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General Discussion => Television aka TV discussion => Topic started by: Russell on August 16, 2011, 08:46:39 PM

Title: Batman: The Animated Series
Post by: Russell on August 16, 2011, 08:46:39 PM
How come nobody ever told me about this show before?! I just watched
the Nostalgia Critic doing a top 11 episodes of this show, and it's amazing!
But I want to know why nobody ever told me about it?! :(
Title: Re: Batman: The Animated Series
Post by: Rainbow Dash on August 16, 2011, 10:02:43 PM
It really was amazing.  Bit meh after Season 3, but it really is one of the most smartly written animated shows I have ever seen.

Love some of the guest stars.  

Of course Mark Hamil bringing in a legendary performance as The Joker, David Warner as Ra's Al Ghul, Roddy McDowell as The Mad Hatter, and a really nice performance from Adam West as The Grey Ghost (made even better because of the relationship of his character to Batman in the Episode).
Title: Re: Batman: The Animated Series
Post by: sarcasm_made_Easy on August 16, 2011, 10:06:38 PM
HOLY COW i totally forgot roddy mcdowell was the hatter (granted at that age i didnt know how he was) i am sooooooo gonna have to get those and rewatch them.
Title: Re: Batman: The Animated Series
Post by: Compound on August 16, 2011, 10:33:37 PM
Dude, it's like you're asking "Why didn't anyone ever tell me about this 'pizza' before?" We kinda assumed everyone knew about it already.
Title: Re: Batman: The Animated Series
Post by: RoninFox on August 16, 2011, 10:35:54 PM
Just watched the Grey Ghost episode again last night. Always brings a tear to my eye. Of all the many many cartoons I watched as a kid, this is the one that holds up the best. To this day, Kevin Conroy IS Batman to me.

Almost Got Him is a great episode, might have to watch that one again soon. The Two-Face two parter sounds good about now too. (Still can't believe that was Richard Moll doing that voice.)
Title: Re: Batman: The Animated Series
Post by: Doctor Who? on August 16, 2011, 10:48:21 PM
The Grey Ghost is my favorite episode.  it really is an amazing show and if you like it you would watch Batman Beyond,Superman(This show was really underrated if you ask me)and Justice League.  This shows are all great too.
Title: Re: Batman: The Animated Series
Post by: Russell on August 16, 2011, 10:55:11 PM
Almost Got Him is a great episode, might have to watch that one again soon. The Two-Face two parter sounds good about now too. (Still can't believe that was Richard Moll doing that voice.)
I just watched that episode, and I was literally shocked at the way that episode misleads
you. It's pretty damn brilliant writing for any cartoon.
Title: Re: Batman: The Animated Series
Post by: Doctor Who? on August 16, 2011, 10:58:22 PM
Heart of Ice,Appointment in Crime ally,and any episode with Harley Quinn are great.
Title: Re: Batman: The Animated Series
Post by: daltysmilth on August 16, 2011, 11:07:51 PM
You seriously didn't know about this show before now?  Where were you during the 90's?  Were you aware that there was a "next generation" of Star Trek?  And have you heard about this show called the Simpsons? 
Title: Re: Batman: The Animated Series
Post by: Rainbow Dash on August 17, 2011, 06:16:40 AM
One of the more random episode I liked was "The Man Who killed Batman", interesting for having almost no presence of Batman in it.  And it was funny.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ld0uIhst3TA

Found this tidbit on wiki
Quote
In an interview, Dini (episode writer) stated that it was fortunate that Sorkin (voice of Harley Quinn) was able to complete the [kazoo] song in one take, as immediately after that, she and the remainder of the voice cast also broke into uncontrollable laughter, and "we'd have never gotten a second take of it."
Title: Re: Batman: The Animated Series
Post by: RoninFox on August 17, 2011, 06:37:23 AM
Just finished the new NC top 11 video myself.  Agree that all the episodes belong on a list of greatness, though I would have changed the order here and there I think.

One of the more random episode I liked was "The Man Who killed Batman", interesting for having almost no presence of Batman in it.  And it was funny.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ld0uIhst3TA

Found this tidbit on wiki
Quote
In an interview, Dini (episode writer) stated that it was fortunate that Sorkin (voice of Harley Quinn) was able to complete the [kazoo] song in one take, as immediately after that, she and the remainder of the voice cast also broke into uncontrollable laughter, and "we'd have never gotten a second take of it."

That was going to be the next one I brought up too.  Also, gotta give this show respect for all the villains it kind of saved or introduced in a way outside of the comics.  No one had ever seen a Two Face story outside a comic before this as far as I know, and the story arc they gave him was fantastic.  They created Harley Quinn from what was going to be a one shot character and she blew up big.  They absolutely rescued Mr. Freeze and made him into a great villain.  The only shots in all of Shumaker's Batman and Robin I can point to as good was the dialog-free sequence where Mr. Freeze crafts an ice-sculpture music box in his cell, and that might has well have been stolen right from the animated version.
Title: Re: Batman: The Animated Series
Post by: Henry88 on August 17, 2011, 08:10:32 AM
hey guy's  don't forget clayface  he was a great villein as well
Title: Re: Batman: The Animated Series
Post by: Sideswipe on August 17, 2011, 08:35:10 AM
Incredibly vioced by Ron Pearlman!  The man has an awesome voice.  There is a lot of sadness from Clayface you can really feel in his voice.
Title: Re: Batman: The Animated Series
Post by: RoninFox on August 17, 2011, 09:25:58 AM
Can't forget Clayface.  This was the first show I remember watching that really made me think that much and feel any sympathy for the villains.
Title: Re: Batman: The Animated Series
Post by: Doctor Who? on August 17, 2011, 09:44:02 AM
The Joker's favor is a great episode.  Batman really isn't in it that much and it is told from the point of view of a random man who is stalked by The Joker for 2 years.
Title: Re: Batman: The Animated Series
Post by: Compound on August 17, 2011, 09:52:45 AM
(http://img148.imageshack.us/img148/6130/vlcsnap2011081710h47m40.png)

"Hey, who's talking about Batman? I love Batman. All those muscles. The tight rubber armor and the flashy car. I heard it can drive up walls!"
Title: Re: Batman: The Animated Series
Post by: RoninFox on August 17, 2011, 10:03:45 AM
(http://img148.imageshack.us/img148/6130/vlcsnap2011081710h47m40.png)

"Hey, who's talking about Batman? I love Batman. All those muscles. The tight rubber armor and the flashy car. I heard it can drive up walls!"

Shut up, Joel.
Title: Re: Batman: The Animated Series
Post by: sarcasm_made_Easy on August 17, 2011, 10:05:30 AM
Clayface is great but unique unlike so many other batman villians (with a few exceptions) he is basically a really powerful thug.  No big mastermind plans.  made him kinda interesting. 
Title: Re: Batman: The Animated Series
Post by: daltysmilth on August 17, 2011, 11:02:07 AM
The first part of the Two-Face origin episodes was pretty interesting.  The second part kinda bothered me a little bit.  Like, the whole letting "bad" Harvey take over and make Harvey Dent into a villain just because half of his face suddenly became ugly... okay it's a little bit far-fetched but whatever.  What bothers me the most is that in such a short amount of time as a villain, Two-Face is able to acquire henchmen.  Actual henchmen.  Now, Harvey Dent, up until recently, had been the district attorney.  A soldier on the side of law and order.  A scourge of the criminal underworld.  Every crook in Gotham probably knew and cursed his name, and they'd all probably been prosecuted by him at some point.  So why would they be willing to trust him just because he claimed he was one of them now?  Sure, half of his face was ugly and he had the whole "crimes based around the number two" gimmick, but it takes more than that to be a criminal.  If I were a petty crook and a man who had spent most of his career putting people like me behind bars suddenly claimed to be a criminal too and that he wanted henchmen... I would want some guarantee that this wasn't just a ruse to catch me in the act of committing some crime so he could send me to prison for life.  Or just kill me himself in pursuit of some twisted sense of justice.
Title: Re: Batman: The Animated Series
Post by: Rainbow Dash on August 17, 2011, 01:32:23 PM
Another Animated Series Original Villain that I'm surprised has apparently had no introduction in the comics, was Red Claw.  She was no Harley, but I thought the idea of a strong woman villain was interesting.  Only recently learned that it was none other than Kate Mulgrew doing her voice.
Title: Re: Batman: The Animated Series
Post by: Sideswipe on August 17, 2011, 02:16:50 PM
There were a lot of Star Trek veterans as guest voices in that show.
Title: Re: Batman: The Animated Series
Post by: Rainbow Dash on August 17, 2011, 03:23:01 PM
There were a lot of Star Trek veterans as guest voices in that show.

Who else?  I just did the list on the Wiki of major and recurring characters.  I know Dianne Muldaur did Doctor Thompson, but other than her and Mulgrew, I don't remember any.
Title: Re: Batman: The Animated Series
Post by: Sideswipe on August 17, 2011, 03:43:13 PM
Theres probably more, but I got tired of searching through episodes.

Kate Mulgrew  EP 1
Rene Auberjonois  EP 2
Michael Ansara   EP 3
Brock Peters   EP 4/5
Ron Pearlman EP 4/5
Ed Begley Jr.  EP 4/5
Paul Dooley  EP 6
Diana Muldaur   EP 12
Title: Re: Batman: The Animated Series
Post by: Johnny Unusual on August 17, 2011, 06:50:07 PM
Theres probably more, but I got tired of searching through episodes.

Kate Mulgrew  EP 1
Rene Auberjonois  EP 2
Michael Ansara   EP 3
Brock Peters   EP 4/5
Ron Pearlman EP 4/5
Ed Begley Jr.  EP 4/5
Paul Dooley  EP 6
Diana Muldaur   EP 12

Cause when people think Ed Begley Jr., they think Star Trek (better than Meet the Applegates, I suppose)

If you wanted to load up your cartoon plate with Star Trek voices, Gargoyles was the way to go.  Jonathan Frakes was wonderfully sinister as Xanatos.  A shame that the comic book comeback of Gargoyles kind of died.  I think when Disney and Marvel merged, they could have made it a universe that Marvel characters would occasionally visit.  I mean if the Marvel 616 is the super-hero universe, then Gargoyles could be the crazy magic and occasional sci-fi universe.
Title: Re: Batman: The Animated Series
Post by: Sideswipe on August 17, 2011, 07:10:27 PM
Yeah, that show had a lot of the main cast of TNG it it.
Title: Re: Batman: The Animated Series
Post by: sarcasm_made_Easy on August 17, 2011, 11:22:27 PM
I always assumed that was the show they kinda kicked around on their coffee breaks on the set of TNG
Title: Re: Batman: The Animated Series
Post by: Sideswipe on August 18, 2011, 07:07:53 AM
that was after TNG ended
Title: Re: Batman: The Animated Series
Post by: sarcasm_made_Easy on August 18, 2011, 08:03:38 AM
My way is funnier
Title: Re: Batman: The Animated Series
Post by: RoninFox on August 19, 2011, 08:34:51 AM
It really was amazing.  Bit meh after Season 3, but it really is one of the most smartly written animated shows I have ever seen.

I actually prefer the style of the later seasons, especially when Bats' costume goes drab instead of primary colors.

I mostly hated the new style because it didn't feel like Batman anymore. They changed the style so it would match the Superman series and that really stood out to me. There are a couple characters that came out the other side of the change better. I prefer the more human looking Penguin and the redone Scarecrow is much more frightening. Some characters are pretty much the same. I have to look very close to tell the difference between the designs for Harley and Two Face.  But then several characters just looked horrible by comparison. I hate the look of the colorless-faced pointy Joker. The Riddler lost every bit of style he had. Poison Ivy suddenly turned into a short green alien. 90% of the women of Gotham went goth. We went from a college age Robin that seemed believable to me to having a new Robin that looked like he should still have training wheels.

Also I absolutely hated that they threw out the character development of both Catwoman and Harley with zero explanation. Both reverted to thier beginnings making several episodes pointless when considered together.
Title: Re: Batman: The Animated Series
Post by: daltysmilth on August 19, 2011, 09:09:23 AM
Yeah, the best episode of the later seasons was "Mad Love", and that was an adaptation of a story Paul Dini had written a few years before for the Batman Adventures comic book.
Title: Re: Batman: The Animated Series
Post by: Pak-Man on August 19, 2011, 09:17:35 AM
It was the Joker's eyes that bugged me in the later seasons.

(http://www.dohtem.com/joker/animation/jkrart25.gif)

You give those eyes to talking puppies. Not crazed lunatics. :^)
Title: Re: Batman: The Animated Series
Post by: k1 on August 19, 2011, 09:22:11 AM
I've been meaning to rip the episodes from the Box Set so I can put them on my WDTV Live Hub.  I should do that at some point soon.
Title: Re: Batman: The Animated Series
Post by: RoninFox on August 19, 2011, 09:36:32 AM
It was still one of my favorite shows after the change, just prefer the way it was before.  I kind of understand why they did the changes, they wanted to be able to present Batman and Superman in a block and even do a their "Worlds Finest" crossover movie/three parter episodes, and if they put Batman as designed next to Superman as designed it would have been grating to look at.  They needed a cohesive style.  Just a matter of personal taste.

At this point, talking about the show again, I'm tempted to steal anais's idea from her Star Trek thread and just watch the show from beginning to end, revisiting each episode and posting a review here.  True, she's watching shows for the first time, so it won't have the same kind of impact, but could still be fun.  I can keep it in this thread to keep the discussions going, and anyone else can join in with their own reviews.  Whats everyone else think?
Title: Re: Batman: The Animated Series
Post by: daltysmilth on August 19, 2011, 09:48:18 AM
I'd be up for it.  I have the first season on DVD, so I'd be able to keep up at least that far.
Title: Re: Batman: The Animated Series
Post by: Doctor Who? on August 19, 2011, 10:28:21 AM
It was still one of my favorite shows after the change, just prefer the way it was before.  I kind of understand why they did the changes, they wanted to be able to present Batman and Superman in a block and even do a their "Worlds Finest" crossover movie/three parter episodes, and if they put Batman as designed next to Superman as designed it would have been grating to look at.  They needed a cohesive style.  Just a matter of personal taste.

At this point, talking about the show again, I'm tempted to steal anais's idea from her Star Trek thread and just watch the show from beginning to end, revisiting each episode and posting a review here.  True, she's watching shows for the first time, so it won't have the same kind of impact, but could still be fun.  I can keep it in this thread to keep the discussions going, and anyone else can join in with their own reviews.  Whats everyone else think?

I blieve there were also budget cuts so they needed to chenge the style to something that would take less time to animated.  I don't think the WB gave them as much money as Fox.
Title: Re: Batman: The Animated Series
Post by: RoninFox on August 19, 2011, 11:06:20 AM
Episode 1:  On Leather Wings

(http://images1.wikia.nocookie.net/__cb20080327221053/batman/images/0/08/Onleatherwings.jpg) (http://batman.wikia.com/index.php?title=On_Leather_Wings&image=Onleatherwings-jpg)

You know what this show needs?  Marc Singer.

First a brief few words on the original opening, since we're starting out.  I love everything about the opening, the animation is gorgeous and a perfect representation of the best parts of the show in short form, and it really shows confidence that they aren't really opening credits.  There are no words in the opening other than signs on the blimps and some of the buildings, not even a title.  They trust the audience to see Batman standing on the building and know they're watching Batman.

Synopsis:  A robbery of a chemical factory leads to the injury of a guard at the hands of a "giant bat".  The police mobilize to take down Batman, while Batman himself starts to investigate, believing someone is setting him up.  While avoiding the police, Batman tracks down evidence of the culprit, tracking him to a lab at the Gotham Zoo and Dr. March (a man seemingly obsessed with bats), his daughter Francine, and Francine's husband Dr. Langstrom.  When going to confront March, Batman finds Dr. Langstrom who transforms in front of him to the ManBat.  After a long fight in the skies of Gotham, Batman subdues the ManBat and takes him back to the Batcave, extracting the chemicals from his body and delivering the human doctor back to Francine, claiming "it's over, for now."

As a kid I really was weirded out by this episode.  It featured a villain I had never seen before, and the whole Jekyl and Hyde-like monster story was the last thing I expected out of Batman.  Watching it now, I appreciate it a lot more.  I love the fact that, again, they trust the audience.  They didn't start their show with an origin story for Batman.  The first time Batman appears its in the Batcave in full costume.  The opening is gripping right away, showing the ManBat in fleeting glimpses and really showing off the style they'd created for Gotham.

Whenever I go back to watch this show I'm amazed at how dark it really is.  According to the commentary on this episode, they were warned they actually were approaching the legal limit for how dark a television show can be, something the producers didn't even know existed before then.  They also explained a lot of the dark backgrounds were made by painting on black paper, leaving the black a true black instead of layering dark colors on a white sheet.

Despite not being an origin story, it established a hell of a lot right away.  It introduced the character of Detective Bullock, and his drive to be the man who brings Batman to justice.  Through confrontation with Bullock, the episode established Commissioner Gordon as a strong character.  It even had a downright chilling bit of foreshadowing with Harvey Dent sitting to the side pre-transformation flipping his coin.

You can tell easily the animation was inspired heavily by the old Max Fleischer Superman cartoons in all the best ways.  The flying scenes with the ManBat, especially the opening shots and the climactic battle, as well as the glory reveal of the Batmobile on its way speeding toward Gotham in the distance are truly fantastic.

It's a little strange to hear Alfred in this episode, as it was before Efrem Zimbalist Jr. took over the role, and he was a lot more stern sounding and sarcastic.  Kevin Conroy's Bruce Wayne voice was a little unrefined as well, but from the start he was a spot on with the Batman voice.  

If there's one flaw I see in this episode, its a plothole left behind while leading the audience on a fakeout to the ManBat's identity.  When investigating the robbery scene Batman finds some unusual hairs and a tape recording the guard was making before being attacked, complete with the cries of the ManBat.  When he took these items to the Zoo under the guise of Bruce Wayne, he gave them to Dr. March hoping to find what creature they came from.  As soon as Dr. March is established, he seems the prime suspect.  He's immediately defensive when Bruce claims that he has a "bat problem".  March is shown as obsessive, Dr. Langstrom claiming he likes bats more than people.  Soon after, Dr March calls and reports that the hairs are common brown bat hairs, and the the sound on the tape is a combination of brown bats and starlings.  These were both proven to be lies.  That's what leads Batman to try and confront March, but in a twist, he finds Dr. Langstrom instead.  While Dr. March had ideas about bats being superior to humans, Langstrom claims that March is "just a theorist."  Langstrom was behind the transformation and the robberies the whole time.  There is never a good explanation then, as to why Dr. March would lie to Bruce Wayne about the source of the hairs or the sounds on the tape.

With that one quibble, this was an incredibly impressive pilot.  It still holds up, and it established a visual style worthy of living up to.

And for those counting, we're up to one Star Trek alum already, with Rene "Odo" Auberjonois playing Dr. March.  We also have, I believe, our only Beastmaster alum with Marc "Dar" Singer as Dr. Langstrom.

Edit:  Just found an interesting bit of trivia on tv.com about this episode I never would have caught.

Quote
Dr. March was named after Fredric March, the actor who portrayed Dr. Henry Jekyll in the 1931 version of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde (on which this episode is loosely based).
Title: Re: Batman: The Animated Series
Post by: daltysmilth on August 19, 2011, 12:19:55 PM
One thing I have to say about this episode right off:  It is, in my mind, the best animation ever produced for American television.  You can talk all you want about Aeon Flux or Samurai Jack, or even Ren & Stimpy, but none of them hold a candle to the first few seasons of Batman: The Animated Series, and On Leather Wings especially.  The animation is feature film quality, and apart from being framed for a 4:3 screen, it has the scale of a feature film.  The aerial chase sequence between Batman and Man-Bat could stand up to the motorcycle chase from Akira, for instance.  (Which shouldn't be too surprising, as a lot of the animators from Akira would eventually work on Batman: TAS.) 

As far as the story, yeah there are a few plot holes.  I think we're meant to assume that Dr. March lied to Bruce Wayne because he was trying to protect Dr. Langstrom, but it's never directly stated. 

Looking at the casting for these shows now, I'm amazed at the caliber of actors they were able to get for some of the characters.  They could have easily gotten regular working stiff voice actors, but instead they cast the voices as though they were casting for a live action TV show. 

I like the fact that Kevin Conroy used two distinct voices for Bruce Wayne and Batman.  It makes sense that he'd want to disguise everything about himself, including his voice, when he puts on the costume.  (Notice I didn't say whether the batsuit or the three-piece suit is the costume.)

One thing I've wondered about this show, was Harvey Dent/Two-Face origninally supposed to be an african-american in this show?  His color is distinctly caucasian, and Richard Moll is white, but the way his features are drawn seems to look more african-american than caucasian.  And especially towards the beginning, the show was taking a lot of its cues from the Tim Burton movies, in which Billy Dee Williams played Harvey Dent.

Also, I can't say enough about the music.  Shirley Walker's scores are so evocative of the style Danny Elfman established in the first two movies, dark, gothic, filled with grandeur.  She and the other composers on the show even used Danny Elfman's Batman theme, not just for the opening and the end credits, but also in a few of the scores of the actual episodes, before switching over to exclusively using Shirley Walker's similar yet distinct Batman theme.  It's such good music, and yet it makes me sad to hear the music in the Nolan Batman movies.  If Hans Zimmer didn't want to use Danny Elfman's Batman theme, that's fine, but I think he could have at least used the same style of music as Elfman and Walker without it seeming out of place. 
Title: Re: Batman: The Animated Series
Post by: sarcasm_made_Easy on August 19, 2011, 12:36:45 PM
thats it im doing this too, amazon here i come.
Title: Re: Batman: The Animated Series
Post by: RoninFox on August 20, 2011, 06:36:07 AM
One thing I have to say about this episode right off:  It is, in my mind, the best animation ever produced for American television.  You can talk all you want about Aeon Flux or Samurai Jack, or even Ren & Stimpy, but none of them hold a candle to the first few seasons of Batman: The Animated Series, and On Leather Wings especially.  The animation is feature film quality, and apart from being framed for a 4:3 screen, it has the scale of a feature film.  The aerial chase sequence between Batman and Man-Bat could stand up to the motorcycle chase from Akira, for instance.  (Which shouldn't be too surprising, as a lot of the animators from Akira would eventually work on Batman: TAS.) 
QFT.

As far as the story, yeah there are a few plot holes.  I think we're meant to assume that Dr. March lied to Bruce Wayne because he was trying to protect Dr. Langstrom, but it's never directly stated. 

I suppose it was simply a time issue.  One scene of Dr. March explaining would have saved this plothole, but the episode was already pretty tight.  Adding a scene would have lost us precious time setting the mood or cutting the aerial chase short, so I'd say we got the better trade with the episode as is.

One thing I've wondered about this show, was Harvey Dent/Two-Face origninally supposed to be an african-american in this show?  His color is distinctly caucasian, and Richard Moll is white, but the way his features are drawn seems to look more african-american than caucasian.  And especially towards the beginning, the show was taking a lot of its cues from the Tim Burton movies, in which Billy Dee Williams played Harvey Dent.

While the show did take a few things from Burton, like the Danny Elfman theme and the design of the Batmobile, I think it was clear from the start they weren't making anything in the same universe.  As far as I know, their Harvey Dent was always supposed to be Caucasian, as he was in the comics.  I can't remember the exact words, but I remember one of the episode commentaries saying that they fully acknowledge that without the success of the Burton films they would never have had the opportunity to make this series, but they always wanted to make their own show and not a spin-off.  That's actually one of the reasons they gave for starting with a pilot featuring ManBat.  He was a villain the audience wouldn't have any preconceived notions on, while if they started with a Joker episode the audience not used to their take on Batman yet would be asking, "Well, is he going to be more like Romero or Nicholson?"
Title: Re: Batman: The Animated Series
Post by: RoninFox on August 20, 2011, 07:29:54 AM
Episode 2:  Christmas with the Joker

(http://images2.wikia.nocookie.net/__cb20100714225823/batman/images/thumb/7/76/Christmas_with_the_Joker_1.jpg/507px-Christmas_with_the_Joker_1.jpg) (http://batman.wikia.com/index.php?title=Christmas_With_The_Joker&image=Christmas_with_the_Joker_1-jpg)

Sure he's going to kill us, but at least there's no mention of Life Day.

Synopsis:  During a Christmas party at Arkham Asylum, The Joker escapes by way of a rocket disguised as a Christmas tree.  Even with the Joker on the loose, Batman and Robin find the city quiet while on patrol, and Robin convinces Batman to take the rest of the night off, relax, and watch It's a Wonderful Life.  Instead of the movie, they see the beginning of a pirate broadcast from the Joker, hosting his own wicked Christmas Special.  The Joker reveals he's taken three hostages, calling them his stolen family.  The family consists of Commissioner Gordon, Detective Bullock, and Summer Gleeson (A news reporter and anchor on Gotham tv).  Joker warns that Batman has until midnight to find where he's broadcasting from, or the hostages will all die, setting traps and giving clues to his location in turn.  The Dynamic Duo track Joker to the abandoned Laffco Toy Factory and fight their way though an onslaught of jury-rigged toys and henchmen.  Joker stands ready to confront Batman, holding a wrapped Christmas present and a pair of scissors, standing next to a large acid vat with the hostages dangling overhead suspended by a rope.  Batman is forced to go along and open the present or Joker threatens to cut the rope.  The present turns out to be a spring loaded cream pie, which Batman takes in the face without complaint.  Joker cuts the rope and Batman narrowly saves the hostages by catching them in midair while leaping over the vat.  Joker himself almost falls into the acid trying to escape as he trips on a roller skate left on a catwalk, Batman just barely catching him by the leg.  The episode ends with Bruce Wayne and Dick Greyson watching a tape of It's a Wonderful Life, and the Joker singing Christmas songs back in the asylum.

This...is nowhere near as good as episode one.  It's still fun to watch, but its kind of a glaring change of tone to go from On Leather Wings to this.  (Granted, this is not at all the order the shows were broadcast in.  According to the Batman Wiki I found this morning, this was the 38th episode aired).  Mark Hamil is funny right away as the Joker, but something seems missing in this episode.  He's evil, but not quite evil enough.  We're talking "Diet Coke of Evil" levels.  In trying to be funnier, it goes a little too far into wackiness.  Robin is largely a non-character in this episode, only being there to try and push Bruce to be more cheerful on the holidays and do a little of the less-exciting grunt work, like "you stay and take care of the hostages, I'll catch the Joker," kind of work. 

While On Leather Wings had a sense of psudo-realism, at least as much as can be expected of a story where a man turns into a half-bat creature that can fly, Christmas With the Joker is cartoony in a much more Looney Tunes style.  There's no way to take the Joker somehow constructing an escape rocket while in Arkham while disguising it as a Christmas tree seriously, but that wasn't the intention anyway.  The final chase had no tension at all, Batman didn't really do anything special to subdue the Joker, he just got lucky when Joker fell on a skate.  A lot of the climax defied physics, like Batman leaping high into the air, catching three people at once in mid flight (one of them an overweight detective), and landing in a perfect arc on the other side of the vat.  During the toy fight, Batman uses a baseball bat to destroy some attacking toy planes, leading to the Robin quip of "They don't call you BATman for nothing."  Yeah, that was pretty groan inducing. 

There are a few points where the animation shines through in interesting ways.  I loved watching Batman's shadow in this episode.  Several times, it didn't fall naturally, but instead twisted to resemble a bat in flight, even when he was just standing still.

The best part of this episode is the first obstacle Joker puts in the way of finding him on time.  He sends two henchmen to blow up a bridge, broadcasting it the whole time while talking to his own hand, which he has painted and dressed into a puppet.  Then he warns Batman that the 11:30 train is fast approaching, leading to a daring rescue.  Jumping from the Batmobile, Robin uncouples the passenger cars and hits the breaks while Batman climbs to the front to save the engineer and leap off just before the engine flies off the end of the tracks.

The second best part of the episode is actually hearing the Joker sing "Jingle Bells, Batman smells..." in the opening scene.

Final conclusion, it lacks the level of darkness I want from a Joker story, but still goofy fun.  Not an episode I'd likely seek out over any other, unless it was Christmas.
Title: Re: Batman: The Animated Series
Post by: anais.jude on August 20, 2011, 07:49:28 AM
I was going to ask how you are are writing so much, but then I noticed there was a synopsis included.


But I would like to know how have the time to write so much! *pout*
Title: Re: Batman: The Animated Series
Post by: RoninFox on August 20, 2011, 07:54:25 AM
I was going to ask how you are are writing so much, but then I noticed there was a synopsis included.


But I would like to know how have the time to write so much! *pout*

Part of it is insomnia.

The other part is the fact that rambling about Batman is practically my natural state of being.
Title: Re: Batman: The Animated Series
Post by: anais.jude on August 20, 2011, 07:56:41 AM
I was going to ask how you are are writing so much, but then I noticed there was a synopsis included.


But I would like to know how have the time to write so much! *pout*

Part of it is insomnia.

The other part is the fact that rambling about Batman is practically my natural state of being.

Are you still not allowed overtime at work? Because I am sure another part is that I work at least 50 hours a week :( Hopefully I wil lhave wifi access to watchi netflix on my phone in Mexico. Because then I will have plenty of time! (I can't leave the hotel after 9)
Title: Re: Batman: The Animated Series
Post by: daltysmilth on August 20, 2011, 09:17:01 AM
Yeah, X-Mas with the Joker is a definite change in tone from the first episode, but I always liked the animated series idea that the Joker isn't just a homicidal maniac, nor is he just a merry mischief maker, but something in between.  And I think the fact that he's willing to put a whole trainload of people in mortal danger just so he can shove a pie in Batman's face says a lot about his character.

Another note, Tim Curry was originally cast as the Joker in TAS, but after he'd recorded a couple of episodes, they decided to recast and of course ended up with the legendary Mark Hamill.  Not only did Hamill's Joker become one of the most iconic portrayals of the character, but it also led to Hamill having a second career as a voice-actor.  Still, I think it would be interesting to hear some of Tim Curry's recordings for the character.

Musical highlights:  there are a lot of great moments in the episode, like the already mentioned opening with Joker actually singing "Jingle Bells, Batman Smells..." and the cheesy music for Joker's Christmas Special, featuring syrupy renditions of traditional Christmas music and game-show-like arrangements of Shirley Walker's Joker theme.  (On the soundtrack from LaLaLand Records, one of the tracks from this episode is actually titled "More Game Show Music".)  But my favorite piece of music in the episode is during the fight scene in the toy factory, when it starts out with a traditional arrangement of "Dance Of The Sugarplum Fairy" from the Nutcracker, and then adds more brass as the action gets more intense.

And I don't understand why they put the episodes in the order they did on the animated sets.  I guess it's in production order rather than broadcast order?  I dunno.
Title: Re: Batman: The Animated Series
Post by: Sideswipe on August 20, 2011, 09:23:13 AM
I really can't imagine anyone else doing the Joker since Mark Hamil.  Did anyone see the Under the Red Hood movie?  Maybe it was just me, but it sounded to me like there were parts of John Dimaggio's perfromance that he was definitely channeling Hamil's Joker voice.
Title: Re: Batman: The Animated Series
Post by: sarcasm_made_Easy on August 20, 2011, 10:08:04 AM
ditto. 
Title: Re: Batman: The Animated Series
Post by: mattwnelson on August 20, 2011, 10:47:55 AM
Just a note on those who didn't like the style of the revamped Bats... If I'm not totally mistaken, as well as the budgetary reasons, I could swear that I'd once read Timm saying that the sleeker style was closer to what he'd originally had in mind for the series. I am also one of those who preferred the later style, liking Bruce Wayne's design much more than the original, who to me always looked dumpy and disheveled. I also liked Gordon more, as he looked older and more stooped, and Penguin was a vast improvement. However, I will agree that several of the villains got short shrift. Joker's minty-green complexion and black eyes were never my favorite, and I missed the red smile of his mouth. I loathed the Riddler's redesign, turning him from the dapper character from the original series into some kind of Clockwork Orange/Jim Carrey Riddler mashup. Catwoman's costume I liked, but thought she looked anorexic. And I thought Croc looked flat-out horrible. On the other hand, the Scarecrow was a fantastic redesign, and I actually liked Poison Ivy's new look quite a bit. Also, Freeze blew my mind. I thought his new, more inhuman look was fantastic.

I gotta say, this is making me want to go back and rewatch this show as well... Mmmmmm, nostalgia.
Title: Re: Batman: The Animated Series
Post by: daltysmilth on August 20, 2011, 11:12:08 AM
Just a note on those who didn't like the style of the revamped Bats... If I'm not totally mistaken, as well as the budgetary reasons, I could swear that I'd once read Timm saying that the sleeker style was closer to what he'd originally had in mind for the series. I am also one of those who preferred the later style, liking Bruce Wayne's design much more than the original, who to me always looked dumpy and disheveled. I also liked Gordon more, as he looked older and more stooped, and Penguin was a vast improvement. However, I will agree that several of the villains got short shrift. Joker's minty-green complexion and black eyes were never my favorite, and I missed the red smile of his mouth. I loathed the Riddler's redesign, turning him from the dapper character from the original series into some kind of Clockwork Orange/Jim Carrey Riddler mashup. Catwoman's costume I liked, but thought she looked anorexic. And I thought Croc looked flat-out horrible. On the other hand, the Scarecrow was a fantastic redesign, and I actually liked Poison Ivy's new look quite a bit. Also, Freeze blew my mind. I thought his new, more inhuman look was fantastic.

I gotta say, this is making me want to go back and rewatch this show as well... Mmmmmm, nostalgia.

I always preferred Gordon's original look.  It's like, yeah he's old, but he still works out and takes care of himself.  The redesign made him look emaciated and frail.  And why did they need to do a second redesign of Scarecrow?  He'd already been redesigned once.  I think the best design of the Joker in the Diniverse is probably the version from the flashback scenes in Batman Beyond: Return of the Joker.
Title: Re: Batman: The Animated Series
Post by: RoninFox on August 20, 2011, 03:26:57 PM
Yeah, X-Mas with the Joker is a definite change in tone from the first episode, but I always liked the animated series idea that the Joker isn't just a homicidal maniac, nor is he just a merry mischief maker, but something in between.  And I think the fact that he's willing to put a whole trainload of people in mortal danger just so he can shove a pie in Batman's face says a lot about his character.

Mark Hamil as the Joker does eventually become my favorite Joker thanks to this series, due to that balance of homicidal maniac and merry mischief maker you're talking about, I just don't think they'd found the right balance, in performance writing or animation, yet.  In the On Leather Wings commentary they talked a lot about the quest to find realism in the context of the show, and to keep things believable.  This episode I think faltered heavily on that.  Yes, it's funny to think that Joker masterminded this scheme just to be in the same room as Batman with a face full of pie.  I think that if the more unbelievable elements had been handled better though, that punchline would have hit a lot harder.  Later Joker episodes I remember finding the right edge, even if they did stretch realism more than some other episodes they didn't stretch them the same way or as far.  (And yes, you have to consider it realism in the context of a series featuring science that is basically magic and where everyone wants to wear their fancy pajamas in public all the time.)  I will say I love it when Joker bends and breaks the fourth wall, taking the opportunity to talk directly to the audience, and the random moments that come up in later episodes where he's just by himself and being goofy, imitating Curly just for the hell of it. 

Another note, Tim Curry was originally cast as the Joker in TAS, but after he'd recorded a couple of episodes, they decided to recast and of course ended up with the legendary Mark Hamill.  Not only did Hamill's Joker become one of the most iconic portrayals of the character, but it also led to Hamill having a second career as a voice-actor.  Still, I think it would be interesting to hear some of Tim Curry's recordings for the character.

I'm pretty curious about this as well, and it'd be interesting to see this episode with his voice to see how it might have changed things.  Tim Curry has done some awesome voicework in the past, and while he probably never would have been my first choice for Joker, I know he can be a great villain.  To me though, one evil clown in a career is probably enough.

(http://img522.imageshack.us/img522/373/pennywise.gif)

And I don't understand why they put the episodes in the order they did on the animated sets.  I guess it's in production order rather than broadcast order?  I dunno.

I'm going to go ahead and assume that's the case unless someone corrects me.  On Leather Wings wasn't the first episode aired, but it is clearly identified as the pilot, and it makes sense to sit on Christmas with the Joker until Christmas actually rolls around.  Also, assuming this was one of the Curry episodes that Hamil had to re-record it might have started production early while being finished much later.

I think the best design of the Joker in the Diniverse is probably the version from the flashback scenes in Batman Beyond: Return of the Joker.

(http://www.markhamill.com/images/bbrotjpo.jpg)

Agreed.
Title: Re: Batman: The Animated Series
Post by: Rainbow Dash on August 20, 2011, 04:25:04 PM
Nothing against Hamill, but I can't imagine Curry's Joker being bad.  Guy does evil so well, especially crazy evil.
Title: Re: Batman: The Animated Series
Post by: Sideswipe on August 20, 2011, 04:34:16 PM
Yeah, he would probably be good at it.  I just can't see him having the range Hamil's Joker has though.
Title: Re: Batman: The Animated Series
Post by: Doctor Who? on August 20, 2011, 04:40:08 PM
Yeah, X-Mas with the Joker is a definite change in tone from the first episode, but I always liked the animated series idea that the Joker isn't just a homicidal maniac, nor is he just a merry mischief maker, but something in between.  And I think the fact that he's willing to put a whole trainload of people in mortal danger just so he can shove a pie in Batman's face says a lot about his character.

Mark Hamil as the Joker does eventually become my favorite Joker thanks to this series, due to that balance of homicidal maniac and merry mischief maker you're talking about, I just don't think they'd found the right balance, in performance writing or animation, yet.  In the On Leather Wings commentary they talked a lot about the quest to find realism in the context of the show, and to keep things believable.  This episode I think faltered heavily on that.  Yes, it's funny to think that Joker masterminded this scheme just to be in the same room as Batman with a face full of pie.  I think that if the more unbelievable elements had been handled better though, that punchline would have hit a lot harder.  Later Joker episodes I remember finding the right edge, even if they did stretch realism more than some other episodes they didn't stretch them the same way or as far.  (And yes, you have to consider it realism in the context of a series featuring science that is basically magic and where everyone wants to wear their fancy pajamas in public all the time.)  I will say I love it when Joker bends and breaks the fourth wall, taking the opportunity to talk directly to the audience, and the random moments that come up in later episodes where he's just by himself and being goofy, imitating Curly just for the hell of it. 

Another note, Tim Curry was originally cast as the Joker in TAS, but after he'd recorded a couple of episodes, they decided to recast and of course ended up with the legendary Mark Hamill.  Not only did Hamill's Joker become one of the most iconic portrayals of the character, but it also led to Hamill having a second career as a voice-actor.  Still, I think it would be interesting to hear some of Tim Curry's recordings for the character.

I'm pretty curious about this as well, and it'd be interesting to see this episode with his voice to see how it might have changed things.  Tim Curry has done some awesome voicework in the past, and while he probably never would have been my first choice for Joker, I know he can be a great villain.  To me though, one evil clown in a career is probably enough.

(http://img522.imageshack.us/img522/373/pennywise.gif)

And I don't understand why they put the episodes in the order they did on the animated sets.  I guess it's in production order rather than broadcast order?  I dunno.

I'm going to go ahead and assume that's the case unless someone corrects me.  On Leather Wings wasn't the first episode aired, but it is clearly identified as the pilot, and it makes sense to sit on Christmas with the Joker until Christmas actually rolls around.  Also, assuming this was one of the Curry episodes that Hamil had to re-record it might have started production early while being finished much later.

I think the best design of the Joker in the Diniverse is probably the version from the flashback scenes in Batman Beyond: Return of the Joker.

(http://www.markhamill.com/images/bbrotjpo.jpg)

Agreed.

I think another reason for the production order being what they used in the boxset is that the show aired on Saturdays and weekdays so if they used the order it aired in some two parts would have parts one at the start of the disc then you would have to watch five other episodes to get to part two. For instance The Red Claw episodes was the first one aird but part two did not air until the following saturday so there were five episodes between parts one and two.  That is kind of a strange way to put episodes on a DvD boxset.  It's just easier to place them in production order.
Title: Re: Batman: The Animated Series
Post by: Rattrap007 on August 20, 2011, 06:40:14 PM
easily one of my fav episodes was The Creeper episode. God that guy was hilarious. He even scares the Joker. Now THAT is insane..
Title: Re: Batman: The Animated Series
Post by: daltysmilth on August 20, 2011, 09:05:32 PM
easily one of my fav episodes was The Creeper episode. God that guy was hilarious. He even scares the Joker. Now THAT is insane..

I believe the Creeper was based on Bruce Timm's original concept for Freakazoid.
Title: Re: Batman: The Animated Series
Post by: mattwnelson on August 21, 2011, 12:56:07 AM
easily one of my fav episodes was The Creeper episode. God that guy was hilarious. He even scares the Joker. Now THAT is insane..

I believe the Creeper was based on Bruce Timm's original concept for Freakazoid.

Creeper's been around since the 60s.
Title: Re: Batman: The Animated Series
Post by: sarcasm_made_Easy on August 21, 2011, 01:18:47 AM
just bought the first volume.  will be here tuesday and will post my thoughts on episodes then.  Im sure your all SO excited to hear that.
Title: Re: Batman: The Animated Series
Post by: Rainbow Dash on August 21, 2011, 06:27:09 AM
Well, I'm going through my box sets, haven't done so in years.  Great stuff, just finished disk 1.
Title: Re: Batman: The Animated Series
Post by: RoninFox on August 21, 2011, 07:09:37 AM
Episode 3:  Nothing to Fear

(http://ryanlb.com/images/timmverse/ep3-ntf/thomas-wayne-2.jpg)

...except for zombie Roosevelt.

Synopsis:  During a charity event to raise money for the troubled Gotham University, Bruce Wayne is confronted by a troubled professor, Dr Long.  Troubled by a series of crimes that have rocked the University, the professor lashes out by telling Bruce that his father would be ashamed of what Bruce has done to the family name.  Before leaving the event, Bruce notices a strange helicopter landing on the roof of the University's bank.  Inside the bank, The Scarecrow breaks in with his henchmen, using his fear gas to subdue the guard.  While his henchmen grab what money they can, Scarecrow is only interesting in burning the bank down, pouring gasoline around the room and claiming "this isn't about money, it's about revenge."  Batman arrives wearing a gas mask, preventing Scarecrow from using his fear gas, but after a fight he is able to shoot Batman with a dart loaded with fear toxin while starting a fire.  As Scarecrow and his men escape, Batman is haunted by a vision of his father calling him a failure and a disappointment.  Batman retreats to the cave to analyze a scrap of fabric from the Scarecrow's costume for traces of the chemicals in the gas, all the while still suffering the effects of the toxin.  After Scarecrow reveals his identity to his men (Dr. Jonathan Crane, former professor of psychology at the University, dismissed for his radical fear-based experiments) he stages another attack, this time flooding a charity event with fear gas and kidnapping Dr. Long.  When Batman arrives again, the crowd turns against him, the toxin making them see him as a monster.  Scarecrow escapes in a blimp, but Batman pursues him, fighting a henchman on top of the blimp, leading to the vehicle to be damaged by machine gun fire.  As the blimp goes out of control Batman has another vision of his father, this time overcoming it by force of will.  He pulls himself together in time save Dr. Long, but not to capture Crane.  Analysis of the chemicals and some detective work on who would have access to them and has a history with the University leads Batman to Crane's identity.  When Crane arrives in his lab, he finds canisters of his own toxin are open and leaking into the room.  Breathing in the gas, he has visions of demonic bats, and Batman is able to subdue him easily.

This is a step back up in quality.  While I don't love the design these early episodes used for Scarecrow, he is a great character for a Batman story.  Things are a little simplistic here, and Scarecrow spends a good chunk of his screen time in a somewhat awkwardly expository mood, but the real story here is Batman fighting the effects of the toxin.  This is the first time the series spends any time on Batman's past, and his visions of his father are a chilling addition to the plot.  We finally get a genuinely warm moment with Alfred.  While in the Batcave, looking haggard in the midst of his analysis of the scrap of Scarecrow's costume he tells Alfred about the toxin, and his fear of his father's disappointment.  Alfred, until now a smug smartass for two and a half episodes straight, assures Bruce, "I know your father would be proud of you, because I'm so proud of you."

The absolute highlight of this episode is when Batman is hanging onto the blimp and he has a vision of his father again, this time as a giant that morphs into a demonic skeleton.  When Batman summons his will to fight his fear, it's with a line that went on to become truly iconic.  "You are not my father, I am not a disgrace!  I am vengeance!  I am the night!  I am Batman!"

There's a couple pretty good scenes with Detective Bullock again too.  He confronts Batman after the attempted bank arson, seeing the scrap that Batman's carrying and accusing him of trying to steal evidence.  At the end of the episode he tries to convince the Commissioner that Batman and Scarecrow are in cahoots, even betting his badge on it.  Gordon then reveals Scarecrow tied up with what looks like a note featuring a bat logo on his chest.  This is pretty much the comic relief of the whole episode, with the exception of a couple zingers from Alfred.  I love how the keep the police visible in an episode like this, even though they really don't figure into the completion of the case at all.  It might not do a lot for this particular episode, but in the overall series it's helping to keep Bullock established in the audience's mind.

The last shot of the episode really sticks with you.  Bruce stands in front of the grave of his parents, wordlessly laying a pair of roses in front of the headstone.  As he walks away, his shadow takes the form of Batman.  Other than maybe the visions of Thomas Wayne, its the best bit of animation this episode.

I'm starting to notice a few cool inside jokes and references here and there.  The guard at the bank is reading a Tiny Toons comic book before he's attacked, this show and Tiny Toons shared a lot of the same team.  At one point Bullock mocks Batman by calling him Zorro, and Zorro was one of Bob Kane's major inspirations for creating Batman.  The list of possible sources for the chemicals Batman found include Axis Engineering, referencing Axis Chemicals from the 1989 Batman flim, and Star Labs, a Superman reference.
Title: Re: Batman: The Animated Series
Post by: daltysmilth on August 21, 2011, 12:12:54 PM
This is one of those episodes I remember being much better when I was a kid.  I also remember the "I am vengeance... etc." line being used in a lot of the network promos for the series in general and this episode in particular.

By the way, are you going to include Mask of the Phantasm in this series of reviews?  If not, I could tackle it myself when it comes up.
Title: Re: Batman: The Animated Series
Post by: sarcasm_made_Easy on August 21, 2011, 02:15:52 PM
star labs is DC
Title: Re: Batman: The Animated Series
Post by: Johnny Unusual on August 21, 2011, 02:35:52 PM
I thought "Star Labs" was the Flash?
[/quote
]
star labs is DC
Yeah.  It's most closely associated with Superman though, as STAR Labs often helps Metropolis and Superman with testing for various sci-fi threats.
Title: Re: Batman: The Animated Series
Post by: sarcasm_made_Easy on August 21, 2011, 02:56:43 PM
its basically similar to shield in marvel
Title: Re: Batman: The Animated Series
Post by: RoninFox on August 21, 2011, 04:56:33 PM
I've been considering including all the Diniverse Batman movies I have access to. I have Mask of the Phantasm, Sub Zero, World's Finest and Mystery of the Batwoman, so I might as well throw them in. I also have Return of the Joker, but none of the rest of Batman Beyond. So might skip that one.
Title: Re: Batman: The Animated Series
Post by: Rainbow Dash on August 21, 2011, 05:31:35 PM
I never got that into Batman Beyond, but Return of the Joker is easily watchable with no prior knowledge.  It's a fantastic film.
Title: Re: Batman: The Animated Series
Post by: RoninFox on August 21, 2011, 05:51:01 PM
I never got that into Batman Beyond, but Return of the Joker is easily watchable with no prior knowledge.  It's a fantastic film.

Very true, I might still include it. Though as it stands I do have the censored version, and I've been meaning to track down the uncut.
Title: Re: Batman: The Animated Series
Post by: daltysmilth on August 21, 2011, 06:29:53 PM
I never got that into Batman Beyond, but Return of the Joker is easily watchable with no prior knowledge.  It's a fantastic film.

Very true, I might still include it. Though as it stands I do have the censored version, and I've been meaning to track down the uncut.

I managed to find the uncut version at Target. 
Title: Re: Batman: The Animated Series
Post by: Rainbow Dash on August 21, 2011, 06:30:36 PM
I think the Blu-Ray is only uncut.
Title: Re: Batman: The Animated Series
Post by: Compound on August 21, 2011, 07:40:28 PM
I never got that into Batman Beyond, but Return of the Joker is easily watchable with no prior knowledge.  It's a fantastic film.

Very true, I might still include it. Though as it stands I do have the censored version, and I've been meaning to track down the uncut.

If you get desperate enough, let me know. I've got a copy of the unedited version.
Title: Re: Batman: The Animated Series
Post by: Johnny Unusual on August 22, 2011, 10:29:46 AM
its basically similar to shield in marvel

Not really.  SHIELD is all about planetary defense and espionage, while STAR Labs is a science organization.  DC's SHIELD equivalent is Checkmate.
Title: Re: Batman: The Animated Series
Post by: sarcasm_made_Easy on August 22, 2011, 10:32:19 AM
Ah got ya.  Isnt there some sort of star labs marvel equal.
Title: Re: Batman: The Animated Series
Post by: Rattrap007 on August 22, 2011, 11:11:29 AM
Ah got ya.  Isnt there some sort of star labs marvel equal.

Yes.. it is called Stark Industries...
Title: Re: Batman: The Animated Series
Post by: Doctor Who? on August 22, 2011, 11:17:13 AM
Doesn't Mr.Fantastic also have a company that does lots of advanced science stuff too?
Title: Re: Batman: The Animated Series
Post by: sarcasm_made_Easy on August 22, 2011, 11:17:23 AM
well I was thinking more of a government agency.  And isnt Luthors company or maybe wayne industries = stark :)
Title: Re: Batman: The Animated Series
Post by: Raefire on August 22, 2011, 09:39:19 PM
Apparently The Hub (the channel with that pony show) has acquired the rights to the show from Disney. Interesting. Apparently they've also got the Batman Beyond rights, too.

http://www.nickandmore.com/2011/08/23/the-hubs-fall-schedule-first-look-batman-the-animated-series-goosebumps-join/
Title: Re: Batman: The Animated Series
Post by: sarcasm_made_Easy on August 22, 2011, 10:33:10 PM
On leather wings aka reliving my childhood one forgotten episode at a time

So i have never written a review of anything before.  I have also not read the two reviews on this episode prior to writing this.  Quite frankly i am not quite sure how i should go about it.  So I am going to post some random thoughts here real quick.

HOLY COW thats odo a couple years before he became odo.  Also he was CLEARLY playing the role of Dr. Red Herring.

How many cylinders does the batcar have?   As long as the hood is one have to assume 46.

Man the guy who plays batman actually SOUNDS young.  I wonder what he looks like now.

Is it supposed to look all scratchy like an old silent movie?

The episode was good, but i have to wonder why they went with manbat first.  The episode felt very fast too.  Almost like a perfunctory introduction to the world of batman without really digging into any characters.  Its still hard to believe how old this and by extension I am now.  Its surprising how well it holds up.  Most action cartoons are better choreographed now but this show is still quite enjoyable to watch. 

Hope all of that was fun to read an not a waste of time.  WOOT EPISODE 2!
Title: Re: Batman: The Animated Series
Post by: sarcasm_made_Easy on August 22, 2011, 11:02:28 PM
Christmas with the joker aka christmas in whatever the hell summer month it is currently

So again with random comments.

Mark hamill hasnt quite found his voice yet

HEY batman has cable in his car how is that possible?

How do you gag someone with a candy cane?  Just spit them out.

Ok bats one liner about is awesome:

Robin: you have never seen its a wonderful life?
Batman:  I could never get past the title.

So wonderfully perfect for batman

Awesome use of the nutcracker score lol

Why does Joker have a paunch

gothems big problem is they have a full fledged henchmen industry.

How did the joker sneak a rocket christmas tree into arkham? 

ya know if he let the joker die lives would be saved.  Just saying.

Good episode.  Felt much longer than the previous episode.  Amazing how is in there that is totally for adults like a few of the one liners.  Also the opening is STILL surprisingly epic.  Can't wait for episode three.
Title: Re: Batman: The Animated Series
Post by: sarcasm_made_Easy on August 22, 2011, 11:29:16 PM
Nothing to fear aka OOOOH must be scarecrow

Random observations:

is Bruce hitting on the ginger reporter?

heh the Drs speech= FUCK U WAYNE

yup a scare crow episode and why is a scare crow supposed to be scary to people

who has a henchmen named Nigel?

heh batman has a gas mask lol

Uh why does detective bullock have such a problem with batman.

wow the fear wing of the university is freaken huge.

did batman get his chicken soup?  the world may never know.

How come no one is scared of anything weird?  Like cupcakes or ATM machines?

Ok so apparently scarecrow capers.

Wow so episode three and we already have the iconic I AM BATMAN speech.  Not bad at all. 

is it easy to hide a glider in an urban setting? 

My thoughts:

So first episode hinting at bats origins.  Some awesome scenes here.  On top of that we get an intro to a neat character.  Pretty good not great.
Title: Re: Batman: The Animated Series
Post by: RoninFox on August 23, 2011, 05:07:18 AM
Trying to catch up, and streamline things a bit.  Figure I'll skimp a bit on the synopsis if you don't mind.

Episode 4:  The Last Laugh

(http://batman.neoseeker.com/w/i/batman/c/c8/Robinhenchman.jpg)

Oh please, just one more.

Synopsis:  On April Fools Day, Joker sails through the rivers of Gotham on a huge garbage barge that lets out a massive cloud of chemical gas, making everyone who breathes it laugh uncontrollably and act crazy.  He and his henchmen use the cover of laughing fits to stage leisurely robberies while wearing protective masks.  Batman starts to investigate, learning that prolonged exposure to the gas could cause permanent insanity, which is especially troubling after Alfred is exposed to it.  With his gas mask in place, the chase begins with Batman tracking the barge in the Batboat.  He easily fights off the standard-issue clown-masked henchmen, but he's stopped by what turns out to be a huge robot.  Trapped in a metal canister, Batman is dumped in the water, almost drowning before calling the Batboat with a remote on his belt to cut the canister open with a laser.  Finally Batman tracks the crew to a waste disposal plant.  Fighting the henchmen again, Batman pulls off the masks, leaving them helpless in the gas.  He fights the "Captain Clown" robot again, eventually trapping it in a compactor and crushing it into a cube.  Finally he chases the Joker through the plant until Joker trips on a cable and almost falls into an incinerator.

Well...it was better than the last Joker episode.  In some ways it seemed like it was getting everything better.  Joker was still funny, but the over-the-top cartoonyness seemed in better control.  The clown robot was pretty silly, but Joker's reaction to its defeat "You killed Captain Clown!  YOU KILLED CAPTAIN CLOWN!" made it all worthwhile.  This marks the first time in the animated series that the Joker uses a gas attack, something that tends to become a Joker trademark.  Seems to be an easy way to make a dangerous situation without seeming too violent for television.

Just when I thought they'd improved everything at least a little compared to Christmas with the Joker, they give us the exact same damn ending!  Once again we get robbed on a last fight with Batman because the Joker just runs down a catwalk and trips, falling over a railing.  Why the hell can't Joker stay away from railings?  This time we get a moment of Joker begging though.  "You wouldn't let me fry, would you Batman?" showing Batman acting casual like he just might...for a second.

I think we all know that if the Micheal Keaton Batman was here, Joker would have died twice by now.
Title: Re: Batman: The Animated Series
Post by: daltysmilth on August 23, 2011, 08:51:49 AM
The score for this episode is one of my favorites from the whole series, mostly because of the theme composed for the episode.  It's so unlike any other score from the show with the use of percussion.  Also the Danny Elfman theme makes another appearance, this time as Batman chases Joker on the conveyer belt. 

And yeah, the "you killed captain clown" line is probably my favorite Joker line from the whole series.
Title: Re: Batman: The Animated Series
Post by: Doctor Who? on August 23, 2011, 09:02:15 AM
The score for this episode is one of my favorites from the whole series, mostly because of the theme composed for the episode.  It's so unlike any other score from the show with the use of percussion.  Also the Danny Elfman theme makes another appearance, this time as Batman chases Joker on the conveyer belt. 

And yeah, the "you killed captain clown" line is probably my favorite Joker line from the whole series.

I love the score for that episode too.
Title: Re: Batman: The Animated Series
Post by: RoninFox on August 26, 2011, 03:44:54 PM
Episode 5:  Pretty Poison

(http://images4.wikia.nocookie.net/__cb20080329173758/batman/images/1/12/Prettypoison.jpg)

We really should take more Batman villains from Alice Cooper songs.

Synopsis:  Years after the construction of Blackgate prison, championed by Harvey Dent, Gotham isn't quite as safe as intended.  Batman tracks down an escapee from the prison, while Harvey is left waiting at a restaurant along with his girlfriend Pamela Isley for his friend Bruce Wayne to arrive.  Bruce finally arrives, late as usual, and they have a pleasant dinner until Pam has to leave.  After a long kiss goodbye, Harvey turns to Bruce and reveals that he's asked Pam to marry him.  While Bruce is still dealing with the shock of the wedding news, Harvey suddenly collapses at the table and has to be rushed to the hospital.  The doctor who examines him reveals to Bruce and the police that Harvey was poisoned.  Bruce steals a sample of Harvey's blood to analyze the poison, finding it comes from the Wild Thorny Rose.  He plans to synthesize an antidote from the plant, but Alfred breaks the news that that strain of rose is extinct.  After checking on Harvey again at the hospital he runs into Pamela.  When they take a moment to comfort each other, Pam seems to go to kiss Bruce, but Bruce avoids it and just hugs her.  Leaving, he calls Alfred to check on Pamela's background, finding out that she has a PhD in Botany, works as a chemist for a cosmetics company, and is considered an expert in rare and extinct plant life.  As Batman, he tracks down her greenhouse/laboratory and breaks in, where he's captured by a giant fly trap.  Pam reveals herself in her full "Poison Ivy" persona, going into her Bond-villain monologue.  She reveals that she poisoned Harvey with her lipstick as revenge, since the construction of the prison he built almost wiped out the Wild Thorny Rose entirely.  She dug up the only surviving plant before the groundbreaking and used it as the base of her attack.  With Batman still captured, she kisses him with the poison too, teasing him by showing the antidote she's already made.  When Batman fights out of the trap, cutting through the tentacle-like vines of the fly trap with a knife, Ivy becomes enraged and starts shooting at Batman with a small crossbow on her wrist.  Batman dodges the darts, one of them accidentally ripping through the main body of the fly trap.  As the fight continues, an overhead lamp crashes and starts a raging fire.  Ivy almost drops Batman down a trap door leading to a pit of deadly spiky plants, but Batman keeps hold of the edge and reveals at the last moment that he's picked up the rose bush in it's planter, threatening to destroy it if Ivy doesn't trade him the antidote.  She agrees and they both escape the fire.  With the antidote, both Batman and Harvey make a complete recovery.  Bruce reveals in the hospital that he doesn't think Pam is wife material.  Ivy gets locked up in Stonegate, allowed to keep the rose with her, vowing that "they can bury us deep, but we always grow back..."

This was my first introduction to the Poison Ivy character as a kid, and the first "Batman hot chick" we find in the series unless you count Summer Gleeson...and I don't think anyone does just because she's so minor a character.  While I do like some of the more recent comics I've seen with Ivy when she's depicted as a green-skinned mutated life form more plant than human, I think there's something to be said for this version where she's just human.  Incredibly intelligent and dangerously twisted, but human.  She doesn't just naturally excrete venom or send out pheromones, she has to perfect her own combinations of chemicals to hide in her lipstick or perfume, showing off her intellect while turning archetypal symbols of femininity into deadly weapons.  Eventually in the animated series (when we get to the changeover of style) Ivy does shift from this version to the half-plant version and it always bugged me that they never really explain that, but we'll get to that when I review those episodes.

There's a lot that gets me smiling when watching this episode.  Even though I end up rolling my eyes a bit at Ivy's long winded speeches, I do like the character and the way she feels so totally justified in killing any mere human who would dare murder a plant.  A femme fatale character done right is a great thing.  Also I like the way they keep establishing Harvey, by now he feels like a well rounded sympathetic character.  Showing the friendship between him and Bruce adds another layer on that.  The flashback to the groundbreaking of the prison with Bruce and Harvey standing side by side was a good start, and the juxtaposition of Batman chasing down a criminal while Harvey tells Pam "there's nothing we don't know about each other" was a great follow up.  

Also, I should point out, since I haven't yet, so far every episode has put an emphasis on Batman as the detective.  True a lot of his detective work involves sitting at the Batcomputer, but it still helps keep the show feeling smart.  Before this most of my exposure to Batman detective work involved him sitting around reading Frank Gorshin's letters while Robin spouts out the answers as Batman responds "right!"
Title: Re: Batman: The Animated Series
Post by: doggans on August 26, 2011, 08:44:45 PM
Also I like the way they keep establishing Harvey, by now he feels like a well rounded sympathetic character.  Showing the friendship between him and Bruce adds another layer on that.

Yeah, I love that dynamic, and I sort of wish we had even more episodes with Harvey as Bruce's friend before he became Two-Face. I think if the series was being done today with more of a focus on continuity and story arcs, "Two-Face" would have been the first season finale.

I also agree with your observation of Batman as a detective. I love how after there have been notable live action takes on Batman, the first filmed version to really play up the detective angle is the children's cartoon--a medium often dismissed as "mindless action".
Title: Re: Batman: The Animated Series
Post by: Rainbow Dash on August 27, 2011, 03:38:19 PM
In re-watching the show, I totally forgot how long it took to introduce Riddler.
Title: Re: Batman: The Animated Series
Post by: gbeenie on August 30, 2011, 11:31:58 PM
It was the Joker's eyes that bugged me in the later seasons.

(http://www.dohtem.com/joker/animation/jkrart25.gif)

You give those eyes to talking puppies. Not crazed lunatics. :^)

Actually, the eyes were the one part of the Joker redesign I liked.
Title: Re: Batman: The Animated Series
Post by: gbeenie on August 30, 2011, 11:33:04 PM
It was still one of my favorite shows after the change, just prefer the way it was before.  I kind of understand why they did the changes, they wanted to be able to present Batman and Superman in a block and even do a their "Worlds Finest" crossover movie/three parter episodes, and if they put Batman as designed next to Superman as designed it would have been grating to look at.  They needed a cohesive style.  Just a matter of personal taste.

At this point, talking about the show again, I'm tempted to steal anais's idea from her Star Trek thread and just watch the show from beginning to end, revisiting each episode and posting a review here.  True, she's watching shows for the first time, so it won't have the same kind of impact, but could still be fun.  I can keep it in this thread to keep the discussions going, and anyone else can join in with their own reviews.  Whats everyone else think?

I blieve there were also budget cuts so they needed to chenge the style to something that would take less time to animated.  I don't think the WB gave them as much money as Fox.

But the creators also had less content restrictions on WB.
Title: Re: Batman: The Animated Series
Post by: Rainbow Dash on August 31, 2011, 06:35:54 AM
In the re-watch I have noticed other things.  They make sure no one "dies", and make sure to explain that.

I'm watching the first episode with the League of Shadows.  Two assassins attack Batman and an informant, and the assassin manages to throw the informant off the Statue of Liberty (or whatever the Gotham equivalent is).  They make sure to show the guy land int eh water, then come up.  Batman then corners the two assassins, who use a gas on themselves, they show their faces and they look pretty dead.  Next scene batman said they used a mind-wiping gas.

I know it was a show for kids, but this episode just really stands out with them going out of their way to explain that no one died.
Title: Re: Batman: The Animated Series
Post by: sarcasm_made_Easy on August 31, 2011, 08:07:47 AM
And thats why i found Under the red hood so excellent.  At the heart was a pretty excellent discussion on batmans methods and the morality of not killing.  Although i found Batmans explanation a little weak. 
Title: Re: Batman: The Animated Series
Post by: daltysmilth on August 31, 2011, 09:13:55 AM
Yeah, it does get a little absurd how they'll avoid letting anyone think for more than a second that it's possible that anyone dies in the course of an episode.  I'm pretty sure there's at least one episode where a character who was not previously seen wearing a parachute suddenly opens a parachute in mid-fall.  I can't think which one it is.

I'm glad Mask of the Phantasm didn't have as many restraints as the regular series did in that regard. 
Title: Re: Batman: The Animated Series
Post by: Doctor Who? on August 31, 2011, 09:18:38 AM
It's not as bad as GI Joe was in this regard.

Yeah how many times can you get blasted in the chest with a giant laser and be okay?
Title: Re: Batman: The Animated Series
Post by: daltysmilth on August 31, 2011, 09:26:38 AM
G.I. Joe, the original Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles, and a couple of episodes of Batman all prove the rule that deadly violence is okay... as long as it happens to a robot.

More on that when we get to those episodes.
Title: Re: Batman: The Animated Series
Post by: Doctor Who? on August 31, 2011, 09:28:31 AM
G.I. Joe, the original Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles, and a couple of episodes of Batman all prove the rule that deadly violence is okay... as long as it happens to a robot.

More on that when we get to those episodes.

And that is why the robot will rise up against us one day.
Title: Re: Batman: The Animated Series
Post by: k1 on August 31, 2011, 09:37:29 AM
It's not as bad as GI Joe was in this regard.

Yeah how many times can you get blasted in the chest with a giant laser and be okay?

At least once according to our in-depth field testing during our iRiff recording sessions for G.I. Joe.   ;)
Title: Re: Batman: The Animated Series
Post by: Doctor Who? on August 31, 2011, 09:39:15 AM
It's not as bad as GI Joe was in this regard.

Yeah how many times can you get blasted in the chest with a giant laser and be okay?

At least once according to our in-depth field testing during our iRiff recording sessions for G.I. Joe.   ;)

As long as you have cartoon life insurance.
Title: Re: Batman: The Animated Series
Post by: Johnny Unusual on September 02, 2011, 05:58:59 PM
In the re-watch I have noticed other things.  They make sure no one "dies", and make sure to explain that.

I'm watching the first episode with the League of Shadows.  Two assassins attack Batman and an informant, and the assassin manages to throw the informant off the Statue of Liberty (or whatever the Gotham equivalent is).  They make sure to show the guy land int eh water, then come up.  Batman then corners the two assassins, who use a gas on themselves, they show their faces and they look pretty dead.  Next scene batman said they used a mind-wiping gas.

I know it was a show for kids, but this episode just really stands out with them going out of their way to explain that no one died.

Which is funny, because making themselves braindead is essentially dead.  And sorry if I opened a can of worms with that statement.
Title: Re: Batman: The Animated Series
Post by: Rainbow Dash on September 04, 2011, 06:59:17 PM
So my rewatch has now taken me to the 4thbox set.  I honestly don't remember watching much of the show once the artstyle changes.  So far I think I was better off for it.  Obviously the changes were made to allow for faster, cheaper animation, but unfortunately the stores also seem to be a lot weaker.
Title: Re: Batman: The Animated Series
Post by: Rainbow Dash on September 04, 2011, 08:02:00 PM
Heard about it and (sadly) read the outline, but I don't think I've ever seen the entire thing.  Should be coming up shortly.  Be happy to see some great episodes, but so far it's been pretty meh.
Title: Re: Batman: The Animated Series
Post by: Rainbow Dash on September 05, 2011, 02:20:38 PM
Finished it up.  "Over the Edge" was a superb episode but I'd still say that it was very much the exception to the 4th DVD set.  Things just got a bit silly, and the villains all seemed to lose a bit of their personality from the previous incarnations.  Only change I liked was Penguin being a nightclub owner.
Title: Re: Batman: The Animated Series
Post by: Russell on September 06, 2011, 04:00:11 PM
Almost Got 'im... I love that episode. Probably the best episode.
Title: Re: Batman: The Animated Series
Post by: Rainbow Dash on September 06, 2011, 08:22:50 PM
Think my top 3 would probably be...

Beware the Gray Ghost
The Man Who Killed Batman
Heart of Ice
Title: Re: Batman: The Animated Series
Post by: Russell on September 06, 2011, 10:15:31 PM
Think my top 3 would probably be...
Beware the Gray Ghost
The Man Who Killed Batman
Heart of Ice
The man who killed Batman... that was a pretty hardcore episode! I mean Jesus the Joker
tries to kill a guy by dropping him in a vat of acid as Harley plays amazing grace on Kazoo!
That was just... classic.
Title: Re: Batman: The Animated Series
Post by: Scribblesense on September 16, 2011, 08:44:05 PM
Currently watching Batman: TAS as the discs arrive from Netflix. Just watched "Pretty Poison" and the one thing that really struck my perverted little mind was that: I'm surprised they got away with the giant, fleshy, drooling venus fly trap that restrains Batman as he fights off a kiss from Poison Ivy, who mocks him for being afraid of "cooties".

Heh. I guess it's something kids wouldn't get, but it's just too obvious to adults.
Title: Re: Batman: The Animated Series
Post by: Rattrap007 on September 17, 2011, 06:07:19 AM
Watching the first season right now. Just finished the first Killer Croc episode.

One thing that kinda jarred me a bit was a few times in the first few episodes there are moments of silence. No music.. just faint footsteps and other quiet SFX.

Overall great writing.

Best so far this season:

Feat of Clay
Two-Face
Heart of Ice
Grey Ghost
Title: Re: Batman: The Animated Series
Post by: sarcasm_made_Easy on September 19, 2011, 06:55:57 PM
Ok was watching the clock king episode again.  Thats when it hit me.  Why does Bats always humor his villians themes?  oh the baddie this week really likes clocks bust out the clock puns.  he does it no matter who he is fighting.  It is kinda crazy. 
Title: Re: Batman: The Animated Series
Post by: daltysmilth on September 25, 2011, 10:17:22 PM
Something I noticed in rewatching "Pretty Poison".  The credits list, under additional voices, "Melissa Manchester AS Neil Ross".  For those that don't recognize the name, Neil Ross is a pretty prominent voice actor who's been in the biz at least since the 80's, starting with shows like G.I. Joe and Transformers and the like.  And the doctor sounds like Neil Ross.  Yet the credits say "Melissa Manchester AS Neil Ross".  Implying that Neil Ross is the name of a character, not one of the performers.  My guess is they meant to say "Melissa Manchester AND Neil Ross" and messed up.  Also, I wonder if they hired a soundalike for some of Bullock's lines, because he sounds different in this episode.  Finally, I noticed a couple of the waiters sounded suspiciously like Kevin Conroy and Bob Hastings with French accents.
Title: Re: Batman: The Animated Series
Post by: RoninFox on September 25, 2011, 10:49:19 PM
I'm hoping to get back to reviewing these soon, unfortunately most of my DVDs are packed. I'm really going through Batman withdrawal here.
Title: Re: Batman: The Animated Series
Post by: Scribblesense on October 02, 2011, 12:06:52 PM
I'm beginning to think that the TAS villain Roland Daggett might be inspired by characters from Atlas Shrugged and The Fountainhead, after watching "Appointment in Crime Alley".

- His physical attributes closely match those of Howard Roark (at least, they both have trademark red hair)
- "Daggett" sounds like "Taggart", the protagonist of Atlas Shrugged
- In his speech to the Gotham Business Bureau (in which he appeals to them to allow him to tear down the slums in Crime Alley and redevelop), he argues that "the weak should not hinder the strong", which is pretty much the gist of Randian Objectivism.

I'll admit that's a pretty weak argument but eh, take it for what it is.

Also! I loved the episode "Eternal Youth", which had Poison Ivy running a health spa in which she was turning people into trees. That's the kind of villainous plot that I would fully expect Poison Ivy to undertake - it's certainly way more interesting than another horde of pirahna plants and giant roots lowering the property value of the affected neighborhood.
Title: Re: Batman: The Animated Series
Post by: Compound on October 04, 2011, 03:42:52 PM
New Batman animated news - Cartoon Network is working on yet another batman show, this one titled "Beware the Batman." (They've also got a Green Lantern animated series, a Doom Patrol series and Lauren "MLP" Faust is working on shorts with Batgirl, Supergirl and Wondergirl.)  It's CGI, BTW.

A look at BtB:
(http://blog.newsarama.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/10/bewarethebatman.jpg)

Yes, that's Katana (for some reason) on the left and a gun toting Alfred on the right.

While I'm not excited that DC is hitting the Batman well again, there's enough variety in that upcoming list to make me happy. Plus Action Alfred too.
Title: Re: Batman: The Animated Series
Post by: Doctor Who? on October 04, 2011, 05:45:45 PM
New Batman animated news - Cartoon Network is working on yet another batman show, this one titled "Beware the Batman." (They've also got a Green Lantern animated series, a Doom Patrol series and Lauren "MLP" Faust is working on shorts with Batgirl, Supergirl and Wondergirl.)  It's CGI, BTW.

A look at BtB:
(http://blog.newsarama.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/10/bewarethebatman.jpg)



AAAAHHHHH! All Blue and a tilted camera! It's Battlefield Earth the animated series!
Title: Re: Batman: The Animated Series
Post by: doggans on October 04, 2011, 06:52:13 PM
You mean BAT-tlefield Earth!

//bitch-slapped by the pun police
Title: Re: Batman: The Animated Series
Post by: daltysmilth on October 04, 2011, 07:31:58 PM
Who is that above the upper right portion of Batman's cape?  It looks like Slippy from StarFox.
Title: Re: Batman: The Animated Series
Post by: Rattrap007 on October 05, 2011, 03:16:10 PM
I blame Bat-Mite for this. He made BBATB jump the shark so we'd end up with this. Definitely not Awesome-sauce...
Title: Re: Batman: The Animated Series
Post by: gbeenie on October 07, 2011, 09:06:34 PM
I blame Bat-Mite for this. He made BBATB jump the shark

Are you kidding? The Bat-Mite episodes of BatB are the BEST!
Title: Re: Batman: The Animated Series
Post by: Rattrap007 on October 08, 2011, 06:23:16 AM
I blame Bat-Mite for this. He made BBATB jump the shark

Are you kidding? The Bat-Mite episodes of BatB are the BEST!

You haven't seen the final episode of BBATB have you?

Spoiler (click to show/hide)

Hence it wasn't a joke that I hated Bat-Mite (I loved him btw) but a reference to the last episode
Title: Re: Batman: The Animated Series
Post by: gbeenie on October 08, 2011, 06:18:48 PM
Oops! My mistake, then.
Title: Re: Batman: The Animated Series
Post by: Rattrap007 on October 09, 2011, 03:42:47 PM
It was a hilarious joke episode. Watch it.
Title: Re: Batman: The Animated Series
Post by: daltysmilth on October 09, 2011, 08:46:32 PM
I blame Bat-Mite for this. He made BBATB jump the shark

Are you kidding? The Bat-Mite episodes of BatB are the BEST!

You haven't seen the final episode of BBATB have you?

Spoiler (click to show/hide)

Hence it wasn't a joke that I hated Bat-Mite (I loved him btw) but a reference to the last episode

Hey, I thought of doing exactly the same thing if I ever did a comedy series. By which I mean have the show go out of its way to jump the shark when it was coming to an end.  But I was going to have it happen in the second-to-last episode, not the finale.




Title: Re: Batman: The Animated Series
Post by: Johnny Unusual on October 14, 2011, 06:21:01 AM

(http://blog.newsarama.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/10/bewarethebatman.jpg)


Hmmm... I'm not sure I care for the knew look (although BatB took some getting used to too).  And is that really Alfred with guns?  Or just a really spiffy Jim Gordon.  It's hard to tell.  Still, if it's Alfred, that doesn't seem right at all considering Bat's gun hatred.

Oh, and in the background, is that Professor Pyg?
(http://herospy.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/08/batman_robin_015.jpg)

If so, this might continue the Grant Morrison influence that tBatB hinted at.

 Oh, actually, what I'm really excited about is the idea of a Doom Patrol cartoon.  It could be the weirdest cartoon from DC yet, if they do it right.  Plus, I'd love to see an animated Mr. Nobody and the Brotherhood of Dada.
Title: Re: Batman: The Animated Series
Post by: daltysmilth on October 14, 2011, 08:34:41 AM

(http://blog.newsarama.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/10/bewarethebatman.jpg)


Hmmm... I'm not sure I care for the knew look (although BatB took some getting used to too).  And is that really Alfred with guns?  Or just a really spiffy Jim Gordon.  It's hard to tell.  Still, if it's Alfred, that doesn't seem right at all considering Bat's gun hatred.

Actually, I believe Alfred has been known to use a gun from time to time in the comics.
Title: Re: Batman: The Animated Series
Post by: gbeenie on October 14, 2011, 12:36:47 PM
And, yes, that IS Professor Pyg.

Although this is just me spit-balling, I suspect the Kitana thing came about because they were originally gonna use Damien, but S&P decided that a sword-wielding ten-year-old was a bit much.
Title: Re: Batman: The Animated Series
Post by: Rattrap007 on October 14, 2011, 04:53:06 PM
Recently watched joker's Millions. Loved a quick cameo by Paul Dini. He plays a replacement Harley.

Joker get's rich, pay's for a completely clean slate and spends money left and right. He decides to let Harley stay in Arkham and get a new one. One of the candidates is Paul Dini dressed in a Harlequin suit. Joker looks at him and goes with the next one. But she proves to be an idiot. Joker makes the comment "Shoulda gone with the fat guy..."