellion).

    
Drink Recipe – Suicide Smoothies

Ingredients
•   1 cup strawberries
•   1/2 cup bananas, sliced
•   1/2 cup fresh raspberries
•   1/2 cup strawberry yogurt
•   1 tablespoon powdered lemonade mix
•   1/2 cup ice cubes
•   2 fluid ounces vodka
•   2 fluid ounces rum
•   2 fluid ounces whiskey, (such as Black Velvet™)
•   2 fluid ounces cherry vodka (such as UV Red™)
Directions
1.   Place the strawberries, bananas, raspberries, yogurt, lemonade mix, and ice cubes into a blender. Pour in the vodka, rum, whiskey, cherry vodka. Puree until smooth, and pour into two large glasses to serve.
 
Yet another video having little to do with the drink, but this looks good.
http://www.youtube.com/v/0YUx36yLLug
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: Johnny Unusual on September 30, 2011, 06:21:17 AM
12 – Green Tea
(http://www.walax.org/wp-content/uploads/2009/05/green-tea-diet.jpg)
61 points          
4 of 16 lists
Top Vote: #5 Cole Stratton
Preferred Serving: Hot (Cole Stratton/Johnny Unusual) Cold in a Bottle (Johnny Unusual.  Used to drink it all the time in Japan)
   

Green tea is made solely with the leaves of Camellia sinensis that have undergone minimal oxidation during processing. Green tea originates from China and has become associated with many cultures in Asia from Japan and South Korea to the Middle East. It has recently become more widespread in the West, where black tea is traditionally consumed. Many varieties of green tea have been created in countries where they are grown. These varieties can differ substantially due to variable growing conditions, horticulture, production processing, and harvesting time.

Over the last few decades green tea has been subjected to many scientific and medical studies to determine the extent of its long-purported health benefits, with some evidence suggesting that regular green tea drinkers have lower chances of heart disease and of developing certain types of cancer. Although green tea does not raise the metabolic rate enough to produce immediate weight loss, a green tea extract containing polyphenols and caffeine has been shown to induce thermogenesis and stimulate fat oxidation, boosting the metabolic rate 4% without increasing the heart rate.

According to a survey released by the United States Department of Agriculture in 2007, the mean content of flavonoids in a cup of green tea is higher than that in the same volume of other food and drink items that are traditionally considered of health contributing nature, including fresh fruits, vegetable juices or wine. Flavonoids are a group of phytochemicals in most plant products that are responsible for such health effects as anti-oxidative and anticarcinogenic functions. However, as a tea information site points out, the content varies dramatically amongst different tea products, basing on the same USDA survey.

    
Drink-Based Recipe – Green Tea Ice Cream

Ingredients:
2 egg yolks
2 tablespoons dry green tea
1 tablespoon sugar
1/2 vanilla pod
1 1/4 cups double (heavy) cream
1/4 cup caster sugar
1 1/4 cups milk
2 tablespoons boiling water


Take the dry green tea and soak in boiling water with the tablespoon of sugar for 10-12 minutes.

Into a saucepan put the vanilla pod and milk and gently bring to the boil then pour this over the tea. Leave to stand for 5 or 6 minutes.

Beat the egg yolks with the 1/4 cup caster sugar in a separate bowl and then strain the milk mixture into it.

Transfer to a saucepan and gently heat, stirring all the time, until the mixture is thick. Leave to cool. Whip the double (heavy) cream and fold into the cooled tea mixture. Transfer the complete mixture into an ice cream maker and follow the manufacturer's instructions.

 http://www.youtube.com/v/TgPmaNMReKQ
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: Johnny Unusual on September 30, 2011, 07:45:27 AM
11 – Seltzer
(http://www.therefrigerator.net/features/food/images/seltzer.jpg)
65 points          
6 of 16 lists
Top Vote: #Imrahil
 
   

Carbonated water (also known as club soda, soda water, sparkling water, seltzer, or fizzy water) is water into which carbon dioxide gas under pressure has been dissolved, a process that causes the water to become effervescent.

Carbonated water is the defining ingredient of carbonated soft drinks. The process of dissolving carbon dioxide in water is called carbonation.

In 1767 Joseph Priestley invented carbonated water when he first discovered a method of infusing water with carbon dioxide when he suspended a bowl of water above a beer vat at a local brewery in Leeds, England. The air blanketing the fermenting beer—called 'fixed air'—was known to kill mice suspended in it. Priestley found water thus treated had a pleasant taste, and he offered it to friends as a cool, refreshing drink. In 1772, Priestley published a paper entitled "Impregnating Water with Fixed Air" in which he describes dripping "oil of vitriol" (sulfuric acid) onto chalk to produce carbon dioxide gas, and encouraging the gas to dissolve into an agitated bowl of water.
In 1771 chemistry professor Torbern Bergman independently invented a similar process to make carbonated water. In poor health and frugal, he was trying to reproduce naturally-effervescent spring waters thought at the time to be beneficial to health.

Carbonated water was introduced in the latter part of the 18th century, and reached Kolkata (formerly known as Calcutta), India in 1822.

In the late eighteenth century, J. J. Schweppe (1740–1821) developed a process to manufacture carbonated mineral water, based on the process discovered by Joseph Priestley, founding the Schweppes Company in Geneva in 1783. In 1792 he moved to London to develop the business there.

The soda siphon, or siphon — a glass or metal pressure vessel with a release valve and spout for dispensing pressurized soda water — was a common sight in bars and in early- to mid-20th century homes where it became a symbol of middle-class affluence.

Ányos Jedlik (1800–95) invented consumable soda-water that is a popular drink today. He also built a carbonated water factory in Budapest, Hungary. The process he developed for getting the CO2 into the water remains a mystery. After this invention, a Hungarian drink made of wine and soda water called "fröccs" (wine spritzers) was popular in Europe.

Since then, carbonated water is made by passing pressurized carbon dioxide through water. The pressure increases the solubility and allows more carbon dioxide to dissolve than would be possible under standard atmospheric pressure. When the bottle is opened, the pressure is released, allowing the gas to come out of the solution, forming the characteristic bubbles.

Carbonated water changed the way people drank. Instead of drinking spirits neat, soda water and carbonated soft drinks helped dilute alcohol, and made having a drink more socially acceptable. Popping into a friend's house for a "dash and a splash" — a whisky and soda — before going out to a social event was part of everyday life in Britain as late as 1965. Whisky and sodas can be seen in many British TV series and films from the 1960s and earlier and the soda siphon is ubiquitous in many movies made before 1970. Social drinking changed with the counter-culture movement of the 1970s, beginning the decline of soda water's popularity. Soda water's 'last hurrah' in Britain may have been the 1970s 'Soda Stream', a home bottling kit which enabled the creation of sparkling beverages with fruit syrups and water.

The popularity of soda water has declined since the late 1980s as drinking habits changed and new bottled or canned beverages arrived. Soda siphons are still bought by the more traditional bar trade and are available at the bar in many upmarket establishments. In the UK there are now only two wholesalers of soda-water in traditional glass siphons, and an estimated market of around 120,000 siphons per year (2009). Worldwide, preferences are for beverages in recyclable plastic containers.

Home soda siphons and soda water are enjoying a renaissance in the 21st century as retro items become fashionable. Contemporary soda siphons are commonly made of aluminum, although glass and stainless steel siphons are available. The valve-heads of today are made of plastic, with metal valves, and replaceable o-ring seals. Older siphons are in demand on on-line auction sites. Carbonated water, without the acidity regulating addition of soda, is currently seen as fashionable although home production (see below) is mainly eschewed in favor of commercial products.

    
Drink Recipe – Witch’s Brew

Ingredients
4 cup(s) Vodka (more Vodka drinks)
4 1/2 cup(s) Apple Juice (Unsweetened - thawed)
1/2 gallon(s) Sherbet (Lime - softened)
8 cup(s) Club Soda
5 cup(s) Water
1/2 cup(s) Lime Juice
Instructions
Combine apple juice, water, vodka, and lime juice in a large bowl. Cover and chill. Just before serving, spoon sherbet into a large punch bowl; slowly pour apple juice mixture and club soda over sherbet, stirring gently.

 http://www.youtube.com/v/ABx4oqeYiIw
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: Johnny Unusual on September 30, 2011, 08:12:47 AM
Bonus #1

The bonus I presented was fictional drinks you wanted to try.  One person, however, also sent a worst beverage.  Which isn't a beverage at all.  Whatevs.

Natural Ice
(http://www.cen.ulaval.ca/merge/images/ecosystems/ice_shelf1.jpg)
From BBQ Platypus
Ingredients: Water, water, more water, fermented reindeer piss
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: Johnny Unusual on September 30, 2011, 08:19:55 AM
Bonus #2


Fizzy Lifting Drink
(http://nickfruhling.com/portfolio/packaging/images/PA_Wonka2.jpg)

http://www.youtube.com/v/U1Nkvs3Bgpo
Can it be bought?

http://juicyvapor.com/Store/tabid/164/ProductID/1055/Default.aspx
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: Johnny Unusual on September 30, 2011, 08:28:08 AM
Bonus #3


Slurm
(http://weeklygeekshow.com/img/slurm.png)

Slurm is a fictional soft drink in the Futurama universe. It is popular and highly addictive, and is Fry's favorite drink. It is widely seen throughout the universe. Slurm delivery trucks can be frequently spotted, including in the Futurama opening credits (shortly before the Planet Express delivery ship crashes into the billboard). The drink's slogan is 'It's Highly Addictive!' - the drink's distribution is handled by Bureau of Soft Drinks, Tobacco, and Firearms which is a parody of the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, and Firearms (which is now known as Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives).

Slurm has an active marketing campaign similar to the leading soft drinks of today, the campaign was fronted by Slurms McKenzie until his tragic death. The campaign uses an instrumental version of 'I've Got a Tan' by The Four Postmen. The Slurm posters seen throughout the episodes acted as one of the first clues to deciphering the Alien Language and have been compared to the Rosetta Stone by fans.

Slurm is made on the planet Wormulon.

In Fry and the Slurm Factory, Fry, Leela, and Bender find out that it's made from a secretion from the anus of the Wormulon Queen. Slurm is so addictive that even after Fry finds out what it's made of he can't stop drinking it, and even the Slurm Queen appears to be addicted to it.

http://www.youtube.com/v/mI5-L6s6dqk
Can it be bought?

http://www.amazon.com/Futurama-Slurm-Energy-Drink/dp/B001BZCBA0

Unfortunately (or fortunately) it is currently unavailable.
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: Johnny Unusual on September 30, 2011, 08:34:42 AM
Bonus #4


Pero
(http://1.bp.blogspot.com/_Nbn2iRezfR0/S_XieV3MiFI/AAAAAAAAATY/0ciiruXe9Lc/s400/Pero.jpg)

Almost missed this worst drink from DB Barnes.  Never heard of it, unfortunately

Caro is a brand of caffeine-free roasted grain beverages. Some consider it a coffee substitute. It is manufactured by Nestlé and was first introduced in West Germany in 1954. It is available throughout Europe as well as other markets including New Zealand. It is imported to the United States under the name Pero. The name "Caro" sounds like the French word "Carreau", which translates to "diamonds" in playing cards, as seen in the Caro logo (which is also used on Pero).

Caro Instant is a powder-based drink available in 50-gram (1.8 oz) containers, whereas Caro Extra is granule-based and comes in 200-gram (7.1 oz) jars.

Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: Johnny Unusual on September 30, 2011, 08:39:25 AM

Bonus #5


True Blood
(http://www.somekindofawesome.com/storage/post-images/true-blood-poster.jpg?__SQUARESPACE_CACHEVERSION=1274450842950)

It's the blood substitute that allow vampires live amongst humans.  I have no idea why you would want to drink fake blood.  It lacks the authentic metallic taste of the real stuff.

http://www.youtube.com/v/vxINMuOgAu8
Can it be bought?

http://trubeverage.com/
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: Johnny Unusual on September 30, 2011, 08:48:17 AM
Bonus the Last


Pan-Galactic Gargle Blaster
(http://images.wikia.com/hitchhikers/images/f/fa/Normal_pangalacticgargleblaster.jpg)

Zaphod is the inventor of the Pan-Galactic Gargle Blaster, a fictional cocktail based on Janx Spirit. The series states that the effect of one "is like having your brain smashed out by a slice of lemon wrapped round a large gold brick." In the television series, two Gargle Blaster drinkers collapse in open-eyed unconsciousness after drinking while the spilled drink burns a hole in the floor; in the film, after the Guide is done explaining what the Pan-Galactic Gargle Blaster is and its effects, Ford and Zaphod yell in pain. The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy gives the recipe as follows:

        "Take the juice from one bottle of that Ol' Janx Spirit.
        Pour into it one measure of water from the seas of Santraginus V
        Allow three cubes of Arcturan Mega-gin to melt into the mixture (it must be properly iced or the benzene is lost).
        Allow four litres of Fallian marsh gas to bubble through it (in memory of all those happy Hikers who have died of pleasure in the Marshes of Fallia).
        Over the back of a silver spoon float a measure of Qualactin Hypermint extract, redolent of all the heady odours of the dark Qualactin Zones.
        Drop in the tooth of an Algolian Suntiger. Watch it dissolve, spreading the fires of the Algolian suns deep into the heart of the drink.
        Sprinkle Zamphour.
        Add an olive.
        Drink...but very carefully."

The Guide also implies that there are multiple voluntary organizations available to rehabilitate those who would try the Pan-Galactic Gargle Blaster. Real versions of the drink have been made available at some stage shows of The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy, as well as bars such as Zaphod Beeblebrox in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. Recipes for these "Earth versions" can be found at Wikibooks. In an interview, Douglas Adams stated that there are a number of environmental and weapons treaties, as well as laws of physics, which prevent the Pan Galactic Gargle Blaster from being mixed on Earth.

http://www.youtube.com/v/Boo9llCz4CM
Can it be bought?

A number of fakers exists.  Here are a few.

http://www.drinksmixer.com/drink12215.html  (clearly a fake.  No lemon.)

http://allrecipes.com/Recipe/pangalactic-gargleblaster/detail.aspx  (no olive)

http://feastygeeks.blogspot.com/2011/01/pan-galactic-gargle-blaster-recipe.html  (not potent enough)

http://www.bbc.co.uk/dna/h2g2/A799419  (got to say, this faker is trying very hard)
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: Johnny Unusual on September 30, 2011, 08:49:14 AM
Whew, OK, I'm going out for lunch.  Expect the true list to continue in an hour or two!
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: BBQ Platypus on September 30, 2011, 08:52:06 AM
Bonus #1

The bonus I presented was fictional drinks you wanted to try.  One person, however, also sent a worst beverage.  Which isn't a beverage at all.  Whatevs.

Natural Ice
(http://www.cen.ulaval.ca/merge/images/ecosystems/ice_shelf1.jpg)
From BBQ Platypus
Ingredients: Water, water, more water, fermented reindeer piss
Tee-hee.  He made a funny.  Still more drinkable than this though:

(http://unitedpackageliquors.com/catalog/images/Natural%20Ice%2030pk%20Cans%20WEB.jpg)
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: D.B. Barnes on September 30, 2011, 09:20:04 AM
13 – Rum
61 points          
3 of 16 lists
Top Vote: #1 Sarcasm Made Easy

For me, rum was more of a gateway liquor. Mom was a big rum drinker. There was always a bottle of Meyers in the fridge. I was probably thirteen when I started stealing sips from the bottle. This led to just outright stealing the bottle, which was always difficult to explain.

Rum is very easy to drink straight. If I had not become such a slave to whiskey, I imagine I would've kept drinking it. I just much prefer whiskey over rum, both for sipping and in mixed drinks. Rum and Coke is a little too sweet for me.

12 – Green Tea
61 points          
4 of 16 lists
Top Vote: #5 Cole Stratton
Preferred Serving: Hot (Cole Stratton/Johnny Unusual) Cold in a Bottle (Johnny Unusual.  Used to drink it all the time in Japan)
   

Boy, do I love this stuff. I drink ridiculous amounts of this. It's a nice change-up from coffee. I like it hot or cold. Oftentimes, I'll leave a mug of it on my desk and it cools down; just as good if not even better. There's just something so clean and pure about this stuff.

Bonus #4
Pero
There is absolutely no reason for this exist. Mom drank this when she wanted to take a break from coffee. Yeah, the same Mom that never took a break from the ubiquitous bottle of Meyers in the fridge.

I used to drink it (Pero) with her because I wanted to be like the grown-ups. It is fucking awful. Even as a kid who wasn't all that familiar with coffee, I knew this shit was vile. I can still remember the taste. I don't want to remember the taste. You could mix this with ten ounces of Bailey's and it still wouldn't help. Well, maybe a little.

Bonus #1

From BBQ Platypus
Ingredients: Water, water, more water, fermented reindeer piss
:D

Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: Johnny Unusual on September 30, 2011, 09:45:49 AM
Bonus #1

The bonus I presented was fictional drinks you wanted to try.  One person, however, also sent a worst beverage.  Which isn't a beverage at all.  Whatevs.

Natural Ice
(http://www.cen.ulaval.ca/merge/images/ecosystems/ice_shelf1.jpg)
From BBQ Platypus
Ingredients: Water, water, more water, fermented reindeer piss
Tee-hee.  He made a funny.  Still more drinkable than this though:

(http://unitedpackageliquors.com/catalog/images/Natural%20Ice%2030pk%20Cans%20WEB.jpg)

Not by intent.  I've serious never heard of Natural Ice beyond actual ice, which contains the same ingredients.
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: D.B. Barnes on September 30, 2011, 09:53:05 AM
Unintentionally hilarious. That's exactly what that shit tastes like.

Similar to Bud and Coors, which are made with deer piss.
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: CJones on September 30, 2011, 10:06:34 AM
Pan-Galactic Gargle Blaster
(http://images.wikia.com/hitchhikers/images/f/fa/Normal_pangalacticgargleblaster.jpg)

Oh man, I wish I had thought of that. I read that book so many times I've lost count.

(http://www.walax.org/wp-content/uploads/2009/05/green-tea-diet.jpg)

And, I have to say, that green tea in the picture is REALLY green. Where can I get tea like that? I fixed what was called gunpowder tea, which was green tea that was rolled up into tight balls. The balls resembled old fashioned gunpowder, hence the name. I'd put the loose tea leaves into a steel tea ball and steep it for like 15 minutes. It was pretty good, but my tea always came out more orange than green.
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: Johnny Unusual on September 30, 2011, 10:09:37 AM
Yeah, there was a better picture but it was too big and I don't have all day to look at pictures of tea.
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: D.B. Barnes on September 30, 2011, 10:10:54 AM
And, I have to say, that green tea in the picture is REALLY green. Where can I get tea like that? I fixed what was called gunpowder tea, which was green tea that was rolled up into tight balls. The balls resembled old fashioned gunpowder, hence the name. I'd put the loose tea leaves into a steel tea ball and steep it for like 15 minutes. It was pretty good, but my tea always came out more orange than green.

Hey look! Somebody used the word "loose" correctly on the internet!

Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: CJones on September 30, 2011, 10:18:36 AM
And, I have to say, that green tea in the picture is REALLY green. Where can I get tea like that? I fixed what was called gunpowder tea, which was green tea that was rolled up into tight balls. The balls resembled old fashioned gunpowder, hence the name. I'd put the loose tea leaves into a steel tea ball and steep it for like 15 minutes. It was pretty good, but my tea always came out more orange than green.

Hey look! Somebody used the word "loose" correctly on the internet!

:D
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: D.B. Barnes on September 30, 2011, 11:05:20 AM
I like black tea, but I can't get into green tea. I've tried it lots, and it just tastes weak and perfumey. 

Weirdly, I don't mind some herbal teas, which other people often say taste perfumey.  I just don't like green tea.

That is strange. I think green tea is one of the least perfumey teas. It smells kinda like dried grass to me.
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: CJones on September 30, 2011, 11:51:38 AM
I like black tea, but I can't get into green tea. I've tried it lots, and it just tastes weak and perfumey. 

Weirdly, I don't mind some herbal teas, which other people often say taste perfumey.  I just don't like green tea.

Did you use tea bags, or loose tea? I've tried several varieties of both, and the loose tea is always much, much better. You just have to buy a tea ball, or some other means of brewing tea without bags.

And I had Fennel Tea, which is an herbal tea that helps with my gut issues, on my list. But it was pretty far down and I doubt anyone else voted for it.
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: Thrifty on September 30, 2011, 12:08:53 PM
And, I have to say, that green tea in the picture is REALLY green. Where can I get tea like that? I fixed what was called gunpowder tea, which was green tea that was rolled up into tight balls. The balls resembled old fashioned gunpowder, hence the name. I'd put the loose tea leaves into a steel tea ball and steep it for like 15 minutes. It was pretty good, but my tea always came out more orange than green.

Hey look! Somebody used the word "loose" correctly on the internet!
It literally burns me up when people misuse words.
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: Johnny Unusual on September 30, 2011, 01:02:24 PM
10 –Coca-Cola
(http://www.freshnetworks.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2011/03/Coca-cola.jpg)
66 points          
4 of 16 lists
Top Vote: #8 BBQ Platypus

Preferred Serving: Fountain (Team RAD)
   

Coca-Cola is a carbonated soft drink sold in stores, restaurants, and vending machines in more than 200 countries. It is produced by The Coca-Cola Company of Atlanta, Georgia, and is often referred to simply as Coke (a registered trademark of The Coca-Cola Company in the United States since March 27, 1944). Originally intended as a patent medicine when it was invented in the late 19th century by John Pemberton, Coca-Cola was bought out by businessman Asa Griggs Candler, whose marketing tactics led Coke to its dominance of the world soft-drink market throughout the 20th century.

The company produces concentrate, which is then sold to licensed Coca-Cola bottlers throughout the world. The bottlers, who hold territorially exclusive contracts with the company, produce finished product in cans and bottles from the concentrate in combination with filtered water and sweeteners. The bottlers then sell, distribute and merchandise Coca-Cola to retail stores and vending machines. Such bottlers include Coca-Cola Enterprises, which is the largest single Coca-Cola bottler in North America and western Europe. The Coca-Cola Company also sells concentrate for soda fountains to major restaurants and food service distributors.

The Coca-Cola Company has, on occasion, introduced other cola drinks under the Coke brand name. The most common of these is Diet Coke, with others including Caffeine-Free Coca-Cola, Diet Coke Caffeine-Free, Coca-Cola Cherry, Coca-Cola Zero,Coca-Cola Vanilla, and special editions with lemon, lime or coffee.

he prototype Coca-Cola recipe was formulated at the Eagle Drug and Chemical Company, a drugstore in Columbus, Georgia by John Pemberton, originally as a coca wine called Pemberton's French Wine Coca. He may have been inspired by the formidable success of Vin Mariani, a European coca wine.

In 1886, when Atlanta and Fulton County passed prohibition legislation, Pemberton responded by developing Coca-Cola, essentially a non-alcoholic version of French Wine Coca. The first sales were at Jacob's Pharmacy in Atlanta, Georgia, on May 8, 1886. It was initially sold as a patent medicine for five cents a glass at soda fountains, which were popular in the United States at the time due to the belief that carbonated water was good for the health. Pemberton claimed Coca-Cola cured many diseases, including morphine addiction, dyspepsia,neurasthenia, headache, and impotence. Pemberton ran the first advertisement for the beverage on May 29 of the same year in the Atlanta Journal.

By 1888, three versions of Coca-Cola — sold by three separate businesses — were on the market. Asa Griggs Candler acquired a stake in Pemberton's company in 1887 and incorporated it as the Coca Cola Company in 1888. The same year, Pemberton sold the rights a second time to four more businessmen: J.C. Mayfield, A.O. Murphey, C.O. Mullahy and E.H. Bloodworth. Meanwhile, Pemberton's son Charley Pemberton began selling his own version of the product.

John Pemberton declared that the name "Coca-Cola" belonged to Charley, but the other two manufacturers could continue to use the formula. So, in the summer of 1888, Candler sold his beverage under the names Yum Yum and Koke. After both failed to catch on, Candler set out to establish a legal claim to Coca-Cola in late 1888, in order to force his two competitors out of the business. Candler purchased exclusive rightst o the formula from John Pemberton, Margaret Dozier and Woolfolk Walker. However, in 1914, Dozier came forward to claim her signature on the bill of sale had been forged, and subsequent analysis has indicated John Pemberton's signature was most likely a forgery as well.

In 1892 Candler incorporated a second company, The Coca-Cola Company (the current corporation), and in 1910 Candler had the earliest records of the company burned, further obscuring its legal origins. By the time of its 50th anniversary, the drink had reached the status of a national icon in the USA. In 1935, it was certified kosher by Rabbi Tobias Geffen, after the company made minor changes in the sourcing of some ingredients.

Coca-Cola was sold in bottles for the first time on March 12, 1894. The first outdoor wall advertisement was painted in the same year as well in Cartersville, Georgia. Cans of Coke first appeared in 1955. The first bottling of Coca-Cola occurred in Vicksburg, Mississippi, at the Biedenharn Candy Company in 1891. Its proprietor was Joseph A. Biedenharn. The original bottles were Biedenharn bottles, very different from the much later hobble-skirt design that is now so familiar. Asa Candler was tentative about bottling the drink, but two entrepreneurs from Chattanooga, Tennessee, Benjamin F. Thomas and Joseph B. Whitehead, proposed the idea and were so persuasive that Candler signed a contract giving them control of the procedure for only one dollar. Candler never collected his dollar, but in 1899 Chattanooga became the site of the first Coca-Cola bottling company. The loosely termed contract proved to be problematic for the company for decades to come. Legal matters were not helped by the decision of the bottlers to subcontract to other companies, effectively becoming parent bottlers.

Coke concentrate, or Coke syrup, was and is sold separately at pharmacies in small quantities, as an over-the-counter remedy for nausea or mildly upset stomach.

 Drink-Based Recipe – Ancho Chili
5 ancho chiles, rinsed, stems, seeds and ribs removed
1 1/2 cups water to cover chilies
1 tablespoon vegatable oil
3 1/2 cups diced white onion, diced small
3 garlic cloves, peeled, smashed
2 jalapeño peppers, medium, seeds and ribs removed, minced
2 tablespoons tomato paste
3/4 pound ground beef, lean
3/4 pound ground pork, lean
1 cup canned whole tomatoes, roughly chopped
1 1/2 cups Coca-Cola®
1 teaspoon ground cumin
1 teaspoon dried oregano
4 teaspoons salt
1 cup (10.5 oz. can) red kidney beans, canned, drained
1/2 cup cheddar cheese, grated (optional)
1/2 cup sour cream, low-fat (optional)
2 tablespoons thinly sliced green onion (optional)

Method:
1. Place ancho chiles in a saucepan, cover with water and bring to a boil over
medium-high heat. Remove from heat and soak until softened, about 30
minutes. Transfer chiles and cooking liquid to a blender or food processor and
purée until smooth. Set aside.
2. Heat the vegetable oil in a Dutch oven over medium heat. Add the onion, garlic,
and jalapeño peppers. Cook until onions soften and turn translucent, about 10
minutes. Add in the tomato paste and cook, stirring, another 3 to 4 minutes. Stir in
the beef and pork, and cook until meat is no longer pink. Add cola, tomatoes,
cumin, tomatoes, and puréed chiles; stir well to combine. Bring mixture to a
simmer, reduce heat to medium-low, cover and cook 30 minutes.
3. Stir in beans and 1 tablespoon salt. Continue to simmer, uncovered, until mixture
thickens, about 30 to 40 minutes. Adjust seasoning to taste with remaining 1
teaspoon salt, or to taste.
4. Ladle chili into warmed bowls and garnish with cheese, sour cream, and green
onions if desired

 http://www.youtube.com/v/lqT_dPApj9U
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: D.B. Barnes on September 30, 2011, 01:25:47 PM
I only ever use loose tea for specialty stuff--there's a vanilla one that I get when I visit my in-laws that's quite tasty.  There wouldn't be any point in green tea that way as I don't like green tea.

I love vanilla-flavored tea, specifically vanilla-flavored black tea. Gimme a pot o' that and some graham crackers and I'm good.
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: Johnny Unusual on September 30, 2011, 01:53:26 PM
9 –Hot Chocolate
(http://www.evernewrecipes.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/03/Hot-Chocolate-Recipe.jpeg)
67 points          
6 of 16 lists
Top Vote: #6 Shodan
 
   

Hot chocolate (also known as hot cocoa or just cocoa or chocolate milk) is a heated beverage typically consisting of shaved chocolate, melted chocolate or cocoa powder, heated milk or water, and sugar. Drinking chocolate is similar to hot chocolate, but is made from melted chocolate shavings or paste rather than a powdered mix that's soluble in water.

The first chocolate beverage is believed to have been created by the Mayans around 2,000 years ago, and a cocoa beverage was an essential part of Aztec culture by 1400 AD. The beverage became popular in Europe after being introduced from Mexico in the New World, and has undergone multiple changes since then. Until the 19th century, hot chocolate was even used medicinally to treat ailments such as stomach diseases. Today, hot chocolate is consumed throughout the world and comes in multiple variations including the very thick cioccolata densa served in Italy, and the thinner hot cocoa that is typically consumed in the United States.

Chocolate is made from cocoa beans, the dried and partially fermented seeds of the cacao tree (Theobroma cacao), a small (4–8 m (or 15–26 ft) tall) evergreen tree native to the deep tropical region of the Americas. Recent genetic studies suggest that the most common genotype of the plant originated in the Amazon basin and was gradually transported by humans throughout South and Central America. Early forms of another genotype have also been found in what is now Venezuela. The scientific name, Theobroma, means "food of the gods". The fruit, called a cacao pod, is ovoid, 15–30 cm (or 6–12 in) long and 8–10 cm (3–4 in) wide, ripening yellow to orange, and weighs about 500 g (1 lb) when ripe.

The sweet chocolate residue found in jars from the site of Puerto Escondido in Honduras from around 1100 BC is the earliest found evidence of the use of cacao to date. An early Classic (460-480 AD) period Mayan tomb from the site of Rio Azul, Guatemala, had vessels with the Maya glyph for cacao on them with residue of a chocolate drink. The Maya are generally given credit for creating the first modern chocolate beverage over 2,000 years ago, despite the fact that the beverage would undergo many more changes in Europe.

To make the chocolate drink, which was served cold, the Maya ground cocoa seeds into a paste, and mixed it with water, cornmeal, chile peppers, and other ingredients. They then poured the drink back and forth from a cup to a pot until a thick foam developed. Chocolate was available to Maya of all social classes, although the wealthy drank chocolate from elaborately decorated vessels.

By the 15th century, the Aztecs gained control of a large part of Mesoamerica, and adopted cacao into their culture. They associated chocolate withXochiquetzal, the goddess of fertility, and often used chocolate beverages as sacred offerings. The Aztec adaptation of the drink was a bitter, frothy, spicy drink called xocolatl, made much the same way as the Mayan chocolate drinks. It was often seasoned with vanilla, chile pepper, and achiote, and was believed to fight fatigue, which is probably attributable to the theobromine content, a mood enhancer. Because cacao would not grow in the dry central Mexican highlands and had to be imported, chocolate was an important luxury good throughout the Aztec empire, and cocoa beans were often used as currency.

The first European contact with chocolate came when Montezuma (then tlatoani of Tenochtitlan) introduced Hernán Cortés, a Spanish conquistador, toxocolatl in the 16th century. Antonio de Solís, Philip IV's official Chronicler of the Indies, described Montezuma customarily taking a chocolate beverage after meals, as part of a sumptuous daily ritual:

“He had Cups of Gold, and Salvers of the same; and sometimes he drank out of Cocoas [i.e., coconut shells], and natural Shells, very richly set with Jewels.[...] When he had done eating, he usually took a Kind of Chocolate, made after the Manner of the Country, that is, the Substance of the Nut beat up with the Mill till the Cup was filled more with Froth than with Liquor; after which he used to smoak Tobacco perfum'd with liquid Amber.”

What the Spaniards then called "chocolatl" was said to be a beverage consisting of a chocolate base flavored with vanilla and other spices that was served cold. Montezuma's court reportedly drank about 2,000 cups of xocolatl per day, 50 of which were consumed by Montezuma himself.

Because sugar was yet to come to the Americas, xocolatl was said to be an acquired taste. The drink tasted spicy and bitter, unlike modern hot chocolate, which is typically sweet. As to when xocolatl was first served hot, sources conflict on when and by whom. However, Jose de Acosta, a Spanish Jesuit missionary who lived in Peru and then Mexico in the later 16th century, described xocolatl as:

“Loathsome to such as are not acquainted with it, having a scum or froth that is very unpleasant taste. Yet it is a drink very much esteemed among the Indians, where with they feast noble men who pass through their country. The Spaniards, both men and women, that are accustomed to the country, are very greedy of this Chocolate. They say they make diverse sorts of it, some hot, some cold, and some temperate, and put therein much of that "chili"; yea, they make paste thereof, the which they say is good for the stomach and against the catarrh.”

After defeating Montezuma's warriors, and demanding that the Aztec nobles hand over their valuables, Cortés returned to Spain in 1528, bringing cocoa beans and chocolate drink making equipment. At this time, chocolate still only existed in the bitter drink invented by the Mayans. Sweet hot chocolate and bar chocolate were yet to be invented.

After its introduction to Europe, the drink slowly gained popularity. The court of King Charles V soon adopted the drink, and what was then only known as "chocolate" became a fashionable drink popular with the Spanish upper class. Additionally, cocoa was given as a dowry when members of the Spanish Royal Family married other European aristocrats. At the time, chocolate was very expensive in Europe because the cacao beans only grew in South America.

The first recorded shipment of chocolate to Europe for commercial purposes was in a shipment from Veracruz to Sevilla in 1585. It was still served as a beverage, but the Europeans added cane sugar to counteract the natural bitterness and removed the chili pepper while retaining the vanilla, in addition they added cinnamon as well as other spices. Sweet-tasting hot chocolate was then invented, leading hot chocolate to become a luxury item among the European nobility by the 17th century. Even when the first Chocolate House (an establishment similar to a modern coffee shop) opened in 1657, chocolate was still very expensive, costing 50 to 75 pence (approximately 10-15 shillings) a pound.

In the late 17th century, Hans Sloane, president of the Royal College of Physicians, visited Jamaica. There, he tried chocolate and considered it "nauseous", but found it became more palatable when mixed with milk. When he returned to England, he brought the recipe with him, introducing milk chocolate to Europe.

In 1828, Coenraad Johannes van Houten developed the first cocoa powder producing machine in the Netherlands. The press separated the greasy cocoa butter from cacao seeds, leaving a purer and less fattening chocolate powder behind. This powder—much like the instant cocoa powder used today—was easier to stir into milk and water, and led to another very important discovery: solid chocolate. By using cocoa powder and low amounts of cocoa butter, bar chocolate was then possible to manufacture. The term "chocolate" then came to mean solid chocolate, rather than hot chocolate.


 Drink Recipe – Creamy Hot Chocolate
Ingredients
•   1/3 cup unsweetened cocoa powder
•   3/4 cup white sugar
•   1 pinch salt
•   1/3 cup boiling water
•   3 1/2 cups milk
•   3/4 teaspoon vanilla extract
•   1/2 cup half-and-half cream
Directions
1.   Combine the cocoa, sugar and pinch of salt in a saucepan. Blend in the boiling water. Bring this mixture to an easy boil while you stir. Simmer and stir for about 2 minutes. Watch that it doesn't scorch. Stir in 3 1/2 cups of milk and heat until very hot, but do not boil! Remove from heat and add vanilla. Divide between 4 mugs. Add the cream to the mugs of cocoa to cool it to drinking temperature.

Now some Hot Chocolate to really warm you up!
http://www.youtube.com/v/J-GkwIRbLw8
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: sarcasm_made_Easy on September 30, 2011, 01:53:48 PM
And, I have to say, that green tea in the picture is REALLY green. Where can I get tea like that? I fixed what was called gunpowder tea, which was green tea that was rolled up into tight balls. The balls resembled old fashioned gunpowder, hence the name. I'd put the loose tea leaves into a steel tea ball and steep it for like 15 minutes. It was pretty good, but my tea always came out more orange than green.

Hey look! Somebody used the word "loose" correctly on the internet!
It literally burns me up when people misuse words.

Heh i get it.
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: D.B. Barnes on September 30, 2011, 01:56:54 PM
And, I have to say, that green tea in the picture is REALLY green. Where can I get tea like that? I fixed what was called gunpowder tea, which was green tea that was rolled up into tight balls. The balls resembled old fashioned gunpowder, hence the name. I'd put the loose tea leaves into a steel tea ball and steep it for like 15 minutes. It was pretty good, but my tea always came out more orange than green.

Hey look! Somebody used the word "loose" correctly on the internet!
It literally burns me up when people misuse words.

Heh i get it.

Thrifty's joke was smokin'!

No, seriously, call 9-1-1.
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: Johnny Unusual on September 30, 2011, 02:26:26 PM
8 – Root Beer Float
(http://simplyrecipes.com/photos/rootbeer-float-vert.jpg)
68 points          
4 of 16 lists
Top Vote: #1 Psycho Goatee
   

Also known as a "black cow" or "brown cow", the root beer float is traditionally made with vanilla ice cream and root beer, but can also be made with other flavors.

In the United States and Canada, the chain A&W Restaurants are well known for their root beer floats. The definition of a black cow varies by region. For instance in some localities, a "root beer float" has strictly vanilla ice cream; a float made with root beer and chocolate ice cream is a "chocolate cow" or a "brown cow." In some places a "black cow" or a "brown cow" was made with cola instead of root beer.

In 2008, the Dr Pepper Snapple Group introduced its Float beverage line. This includes A&W Root Beer, A&W Cream Soda and Sunkist flavors which attempt to simulate the taste of their respective ice cream float flavors in a creamy, bottled drink.

The origin of the name "black cow" has always been of interest to food and beverage experts and allegedly dates to August 1893 in Cripple Creek, Colorado. The only source of this story is the great-grand-nephew of Frank J. Wisner, who has popularized it through advertising on his soft drink products and Wisner, owner of the Cripple Creek Cow Mountain Gold Mining Company, had been producing a line of soda waters for the citizens of the then-booming Cripple Creek gold mining district. He had been trying to create a special drink for the children of Cripple Creek and came up with an idea while staring out at his properties on Cow Mountain on a moonlit night.

The full moon's glow on the snow capped Cow Mountain reminded him of a dollop of vanilla ice cream floating on top of his blackened Cow Mountain. As he told the story later, he was inspired by this view to hurry back to his bar and add a big scoop of vanilla ice cream to the one soda water he produced that the children of Cripple Creek seemed to like best - Myers Avenue Red root beer - and served it the very next day. The drink was an instant hit. Originally named "Black Cow Mountain", the local children shortened this to "black cow". Wisner was known to say many times in his later years that if he had a nickel for every time someone ordered a black cow, he'd have been a rich man.

    
Drink Recipe – Root Beer Float

Ingredients
•   1/2 pint vanilla ice cream
•   1 (12 fluid ounce) can or bottle root beer
•   1/2 cup whipped cream
•   4 maraschino cherries

Directions
1.   Place 1 scoop of ice cream into each of two tall glasses. Pour root beer carefully over the ice cream. Add another scoop and repeat. If possible, repeat again.

http://www.youtube.com/v/lLq1Hma0KvA
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: D.B. Barnes on September 30, 2011, 02:47:01 PM
10 –Coca-Cola
66 points          
4 of 16 lists
Top Vote: #8 BBQ Platypus

Preferred Serving: Fountain (Team RAD)
   

They need to go back to putting cocaine in Coke. That would be Coke Classic and New Coke with have meth in it.

9 –Hot Chocolate
67 points          
6 of 16 lists
Top Vote: #6 Shodan
 
   

Definitely deserves to be in the top ten. What a tasty treat. Sometimes, I'll mix in some coffee.

8 – Root Beer Float
68 points          
4 of 16 lists
Top Vote: #1 Psycho Goatee
   

One of the most awesome beverages on the planet as far as I'm concerned. This Frank J. Wisner fellow was a genius.

Take your big, black cow, and get outta here
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: CJones on September 30, 2011, 03:07:26 PM
They need to go back to putting cocaine in Coke. That would be Coke Classic and New Coke with have meth in it.

I have read that Coke actually still uses Coca leaves as part of the flavoring, just with the Cocaine removed. I find it hard to believe they could get a hold of Coca leaves though. And if they do do this, what do they do with all the Cocaine?

BTW, I'm surprised that article didn't mention where the name Coca-Cola came from. It comes from the fact that the two main ingredients in the original formulation (besides water and sugar) were Coca leaves (which contain Cocaine) and Kola Nuts (which are loaded with caffeine).
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: sarcasm_made_Easy on September 30, 2011, 03:12:33 PM
http://www.snopes.com/cokelore/cocaine.asp
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: Johnny Unusual on September 30, 2011, 03:29:46 PM
7 – Iced Tea
(http://www.evernewrecipes.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/03/Iced-Tea-Recipe.jpeg)
70 points          
4 of 16 lists
Top Vote: #1 DB Barnes
Serving Preferences: Unsweetened (Cole Stratton, Anais Le Conejita, Monty) Lemon (Cole Stratton, Monty)
   

Iced tea (sometimes known as ice tea) is a form of cold tea, often served in a glass with ice. It may or may not be sweetened. Iced tea is also a popular packaged drink. It can be mixed with flavored syrup, with common flavors including lemon, peach, raspberry, lime, passion fruit, andcherry. While most iced teas get their flavor from tea leaves (Camellia sinensis), other herb-infused beverages are also sometimes served cold and referred to as iced tea. Unsweetened iced tea is sometimes made by a particularly long steeping of tea leaves at lower temperature (one hour in the sun versus 5 minutes at 80-100 °C). Some people call this "sun tea". In addition, sometimes it is also left to stand overnight in the refrigerator.

    
Drink Recipe – Iced Tea

Ingredients:
8 cups water
3 orange pekoe tea bags
3/4 cup white sugar
1/2 cup lemon juice
Slices of fresh lemon to garnish

Instructions:
Step 1: In a large saucepan, heat water to a rapid boil. Remove from heat and drop in the tea bags. Cover and let steep for 1 hour.
Step 2: In a large pitcher, combine the steeped tea and the sugar. Stir until sugar is dissolved, then stir in lemon juice. Refrigerate until chilled. Before serving, garnish with thinly-sliced lemons in the pitcher or on the rim of the glass.
 http://www.youtube.com/v/E8ze0dJFd-M
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: D.B. Barnes on September 30, 2011, 03:36:02 PM
7 – Iced Tea
(http://www.evernewrecipes.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/03/Iced-Tea-Recipe.jpeg)
70 points          
4 of 16 lists
Top Vote: #1 DB Barnes
Serving Preferences: Unsweetened (Cole Stratton, Anais Le Conejita, Monty) Lemon (Cole Stratton, Monty)
   

My #1 at #7. Not too shabby!

I drink frightening amounts of this beverage. Always straight up, no lemon, no sugar. I make sun tea all the time. I like to mix a bunch of different bags for the sun tea. It's like an iced tea suicide. And, you get free refills in restaurants. Can't beat that.

I also really like Long Island Iced Teas, even thought there isn't anything resembling tea in them, at least not in the traditional version.
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: gojikranz on September 30, 2011, 03:40:17 PM
not really a fan of iced tea dunno why i guess im used to tea being hot.  but i do sometimes put ice cream in my tea...
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: Johnny Unusual on September 30, 2011, 03:40:59 PM
6 – Orange Juice
(http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_jvNcYoH0574/S9l2VxelpJI/AAAAAAAADs0/N9TyTpGGxUc/s1600/orangejuice.jpg)
73 points          
7 of 16 lists
Top Vote: #4 CJones
 
   

Orange juice is a popular beverage made from oranges. It is made by extraction from the fresh fruit, by desiccation and subsequent reconstitution of dried juice, or by concentration of the juice and the subsequent addition of water to the concentrate. The term "orange juice" or "OJ" is also used, both colloquially and commercially, to refer to all of these forms.

Citrus juices contain flavonoids (especially in the pulp), that may have health benefits. Orange juice is also a source of the antioxidant Hesperidin. Due its citric acid content, orange juice is acidic, with a typical pH of around 3.5.

   
    
Drink Recipe – October Screwdriver

Ingredients:
•   3 oz Blavod vodka
•   3 oz orange juice

Preparation:
1.   Pour the orange juice into a collins glass filled with ice.
2.   Slowly float the Blavod on top.
 http://www.youtube.com/v/T8KJGtMGMSY
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: Johnny Unusual on September 30, 2011, 03:46:55 PM
5 – Coffee
(http://www.ilovecoffeebook.com/images/clip_image071.jpg)
74 points          
6 of 16 lists
Top Vote: #3 DB Barnes
 
   

Coffee is a brewed beverage with a dark, slightly acidic flavor prepared from the roasted seeds of the coffee plant, colloquially called coffee beans. The beans are found in coffee cherries, which grow on trees cultivated in over 70 countries, primarily in equatorial Latin America, Southeast Asia, South Asia and Africa. Green (unroasted) coffee is one of the most traded agricultural commodities in the world. Coffee can have a stimulating effect on humans due to its caffeine content. It is one of the most-consumed beverages in the world.

Coffee has played a crucial role in many societies. The energizing effect of the coffee bean plant is thought to have been discovered in the northeast region of Ethiopia, and the cultivation of coffee first expanded in the Arab world. The earliest credible evidence of coffee drinking appears in the middle of the 15th century, in the Sufi shrines of Yemen in southern Arabia. From the Muslim world, coffee spread to India, Italy, then to the rest of Europe, to Indonesia, and to the Americas. In East Africa and Yemen, it was used in religious ceremonies. As a result, the Ethiopian Church banned its secular consumption, a ban in effect until the reign of Emperor Menelik II of Ethiopia. It was banned in Ottoman Turkey during the 17th century for political reasons, and was associated with rebellious political activities in Europe.

Coffee berries, which contain the coffee seeds or "beans", are produced by several species of small evergreen bush of the genus Coffea. The two most commonly grown are the highly regarded Coffea arabica, and the 'robusta' form of the hardier Coffea canephora. The latter is resistant to the devastating coffee leaf rust (Hemileia vastatrix). Once ripe, coffee berries are picked, processed, and dried. The seeds are then roasted to varying degrees, depending on the desired flavor. They are then ground and brewed to create coffee. Coffee can be prepared and presented in a variety of ways.

An important export commodity, coffee was the top agricultural export for twelve countries in 2004, and it was the world's seventh-largest legal agricultural export by value in 2005. Some controversy is associated with coffee cultivation and its impact on the environment. Many studies have examined the relationship between coffee consumption and certain health conditions; whether the overall effects of coffee are ultimately positive or negative has been widely disputed. The method of brewing coffee has been found to be important to its health effects.

Ethiopian ancestors of today's Oromo people were believed to have been the first to recognize the energizing effect of the coffee bean plant. However, no direct evidence has been found indicating where in Africa coffee grew or who among the natives might have used it as a stimulant or even known about it, earlier than the 17th century. The story of Kaldi, the 9th-century Ethiopian goat herder who discovered coffee, did not appear in writing until 1671 and is probably apocryphal. Other accounts attribute the discovery of coffee to Sheik Omar. According to the ancient chronicle (preserved in the Abd-Al-Kadir manuscript), Omar, who was known for his ability to cure the sick through prayer, was once exiled from Mocha to a desert cave near Ousab. Starving, Omar chewed berries from nearby shrubbery, but found them to be bitter. He tried roasting the beans to improve the flavor, but they became hard. He then tried boiling them to soften the bean, which resulted in a fragrant brown liquid. Upon drinking the liquid Omar was revitalized and sustained for days. As stories of this "miracle drug" reached Mocha, Omar was asked to return and was made a saint. From Ethiopia, the beverage was introduced into the Arab world through Egypt and Yemen.

The earliest credible evidence of either coffee drinking or knowledge of the coffee tree appears in the middle of the fifteenth century, in the Sufi monasteries around Mokha in Yemen. It was here in Arabia that coffee beans were first roasted and brewed, in a similar way to how it is now prepared. By the 16th century, it had reached the rest of the Middle East, Persia, Turkey, and northern Africa. Coffee beans were first exported from Ethiopia to Yemen. Yemeni traders brought coffee back to their homeland and began to cultivate the bean. The first coffee smuggled out of the Middle East was by Sufi Baba Budan from Yemen to India in 1670. Before then, all exported coffee was boiled or otherwise sterilised. Portraits of Baba Budan depict him as having smuggled seven coffee beans by strapping them to his chest. The first plants grown from these smuggled seeds were planted in Mysore. Coffee then spread to Italy, and to the rest of Europe, to Indonesia, and to the Americas.

In 1583, Leonhard Rauwolf, a German physician, gave this description of coffee after returning from a ten-year trip to the Near East:
A beverage as black as ink, useful against numerous illnesses, particularly those of the stomach. Its consumers take it in the morning, quite frankly, in a porcelain cup that is passed around and from which each one drinks a cupful. It is composed of water and the fruit from a bush called bunnu.
—Léonard Rauwolf, Reise in die Morgenländer (in German)

From the Muslim world, coffee spread to Italy. The thriving trade between Venice and North Africa, Egypt, and the Middle East brought many goods, including coffee, to the Venetian port. From Venice, it was introduced to the rest of Europe. Coffee became more widely accepted after it was deemed a Christian beverage by Pope Clement VIII in 1600, despite appeals to ban the "Muslim drink." The first European coffee house opened in Italy in 1645. The Dutch were the first to import coffee on a large scale. The Dutch later grew the crop in Java and Ceylon. The first exports of Indonesian coffee from Java to the Netherlands occurred in 1711. Through the efforts of the British East India Company , coffee became popular in England as well. Oxford's Queen's Lane Coffee House, established in 1654, is still in existence today. Coffee was introduced in France in 1657, and in Austria and Poland after the 1683 Battle of Vienna, when coffee was captured from supplies of the defeated Turks.

When coffee reached North America during the Colonial period, it was initially not as successful as it had been in Europe as alcoholic beverages remained more popular. During the Revolutionary War, however, the demand for coffee increased so much that dealers had to hoard their scarce supplies and raise prices dramatically; this was also due to the reduced availability of tea from British merchants. After the War of 1812, during which Britain temporarily cut off access to tea imports, the Americans' taste for coffee grew, and high demand during the American Civil War together with advances in brewing technology secured the position of coffee as an everyday commodity in the United States. Paradoxically, coffee consumption declined in England, giving way to tea during the 18th century. The latter beverage was simpler to make, and had become cheaper with the British conquest of India and the tea industry there. During the Age of Sail, seamen aboard ships of the British Royal Navy made substitute coffee by dissolving burnt bread in hot water.

The Frenchman Gabriel de Clieu brought a coffee plant to the French territory of Martinique in the Caribbean, from which much of the world's cultivated arabica coffee is descended. Coffee thrived in the climate and was conveyed across the Americas. The territory of San Domingo (now Haiti) saw coffee cultivated from 1734, and by 1788 it supplied half the world's coffee. However, the dreadful conditions that the slaves worked in on coffee plantations were a factor in the soon to follow Haitian Revolution. The coffee industry never fully recovered there. Meanwhile, coffee had been introduced to Brazil in 1727, although its cultivation did not gather momentum until independence in 1822. After this time, massive tracts of rainforest were cleared first from the vicinity of Rio and later São Paulo for coffee plantations. Cultivation was taken up by many countries in Central America in the latter half of the 19th century, and almost all involved the large-scale displacement and exploitation of the indigenous people. Harsh conditions led to many uprisings, coups and bloody suppression of peasants. The notable exception was Costa Rica, where lack of ready labor prevented the formation of large farms. Smaller farms and more egalitarian conditions ameliorated unrest over the 19th and 20th centuries.

Coffee has become a vital cash crop for many Third World countries. Over one hundred million people in developing countries have become dependent on coffee as their primary source of income. It has become the primary export and backbone for African countries like Uganda, Burundi, Rwanda, and Ethiopia, as well as many Central American countries.

   
    
Drink Recipe – Jamaica Coffee

Ingredients
•   3/4 fluid ounce dark rum
•   3/4 fluid ounce coffee flavored liqueur
•   1 cup brewed coffee
•   2 tablespoons whipped cream
•   1 chocolate covered coffee bean
Directions
1.   Pour rum and coffee liqueur into a decorative coffee glass. Fill glass with hot coffee. Top with a dollop of whipped cream and garnish with a coffee bean.
 http://www.youtube.com/v/2AAa0gd7ClM
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: Johnny Unusual on September 30, 2011, 03:54:03 PM
4 – Cream Soda
(http://www.rootbeer.com/images/flavor_cream_soda.jpg)
81 points          
4 of 16 lists
Top Vote: #2 Pak Man
 
   
   
Cream soda is a sweet carbonated soft drink, often flavored with vanilla.
The drink originated in the United Kingdom in the 19th century. A recipe for cream soda—written by E.M. Sheldon and published in Michigan Farmer in 1852—called for water, cream of tartar, Epsom salts, sugar, tartaric acid, egg, and milk, to be mixed together, then heated, and when cool mixed with water and a quarter teaspoonful of soda (sodium bicarbonate) to make an effervescent drink.

Alexander C. Howell, of Vienna, New Jersey, was granted a patent for "cream soda-water" on June 27, 1865. Howell's cream soda-water was made with sodium bicarbonate, water, sugar, egg whites, wheat flour, and "any of the usual flavoring materials—such as oil of lemon, &c, extracts of vanilla, pine-apple, &c., to suit the taste"; before drinking, the cream soda water was mixed with water and an acid such as tartaric acid or citric acid. In Canada, James William Black of Berwick, Nova Scotia was granted a U.S. patent on December 8, 1885, and a Canadian patent on July 5, 1886, for "ice-cream soda". Black's ice-cream soda, which contained whipped egg whites, sugar, lime juice, lemons, citric acid, flavoring, and bicarbonate of soda, was a concentrated syrup that could be reconstituted into an effervescent beverage by adding ordinary ice water.

 Drink Recipe – Italian Cream Soda
Ingredients
•   8 fluid ounces carbonated water
•   3/4 fluid ounce passion fruit flavored syrup
•   3/4 fluid ounce watermelon flavored syrup
•   1 fluid ounce half-and-half cream
Directions
1.   Fill a tall glass half full with ice. Fill to 2/3 with carbonated water. Pour in watermelon and passion fruit flavored syrups, then float the half-and-half cream on top. Stir when ready to drink.
 http://www.youtube.com/v/iMBvj20umQE
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: Johnny Unusual on September 30, 2011, 03:57:34 PM
3 – Root Beer
(http://www.bonappetit.com/images/magazine/2009/09/maar_top_root_beers_v.jpg)
98 points          
5 of 16 lists
Top Vote: #2 Gojikranz, Johnny Unusual
 
   
   
Root beer is a carbonated, sweetened beverage, originally made using the root of a sassafras plant (or the bark of a sassafras tree) as the primary flavor. Root beer, popularized in North America, comes in two forms: alcoholic and soft drink. The historical root beer was analogous to small beer in that the process provided a drink with a very low alcohol content. Although roots are used as the source of many soft drinks in many countries throughout the world (and even alcoholic beverages/beers), the name root beer is rarely used outside North America and the Philippines. Most other countries have their own indigenous versions of root-based beverages and small beers but with different names.

There are hundreds of root beer brands in the United States, produced in every U.S. state, and there is no standardized recipe. The primary ingredient, artificial sassafras flavoring, is complemented with other flavors. Common flavorings are vanilla, wintergreen, cherry tree bark, licorice root, sarsaparilla root, nutmeg, acacia, anise, molasses, cinnamon, clove and honey. Although most mainstream brands are caffeine-free (including A&W Root Beer, Dad's Root Beer, and Mug Root Beer), there are two brands of root beer, Bawls Geek Beer and Barq's, that contain caffeine. Barq's, however, produces a caffeine-free variety sold in several U.S. markets.

Homemade root beer is usually made from concentrate, though it can also be made from actual herbs and roots. Both alcoholic and non-alcoholic root beers have a thick and foamy head when poured, often enhanced by the addition of Cassava extract.

 Drink Recipe – Root of All Evil
Ingredients
1 part(s) Pernod Absinthe (more Pernod Absinthe drinks)
3 part(s) Root Beer (more Root Beer drinks)
Instructions
Fill cocktail glass with ice. Pour in Pernod Absinthe and top with a quality Root Beer.
 
 http://www.youtube.com/v/NFR4me0B198
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: Johnny Unusual on September 30, 2011, 04:00:19 PM
2 – Dr Pepper
(http://2.bp.blogspot.com/_aE3qBi0TWv4/S6AgUzwYVdI/AAAAAAAAAF0/v5JcFqBVeyo/s320/Heritage+Dr+Pepper.jpg)
149 points          
7 of 16 lists
Top Vote: #1 Gojikranz
 
   
   
Dr Pepper is a soft drink, marketed as having a unique flavor. The drink was created in the 1880s by Charles Alderton of Waco, Texas and first served around 1885. Dr Pepper was first nationally marketed in the United States in 1904 and is now also sold in Europe, Asia, Canada, Australia (as an imported drink) and South America. Variants include a non-high fructose corn syrup version, Diet Dr Pepper, as well as a line of versions with additional flavors, first introduced in the 2000s.

W.W. Clements, a former CEO and president of the Dr Pepper/7-Up Company, described the taste of Dr Pepper as one-of-a-kind, saying "I've always maintained you cannot tell anyone what Dr Pepper tastes like because it's so different. It's not an apple, it's not an orange, it's not a strawberry, it's not a root beer, it's not even a cola. It's a different kind of drink with a unique taste all its own."

The U.S. Patent Office recognizes December 1, 1885 as the first time Dr Pepper was served. It was introduced nationally in the United States at the 1904 Louisiana Purchase Exposition as a new kind of soda pop, made with 23 flavors. Its introduction in 1885 preceded the introduction of Coca-Cola by one year.

It was formulated by Brooklyn-born pharmacist Charles Alderton in Morrison's Old Corner Drug Store in Waco, Texas. To test his new drink, he first offered it to store owner Wade Morrison, who also found it to his liking. Patrons at Morrison's soda fountain soon learned of Alderton's new drink and began ordering a "Waco". Alderton gave the formula to Morrison who named it Dr Pepper.

There are many theories about the origins of the soft drink's name. One conjecture is that the "pep" refers to pepsin. In 2009, an old ledger book filled with formulas and recipes was discovered by a man named Bill Waters while shopping at antiques stores in the Texas Panhandle. Several sheets and letterheads hinted that it had come from the W.B. Morrison & Co. Old Corner Drug Store (the same store Dr Pepper was first served at in 1885) and faded letters on the book's cover spelled out "Castles Formulas" (John Castles was a partner of Morrison's for a time and worked at that location as early as 1880). One recipe in the book titled "D Peppers Pepsin Bitters" was of particular interest, and some speculated it could be an early recipe for Dr Pepper. However, Dr Pepper Snapple Group insists it is not the formula for Dr Pepper, but is instead a medicinal recipe for a digestive aid. The book was put up for auction in May 2009 but no one purchased it.

Like many early sodas, the drink was marketed as a brain tonic and energizing pick-me-up, so another theory holds that it was named for the pep it supposedly gave to users.

Others believe the drink was named after a real Dr. Pepper. One candidate is Dr. Charles T. Pepper of Rural Retreat, Virginia, who might have been honored either in order for Morrison to obtain permission to marry the doctor's daughter, or in gratitude to Pepper for giving Morrison his first job. However, Morrison lived nearly 50 miles from Rural Retreat, and Pepper's daughter was only 8 years old at the time Morrison relocated to Waco.

Another possibility is Dr. Pepper of Christiansburg, Virginia. U.S. Census records show a young Morrison working as a pharmacy clerk in Christiansburg. One of the following pages of this census supposedly shows a Dr. Pepper and daughter Malinda or Malissa, age 16. Since census takers of the period were walking door to door, and their census entries were on following pages, it seems likely that Morrison and the family of Dr. Pepper did not live very far from each other.

The period (fullstop) after "Dr" was discarded for stylistic and legibility reasons in the 1950s. Dr Pepper's logo was redesigned and the text in this new logo was slanted. The period made "Dr." look like "Di:". After some debate, the period was removed for good (it had been used off and on in previous logos), as it would also help remove any medical connotation with the product.

In 1951, Dr Pepper sued the Coca-Cola company for $750,000(US) asserting that nickel Coca-Colas were sold below cost and were a restraint of trade.

In 1972, Dr Pepper sued the Coca-Cola company for trademark infringement based on a soft drink marketed by Coca-Cola called "Peppo". They tried naming it Dr. Pibb, which was also determined to violate the trademark. The soft drink was later renamed Mr Pibb.
Dr Pepper became insolvent in the early 1980s, prompting an investment group to take the company private. Several years later, Coca-Cola attempted to acquire Dr Pepper, but was blocked from doing so by the Federal Trade Commission (FTC). Around the same time, Seven Up was acquired from Phillip Morris by the same investment company that bailed out Dr Pepper. Upon the failure of the Coca-Cola merger, Dr Pepper and Seven Up merged (creating Dr Pepper/Seven Up, Inc., or DPSU), giving up international branding rights in the process. After the DPSU merger, Coca-Cola obtained most non-U.S. rights to the Dr Pepper name (with PepsiCo taking the Seven Up rights).

Dr Pepper was a frequent player in the 1990s antitrust history of the United States. As part of these activities, economists and the courts have weighed in with the opinion that Dr Pepper is a "Pepper" flavored drink and not a "Cola". In 1995, the FTC blocked a merger between The Coca-Cola Company and Dr Pepper on grounds that included concerns about a monopoly of the "Pepper" flavor category of soft drinks. In 1996, Dr Pepper was involved in an antitrust case involving Jerry Jones, the Dallas Cowboys, NFL Properties, Nike, and other commercial interests active at Texas Stadium in Irving, Texas. Jones had made deals with Dr Pepper and the other companies that, the league said, violated their exclusive marketing contracts with Coca-Cola and other businesses. The NFL agreed to allow Jones and other teams to pursue their own agreements.

In 1998, the "Pepper" flavor soda category was a major part of the analysis supporting an antitrust case between Coca-Cola and Pepsi.


 Drink Recipe – Dr. Pepper Wassail Holiday Punch
INGREDIENTS:
16 ounces Dr. Pepper
16 ounces grape wine
1 teaspoon lemon juice concentrate
4 ounces bourbon
4 dashes bitters
1 apple, cored sliced and stuffed with cloves
1 orange, sliced thin

PREPARATION:
Heat all ingredients to moderate temperature. Serve warm. Great holiday party drink.
 http://www.youtube.com/v/v8DWf-rSHn0
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: Johnny Unusual on September 30, 2011, 04:02:51 PM
1 – Water
(http://www.drsharma.ca/wp-content/uploads/sharma-obesity-tap-water1.gif)
190 points          
12 of 16 lists
Top Vote: #1 CJones, Johnny Unusual
 
   
   
Water is a chemical substance with the chemical formula H2O. Its molecule contains one oxygen and two hydrogen atoms connected by covalent bonds. Water is a liquid at ambient conditions, but it often co-exists on Earth with its solid state, ice, and gaseous state (water vapor or steam). Water also exists in a liquid crystal state near hydrophilic surfaces. Under nomenclature used to name chemical compounds, Dihydrogen monoxide is the scientific name for water, though it is almost never used.

Water covers 70.9% of the Earth's surface, and is vital for all known forms of life. On Earth, it is found mostly in oceans and other large water bodies, with 1.6% of water below ground in aquifers and 0.001% in the air as vapor, clouds (formed of solid and liquid water particles suspended in air), and precipitation. Oceans hold 97% of surface water, glaciers and polar ice caps 2.4%, and other land surface water such as rivers, lakes and ponds 0.6%. A very small amount of the Earth's water is contained within biological bodies and manufactured products.

Water on Earth moves continually through a cycle of evaporation or transpiration (evapotranspiration), precipitation, and runoff, usually reaching the sea. Evaporation and transpiration contribute to the precipitation over land.

Clean drinking water is essential to humans and other lifeforms. Access to safe drinking water has improved steadily and substantially over the last decades in almost every part of the world. There is a clear correlation between access to safe water and GDP per capita. However, some observers have estimated that by 2025 more than half of the world population will be facing water-based vulnerability. A recent report (November 2009) suggests that by 2030, in some developing regions of the world, water demand will exceed supply by 50%. Water plays an important role in the world economy, as it functions as a solvent for a wide variety of chemical substances and facilitates industrial cooling and transportation. Approximately 70% of the fresh water actively handled by humans is consumed by agriculture.

Water can dissolve many different substances, giving it varying tastes and odors. Humans and other animals have developed senses which enable them to evaluate the potability of water by avoiding water that is too salty or putrid. The taste of spring water and mineral water, often advertised in marketing of consumer products, derives from the minerals dissolved in it. However, pure H2O is tasteless and odorless. The advertised purity of spring and mineral water refers to absence of toxins, pollutants and microbes.


The human body contains from 55% to 78% water, depending on body size. To function properly, the body requires between one and seven liters of water per day to avoid dehydration; the precise amount depends on the level of activity, temperature, humidity, and other factors. Most of this is ingested through foods or beverages other than drinking straight water. It is not clear how much water intake is needed by healthy people, though most advocates agree that approximately 2 liters (6 to 7 glasses) of water daily is the minimum to maintain proper hydration. Medical literature favors a lower consumption, typically 1 liter of water for an average male, excluding extra requirements due to fluid loss from exercise or warm weather. For those who have healthy kidneys, it is rather difficult to drink too much water, but (especially in warm humid weather and while exercising) it is dangerous to drink too little. People can drink far more water than necessary while exercising, however, putting them at risk of water intoxication (hyperhydration), which can be fatal. The popular claim that "a person should consume eight glasses of water per day" seems to have no real basis in science. Similar misconceptions concerning the effect of water on weight loss and constipation have also been dispelled.

An original recommendation for water intake in 1945 by the Food and Nutrition Board of the United States National Research Council read: "An ordinary standard for diverse persons is 1 milliliter for each calorie of food. Most of this quantity is contained in prepared foods." The latest dietary reference intake report by the United States National Research Council in general recommended (including food sources): 3.7 liters for men and 2.7 liters of water total for women. Specifically, pregnant and breastfeeding women need additional fluids to stay hydrated. The Institute of Medicine (U.S.) recommends that, on average, men consume 3.0 liters and women 2.2 liters; pregnant women should increase intake to 2.4 liters (10 cups) and breastfeeding women should get 3 liters (12 cups), since an especially large amount of fluid is lost during nursing. Also noted is that normally, about 20% of water intake comes from food, while the rest comes from drinking water and beverages (caffeinated included). Water is excreted from the body in multiple forms; through urine and feces, through sweating, and by exhalation of water vapor in the breath. With physical exertion and heat exposure, water loss will increase and daily fluid needs may increase as well.

Humans require water with few impurities. Common impurities include metal salts and oxides, including copper, iron, calcium and lead, and/or harmful bacteria, such as Vibrio. Some solutes are acceptable and even desirable for taste enhancement and to provide needed electrolytes.

The single largest (by volume) freshwater resource suitable for drinking is Lake Baikal in Siberia.

 Drink-Based Recipe – Hot Water Cornbread
Ingredients
•   1 cup cornmeal
•   1 teaspoon salt
•   1 teaspoon white sugar
•   1 tablespoon shortening
•   3/4 cup boiling water

Directions
1.   In a medium bowl, combine cornmeal, salt, and sugar. Add boiling water and shortening; stir until shortening melts.
2.   Pour oil or bacon fat to a depth of 1/2 inch in a large skillet and heat to 375 degrees F (190 degrees C).
3.   Shape cornmeal mixture into flattened balls using a heaping tablespoon as a measuring guide. Fry each in hot oil, turning once, until crisp and golden brown, about 5 minutes. Drain on paper towels. Serve at once with maple syrup or honey.
 http://www.youtube.com/v/bCWA7uevo_Q
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: D.B. Barnes on September 30, 2011, 04:12:28 PM
5 – Coffee
74 points          
6 of 16 lists
Top Vote: #3 DB Barnes
   

My lifeblood! Seriously, I couldn't function without it.And I really, truly enjoy the taste. And to me, fresh coffee is one the most inviting aromas. I mainly drink it black with no sugar, but I also enjoy mochas, cappuccinos, and iced coffee with cream and sugar. Back in high school, we'd cut classes and go hang out at Carrow's. We'd sit there drinking coffee and smoking cigarettes for like two hours. Most of the time, all we ordered was coffee. The waitresses fucking hated us!

4 – Cream Soda
81 points          
4 of 16 lists
Top Vote: #2 Pak Man
 
   

I used to love this as a kid, but super-sweet stuff doesn't appeal all that much to me anymore.


2 – Dr Pepper
149 points          
7 of 16 lists
Top Vote: #1 Gojikranz
 
   

#2. Wow.

Also used to love this as a kid, even more than cream soda. I still like the taste, it's just not as appealing to the palate as it used to be. 

1 – Water
190 points          
12 of 16 lists
Top Vote: #1 CJones, Johnny Unusual
 
   

Never heard of it.
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: Johnny Unusual on September 30, 2011, 04:15:36 PM

2 – Dr Pepper
149 points          
7 of 16 lists
Top Vote: #1 Gojikranz
 
   

#2. Wow.



Wow, but quite a large margin too!
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: D.B. Barnes on September 30, 2011, 04:16:15 PM
Thanks for driving the list, Johnny!

A couple of these may have made it into one of the consolidated entries. Not sure.

1. Iced Tea
2. Gentleman's Jack
3. Coffee
4. Jack and Coke
5. White Russian
6. Sierra Nevada Celebration Ale
7. Green Tea
8. Sparking Water
9. Mudslide
10. Wild Turkey American Honey
11. Gin and Tonic
12. Sierra Nevada Bigfoot Ale
13. Jägermeister
14. Stewart's Orange 'n' Cream Soda
15. Absolut Vanilia Vodka
16. Grapefruit Juice
17. Root Beer Float
18. Hot Chocolate
19. Jamaica Red Ale
20. Cherry Coke
21. Vodka Martini
22. Chocolate Milkshake
23. Coke Slurpee
24. Red Bull
25. Cherry Gatorade
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: CJones on September 30, 2011, 04:16:53 PM
Sweet! My number one and two picks ended up first and second, respectively. I love Dr Pepper, but I drink lots and LOTS of water. The most of any beverage by far.

EDIT: Oh, and I just noticed I got the top vote for Orange Juice. Also sweet! Literally! Incidentally, Simply Orange is hands down the best orange juice I've ever tasted that you can buy in a grocery store. I can drink an entire jug of that stuff in two days, easy.

All in all, this was pretty interesting, and I'm glad I joined. I'll endeavor to participate in the next one.
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: sarcasm_made_Easy on September 30, 2011, 04:21:37 PM
I thought it was a pretty darned interesting list. 
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: Johnny Unusual on September 30, 2011, 04:25:38 PM
Yeah, Dr. Pepper's huge lead shocked me.  I checked several times to see it was a miscount, but people LOVE Dr. Pepper.  I don't dislike it, but not a big fan myself.  I really want to try Mexican Coke now.

EDIT:  By the by, the poll for the next list is up now.
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: CJones on September 30, 2011, 04:38:24 PM
Yeah, it was interesting, like I said in my edit.

I had a couple of really oddball ones on my list that I feel like sharing now. Nyquil, which I drink nearly every night to help me sleep, at #24. And Lea & Perrins Worcestershire Sauce at #19. Hey, it's a liquid and it's edible. And it's an ingredient of the Bloody Mary (which I've never actually had). But I put it on all sorts of stuff. I didn't expect either one of those to make it, I was just struggling to reach 25 entries.

Oh and I put Budweiser at #25 out of pity, simply because I live near Busch Gardens Williamsburg (which is a great place). I was tempted to add Bud American Ale just as a joke, but I didn't feel right voting for something I've never tasted.
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: Johnny Unusual on September 30, 2011, 04:41:35 PM
Yeah, people drink condiments and sauces all the time.

I was tempted to make a list of "beverages that are inferior to straight Worchester sauce as a goof, but I'm feeling rather ill.
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: Tripe on September 30, 2011, 05:18:29 PM
1.   Lapsang Souchong Tea
2.   Irish Breakfast Tea
3.   Absinthe
4.   Ribena
5.   Perry
6.   Tiger Beer
7.   Rhone Red Wine
8.   Mead (Particularly Norwegian but any Mead is good as long as it’s the real stuff)
9.   Irish Whisky
10.   Rosé  Sparkling Wine (Champaign Method)
11.   Navy Rum
12.   Cider (scrumpy style)
13.   Scotch
14.   Cognac
15.   Akevitt
16.   Sherry (Amontillado)
17.   Tawny Port
18.   Gin
19.   Calvados
20.   Earl Grey Tea (preferably with Neroli)
21.   Gunpowder Green Tea
22.   Orange Barley Water
23.   Lemon Barley Water
24.   Guan Yin Oolong Tea
25.   Sweet Vermouth
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: D.B. Barnes on September 30, 2011, 05:46:10 PM
1.   Lapsang Souchong Tea
2.   Irish Breakfast Tea
3.   Absinthe
4.   Ribena
5.   Perry
6.   Tiger Beer
7.   Rhone Red Wine
8.   Mead (Particularly Norwegian but any Mead is good as long as it’s the real stuff)
9.   Irish Whisky
10.   Rosé  Sparkling Wine (Champaign Method)
11.   Navy Rum
12.   Cider (scrumpy style)
13.   Scotch
14.   Cognac
15.   Akevitt
16.   Sherry (Amontillado)
17.   Tawny Port
18.   Gin
19.   Calvados
20.   Earl Grey Tea (preferably with Neroli)
21.   Gunpowder Green Tea
22.   Orange Barley Water
23.   Lemon Barley Water
24.   Guan Yin Oolong Tea
25.   Sweet Vermouth

Wow. Lot goin' on here.

Mead! I've never had mead, but if I did, I'd wanna drink it out of a leather mug, or maybe out of the bosom of a wench.
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: Tripe on September 30, 2011, 05:51:37 PM
I'd wanna drink it out of a leather mug, or maybe out of the bosom of a wench.
I've done the latter if not the former (ah Julianna, how I miss our college days sometimes). :)
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: sarcasm_made_Easy on September 30, 2011, 05:54:54 PM
Adding something to my bucket list
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: D.B. Barnes on September 30, 2011, 05:56:48 PM
I'd wanna drink it out of a leather mug, or maybe out of the bosom of a wench.
I've done the latter if not the former (ah Julianna, how I miss our college days sometimes). :)

Nice!
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: Tripe on September 30, 2011, 05:59:33 PM
I've also drunk Remmy that way, and more recently. Which makes me think of something to do this weekend...

It also makes me want to visit Venice and Julie though I think Ann might frown on my reviving an old college drinking tradition. Mind you,she would like the city. ;)
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: Darth Geek on September 30, 2011, 06:02:50 PM
1. Canada Dry Ginger Ale
2. Everfresh brand fruit juice Lime
3. Crystal Light Cherry Pomegranet
4. Hollenbeck's Cider Mill Grape Juice
5. Crystal Light Pomegranet Lemon
6. A&W Root Beer
7. Hollenbeck's Cider Mill Cider
8. Limeade
9. Stewarts Root Beer
10. Fake Ecto Cooler (from recipe by the Chicago Ghostbusters)


Fictional drinks I would love to try:
Fizzy Lifting Drink
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: gojikranz on September 30, 2011, 06:38:33 PM
im all about dr pepper.  though interestingly i didnt really like it as a child i was more a orange soda cream soda kinda guy but then i started to like having some caffeine and since i dont really like colas or coffee dr pepper was the natural for me.

ive since started to have tea more for caffeine needs but dr pepper remains my soda of choice.

cool list still think orange soda should have merged to get up the list.
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: CJones on September 30, 2011, 06:41:18 PM
Well, if we're posting our lists, here's mine (ones that made it to the top 50.... er... 65 in bold):

1 Water
2 Dr Pepper
3 Soy Milk
4 Orange Juice
5 Captain Morgan
6 Goji Berry Juice
7 Green Tea
8 Black Tea
9 V-Eight
10 Mellow Yellow
11 Sprite
12 Guiness
13 Samuel Adams Boston Lager
14 Coke
15 Barcardi Gold
16 Samuel Adams Cream Stout
17 Samuel Adams Octoberfest     
18 Killians
19 Lea & Perrins Worcestershire Sauce
20 Any good Pinot Grigio wine. (I assume this counted as wine)
21 Coffee
22 Fennel "Tea"
23 Michelob Ultra
24 Nyquil
25 Budweiser

No one else else voted for V-8?
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: BBQ Platypus on September 30, 2011, 08:28:06 PM
1.   Beer (in general)
2.   Surly Darkness
3.   Coke Zero

4.   Screwdriver
5.   Water
6.   Surly CynicAle
7.   Vodka (in general)
8.   Coca-Cola

9.   Tahitian Treat
10. Rum (in general)
11. Pepsi
12. Surly Furious
13. White Russian
14. Lemonade

15. Summit EPA
16. Milkshake (Annie's Parlour, Dinkytown, MN)
17. Coffee
18. Tea

19. Grape Juice
20. Hoegaarden Original White Ale
21. Orange Juice
22. Diet Dr. Pepper
23. Slurpee / Icee
24. Mountain Dew
25. Cranberry juice


Dishonorable mention:
Natural Ice (aka Natty Ice, aka Frat Water) - Ingredients: Water, water, more water, fermented reindeer piss.   See also Natty Light, which is at least as bad and possibly even worse.
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: D.B. Barnes on September 30, 2011, 09:58:51 PM
I can't believe diet coke didn't make the list; did I miss it?

It made it.

14 – Diet Coca-Cola
(http://weightdiet1.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/04/coke_diet_logo1.jpg)
60 points          
3 of 16 lists
Top Vote: #2 Imrahil
   


I can't find that Post Road Pumpkin Ale.  :(
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: D.B. Barnes on September 30, 2011, 10:35:03 PM
Mine:

1. Sparkling water/seltzer/club soda
2. Diet Coke
3. Tea, Earl Grey, Hot
4. Diet Canada Dry Ginger Ale
6. Bell's Two-Hearted Ale
7. Mendota Springs flavored waters (Raspberry, Lime, Lemon, etc.)
8. Sparkling Cherry juice
9. Black Pekoe tea, iced or hot
10. Mint Iced Tea
11. New Glarus Moon Man Ale
12. Post Road Pumpkin Ale
13. Chai latte
14. Diet A&W
15. Water
16. New Belgium Hoptober
17. Sparkling White Wines
18. Strawberry Julius
19. Sprite Tropical Remix
20. Cold Duck
21. Russian Tea
22. Three Grapes Port
23. Fragolino
24. Tom and Jerry mix
25. Berry Blue Kool-aid

I can't believe diet coke didn't make the list; did I miss it?

Huh. My original post got flagged for some reason.

Anyway, Diet Coke was #14

I can't find that Post Road Pumpkin Ale.  >:(
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: ColeStratton on October 01, 2011, 04:30:16 PM
Very fun list--a lot of great beverages I forgot to include (um, I drink a ton of wine--and yet I neglected to put it on my list at all. Same with beer. Guess I was in a hard alcohol and cocktail kinda mood when I made it). Anyway, here is mine:

1. Bacon-infused bourbon
2. Mexican Coke (Coke in a bottle)
3. Old-Fashioned

4. Sazerac
5. Unsweetened Iced Tea
6. Hot Green Tea

7. St. Germain Elderflower Liquor
8. Pineapple Juice
9. Dirty Martini
10. Arnold Palmer
11. Spiced Hot Apple Cider
12. Dr. Pepper

13. Faygo Rock n’ Rye
14. Kerns Strawberry Banana Nectar
15. Hendricks Gin
16. Jack and Coke
17. Grape Kool-Aid
18. Fruit Punch Gatorade
19. Tom Collins
20. Stewart’s Key Lime Soda
21. Cointreau Orange Liquer
22. Lime Calistoga Club Soda
23. Mai-Tai
24. Strawberry Torani Italian Soda (with crème)
25. Malibu Rum

Thought I would share one fun cocktail recipe we've found and altered slightly, and have been making lately. It takes a lot of work and weird ingredients, but it's pretty delicious (and sweet). I also named it...

The Rhu McClanahan
1 1/2 oz. gin (Hendricks Gin preferred)
1/2 oz. thyme syrup (see below)
1/2 oz. simple syrup
1 oz. fresh lemon juice
1 oz. rhubarb puree (see below)
3 dashes rhubarb bitters
1 Thyme Sprig (garnish)

In a mixing glass, combine all ingredients and stir with ice. Strain into an ice-filled highball glass and garnish.

For the thyme syrup: Combine 1/2 cup sugar with 1/2 cup water and 4 fresh thyme sprigs in a small saucepan over medium heat. Bring to a simmer and stir frequently until sugar dissolves. Let cool to room temperature and strain into a clean glass jar or bottle. Refrigerate for up to 2 weeks.

Rhubarb Puree
1/2 cup fresh rhubarb, coarsely chopped
1/2 cup sugar
1 cup water
1 vanilla bean, split

In a medium saucepan, combine all ingredients over medium heat. Bring to a simmer and stir frequently until sugar dissolves. Let cool to room temperature. Remove vanilla bean and puree rhubarb with cooking liquid. Strain into a clean glass jar and refrigerate for up to 1 week.
Title: Re: LoC: Top 65 Beverages
Post by: PsychoGoatee on October 07, 2011, 09:12:17 AM
Very groovy list! The top 4 of water, dr. pepper, root beer, and cream soda are some of my top favs.

Also, I was glad to see my #1 the root beer float place handsomely at number 8. A couple weeks ago a friend of mine and I were super thirsty, at a bar we ordered some root beer floats, which took a long time to be ready. But when they were, we agreed it was the best beverage in history.