RiffTrax Forum

General Discussion => General (Off-Topic) Discussion => Topic started by: Pak-Man on July 18, 2011, 10:10:34 AM

Title: LoC 50 - Top Video Games of the '80s (And before!) - Today's High Scores
Post by: Pak-Man on July 18, 2011, 10:10:34 AM
Top 50 Video Games of the '80s (And before!)

Here's the ol' Cut n' Paste!

Participants were asked to send  a list of your 25 Favorite video games from before December 31, 1989. 18 ballots were received with 185 unique entries, and those ranked on a point system allowing 25 points for a #1 choice, 24 for a #2, and all the way down to 1 point for #25. The points were added up, and what follows are the selections.

Tiebreakers work like such: If two games have equal pointage, the game that appeared on the most lists ranks higher. If those games appeared on the same amount of lists, then the game ranked higher on the individual list got the higher spot. A game that was someone's #4 beats another person's #6, for example. If there was still a tie, then the one with more top votes got the bump. (2 #3 votes beat out 1 #3 vote) And then if the game was still tied, alphabetical order reigned supreme.

Without further ado, enjoy the top 50 games of the '80s (And before!)
Title: Re: LoC 50 - Top Video Games of the '80s (And before!) - Today's High Scores
Post by: Pak-Man on July 18, 2011, 10:11:47 AM
#50 - Bad Dudes Vs. DragonNinja

(35 Points) 2 of 18 Lists - Highest Ranking - #7 sarcasm made Easy
(http://i212.photobucket.com/albums/cc83/pakgor/bad_dudes.gif)

The president has been kidnapped by ninjas. Are you a bad enough dude to rescue the president?

Advertisement:
(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/c/c0/Bad_Dudes_DragonNinja_arcadeflyer.png)

Release Date:  1988

Just the facts/Stuff I wiki'd:

Bad Dudes Vs. DragonNinja, often referred to simply as Bad Dudes, and known in Japan simply as DragonNinja, is a 1988 beat 'em up arcade game developed and published by Data East. It is based on the U.S. pop culture of the late 1980s, featuring references to Michael Jackson's Bad and to ninjas, which were popular in the 1980s due to films such as Octagon and Enter the Ninja.
 
The game starts in New York City, where President Ronnie (based on U.S. President Ronald Reagan) has been kidnapped by the nefarious DragonNinja. The game's intro begins with the following introduction: "Rampant ninja related crimes these days... Whitehouse is not the exception...". As soon as that occurs, a Secret Service agent (who resembles Arnold Schwarzenegger as he appears in The Terminator) asks two street-smart brawlers, named Blade and Striker: "President Ronnie has been kidnapped by the ninjas. Are you a bad enough dude to rescue Ronnie?". After hearing that, the Bad Dudes pursue the DragonNinja through the city streets, highway, sewers, transport train, forest, cave and into the secret ninja base in order to save President Ronnie.
 
The Japanese and English language versions' endings of the game differ. In the English version, after the Bad Dudes defeat DragonNinja, they celebrate by eating burgers with President Ronnie. At the very end, President Ronnie is seen holding a burger while standing between the Bad Dudes. Behind them are many security guards with the White House behind them. In the Japanese version, President Ronnie gave the Bad Dudes a statue of them as a tribute to them. The Bad Dudes are seen leaning against a fence on a sidewalk next to their statue. Unlike the ending of the international version, the Japanese version's ending shows a list of every enemy in the game with their names (except the green ninja boss that multiplies himself), while some faces appear next to the names of the game's staff. The background music played in both versions' endings are also completely different.

Bad Dudes VS. DragonNinja was considered by many outside of Japan at the time of its release as Data East's answer to the 1987 beat 'em up hit Double Dragon by Technos; however Bad Dudes Vs. DragonNinja was heavily inspired by the 1987 Sega arcade game, Shinobi.
 
Player One controlling Blade (in white pants) and Player Two controlling Striker (in green pants) will start with nothing but the ability to do punches, kicks and jumps (however most enemies can be beaten with only a single hit of any kind). Some moves are special like spinning kicks and the ability to charge themselves up to throw a powerful, but short-ranged punch toward opponents. Players will also come across several power-ups: some are weapons and some recharge a player's health, yet others add a few seconds to the remaining time. Using the picked-up knives and nunchakus both had their advantages and disadvantages.
 
The various types of enemies encountered in the game have their own means of attack. The basic blue-colored ninja directly charge the player, while some leap with their swords, or throw shuriken and makibishi; there are also acrobatic female ninja, attack dogs, and even people who are on fire. The enemies may be beaten down or avoided. At the end of each level, a boss will appear which needs to be defeated to progress to the next level. The first of them is Karnov, who cameos from the Data East game of the same name; the background music during the fight with him is similar to the main theme in Karnov as well. Each boss has their own special attacks: Karnov, for example, can breathe fire at the player. At the successful completion of each level, the dude(s) strike a "bad" pose and proclaim, "I'm bad!", possibly a reference to Michael Jackson's then-recently released song, "Bad".

Pak's Thoughts -  Bad Dudes is the first game I remember playing that had a secret move. Nowhere on the arcade cabinet (At least nowhere on MY arcade cabinet) did it mention that if you held down the punch button, you could charge up a fire-punch. I heard that tip from my best friend at the time, who had heard it from a random kid at an arcade. Word of mouth was so important back then when it came to passing around video game secrets. The internet spoils gamers. :^)
Title: Re: LoC 50 - Top Video Games of the '80s (And before!) - Today's High Scores
Post by: Pak-Man on July 18, 2011, 10:12:14 AM
#49 - 1942

(36 Points) 3 of 18 Lists - Highest Ranking - #11 - Monty, RVR II
(http://i212.photobucket.com/albums/cc83/pakgor/1942-arcade.jpg)


Advertisement:
(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/5/52/1942_arcade_flyer.png)


Release Date:  December 1984

Just the facts/Stuff I wiki'd:

1942 is a vertically scrolling shoot 'em up made by Capcom that was released for the arcade in 1984. It was the first game in the 19XX series. It was followed by 1943: The Battle of Midway.
 
1942 is set in the Pacific theater of World War II. The goal is to reach Tokyo and destroy the entire Japanese air fleet. The player pilots a plane dubbed the "Super Ace" (but its appearance is clearly that of a Lockheed P-38 Lightning). The player has to shoot down enemy planes; to avoid enemy fire, the player can perform a roll or "loop-the-loop". During the game the player may collect a series of power-ups, one of them allowing the plane to be escorted by two other smaller fighters in a Tip Tow formation.
 
The game was later ported to the NES (developed by Micronics), MSX, NEC PC-8801, Windows Mobile Professional, and Game Boy Color. It was ported by the European games publisher Elite Systems to the Amstrad CPC, ZX Spectrum and Commodore 64. The game was included as part of Capcom Classics Collection for the Xbox and PlayStation 2 in 2005. The arcade version has been released on the Wii Virtual Console in Japan on December 21, 2010, the PAL region on January 21, 2011 and in North America on January 24, 2011.
 
Martin Bedard of Saint-Lazare, Quebec, Canada holds the record for this game with 13,360,960 points on November 19, 2006.

1942 was one of Capcom's first breakaway hits, eclipsing in popularity the company's preceding three titles: (Vulgus, Sonson, and Pirate Ship Higemaru). While not as popular as some of Capcom's series that would debut later in the 1980s (Street Fighter and Mega Man in particular), 1942 would become one of Capcom's hallmark games throughout the arcade era.
 
Although not the first game to receive a sequel (with Pirate Ship Higemaru receiving a Japan-only console semi-sequel, Higemaru Makaijima, in April 1987), 1942 was the first Capcom title to spawn a successful series of sequels, with five titles in the 19XX line released from 1987 to 2000. Additionally, many of Capcom's other vertical shooters featured very similar gameplay to the series such as Varth: Operation Thunderstorm.
 
1942's longevity has shown through in many re-releases since its introduction, principally in Capcom Generations 1 for the Playstation and Saturn consoles. It was featured in the Capcom Classics Collection for the PlayStation 2 and Xbox, as well as Capcom Classics Collection: Reloaded for the PlayStation Portable.

Pak's Thoughts -  A good, solid vertical shooter. I have the Capcom Classics Collection downloaded onto my PSP, and 1942 has become one of my go-to titles whenever I feel like killing a few minutes.
Title: Re: LoC 50 - Top Video Games of the '80s (And before!) - Today's High Scores
Post by: Pak-Man on July 18, 2011, 10:12:40 AM
#48 - DuckTales

(36 Points) 3 of 18 Lists - Highest Ranking - #9 - Gunflyer
(http://i212.photobucket.com/albums/cc83/pakgor/Ducktales.gif)


Advertisement:
http://www.youtube.com/v/qNEq3zqeaDQ?version=3&hl=en_US


Release Date:  1989

Just the facts/Stuff I wiki'd:

DuckTales is a video game based on the Disney animated TV series of the same name. It was first released in the United States for the Nintendo Entertainment System by Capcom in 1989. In this game, Scrooge McDuck travels around the world collecting treasures to become the world's richest duck. The game was later ported to Game Boy. This game is unrelated to DuckTales: The Quest for Gold, which was released on a variety of personal computers in the early 1990s.
 
DuckTales is often a subject of NES-related nostalgia and was generally popular. The game provides a good example of the work produced by Capcom in the late 1980s and early 1990s, along with such titles as those in the Mega Man franchise; both shared key personnel such as Tokuro Fujiwara, Keiji Inafune and Yoshihiro Sakaguchi. DuckTales has much in common with the Mega Man games: bright and colorful graphics, tight play control with unique gameplay dynamics (such as using Scrooge's cane as a weapon, tool, and pogo stick), and non-linear gameplay.

The player controls Scrooge McDuck, the richest duck in the world, on a quest for even more treasure. Scrooge can jump using the A button; his cane is used as a weapon to defeat enemies or strike objects (B button) and as a pogo stick to jump higher (A then B + Down). There is a wide variety of helpful non-player characters and enemy characters.
 
DuckTales comprises five levels that can be played in any order (similar to the Mega Man games). A boss guards the treasure that Scrooge seeks at the end of each level. There are also two hidden treasures: a golden ring in the African Mines level and a golden mirror in the Moon level. Upon finishing all five levels, the player is directed back to Transylvania for the final boss fight. DuckTales contains some non-linear gameplay, in that the player can revisit levels to get items that unlock parts of other levels.

Pak's Thoughts -  Ahh for the days when making a video game based off a popular cartoon didn't mean the game had to be horrible. It didn't mean the game always made sense, mind you (When has Scrooge EVER used his cane like a pogo stick?) but the game itself was darn good. It's also the first game I ever beat (And with both the secret treasures, no less!).
Title: Re: LoC 50 - Top Video Games of the '80s (And before!) - Today's High Scores
Post by: Pak-Man on July 18, 2011, 10:13:06 AM
#47 - Shinobi

(37 Points) 3 of 18 Lists - Highest Ranking - #3 - D.B. Barnes
(http://i212.photobucket.com/albums/cc83/pakgor/shinobi.png)


Advertisement:
Spoiler (click to show/hide)


Release Date:  November 1987

Just the facts/Stuff I wiki'd:

Shinobi is an arcade game, developed and published by Sega. It was originally released in 1987 and ported to numerous systems. The game spawned numerous sequels.
 
A re-worked version was released for Xbox 360's Xbox Live Arcade on June 10, 2009 with HD support and online leaderboards. The original coin-op version of the game was released for the Virtual Console in Japan on July 14, 2009, in the PAL regions on October 23, 2009 and in North America on December 7, 2009.

Shinobi is about a ninja named Joe Musashi who has to stop a criminal organization called "Zeed" who are kidnapping the children of the Oboro clan. Through five missions, each with three or four stages, Musashi must make his way to Zeed's headquarters and free all the hostages before confronting the bosses at the final stage of each mission.

The five missions in the game are each three or four stages long. Several hostages are being held in each stage; Joe must rescue all of them before he is allowed to finish the stage. The last stage in each mission has no hostages, but instead features a powerful boss character whom Joe must defeat. After completing each of the first four missions the player is taken to a bonus stage, where he can earn an extra life if he is able to kill all of the ninjas leaping towards him. Completing the fifth mission ends the game. Also, once the fifth mission begins, continues are no longer allowed; the player has to finish the game with however many lives he has left at that point. If the player earns a place on the high score board, the number of credits it took him to get that score is displayed along with his score.
 
Joe's standard weapons are an unlimited supply of shuriken, along with punches and kicks when attacking at close range. One hostage per stage gives him a power-up. When powered-up, his throwing stars are replaced by a gun that fires large, explosive bullets, and his close-range attack becomes a katana slash. Joe can also perform "ninja magic," which may be used only once per stage and kills (or damages, in the case of bosses) all enemies on the screen. Joe can be killed with one hit, provided he is hit by a projectile or melee attack, but if he does not find himself in those situations, the player can touch regular enemies and just be pushed back without being damaged. Since most enemies appear in the same place on each level, it is possible to master the game by memorizing their locations and devising patterns to defeat them.
 
At the end of each stage, the player receives score bonuses based on performance. Completing the stage without using ninja magic or without using any throwing stars or bullets earns the player a point bonus. The player has three minutes to complete each stage; remaining time at the end of the stage is also converted to bonus points and added to the player's score.


Pak's Thoughts -  I never played a lot of Shinobi, but the image of the first-person ninja-star throwing on the attract screen is one of the first that come to mind when I think of arcades.
Title: Re: LoC 50 - Top Video Games of the '80s (And before!) - Today's High Scores
Post by: Pak-Man on July 18, 2011, 10:13:23 AM
#46 - Excitebike

(37 Points) 4 of 18 Lists - Highest Ranking - #11 - Rattrap007
(http://i212.photobucket.com/albums/cc83/pakgor/Excitebike.jpg)

It's a new record!

Advertisement:
Spoiler (click to show/hide)


Release Date:  November 30, 1984

Just the facts/Stuff I wiki'd:

Excitebike is a motocross racing video game franchise made by Nintendo. It first debuted as a game for the Famicom in Japan in 1984 and as a launch title for the NES in 1985. It is the first game of the Excite series, succeeded by its sequel Excitebike 64, the spiritual successors Excite Truck and Excitebots: Trick Racing, and the WiiWare title Excitebike: World Rally. 3D Classics: Excitebike, a 3D remake of the game, was a free launch title for the Nintendo eShop starting on June 6th, 2011 and is now available for a price of $5.99.

Whether the player chooses to race solo or against computer-assisted riders, he/she races against a certain time limit. The goal is to qualify for the Excitebike (the championship) race by coming in at third place or above in the challenge race (preliminary race). The times to beat are located on the stadium walls (for first place) and in the lower left corner (for third place). In any race, the best time is 8 seconds ahead of third place. When the player places first, then they get a message: "It's a new record!" Additional points are earned by beating the previously-set record time.
 
The player controls the position of the red motorcycle with the Y-axis of the directional pad, and controls acceleration with the A and B buttons. Using B causes greater acceleration, but also increases the motorcycle's temperature shown as a bar at the bottom of the screen. If the temperature exceeds safe limits (the bar becomes full), the player will be immobilized for several seconds while the bike cools down. Driving over an arrow will immediately reduce the bike's temperature.
 
The pitch of the motorcycle can be modified with the X-axis of the directional pad, left raises the front, while right lowers the front. In the air, this rotates the bike, but can also be used to create wheelies on the ground. The up and down arrows on turn the hand bar left and right, respectively when the bike is on the ground.
 
At the start of the game, the player can choose one of five tracks he/she wants to race in.

ExciteBike has three modes of gameplay. In Selection A, the player races solo. In Selection B, CPU players join the player. They act as another obstacle; hitting one from the back will cause the player to fall off the bike, while any CPU riders hitting the player's rear wheel will cause them to fall off.
 
In Design Mode, the player has the ability to build his or her own racing tracks. The player can choose hills and obstacles of various sizes and place them. The player can also choose where to finish the lap, and how many laps there are (up to nine). After it is finished, the player can race the track in either Selection A or Selection B.
 
The game allowed saving the custom-designed track to cassette tape, requiring the Famicom Data Recorder peripheral (basically the Famicom equivalent of the C-64's Datassette). Since this peripheral was only available in Japan (intended for use with Nintendo's Family BASIC), track saving was effectively unavailable to American and European players (the game's English manual states that "Save and Load menu selections are not operable in this game; they have been programmed in for potential product developments."). Unlike Wrecking Crew, Excitebike was never re-released for the Famicom Disk System in its original form. Courses created using the Virtual Console release can actually be saved to the Wii's internal memory.

Pak's Thoughts -  This is one game that probably would have slipped to the back of everyone's memory if it wasn't for the track edit mode. Even without the ability to save, I have fond memories of me and my brothers creating challenges for each other and seeing who could get the best time.

That will do it for today's entries. Tune in tomorrow for 5 more entries that have stood the test of time!
Title: Re: LoC 50 - Top Video Games of the '80s (And before!) - Today's High Scores
Post by: sarcasm_made_Easy on July 18, 2011, 10:16:28 AM
Sweet bad dudes made the list.  I loved that silly game. 
Title: Re: LoC 50 - Top Video Games of the '80s (And before!) - Today's High Scores
Post by: TeamRAD on July 18, 2011, 10:21:55 AM
...hahahahaha.

Bad Dudes!

:)

Title: Re: LoC 50 - Top Video Games of the '80s (And before!) - Today's High Scores
Post by: sarcasm_made_Easy on July 18, 2011, 10:25:38 AM
when i was a little kid i was impressed that the game actually SAID bad dudes, in that horrible 80s quantized sound. 
Title: Re: LoC 50 - Top Video Games of the '80s (And before!) - Today's High Scores
Post by: RVR II on July 18, 2011, 10:29:59 AM
I Still have 1942 on my regular Nintendo 8)
Title: Re: LoC 50 - Top Video Games of the '80s (And before!) - Today's High Scores
Post by: TeamRAD on July 18, 2011, 10:47:02 AM
when i was a little kid i was impressed that the game actually SAID bad dudes, in that horrible 80s quantized sound. 

THE PRESIDENT HAS BEEN KIDNAPPED BY NINJAS. ARE YOU A BAD ENOUGH DUDE TO RESCUE THE PRESIDENT?

:D



Title: Re: LoC 50 - Top Video Games of the '80s (And before!) - Today's High Scores
Post by: gojikranz on July 18, 2011, 12:38:29 PM
wow 35 points for #50 wonder how many of mine will make it.  looking forward to the rest thanks!
Title: Re: LoC 50 - Top Video Games of the '80s (And before!) - Today's High Scores
Post by: sarcasm_made_Easy on July 18, 2011, 12:47:43 PM
when i was a little kid i was impressed that the game actually SAID bad dudes, in that horrible 80s quantized sound. 

THE PRESIDENT HAS BEEN KIDNAPPED BY NINJAS. ARE YOU A BAD ENOUGH DUDE TO RESCUE THE PRESIDENT?

:D





IM BAD

Title: Re: LoC 50 - Top Video Games of the '80s (And before!) - Today's High Scores
Post by: Darth Geek on July 18, 2011, 01:36:45 PM
when i was a little kid i was impressed that the game actually SAID bad dudes, in that horrible 80s quantized sound. 

THE PRESIDENT HAS BEEN KIDNAPPED BY NINJAS. ARE YOU A BAD ENOUGH DUDE TO RESCUE THE PRESIDENT?

:D




:D Didn't somebody recently edit together Spoony responding to that?
Title: Re: LoC 50 - Top Video Games of the '80s (And before!) - Today's High Scores
Post by: D.B. Barnes on July 18, 2011, 01:54:50 PM
#47 - Shinobi

(37 Points) 3 of 18 Lists - Highest Ranking - #3 - D.B. Barnes

Cool! Glad a couple other folks picked it.

I ranked this so high because it's one of only three games I beat on an arcade machine. Me and a friend of mine used to spend countless hours in this little hole-in-wall pizza place that had a handful of games. We'd primarily play Super Mario Bros., but switched to Shinobi when we needed a break. We'd just go back and forth, subsisting on cigarettes and Cherry Coke. Ah, the formative years.
Title: Re: LoC 50 - Top Video Games of the '80s (And before!) - Today's High Scores
Post by: MontyServo on July 18, 2011, 02:58:47 PM
#49 - 1942

(36 Points) 3 of 18 Lists - Highest Ranking - #11 - Monty, RVR II

Cool!  Glad to see this one make it.  This is one that I dumped tons of quarters in back in the day.

#47 - Shinobi

(37 Points) 3 of 18 Lists - Highest Ranking - #3 - D.B. Barnes

Had this one at #22 on my list!  Another one that got tons of my money way back when.
Title: Re: LoC 50 - Top Video Games of the '80s (And before!) - Today's High Scores
Post by: sarcasm_made_Easy on July 18, 2011, 03:00:49 PM
it wasnt as good as 1943 though. 
Title: Re: LoC 50 - Top Video Games of the '80s (And before!) - Today's High Scores
Post by: MontyServo on July 18, 2011, 03:09:18 PM
it wasnt as good as 1943 though. 

Maybe so, but I voted for what I actually played back in the '80s.  Don't think we ever got 1943 in our tiny bowling alley arcade at the tiny little army base my family was stationed at in Germany at the time.

That's actually why I played Shinobi and 1942 tons.  New games rarely came in, so we played the ones we did get tons.
Title: Re: LoC 50 - Top Video Games of the '80s (And before!) - Today's High Scores
Post by: sarcasm_made_Easy on July 18, 2011, 03:26:56 PM
Man one thing i didnt count on was how much this thread makes me miss the old arcade.  So much fun and excitement there, gone forever.  I used to love it when i would come in and boom all new machines up in the front.  HOLY COW A DINASAUR FIGHTING GAME (primal rage) or some such thing.  It was good times.  Dave and busters would be a great replacement for it but i HATE their video game selection.  I do love their alcohol selection though and for some reason when ive had a few i like to win tickets.  Its a weird aspect to drunkeness. 
Title: Re: LoC 50 - Top Video Games of the '80s (And before!) - Today's High Scores
Post by: D.B. Barnes on July 18, 2011, 06:13:27 PM
(http://img803.imageshack.us/img803/8725/unled2db.jpg)
Title: Re: LoC 50 - Top Video Games of the '80s (And before!) - Today's High Scores
Post by: Johnny Unusual on July 18, 2011, 06:53:19 PM
You had a summer like that before, didn't you DB?

I think I accidently wrote 1941 went I meant 42.  Clearly, I was thinking of the Spielberg bomb.  It was pretty low on my list though.  Never played Shinobi or Bad Dudes.  I had planned putting Excite Bike on my list, but forgot (though it would have been pretty low on it too).  Duck Tales was a pretty awesome game.  A lot of those games based on Disney Afternoon games were fun.  I remember really like Darkwing Duck, even though it was basically a Megaman type game (not that that's a problem).

Oops, just realized that I missed putting a Megaman game on my list (it was my intent, but I accidentally deleted my original list and had to recreate from memory.  There were a few gaps.
Title: Re: LoC 50 - Top Video Games of the '80s (And before!) - Today's High Scores
Post by: sarcasm_made_Easy on July 18, 2011, 06:58:38 PM
duck tails was a great one best of the disney one i think
Title: Re: LoC 50 - Top Video Games of the '80s (And before!) - Today's High Scores
Post by: D.B. Barnes on July 18, 2011, 07:01:17 PM
You had a summer like that before, didn't you DB?

Oh yeaaaaaaah.

What's that?? Pardon me me for one second.

On second thought, on counsel's advice, I'd like to retract my previous statement and invoke my right under the Fifth Amendment not to answer on the grounds I may incriminate myself.
Title: Re: LoC 50 - Top Video Games of the '80s (And before!) - Today's High Scores
Post by: Pak-Man on July 18, 2011, 11:26:40 PM
Due to complications beyond my control, tomorrow's entries will be posted very very late in the day. Like- technically it will be the 20th. I'm hoping to get things back on track by Wednesday morning. Until then, enjoy a remix of the music from the Moon stage from our #48 entry - DuckTales! That game had a kickin' soundtrack!

http://www.youtube.com/v/VLA0V0wxh_E?version=3&hl=en_US
Title: Re: LoC 50 - Top Video Games of the '80s (And before!) - Today's High Scores
Post by: ColeStratton on July 19, 2011, 10:36:56 AM
#47 - Shinobi

(37 Points) 3 of 18 Lists - Highest Ranking - #3 - D.B. Barnes

It was #16 on my list! I loved that game so much, and was especially proud when I beat the bonus stage and all those fans dropped...
Title: Re: LoC 50 - Top Video Games of the '80s (And before!) - Today's High Scores
Post by: MontyServo on July 19, 2011, 12:29:54 PM
While we wait for the list to continue, here are some clips of the games listed so far!

#50 - Bad Dudes Vs. DragonNinja
http://www.youtube.com/v/HzTLE4c68E8?version=3&hl=en_US&rel=0

#49 - 1942
http://www.youtube.com/v/y7k6H4PRueY?version=3&hl=en_US&rel=0

#48 - DuckTales
http://www.youtube.com/v/sW-ZUVjjqJY?version=3&hl=en_US&rel=0

#47 - Shinobi
http://www.youtube.com/v/NyqKAskURBw?version=3&hl=en_US&rel=0

#46 - Excitebike

http://www.youtube.com/v/543dG0EWcYM?version=3&hl=en_US&rel=0
Title: Re: LoC 50 - Top Video Games of the '80s (And before!) - Today's High Scores
Post by: D.B. Barnes on July 19, 2011, 01:04:31 PM
While we wait for the list to continue, here are some clips of the games listed so far!

#47 - Shinobi
http://www.youtube.com/v/NyqKAskURBw?version=3&hl=en_US&rel=0

(http://forum.rifftrax.com/Smileys/default/grin.gif)

Thanks Monty. That brought back some good memories.
Title: Re: LoC 50 - Top Video Games of the '80s (And before!) - Today's High Scores
Post by: Pak-Man on July 19, 2011, 03:30:11 PM
Quick word association quiz while we wait:



 When I.say "80's gaming" do you picture an NES, Atari, arcade machine, computer... What pops into your head first?
Title: Re: LoC 50 - Top Video Games of the '80s (And before!) - Today's High Scores
Post by: Johnny Unusual on July 19, 2011, 03:34:19 PM
NES easy.
Title: Re: LoC 50 - Top Video Games of the '80s (And before!) - Today's High Scores
Post by: MontyServo on July 19, 2011, 03:34:40 PM
Quick word association quiz while we wait:



 When I.say "80's gaming" do you picture an NES, Atari, arcade machine, computer... What pops into your head first?

Atari 2600 all the way, then probably C64 and arcade games
Title: Re: LoC 50 - Top Video Games of the '80s (And before!) - Today's High Scores
Post by: sarcasm_made_Easy on July 19, 2011, 03:39:04 PM
I think arcade or possibly atari, however i played mostly NES
Title: Re: LoC 50 - Top Video Games of the '80s (And before!) - Today's High Scores
Post by: goflyblind on July 19, 2011, 03:42:44 PM
When I.say "80's gaming" do you picture an NES, Atari, arcade machine, computer... What pops into your head first?

c64. forever and always. :D
Title: Re: LoC 50 - Top Video Games of the '80s (And before!) - Today's High Scores
Post by: RVR II on July 19, 2011, 04:07:29 PM
Quick word association quiz while we wait:



 When I.say "80's gaming" do you picture an NES, Atari, arcade machine, computer... What pops into your head first?
My Atari 2600 & Original NES game systems 8)

(http://i66.photobucket.com/albums/h275/rvr2/03/IMG_8213.jpg)
Title: Re: LoC 50 - Top Video Games of the '80s (And before!) - Today's High Scores
Post by: D.B. Barnes on July 19, 2011, 04:21:31 PM
It's like the Ark of the Covenant...with more wires.

It's neck and neck between arcade and NES, but I'll have to go with NES. Oh, the hours.
Title: Re: LoC 50 - Top Video Games of the '80s (And before!) - Today's High Scores
Post by: Rattrap007 on July 19, 2011, 05:00:44 PM
I'd say NES.. I had an Atari too. Never had a C64...
Title: Re: LoC 50 - Top Video Games of the '80s (And before!) - Today's High Scores
Post by: Compound on July 19, 2011, 05:03:02 PM
I started the decade with a 2600 and ended with a IBM PC. I spent the latter half of the decade on a home PC, so IBM all the way.
Title: Re: LoC 50 - Top Video Games of the '80s (And before!) - Today's High Scores
Post by: Russell on July 19, 2011, 06:51:48 PM
If I'm ever going to splurge on a console ever again... it's going to be a NEO GEO. Great system
but it AND the games cost a shitload of money.
Title: Re: LoC 50 - Top Video Games of the '80s (And before!) - Today's High Scores
Post by: Pak-Man on July 20, 2011, 01:00:47 AM
OK! Let's get this show back on the road!

#45 - Arkanoid

(38 Points) 2 of 18 Lists - Highest Ranking - #2 D.B. Barnes
(http://i212.photobucket.com/albums/cc83/pakgor/arkanoid_01.png)

The time and era of this story is unknown. After the mothership "Arkanoid" was destroyed, a spacecraft "Vaus" scrambled away from it. But only to be trapped in space warped by someone........

Advertisement:
(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/a/a9/Arkanoid_arcadeflyer.png)

Release Date:  1986

Just the facts/Stuff I wiki'd:

Arkanoid is an arcade game developed by Taito in 1986. It is based upon Atari's Breakout games of the 1970s. The title refers to a doomed "mothership" from which the player's ship, the Vaus, escapes.

Much like the game Breakout, the player controls the "Vaus", a space vessel that acts as the game's "paddle" which prevents a ball from falling from the playing field, attempting to bounce it against a number of bricks. The ball striking a brick causes the brick to disappear. When all the bricks are gone, the player goes to the next level, where another pattern of bricks appear. There are a number of variations (bricks that have to be hit multiple times, flying enemy ships, etc.) and power-up capsules to enhance the Vaus (expand the Vaus, multiply the number of balls, equip a laser cannon, break directly to the next level, etc.), but the gameplay remains the same.
 
At round 33, the final stage, the player will take on the game's boss, "DOH", a head resembling moai. Once a player reaches round 33, he must defeat DOH with his remaining extra lives because there are no continues on the final round.

Because of the game's popularity, five other versions of the game were developed for the market: Tournament Arkanoid and Revenge of Doh (Arkanoid II) both in 1987, Arkanoid - Doh It Again and Arkanoid Returns both in 1997, Arkanoid DS in 2007, Arkanoid Live, and, most recently, Arkanoid Plus! on WiiWare.
 
The controls used by various conversions differ from machine to machine, and some conversions allow for multiple control methods. The two basic control methods are digital and analog. Digital controls (many joysticks and control pads, and keyboards) are considered less desirable than analog controls (most mice, trackballs, and paddles); while digital controls limit the player to single-speed control, analog controls allow the player to move the Vaus at nearly any desired speed across the screen. The NES version of Arkanoid was originally packaged with what's considered one of the rarest of all NES controllers, the Vaus Controller: a small gray controller featuring one button, a small spinner (with limited turn radius), an adjustment port, and the Taito logo. While the game may be played with the standard digital NES control pad, optimum gameplay is achieved with the Vaus Controller. Latter-day MAME arcade cabinet developers have created customized spinner controls to further simulate the arcade experience, although the Arkanoid controller had quirks which have made it difficult to achieve 100% reproduction. The Japanese DS version features an optional paddle controller that connects in the Game Boy Advance slot, but the paddle controller is not being released in America.

Pak's Thoughts -  Taito is a genius! For years I had played Breakout, and enjoyed the game on pretty much every system I owned, but I never knew what it was missing until the day I tried out Arkanoid in an arcade and realized. Breakout needs guns! Guns and magnets and lengthening power-ups and boss fights! Arkanoid remains one of my favorite old games and deserves its place on this list.

And I learned something today! I had never heard of the Vaus controller until just now. Now I think I have to eBay one...
Title: Re: LoC 50 - Top Video Games of the '80s (And before!) - Today's High Scores
Post by: Pak-Man on July 20, 2011, 01:01:19 AM
#44 - Bomberman

(40 Points) 3 of 18 Lists - Highest Ranking - #1 gojikranz
(http://i212.photobucket.com/albums/cc83/pakgor/Bomber_Man_NES_ScreenShot1.jpg)


Box Art:
(http://i212.photobucket.com/albums/cc83/pakgor/563390_29002_front.jpg)

Release Date:  1983

Just the facts/Stuff I wiki'd:

Bomberman is an arcade-style maze-based video game developed by Hudson Soft. It was first released in 1983 for the MSX, NEC PC-8801, NEC PC-6001, Sharp MZ-700 and FM-7 in Japan, and for the ZX Spectrum in Europe (under the English language title Eric and the Floaters, Spanish Don Pepe Y Los Globos). Bomberman spawned the long-running series with many installments building on its basic gameplay. The earlier game Warp & Warp by Namco is most likely the inspiration for the Bomberman gameplay.

The eponymous character, Bomberman, is a robot that wants to be free from his job at an underground bomb factory. He must find his way through a maze while avoiding enemies. Doors leading to further maze rooms are found under rocks, which Bomberman must destroy with bombs. There are items that can help improve Bomberman's bombs, such as the Fire ability, which improves the blast range of his bombs. Bomberman will turn human when he escapes and reaches the surface. Each game has 50 levels in total.

Bomberman was subsequently ported to the Family Computer and released in Japan on December 20, 1985, arriving for the U.S. Nintendo Entertainment System in 1987. Bomberman's appearance in this game (Hudson Soft re-used an enemy graphic taken from their 1984 Famicom/NES port of Broderbund's Lode Runner) is an early version of Bomberman's more famous design, a robotic anime-like character with a pink antenna.

Pak's Thoughts - Bomberman was a great game, but for me (And probably most of you) it never came into its own until the '90s when it became a multiplayer competition. There's still a lot of fun to be had in this old game, though, and the music has been running through my head off-and-on for most of my life. :^)
Title: Re: LoC 50 - Top Video Games of the '80s (And before!) - Today's High Scores
Post by: Pak-Man on July 20, 2011, 01:01:44 AM
#43 - Mega Man

(41 Points) 4 of 18 Lists - Highest Ranking - #10 Asbestos Bill, Gunflyer
(http://i212.photobucket.com/albums/cc83/pakgor/MegaMan.jpg)


Commercial:
http://www.youtube.com/v/AjkyQOYg8VI?version=3&hl=en_US

Release Date:  1987

Just the facts/Stuff I wiki'd:

Mega Man, known as Rockman in Japan, is a video game developed and published by Capcom for the Nintendo Entertainment System (NES). It is the first game in the original Mega Man series and the entire Mega Man franchise. It was released in Japan on December 17, 1987, and was localized for North America in December 1987 and for Europe in May 1990.
 
The plot begins the everlasting struggle between the heroic, humanoid robot Mega Man and the evil scientist Dr. Wily. The game establishes many of the gameplay conventions that would define the original Mega Man series as well as its multiple subseries. A standard action-platform game, Mega Man features a somewhat non-linear setup whereby the player can choose the order to complete its six initial stages. With each "Robot Master" boss defeated at the end of a level, a unique weapon is added to the player's arsenal to be used against enemies. Mega Man was developed by a small team of people, which included significant involvement from artist Keiji Inafune. The game was produced specifically for the home console market, a first for Capcom, who had previously focused on arcade titles.
 
Mega Man was critically well-received for its overall design and has been noted for its high difficulty. Although it was not a commercial success, the game was followed by an abundance of sequels and spin-offs that are still being released to this day, many of which utilize the same graphical, storyline, and gameplay setups instituted by the 1987 game. Mega Man has since been included in game compilations and has been re-released on mobile phones and console emulation services.

The plot for the English localization of Mega Man entails the events after the co-creation of the humanoid robot named Mega Man by the genius Dr. Wright (named Dr. Light in later titles) and his assistant Dr. Wily. The two scientists also create six other advanced robots: Cut Man, Elec Man, Ice Man, Fire Man, Bomb Man, and Guts Man. Each of these robots is designed to perform industrial tasks involving construction, demolition, logging, electrical operations, or labor in extreme temperatures, all for the benefit of mankind in a location known as "Monsteropolis". However, Dr. Wily grows disloyal of his partner and reprograms these six robots to aid himself in taking control of the world. Dr. Wright sends Mega Man to defeat his fellow creations and put a stop to Dr. Wily. After succeeding, Mega Man returns home to his robot sister Roll and their creator Dr. Wright.

Mega Man presents the player with six stages designed in the side-scrolling platformer genre. The stage select screen allows the player to freely choose from these six stages, which can be replayed if they are cleared. The player, as Mega Man, fights through various enemies and obstacles in every stage before facing a "Robot Master" boss at the level's end. The player's health, represented by a gauge on the left side of the screen, can be replenished by picking up energy cells randomly dropped by enemies. Upon defeating a Robot Master, the player assimilates the Robot Master's signature attack (or "Master Weapon") into Mega Man's arsenal for the rest of the game. Unlike the standard blaster, the Robot Master powers have limited ammunition which must be refilled by collecting ammunition cells also dropped by defeated enemies. While the player is free to proceed through the game in any order, each Robot Master is especially vulnerable to a specific weapon, encouraging the player to complete certain stages before others.
 
Besides the weapons taken from the Robot Masters, the player is able to pick up a platform generator item known as the "Magnet Beam" in Elec Man's stage. Mega Man also features a scoring system for defeating enemies. Extra points are earned by collecting power-ups from fallen enemies and a bonus is awarded for clearing each stage. When all six Robot Master stages are completed, the seventh and last stage appears in the middle of the stage select menu. This stage, known as the "Wily Fortress", is a chain of four regular stages linked together, each containing at least one new boss. During these final stages, the six Robot Masters must also be fought again in a predetermined order before the final confrontation against Dr. Wily.

Mega Man garnered moderately low sales upon its release, although they were higher than Capcom had anticipated. With little press coverage save for a full-page advertisement in Nintendo Fun Club News, the game established itself as a sleeper hit with overseas fans thanks in part to word of mouth. Inafune blamed its North American cover art for the game's lack of initial prosperity in that region. This box art contains virtually nothing that can be found in the game: Mega Man himself resembles a middle-aged man rather than a boy, his costume is colored yellow and blue instead of being entirely blue, and he is holding a handgun instead of his arm cannon. Over the years, the cover art has become infamous in the gaming community. It has been considered one of worst of game covers of all time by publications including GameSpy, Wired, and OC Weekly.

(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/d/dd/Mega_Man_1_box_artwork.jpg)

Pak's Thoughts - You know those games where you played them and loved them as a kid, and then you play them again in your adult life and realize how awful they were? This is not one of those games. I played through the title that started it all as recently as 2 years ago, and still had a blast doing it. If you can beat that rock monster without using the pause trick, then you never have to feel inadequate about being a gamer. :^)
Title: Re: LoC 50 - Top Video Games of the '80s (And before!) - Today's High Scores
Post by: Pak-Man on July 20, 2011, 01:02:16 AM
#42 - Ghostbusters

(42 Points) 2 of 18 Lists - Highest Ranking - #4 - Pak-Man
(http://i212.photobucket.com/albums/cc83/pakgor/ghostbusters_01.gif)

Who ya gonna call?

Advertisement:
(http://i212.photobucket.com/albums/cc83/pakgor/GBAd.png)

Release Date:  1984

Just the facts/Stuff I wiki'd:

Ghostbusters is a licensed game produced by Activision based on the movie of the same name. It was designed by David Crane, produced by Brad Fregger, and released for several home computer platforms in 1984, and later released for various video game console systems, including the Atari 2600, Sega Master System and NES.
 
Most versions of the game had a similar basic format to the initial Commodore 64 and Atari 800 game, which was written in eight months and later ported to the Spectrum and Amstrad CPC. The game was made in such a short time by incorporating portions of a game named "Car Wars" that was already in production. The game was in production concurrently to the movie. The last week of development was spent on the opening screen which plays the Ghostbusters theme. The player must stock up on equipment and make money to complete their objectives. Upon completion of the Commodore 64, ZX Spectrum, Atari 8-bit and Amstrad CPC versions of the game, a code was provided that allowed the player to start a new game with the amount of money accumulated by the end of the previous game. This allowed accelerated progression in the new game. The game varied in some respects depending upon which platform it was played; the Sega Master System version (1987) added an on-foot shooting gallery level with different animations, while the NES version (1988), ported by a Japanese developer, made the action sequences considerably more difficult, had lower graphical resolution and provided a different ending. The new ending in the NES version was full of spelling mistakes:

Conglaturation !!!

You have completed a great game.
And prooved the justice of our culture.
Now go and rest our heroes !

Pak's Thoughts - This one's a bit of a hidden gem. You had to be introduced to it in just the right way to fully enjoy it. If you just pick it up and play it, it seems like an awful cash-in game, but if you take the time to learn it properly, it can be an incredibly addicting game. It's not so much a Ghostbusters action game as it is a Sim-Ghostbusters game. The Commodore (Or Apple) versions were the ones to play because of the password that let you continue your progress. (And the lack of that awful stair-climbing stage in the NES version) It was always really satisfying to buy the sports car and cruise around with a souped up vehicle, sucking up ghosts at will. There's a fan-remake floating around the internet somewhere with some souped-up graphics and sound. Check it out if you've never played (Or want to play again!)
Title: Re: LoC 50 - Top Video Games of the '80s (And before!) - Today's High Scores
Post by: Pak-Man on July 20, 2011, 01:03:07 AM
#41 - Joust

(42 Points) 6 of 18 Lists - Highest Ranking - #14 - Asbestos Bill, Gunflyer
(http://i212.photobucket.com/albums/cc83/pakgor/Joust.png)

Thy game is over.

Advertisement:
(http://i212.photobucket.com/albums/cc83/pakgor/BE0912.jpg)

Release Date:  1982

Just the facts/Stuff I wiki'd:

Joust is an arcade game developed by Williams Electronics and released in 1982. It is a platform game that features two-dimensional (2D) graphics. The player uses a button and joystick to control a knight riding a flying ostrich. The object is to progress through levels by defeating groups of enemy knights riding buzzards.
 
John Newcomer led the development team which included Bill Pfutzenrueter, Jan Hendricks, Python Anghelo, Tim Murphy, and John Kotlarik. Newcomer aimed to create a flying game with co-operative two-player gameplay, but wanted to avoid a space theme, which was popular at the time. Staff worked within the technical limitations of the hardware (originally developed two years earlier for Williams' first game, Defender), excluding concepts and optimizing the visuals.
 
The game was well received in arcades and by critics, who praised the gameplay. The gameplay mechanics influenced titles by other developers. Joust was followed by a sequel three years later, and was ported to numerous home and portable platforms.

Joust is a platforming game where the player controls a yellow knight riding a flying ostrich from a third-person perspective. The player navigates the protagonist around the game world, which consists of rock platforms floating above a flat island surrounded by lava, via two-way joystick and a button. Home console versions, however, use game controllers with directional pads and analog sticks. The joystick controls the horizontal direction that the knight travels, while pressing the button makes the ostrich flap its wings. The rate at which the player repeatedly presses the button causes the ostrich to fly upward, hover, or slowly descend. The objective is to defeat groups of enemy knights riding buzzards that populate each level, referred to as a "wave". Upon completing a wave, a subsequent, more challenging one will begin. Players navigate the knight to collide with enemies. The elevation of an enemy in relation to the player's knight determines the outcome of the collision. If the protagonist is higher than the enemy, the villain is defeated and vice versa. A collision of equal elevations results in the two knights bouncing off each other. A defeated enemy will turn into an egg that falls to the bottom of the screen, which a player can collect for points. If the egg lands on a platform and the player fails to pick it up, it will eventually hatch into another knight that must be defeated again. The game features three type of enemy knights—Bounder, Hunter, and Shadow Lord—that are worth different amounts of points. A pterodactyl will appear after a predetermined time frame to hunt the hero. A second player, controlling a blue knight on a stork, can join the game. The two players can either cooperatively complete the waves or attack each other while competitively defeating enemies.


Given the different control scheme, Williams was concerned that the game would be unsuccessful. Though arcades were hesitant to purchase the game for the same reason, Joust sold well. Williams eventually shipped 26,000 units. A cocktail table version was later released, engineered by Leo Ludzia. It differs from other cocktail games in that it features side-by-side seating rather than opposing sides. This setup allowed Williams to use the same ROM chip as in the upright cabinets. The cabinets have since become collector's items. Though the upright cabinets are common, the cocktail version is a rare, sought after game. Between 250-500 units were manufactured. Players have competed to obtain the highest score at the game. Expert players exploited software bugs to extend the length of their play time and obtain higher scores. One bug, which facilitates the defeat of the pterodactyl, allows players earn a large number of "extra lives". Players can then use the excess lives to leave the game unattended while they rest. Joust has been parodied in popular culture. References appear in episodes of Robot Chicken and Code Monkeys, as well as the video games Mortal Kombat 3 and World of Warcraft: Cataclysm.
 
Author Steve Kent considered Joust one of the more memorable games of its time. Author David Ellis agreed, and stated that the game retains it enjoyment in contemporary times. In 2008, Guinness World Records listed it as the number sixty-nine arcade game in technical, creative, and cultural impact. A writer for Video Gaming Illustrated called Joust exotic and praised the animation as life-like. Kevin Bowen of GameSpy's Classic Gaming said that despite a concept he described as "incredibly stupid", Joust is an appealing game with good controls and competitive gameplay. Bowen further commented that the multiplayer aspect differentiated the game from others at the time. He described it as "one of the first really fun multiplayer games" and a precursor to the video game deathmatch. Retro Gamer writer Mike Bevan praised the game's physics, calling them "beautifully realised", and described Joust as one of Williams' "most remarkable and well-loved titles". A Computer and Video Games writer called the game "weird and wonderful". Author John Sellers praised the competitive two-player gameplay, and attributed the game's appeal to the flapping mechanism. In 2004, Ellis described Joust as an example of innovative risk absent in the then-current video game industry. In retrospect, Newcomer commended Williams' management for taking a risk on him and the game. The game has garnered praise from industry professionals as well. Jeff Peters of GearWorks Games lauded the gameplay, describing it as unique and intuitive. Fusion Learning Systems' Jeff Johannigman praised the flapping mechanism and Kim Pallister of Microsoft enjoyed the multi-player aspect.

Pak's Thoughts - The distinctive flapping and screeching noises of Joust immediately transport me back in time to birthday parties at Chuck-E-Cheese (Or Showbiz Pizza). While the other party attendees all seemed happy to play in the balls, I'd grab my big stack of tokens and hit the arcade for hours, and no Birthday was complete until I'd played at least one game of Joust. I wasn't extremely good, back then, but there was so much awesome uniqueness to the game I just couldn't stay away.


OK. And we're back on track. If all goes well, I should have 5 more entries up in the morning! Game on!
Title: Re: LoC 50 - Top Video Games of the '80s (And before!) - Today's High Scores
Post by: sarcasm_made_Easy on July 20, 2011, 01:04:53 AM
well one more from my list as far as i remember woot for joust
Title: Re: LoC 50 - Top Video Games of the '80s (And before!) - Today's High Scores
Post by: Compound on July 20, 2011, 01:18:27 AM
Fun gaming fact- one (several actually) of the quests in World of Warcraft involve the player playing Joust and defeating enemies complete with lance and flying ostrich thing. The unbeatable pterodactyl does not appear in game, but is referred to in the quest text.
Title: Re: LoC 50 - Top Video Games of the '80s (And before!) - Today's High Scores
Post by: D.B. Barnes on July 20, 2011, 07:34:43 AM
#45 - Arkanoid

(38 Points) 2 of 18 Lists - Highest Ranking - #2 D.B. Barnes

Another one of the arcade-style games I managed to beat. This time it was in a pool hall. It was the only video game in the joint and we played it constantly. It was great; a sit-down, face-to-face machine where you could slap ashtrays and sodas right on the the screen and go back and forth for hours. There was nothing like the feeling of that ball getting all super speeded up and the laser vaus just within your reach. Good times!
Title: Re: LoC 50 - Top Video Games of the '80s (And before!) - Today's High Scores
Post by: Johnny Unusual on July 20, 2011, 07:40:43 AM
Forgot about Bomberman.  Great game.  I would have put Megaman 2 on my list, but I forgot about it when rewriting my list.
Title: Re: LoC 50 - Top Video Games of the '80s (And before!) - Today's High Scores
Post by: Russell on July 20, 2011, 07:46:21 AM
#42 - Ghostbusters

(42 Points) 2 of 18 Lists - Highest Ranking - #4 - Pak-Man
(http://i212.photobucket.com/albums/cc83/pakgor/ghostbusters_01.gif)
Who ya gonna call?
Advertisement:
I.... I don't believe this.... Ghostbusters, one of the worst goddamn games of
all time let alone on the NES got voted ABOVE Mega Man?! I'm not a hardcore
gamer like I used to be, but even I think that is blasphemy.
Title: Re: LoC 50 - Top Video Games of the '80s (And before!) - Today's High Scores
Post by: sarcasm_made_Easy on July 20, 2011, 07:48:02 AM
Fun gaming fact- one (several actually) of the quests in World of Warcraft involve the player playing Joust and defeating enemies complete with lance and flying ostrich thing. The unbeatable pterodactyl does not appear in game, but is referred to in the quest text.

But the unbeatable pterodactyl is beatable.  You know that right?  its just obnoxiously hard to hit him just right.
Title: Re: LoC 50 - Top Video Games of the '80s (And before!) - Today's High Scores
Post by: Compound on July 20, 2011, 09:51:58 AM
Fun gaming fact- one (several actually) of the quests in World of Warcraft involve the player playing Joust and defeating enemies complete with lance and flying ostrich thing. The unbeatable pterodactyl does not appear in game, but is referred to in the quest text.

But the unbeatable pterodactyl is beatable.  You know that right?  its just obnoxiously hard to hit him just right.

Actually, it means that the quest text refers to the 'Unbeatable?" Pterodactyl as did the arcade version of Joust. I just wasn't specific enough with my punctuation.
Title: Re: LoC 50 - Top Video Games of the '80s (And before!) - Today's High Scores
Post by: Pak-Man on July 20, 2011, 09:57:28 AM
Back to the list!

#40 - Spy Hunter

(43 Points) 2 of 18 Lists - Highest Ranking - #1 - RVR II
(http://i212.photobucket.com/albums/cc83/pakgor/SpyHunter.jpg)


Advertisement:
(http://i212.photobucket.com/albums/cc83/pakgor/SpyHunterFlyer.jpg)

Release Date:  1983

Just the facts/Stuff I wiki'd:

Spy Hunter is a 1983 arcade game developed and released by Bally Midway. It has also been ported to various home computers and video game systems.
 
As a cabinet-style arcade game, Spy Hunter was produced in both sit-down and standard upright versions with the latter being more common. The game's controls consist of a steering wheel in the form of a futuristic aircraft-style yoke with several special-purpose buttons, a two-position stick shift (offering 'low' and 'high' gears), and a pedal used for acceleration. It is a single-player game.

Spy Hunter is an action/driving game with the player in the role of a spy driving an armed sportscar. The object of the game is to travel the freeway destroying as many enemy vehicles as possible while protecting civilian vehicles. The game is a top-down vertical scroller.
 
Early versions of the game used the James Bond theme by Monty Norman, but the inability to obtain the rights to use the music forced Midway to change this theme. As a result, an arrangement of Henry Mancini's theme to Peter Gunn plays throughout.
 
The game begins with the player driving the fictitious G-6155 Interceptor. Enemy vehicles try to destroy the player's car or to force it off the road. Points are scored for distance traveled (a counter increments the score while the car is moving) and for destroying enemy vehicles. There is an initial lead-in time during which the player has an unlimited supply of cars. After the lead-in time expires the player must earn extra cars by obtaining high scores. The first extra car is generally earned at a default value of 30,000 points, but this value can vary depending on settings for a given machine. Up to 3 additional cars are awarded at similar increments.
 
The player must be cautious to avoid harming innocent civilian vehicles. There are three types of such vehicles: two automobiles (one pink in color, the other light blue) and a motorcycle. Destroying these vehicles causes the score meter to halt for a few seconds (in effect subtracting points from the player's score) and will result in the Weapons Van arriving only once instead of twice in that sequence. It is also possible to destroy the Weapons Van itself. Doing so produces the same consequences as destroying a civilian vehicle. A very hard, direct crash with a civilian vehicle can result in the player losing a car. If the player survives long enough (several minutes), eventually civilian vehicles stop appearing and the only other vehicles on the road are the player's enemies.
 
The player's car starts the game with two front-mounted machine guns with an endless supply of ammunition. The machine guns and the player's driving skill (opponents can be sideswiped off the road) are the only means of defense against the enemy vehicles in the beginning stages of the game. At regular intervals, following a fork in the road, the player will enter a new 'territory' also marked by a change in the environment, such as addition of snow and ice, a transition to or from water, or merely a change in the color of the terrain and vegetation alongside the road. In each new road territory, the player will pass a red tractor-trailer parked on the shoulder—the Weapons Van. The player receives additional weapons by entering the Van, which will accelerate until it reaches a point directly in front of the player's vehicle, at which time it will extend a ramp allowing the player to drive in. Three special weapons are available: oil slicks, smoke screens, and surface-to-air missiles. The type of weapon provided by the Weapons Van is displayed on the Van's roof rack. The Van subsequently stops briefly at the side of the road for the player's vehicle to exit. The Weapons Van can appear twice in each territory; after entering the Van the first time, the button in the middle of the steering yoke will be lit steadily as long as the player does not destroy any civilian vehicles. When the middle button is thus lit, the Van can be manually summoned by pressing it, or if the player loses a car the Weapons Van will reappear (with the same weapon) automatically.
 
All three special weapons can be equipped simultaneously, although this state of play is difficult to achieve. Each special weapon has a limited number of uses. For example, the smokescreen can be used only four times (three times in some game versions). The special weapons are activated via dedicated buttons on the steering yoke. In most game versions entering the Weapons Van twice in the same territory will refill the player's ammunition supply. If the player's car is destroyed, either by being forced off the road or shot, it will reappear with only machine guns. The game's dashboard shows which weapons are available, when lit.

A version of Spy Hunter is included as an Easter egg in the first release of Microsoft Excel 2000. It requires DirectX to work. Shortly after Excel 2000's release, Microsoft officially banned Easter eggs from its non-game software.

Pak's Thoughts - I could never make it to the boat level. I always have a blast trying, but I always get too speed-happy and plow into a car and die. It's a testiment to this game's awesomeness that I still think of it as one of the best games ever made when I could never really play it. :^)
Title: Re: LoC 50 - Top Video Games of the '80s (And before!) - Today's High Scores
Post by: Pak-Man on July 20, 2011, 09:58:07 AM
#39 - Psychic 5

(44 Points) 2 of 18 Lists - Highest Ranking - #4 - Invader Quirk, Asbestos Bill
(http://i212.photobucket.com/albums/cc83/pakgor/Psy5.jpg)


Advertisement:
(http://i212.photobucket.com/albums/cc83/pakgor/psychic5afas.jpg)

Release Date:  1987

Just the facts/Stuff I wiki'd:

Psychic 5 is the third game developed by Nihon Maicom Kaihatsu (NMK) for Jaleco (after Argus and Valtric), and was released in 1987. While it did not have huge success, it nevertheless became a 'cult game' for many players thanks to the brilliant gameplay, hard-to-find secret bonuses and anime-like plot. The inspiration for the design of the five ESPers comes from several Japanese cartoons of the '70s where the physical aspect of main characters was strongly stereotyped to suit their psychological profile/fighting ability.
 
The game was never ported to any home system. However, portions of the gameplay, including the cast of characters, did serve as the basis for the Jaleco published Famicom game, Esper Boukentai.

The player starts the game with 2 Espers, Naoki and Akiko. The remainders are found inside magic jars.
 
Normally, the player gets Bunta in scene 1, Makoto in scene 3, and Genzoh in scene 5. However, when certain conditions are fulfilled, you'll find the last 2 Espers sooner. To get Makoto in scene 1, you need to get the Secret Bonus in scene 1 (before opening the magic jar). To get Makoto (or Bunta if you have got Makoto already) in scene 2, you need to get All Gold Bonus in scene 1. To get Genzoh in scene 3, you need to get both Bunta and Makoto in scenes 1 and 2, and get the Secret Bonus in scene 3. To get Genzoh in scene 4, you need to get All Gold Bonus in scene 3.
 
Because Genzoh is incredibly powerful against Satan the devil, it is advantageous to get him as early as possible. Therefore, it is advisible for intermediate players to at least try to get All Gold Bonus in scene 1 and Secret Bonus in scene 3, even if they are just trying to clear the game rather than going for a high score.

Pak's Thoughts And that's about all the info I can scrounge. Before this list is over, I'll try to find a means by which to experience this game and I'll report on my findings. For right now, maybe one of the two voters can elaborate on this one. :^)
Title: Re: LoC 50 - Top Video Games of the '80s (And before!) - Today's High Scores
Post by: Pak-Man on July 20, 2011, 09:58:27 AM
#38 - Maniac Mansion

(44 Points) 3 of 18 Lists - Highest Ranking - #2 (out of 12) - James of LinHood
(http://i212.photobucket.com/albums/cc83/pakgor/maniacmansion_title.png)

Bernard! Don't be a tunahead.

Advertisement:
Spoiler (click to show/hide)

Release Date:  October 1987

Just the facts/Stuff I wiki'd:

Maniac Mansion is a 1987 graphic adventure game developed and published by Lucasfilm Games. A comedy horror parody of B movies, the game's plot follows teenager Dave Miller as he attempts to rescue his girlfriend from the mansion of an evil mad scientist. The player uses a point-and-click control system to guide Dave and two of his friends through the mansion while avoiding its dangerous inhabitants and solving puzzles.
 
The game was conceived in 1985 by Ron Gilbert and Gary Winnick. Its point-and-click interface was borne out of the designers' desire to improve on contemporary text parser-based graphical adventure games. Gilbert implemented a game engine, SCUMM, to decrease the effort required for the envisioned game. This engine and its accompanying scripting language were later re-used for many other games.
 
Maniac Mansion was the first video game published by Lucasfilm, who initially released it for the Commodore 64 and Apple II, to critical acclaim; reviewers lauded its graphics (especially its cutscenes and other animation) and humor. Later it was ported to several other platforms, to a largely positive critical reception; its Nintendo Entertainment System (NES) version had to be considerably modified to comply with Nintendo of America's policies. Fans created remakes with enhanced visuals. The game influenced numerous other titles, and it was later placed on several "hall of fame" lists. In 1993 the sequel, Day of the Tentacle, was released, also to critical acclaim.

The game's story takes place in the mansion of the fictional Edison family: Dr. Fred, Nurse Edna, and their son Weird Ed. Living with the Edisons are two large, disembodied tentacles—one purple and the other green. The player prepares the game after startup by selecting two out of six characters to accompany protagonist Dave Miller. The game's intro sequence shows that a meteor crashed near the mansion 20 years earlier; it later turns out that the meteor is sentient, took control of the family, and caused Dr. Fred to begin performing human experiments while plotting to take over the world. After the introduction, the player begins the game as Dave and his two companions prepare to enter the mansion to rescue his cheeerleader girlfriend, Sandy Pantz, who was kidnapped by Dr. Fred.
 
Maniac Mansion is a graphic adventure game; the player uses a point-and-click interface to guide characters through a two-dimensional (2D) game world and solve puzzles. The game contains fifteen commands that are selected with the point-and-click control scheme. The commands include "Walk to", which the player uses to navigate the characters; "New kid", which allows the player to switch between the three characters; and "Pick up", which the player uses to collect objects. Each character that the player can select possesses unique abilities; for example, Syd and Razor can play musical instruments, while Bernard can repair appliances. The game may be completed with any combination of characters, but, because many puzzles can be solved only with specific skills, players must use different methods to finish the game depending on the characters they select.
 
The gameplay is regularly interrupted by cutscenes (a term coined by Ron Gilbert); they advance the story and inform the player about the non-player characters' actions. Aside from the green tentacle, most of the mansion's inhabitants pose a threat and will throw the player characters into the dungeon—or, in some situations, kill them—if they see them. If one character dies, a replacement must be chosen from those that were unselected at the game's start, and the game ends if all characters die. Maniac Mansion has five possible successful endings, and each ending depends on which characters the player uses, which ones survive, and what those characters do.

Pak's Thoughts I was really raised on Adventure Games. I started with Scott Adams' (No, not THAT Scott Adams) Adventureland on my ol' Commodore Vic-20 and graduated to the Space Quest and Kings Quest games later in my youth. When maniac mansion came out, I saw it as something of a blasphemy. How could it be an adventure game without a text parser? Where was the fun (Yeah, it's fun for me) of going through countless synonyms, trying to figure out the right combination of words to get your character to do what you wanted? I finally gave it a shot years later when it hit the NES and I realized what I had been missing. There was still challenge to be had. The puzzles are all fiendishly clever and you don't die unless you pretty much ask for it. Then I had to play it again and again to get all the endings with the various character combinations you could pick. There's a lot of game in this game.
Title: Re: LoC 50 - Top Video Games of the '80s (And before!) - Today's High Scores
Post by: Pak-Man on July 20, 2011, 09:58:53 AM
#37 - Defender

(45 Points) 3 of 18 Lists - Highest Ranking - #5 - RVR II
(http://i212.photobucket.com/albums/cc83/pakgor/Defender.jpg)


Advertisement:
(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/e/ea/Defender_red_label.flyer.png)

Release Date:  1980

Just the facts/Stuff I wiki'd:

Defender is an arcade video game developed released by Williams Electronics in 1980. A shooting game featuring two-dimensional (2D) graphics, the game is set on a fictional planet where the player must defeat waves of invading aliens while protecting astronauts. Development was led by Eugene Jarvis, a pinball programmer at Williams; Defender was Jarvis's first video game project, and drew inspiration from Space Invaders and Asteroids. Williams planned to display the game at the Amusement & Music Operators Association (AMOA) trade show, though development delays resulted in the team working on the game up until the show started.
 
Defender was commercially successful, selling over 55,000 units to become the company's best selling arcade game. Praise among critics focused on the game's audio-visuals and gameplay. It is frequently listed as one of Jarvis's best contributions to the video game industry, as well as one of the most difficult video games. Defender was ported to numerous platforms, inspired the development of other games, and was followed by sequels and many imitations.

Defender is a two-dimensional, side-scrolling shooting game set on the surface of an unnamed planet. The player controls a space ship as it navigates the terrain, flying either to the left or right. A joystick controls the ship's elevation, and five buttons control its horizontal direction and weapons. The object is to destroy alien invaders, while protecting astronauts on the landscape from abduction. Humans that are successfully abducted return as mutants that attack the ship. Defeating the aliens allows the player to progress to the next level. Failing to protect the astronauts, however, causes the planet to explode and the level to become populated with mutants. Surviving the waves of mutants results in the restoration of the planet. Players are allotted three chances (lives) to progress through the game and are able to earn more by reaching certain scoring benchmarks. A life is lost if the ship comes into contact with an enemy or its projectiles. After exhausting all lives, the game ends.

Defender is often described as one of the most difficult games in the industry. GameDaily rated Defender the ninth most difficult game, citing the attack and rescue gameplay. Author Steven L. Kent called it "one of the toughest games in arcade history". He also stated that novice players typically are able to play only a few seconds, and that enthusiasts saw proficiency at the game as a "badge of honor". GameSpy's David Cuciz echoed similar comments. Sellers described Defender's difficulty as "humbling", saying that few could play it with proficiency. He further stated, however, that players would continue to play despite the difficulty. Author David Ellis attributes the game's success to its challenging design. Its difficulty is often attributed to its complex control scheme. Edge magazine called Defender "one of the most difficult-to-master" games, describing its controls as "daunting". Retro Gamer editor Craig Grannell called the game and controls "ruthless" and "complex" respectively.

Pak's Thoughts: I'll be honest here. I'm one of the gamers who can't last more than about a minute playing Defender. At least in its original Arcade format. I was pretty good on the Apple II version, but I'm pretty sure the difficulty is toned down a couple notches. Watching someone play Defender who CAN play Defender is a sight to behold. I wasn't paying attention at the time, but I have to assume that the guy in the arcade who could spend a solid hour playing Defender got like- ALL the babes. :^)
Title: Re: LoC 50 - Top Video Games of the '80s (And before!) - Today's High Scores
Post by: Pak-Man on July 20, 2011, 10:01:48 AM
#36 – Ninja Gaiden

(45 Points) 3 of 18 Lists - Highest Ranking - #2 - Gunflyer
(http://i212.photobucket.com/albums/cc83/pakgor/NinGai.jpg)


Advertisement:

http://www.youtube.com/v/TRLrLZdZoDY?version=3&hl=en_US

Release Date:  December 1988

Just the facts/Stuff I wiki'd:

Ninja Gaiden, known in Japan as Ninja Ryūkenden (literally "Legend of the Ninja Dragon Sword") and as Shadow Warriors in Europe, is a side-scrolling platforming video game. It was developed and published by Tecmo for the Nintendo Entertainment System (NES); its development and release coincided with the beat 'em up arcade version of the same name. It was released in December 1988 in Japan, in March 1989 in North America, and in September 1991 in Europe. It was ported to the PC Engine in Japan in 1992, to the Super NES as part of the Ninja Gaiden Trilogy compilation in 1995, and to mobile phones in four planned episodic installments in 2004. It was released on the Wii's Virtual Console service for all regions in 2007.
 
The story follows a ninja named Ryu Hayabusa as he journeys to America to avenge his murdered father. There, he learns that a person named "the Jaquio" plans to take control of the world by unleashing an ancient demon through the power contained in two statues. Featuring platforming gameplay similar to Castlevania and the NES version of Batman, players control Ryu through six "Acts" that comprise 20 levels; they encounter enemies that must be dispatched with Ryu's katana and other secondary weapons.
 
Ninja Gaiden has been renowned for its elaborate story and usage of anime-like cinematic cutscenes. It received extensive coverage and won several awards from video gaming magazines, while criticism focused on its high and unforgiving difficulty, particularly in the later levels. Over fifteen years after its release, the game continued to receive acclaim from print and online publications. It was novelized as part of the Worlds of Power NES game adaptations written by Seth Godin and Peter Lerangis, and it spawned a soundtrack CD. On the NES, Ninja Gaiden has been described as one of the best arcade-style games, and the best ninja-related game.

Ninja Gaiden is a side-scrolling platform game in which the player takes control of the player character, Ryu Hayabusa, and guides him through six "Acts" that comprise 20 levels. Ryu's physical strength is represented by a life meter, which decreases when he is hit by an enemy or projectile. A "life" is lost when the life meter depletes entirely, when Ryu falls off of the screen, or when the timer runs out. A game over screen appears when all lives are lost; however, the player may restart the level on which this occurred by continuing. At the end of every act, the player fights a boss; bosses have life meters that the player depletes with attacks. A boss is defeated when its life meter is depleted entirely. Each boss is one of the "Malice Four" – evil underlings of the Jaquio, the game's main antagonist. The Malice Four consist of Barbarian, Bomberhead, Basaquer, and their leader Bloody Malth.
 
Players attack enemies by thrusting at them with Ryu's Dragon Sword – a katana-like sword passed down from the Hayabusa clan for generations. They can also use "secondary" weapons that consume Ryu's "spiritual strength". Secondary weapons include throwing stars, "windmill throwing stars" which cut through enemies and return like boomerangs, a series of twirling fireballs named "the art of the fire wheel", and a mid-air slashing technique called the "jump & slash". When Ryu's spiritual strength meter becomes too low, the player cannot use secondary weapons. Players can replenish Ryu's spiritual strength by collecting red and blue "spiritual strength" items found in lamps and lanterns. Other items found along the way include hourglasses that freeze all enemies and projectiles for five seconds, bonus point containers, potions that restore six units of physical strength, "invincible fire wheels" that make Ryu temporarily invincible to attacks, and 1-ups.
 
Ryu has the ability to jump on and off ladders and walls, and by using the directional pad, he can climb up or down ladders. Ryu can spring off walls by holding the directional pad in the opposite direction he is facing and pressing the jump button. He cannot attack while on walls or ladders. Players can use this technique to get Ryu to climb up spaces between walls and columns by holding down the jump button and alternating between left and right on the directional pad. Ryu can also vertically climb a single wall by springing off it and then quickly pressing the directional pad back towards the wall.

Pak's Thoughts: Here's another one for the video game massochist. Every couple years, I pop Ninja Gaiden into my ol' NES and see if I have what it takes to beat it yet. I'm up to Level 4 now. Back on the ol' Schoolyard, I heard tale of a kid who went to game shows and could play through the entire game blindfolded. I don't know whether that was just playground talk, or if this person exists, but maybe someday, I'll be able to beat this game with my eyes open. :^)

And we’re all caught up with our 5 for the day. Tune in tomorrow for the next 5!
Title: Re: LoC 50 - Top Video Games of the '80s (And before!) - Today's High Scores
Post by: Johnny Unusual on July 20, 2011, 10:18:18 AM
Spy Hunter is a fun game.  I forgot about it, and though I doubt it would make my list, it was pretty cool.

Never heard of Psychic 5.

Only 2 votes for Maniac Mansion?  For shame!  This is one of the greatest games of all time.  It might have gotten higher in my list with the exception that when you are stuck on an adventure game (I mean really stuck), then fun comes to a dead stop.  And hey, I liked the Maniac Mansion TV series.  It just had the misfortune of having very little to do with the game beyond a few character names and the meteor under the house.  I loves me some Joe Flaherty and the various other SCTV cast types they could scrounge up.  It really had an SCTV tinge to it in terms of humour (though there were the more obvious jokes, it also had a lot of subtle acting stuff in it.)

Defender is OK.

Ninja Gaiden was one of the biggest games of my childhood.  My folks used to go to this gym, which was boring for me and my sister, so we were always in the play room, which had an NES and Ninja Gaiden (and later Mario 2).  We loved that game to death.  Also, GO TO HELL BIRDS!

Title: Re: LoC 50 - Top Video Games of the '80s (And before!) - Today's High Scores
Post by: sarcasm_made_Easy on July 20, 2011, 10:20:55 AM
Fun gaming fact- one (several actually) of the quests in World of Warcraft involve the player playing Joust and defeating enemies complete with lance and flying ostrich thing. The unbeatable pterodactyl does not appear in game, but is referred to in the quest text.

But the unbeatable pterodactyl is beatable.  You know that right?  its just obnoxiously hard to hit him just right.

Actually, it means that the quest text refers to the 'Unbeatable?" Pterodactyl as did the arcade version of Joust. I just wasn't specific enough with my punctuation.

No i sure didn't sorry about that.
Title: Re: LoC 50 - Top Video Games of the '80s (And before!) - Today's High Scores
Post by: RVR II on July 20, 2011, 10:43:21 AM
Back to the list!

#40 - Spy Hunter

(43 Points) 2 of 18 Lists - Highest Ranking - #1 - RVR II
(http://i212.photobucket.com/albums/cc83/pakgor/SpyHunter.jpg)


Advertisement:
(http://i212.photobucket.com/albums/cc83/pakgor/SpyHunterFlyer.jpg)

Release Date:  1983

Just the facts/Stuff I wiki'd:

Spy Hunter is a 1983 arcade game developed and released by Bally Midway. It has also been ported to various home computers and video game systems.
 
As a cabinet-style arcade game, Spy Hunter was produced in both sit-down and standard upright versions with the latter being more common. The game's controls consist of a steering wheel in the form of a futuristic aircraft-style yoke with several special-purpose buttons, a two-position stick shift (offering 'low' and 'high' gears), and a pedal used for acceleration. It is a single-player game.

Spy Hunter is an action/driving game with the player in the role of a spy driving an armed sportscar. The object of the game is to travel the freeway destroying as many enemy vehicles as possible while protecting civilian vehicles. The game is a top-down vertical scroller.
 
Early versions of the game used the James Bond theme by Monty Norman, but the inability to obtain the rights to use the music forced Midway to change this theme. As a result, an arrangement of Henry Mancini's theme to Peter Gunn plays throughout.
 
The game begins with the player driving the fictitious G-6155 Interceptor. Enemy vehicles try to destroy the player's car or to force it off the road. Points are scored for distance traveled (a counter increments the score while the car is moving) and for destroying enemy vehicles. There is an initial lead-in time during which the player has an unlimited supply of cars. After the lead-in time expires the player must earn extra cars by obtaining high scores. The first extra car is generally earned at a default value of 30,000 points, but this value can vary depending on settings for a given machine. Up to 3 additional cars are awarded at similar increments.
 
The player must be cautious to avoid harming innocent civilian vehicles. There are three types of such vehicles: two automobiles (one pink in color, the other light blue) and a motorcycle. Destroying these vehicles causes the score meter to halt for a few seconds (in effect subtracting points from the player's score) and will result in the Weapons Van arriving only once instead of twice in that sequence. It is also possible to destroy the Weapons Van itself. Doing so produces the same consequences as destroying a civilian vehicle. A very hard, direct crash with a civilian vehicle can result in the player losing a car. If the player survives long enough (several minutes), eventually civilian vehicles stop appearing and the only other vehicles on the road are the player's enemies.
 
The player's car starts the game with two front-mounted machine guns with an endless supply of ammunition. The machine guns and the player's driving skill (opponents can be sideswiped off the road) are the only means of defense against the enemy vehicles in the beginning stages of the game. At regular intervals, following a fork in the road, the player will enter a new 'territory' also marked by a change in the environment, such as addition of snow and ice, a transition to or from water, or merely a change in the color of the terrain and vegetation alongside the road. In each new road territory, the player will pass a red tractor-trailer parked on the shoulder—the Weapons Van. The player receives additional weapons by entering the Van, which will accelerate until it reaches a point directly in front of the player's vehicle, at which time it will extend a ramp allowing the player to drive in. Three special weapons are available: oil slicks, smoke screens, and surface-to-air missiles. The type of weapon provided by the Weapons Van is displayed on the Van's roof rack. The Van subsequently stops briefly at the side of the road for the player's vehicle to exit. The Weapons Van can appear twice in each territory; after entering the Van the first time, the button in the middle of the steering yoke will be lit steadily as long as the player does not destroy any civilian vehicles. When the middle button is thus lit, the Van can be manually summoned by pressing it, or if the player loses a car the Weapons Van will reappear (with the same weapon) automatically.
 
All three special weapons can be equipped simultaneously, although this state of play is difficult to achieve. Each special weapon has a limited number of uses. For example, the smokescreen can be used only four times (three times in some game versions). The special weapons are activated via dedicated buttons on the steering yoke. In most game versions entering the Weapons Van twice in the same territory will refill the player's ammunition supply. If the player's car is destroyed, either by being forced off the road or shot, it will reappear with only machine guns. The game's dashboard shows which weapons are available, when lit.

A version of Spy Hunter is included as an Easter egg in the first release of Microsoft Excel 2000. It requires DirectX to work. Shortly after Excel 2000's release, Microsoft officially banned Easter eggs from its non-game software.

Pak's Thoughts - I could never make it to the boat level. I always have a blast trying, but I always get too speed-happy and plow into a car and die. It's a testiment to this game's awesomeness that I still think of it as one of the best games ever made when I could never really play it. :^)
I RULED at this game back in the day!!
I had the Top Score for 3 years straight at the arcade in Garden City/Surfside Beach (south of Myrtle Beach) when our family took our summer vacations there back then!
Ah those were the days.. 8)
Title: Re: LoC 50 - Top Video Games of the '80s (And before!) - Today's High Scores
Post by: Tyrant on July 20, 2011, 12:19:52 PM
#40 - Spy Hunter


This sucker got me through tons of boring school field trips to the bowling alley (yes, our school took us to the bowling alley. And yes, bowling bored the snot out of me). I was a poor kid, however, so I had reasons to get good at it to make those few coins last as long as possible until it was time to get herded back onto the bus.
Title: Re: LoC 50 - Top Video Games of the '80s (And before!) - Today's High Scores
Post by: D.B. Barnes on July 20, 2011, 12:29:58 PM
#40 - Spy Hunter

(43 Points) 2 of 18 Lists - Highest Ranking - #1 - RVR II
(http://i212.photobucket.com/albums/cc83/pakgor/SpyHunter.jpg)

Nice! Had it at #8.

Many an hour was whittled away at the 7/11 playing Spy Hunter. It was a stand-up machine. I imagine if it had been a sit-down machine, I would've died there. Just looking at the screenshot makes me wanna go get a Slurpee.
Title: Re: LoC 50 - Top Video Games of the '80s (And before!) - Today's High Scores
Post by: gojikranz on July 20, 2011, 12:48:39 PM
whatever version of bomberman i was playing had multiplayer so perhaps i didnt have the 80s version.  oh well the beginning of the dream right?  i played it at my friends house which is why i dont really know what version they had.  i still think its one of the best multiplayer games around.
Title: Re: LoC 50 - Top Video Games of the '80s (And before!) - Today's High Scores
Post by: Rattrap007 on July 20, 2011, 04:24:46 PM
So many I had on my big list, but they failed to make the cut..
Title: Re: LoC 50 - Top Video Games of the '80s (And before!) - Today's High Scores
Post by: Russell on July 20, 2011, 09:46:39 PM
I left a LOT of Arcade games off my list because honestly, I didn't play them nearly as much as NES games that I
had. I thought most of them were probably a tad too simplistic in the gameplay department to be
considered that high on my list.
Title: Re: LoC 50 - Top Video Games of the '80s (And before!) - Today's High Scores
Post by: sarcasm_made_Easy on July 20, 2011, 11:06:34 PM
My opinion is anything that utilized the track ball was just a bit cooler than anything else. 
Title: Re: LoC 50 - Top Video Games of the '80s (And before!) - Today's High Scores
Post by: Pak-Man on July 21, 2011, 09:31:05 AM
Getting today's entries up bright and early!

#35 – Dragon's Lair

(45 Points) 4 of 18 Lists - Highest Ranking - #9 - Monty
(http://i212.photobucket.com/albums/cc83/pakgor/Dragons20Lair20U.png)

Dragon's Lair: The fantasy adventure where you become a valiant knight, on a quest to rescue the fair princess from the clutches of an evil dragon. You control the actions of a daring adventurer, finding his way through the castle of a dark wizard, who has enchanted it with treacherous monsters and obstacles. In the mysterious caverns below the castle, your odyssey continues against the awesome forces that oppose your efforts to reach the Dragon's Lair. Lead on, adventurer. Your quest awaits!

Advertisement:

(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/5/5c/Dragons_lair.jpg)

Release Date:  June 19, 1983

Just the facts/Stuff I wiki'd:

Dragon's Lair is a laserdisc video game published by Cinematronics in 1983. It featured animation created by an ex-Disney animator Don Bluth.
 
At this time, most other games of the era represented the character as a sprite, which consisted of a series of bitmaps displayed in succession. However, due to hardware limitations of the era, artists were greatly restricted in the detail they could achieve using that technique; the resolution, framerate, and number of frames were severely constrained. Dragon's Lair overcame those limitations by tapping into the vast storage potential of the laserdisc, but imposed other limitations on the actual gameplay. The game's enormous contrast with other arcade games of the time created a sensation when it appeared, and was played so heavily that many machines often broke due to the strain of overuse. It was also arguably the most successful game on this medium and is aggressively sought after by collectors.
 
The success of the game sparked numerous home ports, sequels and related games. In the 21st century it has been repackaged in a number of formats (such as for the iPhone) as a "retro" or historic game.
 
It is currently one of only three video games (to include Pong and Pac-Man) on permanent display at the Smithsonian in Washington, D.C.

Dragon's Lair features the hero, Dirk the Daring, attempting to rescue Princess Daphne from the evil dragon Singe, who has locked Princess Daphne in the foul wizard Mordroc's castle. The screen shows animated cutscenes, and the player executes an action by selecting a direction or pressing the sword button with correct timing, requiring the player to memorize each scenario in order to clear each quick time event. The comedy aspects of the game stemmed not only from the bizarre looking creatures and humorous death scenes, but also the fact that while Dirk was a skilled knight, he was somewhat clumsy in his efforts, as well as being a reluctant hero, prone to shrieking and reacting in horror to the various dangers he encounters.

Pak's Thoughts: Dragon's Lair represented what I had always wanted video games to be in my head as a kid. It was a playable cartoon. It might not have been extremely interactive, but the memorization-based play and the awesome animations for both success and failure made sure this game would devour my tokens every time. I actually beat this one when I finally got it for my PC, but the arcade version was harder because it would randomize the scenes, and you'd have a WarioWare-Like moment where you had to quickly remember which one it was and what you were supposed to do.
Title: Re: LoC 50 - Top Video Games of the '80s (And before!) - Today's High Scores
Post by: Pak-Man on July 21, 2011, 09:31:21 AM
#34 – Q*bert

(46 Points) 3 of 18 Lists - Highest Ranking - #5 - Pak-Man
(http://i212.photobucket.com/albums/cc83/pakgor/QBert-1.jpg)

@!#?@!

Advertisement:

(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/3/32/Q-bert_Poster.png)

Release Date:  1982

Just the facts/Stuff I wiki'd:

Q*bert is an arcade video game developed and published by Gottlieb in 1982. It is a platform game that features two-dimensional (2D) graphics. The object is to change the color of every cube in a pyramid by making the on-screen character jump on top of the cube while avoiding obstacles and enemies. Players use a joystick to control the character.
 
The game was conceived by Warren Davis and Jeff Lee. Lee designed the titular character based on childhood influences and gave Q*bert a large nose that shoots projectiles. His original idea involved traversing a pyramid to shoot enemies, but Davis removed the shooting game mechanic to simplify gameplay. Q*bert was developed under the project name Cubes, but was briefly named Snots And Boogers and @!#?@!? during development.
 
Q*bert was well received in arcades and by critics, who praised the graphics, gameplay and main character. The success resulted in sequels and use of the character's likeness in merchandising, such as appearances on lunch boxes, toys, and an animated television show. The game has since been ported to numerous platforms.

Q*bert is an isometric platform game with puzzle elements where the player controls the titular protagonist from a third-person perspective. Q*bert starts each game at the top of a pyramid of cubes, and moves by jumping diagonally from cube to cube. Landing on a cube causes it to change color, and changing every cube to the target color allows the player to progress to the next stage. In later stages, each cube must be hit multiple times to reach the target color. In addition, cubes will change color every time Q*bert lands on them, instead of remaining on the target color once they reach it. Jumping off the pyramid results in the character's death.
 
The player is impeded by several enemies: Coily, a purple snake that chases after Q*bert; Ugg and Wrong-Way, purple creatures that run along the sides of the cubes; and Slick and Sam, green gremlins that revert the color changes that have occurred. A collision with purple enemies is fatal to the character. Colored balls occasionally appear at the top of the pyramid and bounce downward; contact with a red ball is lethal to Q*bert, while contact with a green one will immobilize the on-screen enemies. Upon dying, Q*bert emits a sound likened to swearing. A multi-colored disc on either side of the pyramid serves as an escape device from danger, particularly Coily. The disc returns Q*bert to the top of the pyramid, tricking Coily to jump off the pyramid if the snake was in close pursuit.

Pak's Thoughts: Our local supermarket had a Q*bert machine when I was growing up, and begging for quarters every time my mom went shopping became a ritual. I never know how well I'm going to do in a game of Q*bert. Some days I'll pop in a quarter and get into the zone and make it all the way to where the colors change back when you hop on them a second time. Other days, I'll die before making it out of the first stage. It's always fun, though, and despite my namesake, it's my personal choice for best arcade game of the '80s.
Title: Re: LoC 50 - Top Video Games of the '80s (And before!) - Today's High Scores
Post by: Pak-Man on July 21, 2011, 09:31:37 AM
#33 – SimCity

(46 Points) 4 of 18 Lists - Highest Ranking - #3 - goflyblind
(http://i212.photobucket.com/albums/cc83/pakgor/simcity_classic_screenshot1.jpg)


Box Art:

(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/7/7b/SimCity_Classic_cover_art.jpg)

Release Date:  1989

Just the facts/Stuff I wiki'd:

SimCity is a city-building simulation video game, first released in 1989, and designed by Will Wright. SimCity was Maxis's first product, which has since been ported into various personal computers and game consoles, and spawned several sequels including SimCity 2000 in 1994, SimCity 3000 in 1999, SimCity 4 in 2003, SimCity DS, and SimCity Societies in 2007. The original SimCity was later renamed SimCity Classic. Until the release of The Sims in 2000, the SimCity series was the best-selling line of computer games made by Maxis. SimCity spawned a series of Sim games.
 
SimCity was originally developed by game designer Will Wright. The inspiration for SimCity came from a feature of the game Raid on Bungeling Bay that allowed Wright to create his own maps during development. Wright soon found he enjoyed creating maps more than playing the actual game, and SimCity was born.[2] While developing SimCity, Wright cultivated a real love of the intricacies and theories of urban planning and acknowledges the influence of System Dynamics which was developed by Jay Wright Forrester and whose book on the subject laid the foundations for the simulation. In addition, Wright also was inspired by reading "The Seventh Sally", a short story by Stanisław Lem, in which an engineer encounters a deposed tyrant, and creates a miniature city with artificial citizens for the tyrant to oppress.
 
The first version of the game was developed for the Commodore 64 in 1985, but it would not be published for another four years. The original working title of SimCity was Micropolis. The game represented an unusual paradigm in computer gaming, in that it could neither be won nor lost; as a result, game publishers did not believe it was possible to market and sell such a game successfully. Brøderbund declined to publish the title when Wright proposed it, and he pitched it to a range of major game publishers without success. Finally, founder Jeff Braun of then-tiny Maxis agreed to publish SimCity as one of two initial games for the company.
 
Wright and Braun returned to Brøderbund to formally clear the rights to the game in 1988, when SimCity was near completion. Brøderbund executives Gary Carlston and Don Daglow saw that the title was infectious and fun, and signed Maxis to a distribution deal for both of its initial games. With that, four years after initial development, SimCity was released for the Amiga and Macintosh platforms, followed by the IBM PC and Commodore 64 later in 1989.
 
Pak's Thoughts: Ah, there's nothing like a city builder to scratch the ol' god-complex, and the legacy that the game leaves behind encompasses pretty much the whole Tycoon genre. One glorious weekend, me and my dad decided we were going to fill every available scrap of land with city, and we did it too. Fully functional and filled to the brim from all corners of the map. Then we unleashed Godzilla over and over 'til there was nothing left. :^)
Title: Re: LoC 50 - Top Video Games of the '80s (And before!) - Today's High Scores
Post by: Pak-Man on July 21, 2011, 09:31:53 AM
#32 – Pitfall

(46 Points) 6 of 18 Lists - Highest Ranking - #4 - Monty
(http://i212.photobucket.com/albums/cc83/pakgor/pitfall.jpg)


Advertisement:

(http://i212.photobucket.com/albums/cc83/pakgor/PitfallAd.png)

Release Date:  September 1982

Just the facts/Stuff I wiki'd:

Pitfall! is a video game released by Activision for the Atari 2600 in 1982. It is the second best selling game made for the Atari 2600, with over 4 million copies sold.

The player must maneuver a character known as Pitfall Harry through a maze-like jungle in an attempt to recover 32 treasures in a 20-minute time period. Along the way, he must negotiate numerous hazards, including pits, quicksand, rolling logs, fire, rattlesnakes, scorpions, and crocodiles. Harry may jump over or otherwise avoid these obstacles by climbing, running, or swinging on a vine to avoid them. Treasure includes gold and silver bars, diamond rings, and bags of money. Under the jungle there is a tunnel which Harry can access through ladders found at various places. This is required to get around some surface areas that have no way across otherwise. The tunnels are filled with dead-ends blocked by brick walls, forcing the player return to the surface at one of the ladders, and try to find a way around again. The tunnels also contain treasure and scorpions Harry must jump over.
 
Pitfall! was created by David Crane, a programmer who worked for Activision in the early 1980s. In a November 2003 interview with Edge he described how in 1979 he had developed the technology to display a realistic little running man and in 1982 was searching for a suitable game in which to use it:
 
Quote from: David Crane
I sat down with a blank sheet of paper and drew a stick figure in the center. I said, “Okay, I have a little running man and let's put him on a path [two more lines drawn on the paper]. Where is the path? Let's put it in a jungle (draw some trees). Why is he running (draw treasures to collect, enemies to avoid, etc.)?” And Pitfall! was born. This entire process took about ten minutes. About 1,000 hours of programming later, the game was complete.

Its technical achievements included non-flickering, multicolored, animated sprites on a system with notoriously primitive graphics hardware. Innovative techniques were used to keep the codespace within the 4k limit, including polynomials to create 256 screens within 50 bytes of code. The Atari "bullet" was used to draw the vine in higher resolution than permitted with sprites.

Pitfall! was a massive success for the 2600. Several ports were made for computer systems (such as the Commodore 64, Atari 800, and TRS-80 Color Computer), as well as for home consoles (such as the ColecoVision and the Intellivision).

When Pitfall! was originally sold, anyone who scored above 20,000 points could send Activision a picture of his or her television screen to receive a Pitfall! Harry Explorer Club patch. The television commercial for Pitfall featured then child actor Jack Black at age 13 in his first TV role.

http://www.youtube.com/v/CKduyaz6ddY?version=3&hl=en_US


Pak's Thoughts: There's something about Pitfall that makes it feel more like a complete game than a lot of Atari games did. It’s just really well-planned and it all comes together very nicely. I suppose I should mention here that I actually had the chance to meet David Crane himself at last year's Classic Gaming Expo. I shook his hand and he signed my copy of "A Boy and his Blob". It was a thrill. :^)
Title: Re: LoC 50 - Top Video Games of the '80s (And before!) - Today's High Scores
Post by: Pak-Man on July 21, 2011, 09:33:12 AM
#31 – Pole Position

(48 Points) 3 of 18 Lists - Highest Ranking - #7 - goflyblind
(http://i212.photobucket.com/albums/cc83/pakgor/Pole.png)

It'll bust your crank and leave skid marks on your soul!

Commercial (You guys HAVE to watch this one if you've never seen it!):

http://www.youtube.com/v/kiEj4RNpYME?version=3&hl=en_US

Release Date:  September 1982

Just the facts/Stuff I wiki'd:

Pole Position is a racing video game released in 1982 by Namco. It was published by Namco in Japan and by Atari, Inc. in the United States. The game popularized the use of sprite-based, pseudo-3D graphics with its "rear-view racer format"—where the player’s view is behind and above the vehicle, looking forward along the road with the horizon in sight—which would remain in use even after true 3D computer graphics became standard for racing games.

In this game, the player controls a Formula One race car. The player completes a time trial lap within a certain amount of time to qualify for an F1 race at the Fuji Racetrack. After qualifying, the player races against other cars in a championship race.
 
Pole Position was the leading game in arcades worldwide due to its relatively realistic graphics for the time. While it wasn't the first game to use the "rear-view racer format" (the first was Turbo (1981) by Sega), it pioneered the format which is used in many games today. It also led to contemporary imitators of the format, most notably Sega's Out Run in 1986.
 
Pole Position set the template for future racing games, featuring a rear-view format, AI cars to race against, a time limit pushing the player to go faster, and a track based on a real racing circuit. It also featured crashes caused by collisions with other vehicles and roadside signs, and was the first game to feature a qualifying lap, where the player needs to complete a time trial before they can compete in Grand Prix races. The game's publisher Atari publicized the game for its "unbelievable driving realism" in providing a Formula 1 experience behind a racing wheel at the time, for which it is considered the first attempt at a driving simulation. The game's graphics featured full-colour landscapes with scaling sprites, including race cars and other signs, and a perspective view of the track, with its vanishing point swaying side to side as the player approaches corners, accurately simulating forward movement into the distance.

Pak's Thoughts: If you had the quarters and could actually find an open machine, playing the sit-down version of Pole Position was a real treat. It was the closest most of us would get to driving as kids, and usually a pretty good indicator of why we shouldn't.

And those are the 5 for today. We'll be hitting the halfway point tomorrow, so if this list dies after then, it should be able to respawn at #25. :^)
Title: Re: LoC 50 - Top Video Games of the '80s (And before!) - Today's High Scores
Post by: Johnny Unusual on July 21, 2011, 10:04:02 AM
Dragon's Lair is great, but it was Dragon's Lair 2 that was at my arcade.

I like how the Q*Bert ad is really transparent about wanting your money.

I played the 90's Sim City for SNES, but not the original.

Never played Pitfall or Pole Position.  "He stops fun things from happening" Must have been the guy who created any Superman game ever.  THANK YOU, GOOD NIGHT!
Title: Re: LoC 50 - Top Video Games of the '80s (And before!) - Today's High Scores
Post by: Pak-Man on July 21, 2011, 10:16:35 AM
I like how the Q*Bert ad is really transparent about wanting your money.

Yeah most of the arcade game ads I'm scrounging up are aimed more at the owners of arcades than the arcade gamers. I'm going through a hierarchy where I try to include TV Ads first, then comic book/magazine ads aimed at consumers, then arcade game flyers for arcade owners, then box art.
Title: Re: LoC 50 - Top Video Games of the '80s (And before!) - Today's High Scores
Post by: Scribblesense on July 21, 2011, 10:38:13 AM
Holy crap, Jack Black hasn't changed one bit in over thirty years.

He's just gotten fatter.
Title: Re: LoC 50 - Top Video Games of the '80s (And before!) - Today's High Scores
Post by: Rattrap007 on July 21, 2011, 03:49:37 PM
Got three of mine today...

Q*Bert
Pitfall
Simcity


Both Dragon's Lair and Pole Position were on my list before having to cut it to 25..

My picks are arcade, atari and NES. I kind of did a mix of my faves and ones that were kinda ground breaking for their time.
Title: Re: LoC 50 - Top Video Games of the '80s (And before!) - Today's High Scores
Post by: Asbestos Bill on July 22, 2011, 08:43:10 AM
#39 - Psychic 5


Pak's Thoughts And that's about all the info I can scrounge. Before this list is over, I'll try to find a means by which to experience this game and I'll report on my findings. For right now, maybe one of the two voters can elaborate on this one. :^)


Here's a MAME rom download (http://www.coolrom.com/roms/mame/11919/Psychic_5.php). You'll need MAME (http://mamedev.org/), of course.
Title: Re: LoC 50 - Top Video Games of the '80s (And before!) - Today's High Scores
Post by: Asbestos Bill on July 22, 2011, 08:44:57 AM
*sigh*  Shouldn't I, after 700 posts, be allowed to post a link without it being flagged as spam?
Title: Re: LoC 50 - Top Video Games of the '80s (And before!) - Today's High Scores
Post by: Pak-Man on July 22, 2011, 08:54:38 AM
I can't after over 8600 posts.

But I digress. Let's get this show back on the road!

#30 – Paperboy

(48 Points) 4 of 18 Lists - Highest Ranking - #7 - gojikranz
(http://i212.photobucket.com/albums/cc83/pakgor/paperboy_01.png)

Paperboy... stopping at nothing in his valiant effort to save this land from TV journalism,

Commercial:

http://www.youtube.com/v/RyozUYtBl_o?version=3&hl=en_US


Release Date:  1984

Just the facts/Stuff I wiki'd:

Paperboy is a 1984 arcade game by Atari Games. The players take the role of a paperboy who delivers newspapers along a suburban street on his bicycle. This game was innovative for its theme and novel controls.

The player controls a paperboy on a bicycle delivering newspapers along a suburban street which is displayed in a cabinet perspective view. The player attempts to deliver a week of daily newspapers to subscribing customers, attempts to vandalize non-subscribers' homes and must avoid hazards along the street. Subscribers are lost by missing a delivery or damaging a subscriber's house.
 
The game begins with a choice of difficulty levels: Easy Street, Middle Road and Hard Way. The object of the game is to perfectly deliver papers to subscribers for an entire week and avoid crashing (which counts as one of the player's lives) before the week ends. The game lasts for seven in-game days, Monday through Sunday.
 
Controlling the paperboy with the handlebar controls, the player attempts to deliver newspapers to subscribers. Each day begins by showing an overview of the street indicating subscribers and non-subscribers. Subscribers and non-subscribers' homes are also easy to discern in the level itself, with subscribers living in brightly colored houses, and non-subscribers living in dark houses.

The cabinet of this game is a standard upright but with custom controls. The controls consist of a bicycle handlebar with one button on each side, used to throw papers. The handlebars can be pushed forward to accelerate, and pulled back to brake.

The character and world of Paperboy was featured prominently in an episode of Captain N: The Game Master. This portrayed a more thought-out world. The paperboy was named Julio from a Hispanic family, and had to deal with the people of his community being brainwashed through subliminal messaging by Mother Brain into attacking the N-Team. When questioned why Julio was immune to this brainwashing, he admitted to Captain N and his friends that he was illiterate due to neglecting his reading lessons to devote all his efforts to his paper route to earn money for his family in light of his father being laid off from work. This later proves no longer necessary, when his father finds another job and both his parents homeschool Julio in order for him to gain proficient reading skills.

Pak's Thoughts: Paperboy is one of those games that keeps daring you to do better. The way the neighborhood changes based on whether you wrecked or delivered to certain houses adds a surprising level of interactivity for the day. I could never get the hang of the handle-bar controls, but I spent a lot of time mastering this game on the NES.
Title: Re: LoC 50 - Top Video Games of the '80s (And before!) - Today's High Scores
Post by: Pak-Man on July 22, 2011, 08:55:02 AM
#29 – Pong

(51 Points) 4 of 18 Lists - Highest Ranking - #5 - Monty
(http://i212.photobucket.com/albums/cc83/pakgor/pong2.jpg)


Advertisement:

(http://i212.photobucket.com/albums/cc83/pakgor/pong.jpg)


Release Date:  November 29, 1972

Just the facts/Stuff I wiki'd:

Pong (marketed as PONG) is one of the earliest arcade video games, and is a tennis sports game featuring simple two-dimensional graphics. While other arcade video games such as Computer Space came before it, Pong was one of the first video games to reach mainstream popularity. The aim is to defeat the opponent in a simulated table tennis game by earning a higher score. The game was originally manufactured by Atari Incorporated (Atari), who released it in 1972. Allan Alcorn created Pong as a training exercise assigned to him by Atari co-founder Nolan Bushnell. Bushnell based the idea on an electronic ping-pong game included in the Magnavox Odyssey, which later resulted in a lawsuit against Atari. Surprised by the quality of Alcorn's work, Atari decided to manufacture the game.
 
Pong quickly became a success and is the first commercially successful video game, which led to the start of the video game industry. Soon after its release, several companies began producing games that copied Pong's gameplay, and eventually released new types of games. As a result, Atari encouraged its staff to produce more innovative games. The company released several sequels that built upon the original's gameplay by adding new features. During the 1975 Christmas season, Atari released a home version of Pong exclusively through Sears retail stores. It was also a commercial success and led to numerous copies. The game has been remade on numerous home and portable platforms following its release. Pong has been referenced and parodied in multiple television shows and video games, and has been a part of several video game and cultural exhibitions.

Pong is a two-dimensional sports game that simulates table tennis. The player controls an in-game paddle by moving it vertically across the left side of the screen, and can compete against either a computer controlled opponent or another player controlling a second paddle on the opposing side. Players use the paddles to hit a ball back and forth. The aim is for a player to earn more points than the opponent; points are earned when one fails to return the ball to the other.

Pak's Thoughts: Yes, there were other games before Pong, but Pong's the game that made the world sit up and take notice. Pong directly influenced one of the entries on this list so far (Arkanoid!) and indirectly influenced like- all of them. This is the game that more or less BEGAN Coin-Op arcade games, home consoles, and it was the first video game to make money, so if you enjoy video games, you owe it all to the 1-Pixel-wide stick. (Pixels were BIG back in those days. Not like these little baby pixels they try to pass off today...)
Title: Re: LoC 50 - Top Video Games of the '80s (And before!) - Today's High Scores
Post by: Pak-Man on July 22, 2011, 08:55:23 AM
#28 – Bubble Bobble

(52 Points) 4 of 18 Lists - Highest Ranking - #4 - gojikranz
(http://i212.photobucket.com/albums/cc83/pakgor/bubble_bobble_01.gif)

Now it is the beginning of a fantastic story! Let us make a journey to the cave of monsters! Good luck!

Advertisement:

(http://i212.photobucket.com/albums/cc83/pakgor/Bubblead.jpg)


Release Date:  1986

Just the facts/Stuff I wiki'd:

Bubble Bobble is an arcade game by Taito, first released in 1986 and later ported to numerous home computers and game consoles. The game, starring the twin Bubble Dragons Bub and Bob, is an action-platform game in which players travel through one hundred different stages, blowing and bursting bubbles, avoiding enemies and collecting a variety of items. The game became very popular and led to a long series of sequels and spin-offs. The main goal of the game is to rescue Bub and Bob's girlfriends from monsters. It is also notable for being an early example of a game with multiple endings, which depended on the player's skill and discovering secrets.

In the game, each player controls one of the two Bubble Dragons, Bub and Bob. The player can move along platforms, as well as jump to those above and to the side, similar to most platform games.
 
The player can also blow bubbles. These can trap enemies, who are defeated if the bubble is then burst by the player's spiny back. The bubbles also float for a time before bursting, and can be jumped on, allowing access to otherwise inaccessible areas. Players progress to the next level once all enemies on the current level are defeated.
 
Enemies turn "angry" – becoming pink-colored and moving faster – if they are the last enemy remaining, escape from a bubble after being left too long, or a certain amount of time has been spent on the current level. A monster will also become angry if either player collects a skull (the only negative item in the game), and the monster is hit by the resulting comet crossing the screen. However, this is a rare occurrence.
 
After a further time limit expires, an additional invincible enemy appears for each player, actively chasing them using only vertical and horizontal movements. These do not need to be defeated to complete the level, and disappear once a player's life is lost.
 
Contact with enemies and their projectiles (rocks, lasers, fireballs, etc.) is deadly, resulting in the loss of a life.
 
The game's music was written by Japanese team Zuntata. Peter Clarke, Tim Follin and David Whittaker have arranged music for home computer ports (some versions have a new intro music by Whittaker).


Pak's Thoughts: This game is pure video game JOY. The music and graphics are all marinated in a broth of pure happiness for several hours, then kissed by cherubs and baked in the warm glow of love until everything is cooked to perfection, then it's sprinkled with fairy dust and delivered to you on a platter made of glee.

Cuteness aside, it's a fun game too. The mechanic is neat, and the ability to bounce off your own bubbles (If you're good) is neat and occasionally necessary. That's when the game gets frustrating. There are some later levels that have the enemies waaay up at the top of the screen and you're waaaay at the bottom, and the only way to get up is to bounce on a series of your own unpredictable bubbles. Also the enemies can bomb you. Good luck!
Title: Re: LoC 50 - Top Video Games of the '80s (And before!) - Today's High Scores
Post by: Pak-Man on July 22, 2011, 08:55:42 AM
#27 – Frogger

(55 Points) 5 of 18 Lists - Highest Ranking - #8 - gojikranz
(http://i212.photobucket.com/albums/cc83/pakgor/Frogger.png)


Advertisement:

(http://i212.photobucket.com/albums/cc83/pakgor/FroggerAd.jpg)


Release Date:  1981

Just the facts/Stuff I wiki'd:

Frogger is an arcade game introduced in 1981. It was developed by Konami, and licensed for worldwide distribution by Sega/Gremlin. The object of the game is to direct frogs to their homes one by one. To do this, each frog must avoid cars while crossing a busy road and navigate a river full of hazards. Skillful players may obtain some bonuses along the way. The game is regarded as a classic from the golden age of video arcade games and was noted for its novel gameplay and theme. It was also an early example of a game using more than one CPU, using two Z80 processors. Frogger is still popular and versions can be found on many Internet game sites.

The player starts with three, five, or seven frogs (lives). The player guides a frog which starts at the bottom of the screen. The lower half of the screen contains a road with motor vehicles, which in various versions include cars, trucks, buses, dune buggies, bulldozers, vans, taxis, bicyclists, and/or motorcycles, speeding along it horizontally. The upper half of the screen consists of a river with logs, crocodiles, and turtles, all moving horizontally across the screen. The very top of the screen contains five "frog homes" which are the destinations for each frog. Every level is timed; the player must act quickly to finish each level before the time expires.
 
The only player control is the joystick used to navigate the frog; each push in a direction causes the frog to hop once in that direction. On the bottom half of the screen, the player must successfully guide the frog between opposing lanes of trucks, cars, and other vehicles, to avoid becoming roadkill.
 
The middle of the screen, after the road, contains a median where the player must prepare to navigate the river.
 
By jumping on swiftly moving logs and the backs of turtles, the player can guide his or her frog safely to one of the empty lilypads. The player must avoid crocodiles, snakes, and otters in the river, but may catch bugs or escort a lady frog for bonuses. When all five frogs are directed home, the game progresses to the next, harder level. After five levels, the game gets briefly easier yet again gets progressively harder to the next fifth level.

The game's opening tune is the first verse of a Japanese children's song called Inu No Omawarisan (The Dog Policeman). The song remained intact in the US release. Other Japanese tunes that are played during gameplay include the themes to the anime Hana no Ko Lunlun and Araiguma Rascal.

Pak's Thoughts: Now Frogger is a game I can rock. It's been a while, so it may not be true today, but once upon a time, 25 cents was enough to get me through 5 stages easy. I've always admired how this game took a pretty simple concept (Cross the street) and made it into a viable arcade game. Plus it actually takes an old cartoon gag (That's not a log! It's an aligator!) and works it into the game mechanics. I always thought that was cool.
Title: Re: LoC 50 - Top Video Games of the '80s (And before!) - Today's High Scores
Post by: Pak-Man on July 22, 2011, 08:56:45 AM
#26 – Tron

(61 Points) 4 of 18 Lists - Highest Ranking - #6 - Rattrap007
(http://i212.photobucket.com/albums/cc83/pakgor/tron.png)


Advertisement:

(http://i212.photobucket.com/albums/cc83/pakgor/TronAd.jpg)

Release Date:  1982

Just the facts/Stuff I wiki'd:

Tron is a coin-operated arcade video game manufactured and distributed by Bally Midway in 1982. It is based on the Walt Disney Productions motion picture Tron released in the same year. The game consists of four subgames inspired by the events of the science fiction film. It features some characters and equipment seen in the film, e.g. the Light Cycles, battle tanks, the Input/Output Tower. The game earned more than the film's initial release.
 
In the 2010 film Tron: Legacy, the arcade game makes a brief appearance, but is displayed as being manufactured and distributed by the in-universe company ENCOM International instead of Bally Midway. It is also displayed as such on the "ENCOM International" promotional website for the film.

Tron was distributed in four types of cabinets: the standard upright, the mini upright, the cocktail (table) version and a sit down enclosed cabinet. The upright cabinet is designed as movie tie-in. It has, as a special feature, two blacklights and fluorescent lines painted on, resembling the blue, red etc. circuit lines from the film Tron. In a darkened room or arcade the lines glow. The sit down enclosed cabinet is the rarest of all the cabinet types. The sit down plays a part in the 2010 Tron: Legacy movie. Walt Disney Pictures searched for 3 years with no luck until they found a video game collector in Slayton, Minnesota who rented his sit down game to Walt Disney Pictures.
 
All cabinets feature an 8-way joystick for moving, with one button for firing or speed control, and a rotary dial for controlling the direction of the fire (a setup also used in Kozmik Krooz'r, another Midway game). The game can be played by one player or by two alternating players as the controls are made for only one player at a time.

The player in the role of Tron has to beat four subgames, each at 12 increasingly difficult levels, with each level named after a computer programming language, such as "BASIC", "RPG", "COBOL", etc. All four segments of one level must be completed before continuing on to the next level.
 
I/O Tower
 
This segment of the game mimics Tron's quest to enter the Input/Output tower from the motion picture. In the arcade game, the player must destroy large numbers of Grid Bugs with Tron's disc and clear a path to the flashing circle, which must be entered before a timer runs out to complete the section.
 
MCP Cone
 
This area imitates Tron's final battle against the MCP. The game's interpretation has the player destroying a multicolored wall in front of the MCP cone and getting by the wall, into the cone. A 1000 point bonus is awarded for completing the level, and an additional 1000 points is given for destroying all blocks of the wall.
 
Battle Tanks
 
The Battle Tanks subgame is not strictly based on film events, but the tanks are taken from there. The player must guide Tron's red tank through a maze and destroy several blue tanks or red recognizers controlled by the computer. This must be done without taking any hits from enemies. If the player drives into the purple diamond in the center of the maze, the tank is warped to a random area of the maze. A bug in the game results in a cheat option. When the player's tank is not touching the white line in the corridors, it can not be hit by the enemy's fire, but it can still be rammed by enemy tanks.
 
Light Cycles
 
This game is well known and associated with the Tron franchise. The player must guide a blue Light Cycle in an arena against an opponent, while avoiding the walls and trails (walls of light) left behind by both Light Cycles. The player must maneuver quickly and precisely in order to force opponents to run into walls. The enemy cycles have a fixed behavior pattern for each level: if the player can find it, the opponent can be defeated every time on this level. The Light Cycles were supposed to look like motor cycles with your head merging into it but in the movie they could not due to a low budget.

The video game's story was based on an early draft of the script for TRON. In the game, the light cycle the player controls is blue and the enemy light cycles are yellow whereas in the movie the colors of the opposing players are reversed. The Grid Bugs played a major part as an enemy TRON has to fight whereas in the movie they are briefly mentioned and run away. The MCP cone was rewritten as the MCP's tower in the film but remained in the game with the same premise for the player to breach it. The tank level is based on the tanks in the movie. Sometimes the enemy tanks are replaced by faster, non-shooting recognizers through a trick in the game.

Pak's Thoughts: Oh, how I loved playing Tron. The ability to pick the order in which you played the games was the coolest thing ever at the time, and most of the games were pretty good. I could never get into the tank game, and the Spider game was just OK, but I loved doing the light cycles and going up against the MCP.


And that's that for today's 5. We're taking a break for the weekend and starting the top 25 Monday Morning! Discuss!
Title: Re: LoC 50 - Top Video Games of the '80s (And before!) - Today's High Scores
Post by: sarcasm_made_Easy on July 22, 2011, 09:00:39 AM
*sigh*  Shouldn't I, after 700 posts, be allowed to post a link without it being flagged as spam?

nope :) Our money is greatly desired by the business community.  there are people who play a role for years before they start spamming.  Im still not convinved RVR isnt really a sophisticated spam bot. 
Title: Re: LoC 50 - Top Video Games of the '80s (And before!) - Today's High Scores
Post by: RVR II on July 22, 2011, 09:05:45 AM
  Im still not convinved RVR isnt really a sophisticated spam bot. 
Yeah me neither.. Oh wait :o
Title: Re: LoC 50 - Top Video Games of the '80s (And before!) - Today's High Scores
Post by: Johnny Unusual on July 22, 2011, 09:15:50 AM
Never played Tron and I don't have much to say about Bubble Bobble or Forgger.  Pong is a classic, but there isn't much more to say than that.  I'm curious, what is the first video game?

Paperboy!  I forgot about that.  It's a friggin fantastic game that is tremendous fun.
Title: Re: LoC 50 - Top Video Games of the '80s (And before!) - Today's High Scores
Post by: goflyblind on July 22, 2011, 10:33:13 AM
frogger?! memory, what is wrong with you? brain fail. ):
Title: Re: LoC 50 - Top Video Games of the '80s (And before!) - Today's High Scores
Post by: Doctor Who? on July 22, 2011, 11:17:06 AM
#31 – Pole Position

(48 Points) 3 of 18 Lists - Highest Ranking - #7 - goflyblind
(http://i212.photobucket.com/albums/cc83/pakgor/Pole.png)

It'll bust your crank and leave skid marks on your soul!

Commercial (You guys HAVE to watch this one if you've never seen it!):

http://www.youtube.com/v/kiEj4RNpYME?version=3&hl=en_US

Release Date:  September 1982

Just the facts/Stuff I wiki'd:

Pole Position is a racing video game released in 1982 by Namco. It was published by Namco in Japan and by Atari, Inc. in the United States. The game popularized the use of sprite-based, pseudo-3D graphics with its "rear-view racer format"—where the player’s view is behind and above the vehicle, looking forward along the road with the horizon in sight—which would remain in use even after true 3D computer graphics became standard for racing games.

In this game, the player controls a Formula One race car. The player completes a time trial lap within a certain amount of time to qualify for an F1 race at the Fuji Racetrack. After qualifying, the player races against other cars in a championship race.
 
Pole Position was the leading game in arcades worldwide due to its relatively realistic graphics for the time. While it wasn't the first game to use the "rear-view racer format" (the first was Turbo (1981) by Sega), it pioneered the format which is used in many games today. It also led to contemporary imitators of the format, most notably Sega's Out Run in 1986.
 
Pole Position set the template for future racing games, featuring a rear-view format, AI cars to race against, a time limit pushing the player to go faster, and a track based on a real racing circuit. It also featured crashes caused by collisions with other vehicles and roadside signs, and was the first game to feature a qualifying lap, where the player needs to complete a time trial before they can compete in Grand Prix races. The game's publisher Atari publicized the game for its "unbelievable driving realism" in providing a Formula 1 experience behind a racing wheel at the time, for which it is considered the first attempt at a driving simulation. The game's graphics featured full-colour landscapes with scaling sprites, including race cars and other signs, and a perspective view of the track, with its vanishing point swaying side to side as the player approaches corners, accurately simulating forward movement into the distance.

Pak's Thoughts: If you had the quarters and could actually find an open machine, playing the sit-down version of Pole Position was a real treat. It was the closest most of us would get to driving as kids, and usually a pretty good indicator of why we shouldn't.

And those are the 5 for today. We'll be hitting the halfway point tomorrow, so if this list dies after then, it should be able to respawn at #25. :^)

I had Poll Position 2 was on my list,that was the one I played as a kid.  I played it on the Atari 7800 and in the arcade.
Title: Re: LoC 50 - Top Video Games of the '80s (And before!) - Today's High Scores
Post by: Asbestos Bill on July 22, 2011, 11:56:42 AM
#29 – Pong

This is the game that more or less BEGAN Coin-Op arcade games, home consoles, and it was the first video game to make money, so if you enjoy video games, you owe it all to the 1-Pixel-wide stick. (Pixels were BIG back in those days. Not like these little baby pixels they try to pass off today...)

Not true. Read on...

Never played Tron and I don't have much to say about Bubble Bobble or Forgger.  Pong is a classic, but there isn't much more to say than that.  I'm curious, what is the first video game?

Spacewar! (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spacewar!) is the first digital video game, programmed on the PDP-1 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/PDP-1) in 1961. It was like a more complicated asteroids, but played 2-player, 1v1. You had to try to shoot the other person's ship while also avoiding falling into the star you both orbited, and you had limited fuel and ammo.

Galaxy Game came after that  in 1971 (essentially the same game, but a bit further towards Asteroids) and it was the first digital game with its own hardware. Then came Computer Space only a month later; again, the same game, but this one was the first coin operated and publicly distributed game (Galaxy Game was kept at Stanford University, where it was made). Computer Space was featured in Soylent Green, which shows about 10 seconds of gameplay. It was made by the founders of Atari before they became Atari. Once they did, they took a step backward in terms of game complexity and made Pong, and for some reason it was more popular than its predecessor. Pong wasn't even original, being based on the home console version included with the Maxnavox Odyssey and it's prototype, the "Brown Box," which was made in 1966.

Before any of these, there was a version of Tic-Tac-Toe on the EDSAC, which was programmed with punch cards and used a rotary telephone dial for input (boxes 1-9). The display is not technically video, but this is in the 50s, so it's pretty impressive.

(http://www.computerspacefan.com/Tic-Tac-Toe.gif)

And then there was the Cathode Ray Tube Amusement Device, also from the 50s, which had an overlaid transparent sheet with graphics of planes on it. Players used the controls to move a single dot of light projected by the CRT screen until it was under a plane, then pressed a button. If the light was within the programmed coordinates of a plane, the dot would blur, which was supposed to look like an explosion.

There's one other really awesome example, but it's going to show up later in the list, I think, so I'll leave it a surprise...


I got a lot of this information from this history (http://www.computerspacefan.com/Historyp1.htm), as well as Wikipedia.
Title: Re: LoC 50 - Top Video Games of the '80s (And before!) - Today's High Scores
Post by: Tyrant on July 22, 2011, 12:16:59 PM
Pak's Thoughts: This game is pure video game JOY. The music and graphics are all marinated in a broth of pure happiness for several hours, then kissed by cherubs and baked in the warm glow of love until everything is cooked to perfection, then it's sprinkled with fairy dust and delivered to you on a platter made of glee.

Too bad this wasn't used as Bubble Bobble's official advertisement hook. I think you missed your calling, Pak.

Title: Re: LoC 50 - Top Video Games of the '80s (And before!) - Today's High Scores
Post by: Rattrap007 on July 22, 2011, 01:03:21 PM
Tron and Paperboy were both on my list..
Title: Re: LoC 50 - Top Video Games of the '80s (And before!) - Today's High Scores
Post by: gojikranz on July 23, 2011, 01:53:07 AM
bubble bobble was pretty big game for me back in the day.  i downloaded it on wii too and it is still great.

i think i may have actually cut my teeth on paperboy 2 on the genesis but its the same idea anyways.
Title: Re: LoC 50 - Top Video Games of the '80s (And before!) - Today's High Scores
Post by: D.B. Barnes on July 23, 2011, 06:55:42 PM
#31 – Pole Position

(48 Points) 3 of 18 Lists - Highest Ranking - #7 - goflyblind

Had it at #10. Great driving game and yeah, it was kind of a struggle. I always to go too fast, but that only got you into a world of hurt, and then of course I would try to go even faster to make up for it. I think I lacked the patience to play this very well. Jesus, you'd think that commercial was made in Japan!

#30 – Paperboy

(48 Points) 4 of 18 Lists - Highest Ranking - #7 - gojikranz

Had it at #17. This was a fun game. I remember it being a tad monotonous but still pretty enjoyable. Always had trouble with the skateboarder.

#27 – Frogger

(55 Points) 5 of 18 Lists - Highest Ranking - #8 - gojikranz

Had it at #14. Frogger is the first video game I ever played. Incredibly simple, but still a classic.

http://www.youtube.com/v/fVX4eYIFepE?version=3&hl=en_US


Seven from my list so far. Not too shabby.


Title: Re: LoC 50 - Top Video Games of the '80s (And before!) - Today's High Scores
Post by: sarcasm_made_Easy on July 25, 2011, 08:43:27 AM
Just so you know PAK i am eagerly awaiting the next entries.  The sooner the better because this is almost as good as a cup of coffee to me first thing in the morning. 
Title: Re: LoC 50 - Top Video Games of the '80s (And before!) - Today's High Scores
Post by: goflyblind on July 25, 2011, 10:22:44 AM
does pak work on weekends or something? i hope he's not dead. D:
Title: Re: LoC 50 - Top Video Games of the '80s (And before!) - Today's High Scores
Post by: Pak-Man on July 25, 2011, 11:28:00 AM
Yeah. Sorry they were a little late today, but my mom's in town and kept me all morning. Back to the list!

#25 – Centipede

(64 Points) 6 of 18 Lists - Highest Ranking - #2 - Tyrant
(http://i212.photobucket.com/albums/cc83/pakgor/Centipede.jpg)


Commercial:

http://www.youtube.com/v/C6CtL-Ulkqk?version=3&hl=en_US

Release Date:  1980

Just the facts/Stuff I wiki'd:

Centipede is a vertically-oriented shoot 'em up arcade game produced by Atari, Inc. in 1980. The game was designed by Ed Logg along with Dona Bailey, one of the few female game programmers in the industry at this time. It was also the first arcade coin-operated game to have a significant female player base. The player defends against swarms of insects, completing a round after eliminating the centipede that winds down the playing field.

The player is represented by a small, "somewhat humanoid head" at the bottom of the screen (Later described as being a garden gnome in the trivia section of the cell phone interpretation). The player moves the character about the bottom area of the screen with a trackball and fires laser shots at a centipede advancing from the top of the screen down through a field of mushrooms. Shooting any section of the centipede creates a mushroom; shooting one of the middle segments splits the centipede into two pieces at that point. Each piece then continues independently on its way down the board, with the first section of the rear piece becoming a new head. If the head is destroyed, the section behind it becomes the next head.
 
The centipede starts at the top of the screen, traveling either left or right. When it hits a mushroom or the edge of the screen, it drops one level and switches direction. Thus, more mushrooms on the screen cause the centipede to descend more rapidly. The player can destroy mushrooms by shooting them, but each takes four hits to destroy.
 
If the centipede reaches the bottom of the screen, it moves back and forth within the player area and one-segment "head" centipedes are periodically added. This continues until the player has eliminated both the original centipede and all heads. When all the centipede's segments are destroyed, a new centipede forms at the top of the screen. Every time a centipede is eliminated, however, the next one is one segment shorter and is accompanied by one additional, fast-moving "head" centipede. A player loses a life when hit by a centipede or another enemy, such as a spider or a flea. The flea leaves mushrooms behind when fewer than five are in the player area, though the number required increases with level of difficulty. Spiders move across the player area in a zig-zag fashion and occasionally eat some of the mushrooms.

Scorpions poison every mushroom they touch, but these never appear in the player's movement region. A centipede touching a poisoned mushroom hurtles straight toward the player's area. Upon reaching the player's area, the centipede returns to normal behavior.

Pak's Thoughts: OK. So I have a phobia of centipedes. Tyrant doesn't, and this phobia has resulted in some most unmasculine behavior when one happens to crawl into our house. (We have BIG suckers here in NM too. Like- 5 inches long or more.)

Tell you that to tell you this: When going through the image search engines looking for TRON screenshots and ads, I was treated to incidental photos of Olivia Wilde in a skin-tight suit. Woo! Bonus. While going through the images for Centipede, I was treated to visions pulled from my darkest nightmares. You win some, you lose some, is the moral of this story, I suppose.

Now I have no phobia of the arcade classic and have spent many hours on my VIC-20 gleefully blowing away chunks of Centipede. Tyrant puts me to shame, though. I'm here to tell you that as a gamer, you can never be more in love with your wife than you are after you've watched her go through like- 30 stages of Centipede. I am a lucky man. I bet Olivia Wilde can only beat like- one level. :^)
Title: Re: LoC 50 - Top Video Games of the '80s (And before!) - Today's High Scores
Post by: Pak-Man on July 25, 2011, 11:28:17 AM
#24 – Asteroids

(68 Points) 5 of 18 Lists - Highest Ranking - #3 - RVR II
(http://i212.photobucket.com/albums/cc83/pakgor/asteroids_game_screen.jpg)


Commercial:

http://www.youtube.com/v/3aHaWloD0Js?version=3&hl=en_US

Release Date:  1979

Just the facts/Stuff I wiki'd:

Asteroids is a video arcade game released in 1979 by Atari Inc. It was one of the most popular and influential games of the Golden Age of Arcade Games. Asteroids uses a vector display and a two-dimensional view that wraps around in both screen axes. The player controls a spaceship in an asteroid field which is periodically traversed by flying saucers. The object of the game is to shoot and destroy asteroids and saucers while not colliding with either, or being hit by the saucers' counter-fire.

The game was conceived by Lyle Rains and programmed and designed by Ed Logg. It was implemented on hardware developed by Howard Delman. Asteroids was a hit in the United States and became Atari's best selling game of all time. Atari had been in the process of manufacturing another vector game, Lunar Lander, but demand for Asteroids was so high "that several hundred Asteroids games were shipped in Lunar Lander cabinets." Asteroids was so popular that video arcade operators sometimes had to install larger boxes to hold the number of coins that were spent by players.
 
Asteroids is also the first game to use Atari's "QuadraScan" vector-refresh system; a full-color version known as "Color-QuadraScan" was later developed for games such as Space Duel and Tempest.

The objective of Asteroids is to score as many points as possible by destroying asteroids and flying saucers. The player controls a triangular-shaped ship that can rotate left and right, fire shots straight forward, and thrust forward. As the ship moves, momentum is not conserved — the ship eventually comes to a stop again when not thrusting. The player can also send their ship into hyperspace, causing it to disappear and reappear in a random location on the screen (with the risk of self-destructing or appearing on top of an asteroid).
 
Each stage starts with a few asteroids drifting in random directions on the screen. Objects wrap around screen edges — for instance, an asteroid that drifts off the top edge of the screen reappears at the bottom and continues moving in the same direction. As the player shoots asteroids, they break into smaller asteroids that frequently move faster and are more difficult to hit. Smaller asteroids also score higher points. Periodically, a flying saucer appears on one side of the screen and moves across to the other before disappearing again. The saucers are of two kinds: Large saucers fire in random directions, while small saucers aim at the player's ship.
 
The minimalist soundtrack features a memorable deep-toned electronic "heartbeat", which quickens as the asteroid density is reduced by the player's fire.
 
Once the screen has been cleared of all asteroids and flying saucers, a new set of large asteroids appears. The number of asteroids increases each round up to a maximum of 12. The game is over when the player has lost all of his/her lives.
 
Like many games of its time, Asteroids contains several bugs that were mostly the result of the original programmers underestimating the game's popularity or the skill of its players. The maximum possible score in this game is 99,990 points, after which it "rolls over" back to zero. Other common terms for this bug were "turn over" and "flip over". Also, an oversight in the small saucer's programming gave rise to a popular strategy known as "lurking" — because the saucer could only shoot directly at the player's position on the screen, the player could "hide" at the opposite end of the screen and shoot across the screen boundary, while remaining relatively safe. Another popular method of exploiting this bug was to simply use thrust to keep the ship in motion with 1 or 2 asteroids in the play field, allowing the player to pick off as many 1,000 point UFOs as possible. This led to experienced players being able to play indefinitely on a single credit. This oversight was addressed in the game's sequel, Asteroids Deluxe, and led to significant changes in the way game developers designed and tested their games in the future.

Pak's Thoughts: Asteroids was a good investment, quarter-wise. Most arcade games do their best to burn through 25 cents every 5 minutes or so, but if you know what you're doing in a game of asteroids, 25 cents can kill a good 15 minutes or more.

It's funny how some games just transport you back to a certain point in your life. When my family was in the process of first moving to New Mexico, we had to stay in a hotel and search for houses all day long, which is absolute boredom for a boy in his early teens. My one saving grace was the Asteroids machine they had down in the lobby. Throughout the trip I burned through about $10 in quarters playing Asteroids in-between house-hunts. Ever since then, Asteroids has reminded me of my first time in New Mexico.
Title: Re: LoC 50 - Top Video Games of the '80s (And before!) - Today's High Scores
Post by: Pak-Man on July 25, 2011, 11:28:36 AM
#23 – Oregon Trail

(69 Points) 4 of 18 Lists - Highest Ranking - #1 (Of 12) - James of LinHood
(http://i212.photobucket.com/albums/cc83/pakgor/OregonTrail.jpg)


Box Art:

(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/7/79/The_Oregon_Trail_cover.jpg)

Release Date:  1971

Just the facts/Stuff I wiki'd:

The Oregon Trail is a computer game originally developed by Don Rawitsch, Bill Heinemann, and Paul Dillenberger in 1971 and produced by the Minnesota Educational Computing Consortium (MECC) in 1974. The original game was designed to teach school children about the realities of 19th century pioneer life on the Oregon Trail. The player assumes the role of a wagon leader guiding his party of settlers from Independence, Missouri, to Oregon's Willamette Valley over the Oregon Trail via a Conestoga wagon in 1848. The game has been released in many editions since the original release by various developers and publishers who have acquired rights to it.

The Oregon Trail was created in 1971 by three student teachers at Carleton College in Northfield, Minnesota, in the HP Time-Shared BASIC environment running on an HP 2100 minicomputer. One of these students, senior Don Rawitsch, had the idea to create a computer program for a history class he was teaching, and recruited two of his friends, Paul Dillenberger and Bill Heinemann, both of whom were students teaching math, to help.
 
The Oregon Trail debuted to Rawitsch's class on 3 December 1971. Despite bugs, the game was immediately popular, and he made it available to others on Minneapolis Public Schools' time-sharing service. When the next semester ended, however, Rawitsch deleted the program, although he printed out a copy of the source code.

In 1974 Rawitsch took a job at Minnesota Educational Computing Consortium (MECC), a state-funded organization that developed educational software for the classroom. He added many historically accurate features and uploaded The Oregon Trail into the organization's time-sharing network, where it could be accessed by schools across Minnesota. The game became one of the network's most popular programs, with thousands of players monthly.
 
In 1978 MECC began encouraging its schools to adopt the Apple II microcomputer. The first published version of The Oregon Trail was in Creative Computing's May-June 1978 issue. It was written in BASIC 3.1 for the CDC Cyber 70/73-26. The program was then adapted by John Cook for the Apple II, and provided on A.P.P.L.E.'s PDS Disk series #108. A further version called Oregon Trail 2 was adapted in June, 1978 by J.P. O'Malley. The game was further released as part of MECC's Elementary series, on Elementary Volume 6 in 1980. The game was titled simply Oregon, and featured minimal graphics. It proved so popular that it was re-released as a standalone game, with substantially improved graphics, in 1985. By 1995 The Oregon Trail comprised about one third of MECC's $30 million in annual revenue.
 
An updated version, Oregon Trail Deluxe, was released for DOS in 1992, followed by Oregon Trail II in 1995, The Oregon Trail 3rd Edition in 1997, and 4th and 5th editions. As of 2011, more than 65 million copies of The Oregon Trail have been sold.


Pak's Thoughts: It's good to see a little edutainment on the list. I became hooked on this game the way I think everyone who was hooked on this game got hooked on this game - 5th period computer lab. Back in the '80s, schools (At least MY school) were really perplexed about what to do with their computer labs. They sure didn't have anyone who knew how to program one on staff, so they didn't know what to do except park us in front of an Apple II for an hour every day and give us a library of educational games to play. At my school it was pretty much this or Carmen Sandiego. Of course since you could name the whole crew, groups of 4 kids would gather around one screen to see what would happen to them. My virtual self must have had a penchant for drinking out of every puddle he could find because I always seemed to be the one to come down with dysentery or cholera.
Title: Re: LoC 50 - Top Video Games of the '80s (And before!) - Today's High Scores
Post by: Pak-Man on July 25, 2011, 11:29:08 AM
#22 – Duck Hunt

(69 Points) 7 of 18 Lists - Highest Ranking - 2 #8s - Doctor Who? Rattrap007
(http://i212.photobucket.com/albums/cc83/pakgor/duck-hunt.jpg)


Box Art:

(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/1/14/DuckHuntBox.jpg)

Release Date:  April 21, 1984

Just the facts/Stuff I wiki'd:

Duck Hunt is a video game for the Nintendo Famicom/Nintendo Entertainment System (NES) game console system in which players use the NES Zapper to shoot ducks (or Mallard drakes to be exact) on screen for points. The game was developed and published by Nintendo, and was released in 1984 in Japan. The ducks appear one or two at a time, and the player is given three shots to shoot them down.
 
Duck Hunt was one of the two original pack-in titles for the first release of the game system. The game was not initially reviewed often, but given mediocre critical praise and positive gamer reaction. Prior to the NES version, Nintendo also made a Duck Hunt game based on Laser Clay Shooting System released in 1976.

In Duck Hunt, players use the Nintendo Zapper Light Gun and attempt to shoot down either ducks or clay pigeons in mid-flight. Duck Hunt was also released as an arcade game in 1984, as Vs. Duck Hunt, and is included in the PlayChoice-10 arcade console.
 
The game has three modes:
 One Duck – In each round, there are 10 ducks for the player to shoot down. Only one duck appears on screen at a time, and the player has three shots to hit it.
 Two Ducks – Identical to "One Duck" except that the ducks appear on screen in pairs. A new pair of ducks will not appear until both of the previous pair have either escaped or been shot down.
 Clay Shooting – In each round, there are 10 clay pigeons for the player to shoot down. Clay pigeons are fired off two at a time from a first person perspective and are aimed into the distance. In Vs. Duck Hunt, Clay Shooting mode appears as the second round with the first round being the two duck variation (the arcade version never had one duck).
 
In the first two modes, a dog retrieves the ducks a player shoots, and laughs at the player if both of the birds on screen escape (and if the player fails to advance to the next level).
 
During bonus stages in Vs. Duck Hunt the dog jumps out from the grass as a distraction to the player as they try to shoot ducks, thus putting himself in the line of fire and enabling a player to inadvertently shoot him. If the dog is shot, the bonus round ends.
 
Several unofficial remakes of Duck Hunt have been released which enable the player to shoot the dog. The nameless dog makes a cameo appearance in the NES game Barker Bill's Trick Shooting (another Zapper game) and he can be shot. A remake is included in the Homebrew Channel for Wii.
 
While Duck Hunt does not have a traditional multiplayer mode, the manual states that a second player may plug in a standard NES controller in the other controller port and control the duck that appears. This option is only possible in the one duck mode.

Since appearing in Duck Hunt, the dog has become an icon to gaming, as well as a symbol of annoyance. IGN described him as the bane of their existence, including him in their "Annoying Character Hall of Fame", calling him the "most annoying pooch they couldn't kill." IGN editor Lucas M. Thomas listed the dog as a character he would like to see in Super Smash Bros. Brawl, calling him the most despised animal character in Nintendo history. GamesRadar listed him as the most annoying sidekick ever, discussing how as opposed to introducing interesting characters, they used the dog as a character who would mock their failures. However, they added that without him, Duck Hunt would be less of an icon. However, they also listed him as the seventh best canine companion, stating that they think that he is laughing with the player, as opposed to at the player. Cracked listed the dog as the most annoying video game character from an otherwise great game, calling him the single most hated character in video game history. They also listed him as one of Nintendo's best villains.
 
Andy Slaven, author of Video Game Bible: 1985-2002, described Duck Hunt as being a quality game except for the fact that you could not shoot the dog. 1UP.com listed him as the seventh best dog in video games, stating that even though he is annoying, he is ballsy enough to laugh at someone with a loaded rifle. GameDaily listed the dog as the third greatest in-game moment. listed the dog as one of the most unappreciated Nintendo characters. They stated that while dogs are man's best friend, that if the dog from Duck Hunt is man's best friend, they'd hate to meet their enemy. They also included him in their list of characters they wish they could kill, stating that almost everyone they talked to, even dog lovers, wanted to shoot him. In another GameDaily article, they state that the goal of the game was not just to shoot all of the ducks, but to avoid being laughed at by the dog. Nintendo Power listed the dog as one of the things they love to hate, stating that there isn't a Duck Hunt player in the world who hasn't wanted to shoot him. GameSpy listed the dog as the 10th favourite dog in video games, stating that while a dog in real life doesn't judge its master, the Duck Hunt dog unfortunately is not like that.
 
UGO.com listed the ability to kill the dog as one of the best video game urban legends, stating that it is one of the few video game urban legends based in actual truth, since players could shoot the dog in the arcade Vs. Duck Hunt. MTV Multiplayer conducted two awards that included the Duck Hunt dog; the "Greatest Video Game Canine" and "Greatest Video Game Animal" awards. The Duck Hunt dog tied for first in the reader poll with four other characters - K.K. Slider from Animal Crossing, Amaterasu from Ōkami, and Sam from Sam & Max. Brian Crecente of Kotaku listed him as his third favourite, stating that the dog's art style and attitude reminded him of Fred Avery cartoons from the 1940s. Humorist Tofuburger listed him as his third favourite as well, stating that anyone who has played Duck Hunt will tell stories of broken TVs, controllers, and NESes due to the dog. Official Nintendo Magazine listed him as the eighth greatest Nintendo moment, describing him as being smug and stating that they loath him. Video game developer Mastiff referenced the Duck Hunt dog in promoting their video game Remington Great American Bird Hunt, stating that Rockford, a dog in the game, will never laugh at players for missing the ducks.

Pak's Thoughts: The last 3 paragraphs of the "Stuff I wiki'd" section were from one section in the Wikipedia entitled "Cultural Impact." That's the entire section, too. I find it very amusing that the entire cultural impact of Duck Hunt, according to Wikipedia, is that people really want to shoot that dog. :^)

Of course the star of the show back in the day was really the light gun. In this world of Wii-motes and Kinnects, it's hard to impress just how groundbreaking it was to be able to fire a gun at the screen and have the game detect whether you hit it or not. Of course once I got it on my NES, it didn't take long to figure out that I could just hold up the gun against the screen and shoot the ducks point blank.
Title: Re: LoC 50 - Top Video Games of the '80s (And before!) - Today's High Scores
Post by: Pak-Man on July 25, 2011, 11:29:42 AM
#21 – Ms. Pac-Man

(69 Points) 6 of 18 Lists - Highest Ranking - 4  - Tyrant
(http://i212.photobucket.com/albums/cc83/pakgor/MsPacMan.jpg)


Advertisement:

Spoiler (click to show/hide)

Release Date:  April 21, 1981

Just the facts/Stuff I wiki'd:

Ms. Pac-Man is an arcade video game produced by Midway as an unauthorized sequel to Pac-Man. It was released in North America in 1981 and became one of the most popular video games of all time, leading to its adoption by Pac-Man licensor Namco as an official title. This game introduces a female protagonist, new maze designs and several minor gameplay changes over the original game.

The gameplay of Ms. Pac-Man is largely identical to that of the original Pac-Man. The player gathers points by eating dots and avoiding ghosts (contact with one loses a life). Power-pellets or energizers change the ghosts, which reverse their course and can be eaten for bonus points. Fruit bonuses can be consumed for increasing point values, twice per level. As the levels increase, the speed and difficulty increase as well.
 
There are, however, some notable differences:
- The game has four different mazes that appear in different sets of colors.
- Most of the new mazes have two sets of warp tunnels.
- Unlike the original Pac-Man, the spaces in between the walls are filled in, making it easier to see where the path is.
- The ghosts' behavior patterns are different and include semi-random movement, precluding the use of patterns to beat each level.
- Instead of appearing in the center of the maze, fruits bounce around the maze, entering and leaving through the warp tunnels. Once all fruits have been encountered, they appear in random sequence for the rest of the game.
- The orange ghost's name is Sue instead of Clyde.
- The three intermissions have changed to follow the developing relationship between Pac-Man and Ms. Pac-Man (from when they first meet to having a stork drop off their baby).
- The sound effects and music of the game are very different from the Pac-Man sounds.
 
As in Pac-Man, the game has a bug in the subroutine that draws the fruit, which renders the 256th level unplayable. However, the game also has other bugs that cause it to crash or become unplayable much sooner, making it impossible to reach the 256th level without an emulator.

Pak's Thoughts: The placement of this game on my list required a lot of soul searching. On the one hand, Pac-Man is PAC-MAN. It was the heart of the phenominon we called Pac-Man fever, and Ms. Pac-Man was just riding on his coattails. On the other hand,  Ms. Pac-Man is the superior game in pretty much every way. The levels change every couple stages and the ghosts are a bit less predictable. I won't tell you which one I scored higher, but I pass the question on to you: What's more important? The game that started it all, or the game that refined it?

And that does it for today! The top 20 starts tomorrow!
Title: Re: LoC 50 - Top Video Games of the '80s (And before!) - Today's High Scores
Post by: RVR II on July 25, 2011, 11:52:18 AM
#24 – Asteroids

(68 Points) 5 of 18 Lists - Highest Ranking - #3 - RVR II
(http://i212.photobucket.com/albums/cc83/pakgor/asteroids_game_screen.jpg)


Commercial:

http://www.youtube.com/v/3aHaWloD0Js?version=3&hl=en_US

Release Date:  1979

Just the facts/Stuff I wiki'd:

Asteroids is a video arcade game released in 1979 by Atari Inc. It was one of the most popular and influential games of the Golden Age of Arcade Games. Asteroids uses a vector display and a two-dimensional view that wraps around in both screen axes. The player controls a spaceship in an asteroid field which is periodically traversed by flying saucers. The object of the game is to shoot and destroy asteroids and saucers while not colliding with either, or being hit by the saucers' counter-fire.

The game was conceived by Lyle Rains and programmed and designed by Ed Logg. It was implemented on hardware developed by Howard Delman. Asteroids was a hit in the United States and became Atari's best selling game of all time. Atari had been in the process of manufacturing another vector game, Lunar Lander, but demand for Asteroids was so high "that several hundred Asteroids games were shipped in Lunar Lander cabinets." Asteroids was so popular that video arcade operators sometimes had to install larger boxes to hold the number of coins that were spent by players.
 
Asteroids is also the first game to use Atari's "QuadraScan" vector-refresh system; a full-color version known as "Color-QuadraScan" was later developed for games such as Space Duel and Tempest.

The objective of Asteroids is to score as many points as possible by destroying asteroids and flying saucers. The player controls a triangular-shaped ship that can rotate left and right, fire shots straight forward, and thrust forward. As the ship moves, momentum is not conserved — the ship eventually comes to a stop again when not thrusting. The player can also send their ship into hyperspace, causing it to disappear and reappear in a random location on the screen (with the risk of self-destructing or appearing on top of an asteroid).
 
Each stage starts with a few asteroids drifting in random directions on the screen. Objects wrap around screen edges — for instance, an asteroid that drifts off the top edge of the screen reappears at the bottom and continues moving in the same direction. As the player shoots asteroids, they break into smaller asteroids that frequently move faster and are more difficult to hit. Smaller asteroids also score higher points. Periodically, a flying saucer appears on one side of the screen and moves across to the other before disappearing again. The saucers are of two kinds: Large saucers fire in random directions, while small saucers aim at the player's ship.
 
The minimalist soundtrack features a memorable deep-toned electronic "heartbeat", which quickens as the asteroid density is reduced by the player's fire.
 
Once the screen has been cleared of all asteroids and flying saucers, a new set of large asteroids appears. The number of asteroids increases each round up to a maximum of 12. The game is over when the player has lost all of his/her lives.
 
Like many games of its time, Asteroids contains several bugs that were mostly the result of the original programmers underestimating the game's popularity or the skill of its players. The maximum possible score in this game is 99,990 points, after which it "rolls over" back to zero. Other common terms for this bug were "turn over" and "flip over". Also, an oversight in the small saucer's programming gave rise to a popular strategy known as "lurking" — because the saucer could only shoot directly at the player's position on the screen, the player could "hide" at the opposite end of the screen and shoot across the screen boundary, while remaining relatively safe. Another popular method of exploiting this bug was to simply use thrust to keep the ship in motion with 1 or 2 asteroids in the play field, allowing the player to pick off as many 1,000 point UFOs as possible. This led to experienced players being able to play indefinitely on a single credit. This oversight was addressed in the game's sequel, Asteroids Deluxe, and led to significant changes in the way game developers designed and tested their games in the future.

Pak's Thoughts: Asteroids was a good investment, quarter-wise. Most arcade games do their best to burn through 25 cents every 5 minutes or so, but if you know what you're doing in a game of asteroids, 25 cents can kill a good 15 minutes or more.

It's funny how some games just transport you back to a certain point in your life. When my family was in the process of first moving to New Mexico, we had to stay in a hotel and search for houses all day long, which is absolute boredom for a boy in his early teens. My one saving grace was the Asteroids machine they had down in the lobby. Throughout the trip I burned through about $10 in quarters playing Asteroids in-between house-hunts. Ever since then, Asteroids has reminded me of my first time in New Mexico.

Nuther one I kicked ass-teroids at back in the day 8)
Title: Re: LoC 50 - Top Video Games of the '80s (And before!) - Today's High Scores
Post by: D.B. Barnes on July 25, 2011, 01:11:43 PM
#22 – Duck Hunt

(69 Points) 7 of 18 Lists - Highest Ranking - 2 #8s - Doctor Who? Rattrap007

Good lord, how could I forgotten Duck Hunt?!?

My brain doesn't work right anymore.
Title: Re: LoC 50 - Top Video Games of the '80s (And before!) - Today's High Scores
Post by: sarcasm_made_Easy on July 25, 2011, 01:15:18 PM
See i added duck hunt but i added it as super mario/duck hunt combo. 
Title: Re: LoC 50 - Top Video Games of the '80s (And before!) - Today's High Scores
Post by: Johnny Unusual on July 25, 2011, 01:55:17 PM
It didn't make it on mine, but Duck Hunt is certainly a classic.  I just thought that while it was fun and cool, it didn't have quite enough to make my list.  Damn dog.
Title: Re: LoC 50 - Top Video Games of the '80s (And before!) - Today's High Scores
Post by: MontyServo on July 25, 2011, 01:56:33 PM
See i added duck hunt but i added it as super mario/duck hunt combo. 

I listed them as separate games even though I too had that combo pack.
Title: Re: LoC 50 - Top Video Games of the '80s (And before!) - Today's High Scores
Post by: Rattrap007 on July 25, 2011, 09:47:42 PM
Duck Hunt, Asteroids, Oregon Trail and Centipede (The non-human variety) were all on my list.

Title: Re: LoC 50 - Top Video Games of the '80s (And before!) - Today's High Scores
Post by: Pak-Man on July 26, 2011, 09:32:14 AM
#20 – Dig Dug

(71 Points) 6 of 18 Lists - Highest Ranking - 2 - RVR II
(http://i212.photobucket.com/albums/cc83/pakgor/DigDug.jpg)


Commercial:

http://www.youtube.com/v/WmFZnpnur4U?version=3&hl=en_US
Do the Dig Dug Dance!

Release Date:  1982

Just the facts/Stuff I wiki'd:

Dig Dug is an arcade game developed and published by Namco in Japan in 1982 for Namco Galaga hardware. It was later published outside of Japan by Atari. A popular game based on a simple concept, it was also released as a video game on many consoles.

The objective of Dig Dug is to eliminate underground-dwelling monsters by inflating them until they pop, or by dropping rocks on them. There are two kinds of enemies in the game: Pookas, round red monsters (said to be modeled after tomatoes) who wear yellow goggles, and Fygars, green dragons who can breathe fire. The player's character is Dig Dug, dressed in white and blue, and able to dig tunnels through destructible environments. Dig Dug is killed if he is caught by either Pooka or Fygar, burned by a Fygar's fire, or crushed by a rock.
 
If left partially inflated, the monster will deflate and recover after a few seconds, and the player can also pass through the enemy while it is deflating.
 
The monsters normally crawl through the tunnels in the dirt but can turn into ghostly eyes and travel slowly through the dirt. The last enemy on a level will try to escape off the top left of the screen.
 
More points are awarded for eliminating an enemy further down in the dirt (the levels are color coded), and the Fygar is worth more points if it is inflated horizontally facing the player rather than inflated horizontally opposing the player or inflated vertically (because it only breathes fire horizontally). More points are also awarded for dropping rocks on enemies in order to eliminate them rather than inflating them. If one enemy is killed by the rock, it is worth 1000 points. The next two add 1500 points each and any after that they add 2000. The act of digging is itself worth points, giving ten points for each block dug, so some players do as much of it as possible in situations where the threat from the remaining monsters is minimal.
 
After the player drops two rocks, fruits and vegetables (and other edible bonus items, such as Galaxian flagships) appear in the center of the play field, and can be collected for points if the player is able to reach them before they disappear. These edible bonus items will appear even if the rocks fail to hit any enemies. In some versions of the game, the most points attainable from a single bonus fruit is 8,000 from the pineapple.
 
If the player drops a rock on a foe at the same time he pumps it to death, a glitch will occur whereupon all enemies will promptly disappear, but the game will not progress and the player will be free to dig through all dirt. Attaining the next level of play will then remain impossible, but the glitch can be resolved by forcing a rock to drop.
 
Level numbers are represented by flowers in the top right of the screen and each new level is noted at the beginning of each stage on the bottom right (as seen in this article's screenshot graphic). In successive levels more monsters appear on each screen and they move quicker. A level is completed successfully when the last monster is dispatched or succeeds in fleeing.
 
In the coin-operated version the game ends on round 256 (round 0), since this board is essentially an unplayable kill screen. At the start of the level a Pooka is placed directly on top of where the player starts, with no way to kill it.

Although Namco has officially given the character of the original Dig Dug the name Dig Dug, in other games where he makes an appearance, the protagonist goes by the name Taizo Hori (in Japanese order, HORI Taizo), and is the father of Susumu Hori, the main character in the Mr. Driller series. He is also the ex-husband of Toby "Kissy" Masuyo, the heroine of Baraduke. His name is a pun on the Japanese phrase "Horitai zo" or "I want to dig!"  a similar pun might be rendered in English as "Will Dig" or "Wanda [Wanna] Dig". Many American gamers learned of his real name via the Nintendo DS game Mr. Driller Drill Spirits, where he is also a playable character. He is additionally featured in an unlockable gallery of Mr. Driller items in Mr. Driller 2. In the Mr. Driller series, Hori is known as the "Hero of the Dig Dug Incident". In Japan, he is also the Hero of the South Island incident and is the honorary chairman of the Driller Council to whom most of the characters answer. This contrasts greatly with the PC remake Dig Dug Deeper, where the hero is simply named Dig Dug.

Pak's Thoughts: Of all the '80s arcade games to come out in the '80s, Dig Dug had the most unique form of defense. While other game heroes were hiding behind guns and power-ups, Dig Dug was inflating his enemies 'til they popped. It was satisfying 30 years ago, and it's satisfying today. I also found it completely liberating to play a game where you weren't bound by any kind of maze walls. Dig Dug could just dig his way in any direction he wanted at any time and shape his own maze. Dig Dug has aged very well and it's still a blast any time I decide to play it.
Title: Re: LoC 50 - Top Video Games of the '80s (And before!) - Today's High Scores
Post by: Pak-Man on July 26, 2011, 09:32:50 AM
#19 – Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles (Arcade)

(73 Points) 4 of 18 Lists - Highest Ranking - 2 #1s - ColeStratton, TeamRAD
(http://i212.photobucket.com/albums/cc83/pakgor/turtles_title_screen.png)

Turtle Power!

Commercial:

Spoiler (click to show/hide)

Release Date:  1989

Just the facts/Stuff I wiki'd:

Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles, released as Teenage Mutant Hero Turtles in Europe, is a side-scrolling beat-'em-up released by Konami as a coin-operated video game in 1989. It is based on the first Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles animated series which began airing in the winter of 1987. The original coin-operated game was distributed to the arcades in two variants: a standard 2-player version that allowed either player to choose their character and a deluxe 4-player version with each player controlling a different character. Home versions of the game were released for various platforms.

The player chooses from one of the four Ninja Turtles: Leonardo, Michelangelo, Donatello, and Raphael. After Shredder kidnaps the turtles' friend April O'Neil and their mentor Splinter, they must give chase, save their comrades, and defeat the evil Shredder. Up to four players (two in some versions) can take control of any of the turtles. Donatello has slower attacks but a longer range, Michelangelo and Raphael have fast attacks but a short range, and Leonardo is a well-rounded Turtle with average range and speed.
 
The eight-way joystick controls the movements of the Turtle, the jump button makes them jump and the attack button makes them hit in front of them using their weapon. In addition to this, some combinations are possible. The Turtles can throw Foot soldiers overhead, and by pressing the jump and attack buttons, a special attack is performed. Raphael rolls along the ground and finishes with a kick, while the other Turtles do a sweeping jump attack with their weapons. Turtles can also spring off the wall in certain areas. Enemies can be defeated more quickly by slamming them into walls or solid objects. Many objects such as traffic cones, parking meters, fire hydrants and exploding oil drums can be hit or damaged with attacks in order to help defeat nearby enemies. In the attract mode, the game showed the first part of the cartoon opening, along with a portion of the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles theme song.
 
The majority of the enemies the Turtles must face are the Foot Soldiers. They wear a different colored uniform depending on what weapon they have. The purple-clad Foot Soldiers also have the ability to hold the Turtles from behind, draining their health and leaving them open to attack by the other Foot soldiers. The bosses in the game includes Bebop and Rocksteady (individually and together), Baxter Stockman, Lieutenant Granitor, General Traag, Krang, and Shredder himself.

Pak's Thoughts: I wasn't initially on-board with Turtlemania. Something about the concept seemed like it was trying too hard. Then one day, me and my friend decided to check out the game at the local arcade. We were hooked on the game, and that got me hooked on the Turtles. What an arcade game it was, too! It had voice acting, partially interactive environments and character selection. My go-to character was Donatello...
Title: Re: LoC 50 - Top Video Games of the '80s (And before!) - Today's High Scores
Post by: Pak-Man on July 26, 2011, 09:33:12 AM
#18 – Missile Command

(75 Points) 5 of 18 Lists - Highest Ranking - #2 - sarcasm made Easy
(http://i212.photobucket.com/albums/cc83/pakgor/missile2.png)


Advertisement:

Spoiler (click to show/hide)

Release Date:  1980

Just the facts/Stuff I wiki'd:

Missile Command is a 1980 arcade game by Atari, Inc. that was also licensed to Sega for European release. It is considered one of the most notable games from the Golden Age of Video Arcade Games. The plot of Missile Command is simple: the player's six cities are being attacked by an endless hail of ballistic missiles, some of them even splitting like multiple independently targetable reentry vehicles (MIRVs), and in later levels smart bombs which can evade a less than perfectly targeted missile. As a regional commander of three anti-missile batteries, the player must defend six cities in their zone from being destroyed.

The game is played by moving a crosshair across the sky background via a trackball and pressing one of three buttons to launch a counter-missile from the appropriate battery. Counter-missiles explode upon reaching the crosshair, leaving a fireball that persists for several seconds and destroys any enemy missiles that enter it. There are three batteries, each with ten missiles; a missile battery becomes useless when all its missiles are fired, or if the battery is destroyed by enemy fire. The missiles of the central battery fly to their targets at much greater speed; only these missiles can effectively kill a smart bomb at a distance.
 
The game is staged as a series of levels of increasing difficulty; each level contains a set number of incoming enemy weapons. The weapons attack the six cities, as well as the missile batteries; being struck by an enemy weapon results in destruction of the city or missile battery. Enemy weapons are only able to destroy 3 cities during one level. A level ends if all the cities are destroyed, or when all enemy weaponry is destroyed or reaches its target. A player who runs out of missiles no longer has control over the remainder of the level. At the conclusion of a level, the player receives bonus points for any remaining cities or unused missiles. Between levels missile batteries are rebuilt and replenished; destroyed cities are rebuilt only at set point levels (usually 10 or 12K).
 
The game inevitably ends when all six cities have been wiped out. Like most early arcade games, there is no way to "win" the game; the game just keeps going with ever faster and more prolific incoming missiles. The game, then, is just a contest in seeing how long the player can survive. On conclusion of the game, the screen displays "The End", perhaps a poke at oncoming Nuclear Holocaust rather than the standard "Game Over" text (however, if the player is able to make the high score list, the game then prompts the player to enter his/her initials, with the "The End" sequence skipped).
 
The game features an interesting bug: once a score of 810,000 is reached, a large number of cities are awarded (150 cities plus the continuing accrual of bonus cities) and it is possible to carry on playing for several hours. At some later stage the speed of missiles increases greatly for a few screens. On the 255th and 256th yellow screens, known as the 0x stages, the scoring increases by 256 times the base value. For good players these two 0x stages could earn over a million points, this enabled them to reach a score of approximately 2,800,000 (although only 6 digit scores were shown, so it would display 800,000) and at this point the accelerated rate would suddenly cease and the game would restart at its original (slow) speed and return to the first stage, but with the score and any saved cities retained. In this way it was possible to play this game for hours on end. The world marathon record, set in 1982 by Victor Ali, is 80,364,995 points.

When the game was originally designed, the six cities were meant to represent six cities in California: Eureka, San Francisco, San Luis Obispo, Santa Barbara, Los Angeles, and San Diego.
 
While programming Missile Command, the programmer, Dave Theurer, suffered from nightmares of these cities being destroyed by a nuclear blast.

Pak's Thoughts: I never got hooked on Missile Command. It was a bit too abstract for me when I was a kid. I couldn't figure out what was what or why. These days I get it, but I don't have the nostalgia a lot of people have for it. It's a good game, though, and one of the first games that comes to mind when you think of old arcade games.
Title: Re: LoC 50 - Top Video Games of the '80s (And before!) - Today's High Scores
Post by: Pak-Man on July 26, 2011, 09:33:39 AM
#17 – Star Wars (Arcade)

(77 Points) 6 of 18 Lists - Highest Ranking - #3 - TeamRAD
(http://i212.photobucket.com/albums/cc83/pakgor/starwars_d.jpg)

Use the Force, Luke.

Advertisement:

(http://i212.photobucket.com/albums/cc83/pakgor/starwarsflyer.jpg)

Release Date:  1983

Just the facts/Stuff I wiki'd:

Star Wars is an arcade game produced by Atari Inc. and released in 1983. The game is a first person space simulator, simulating the attack on the Death Star from the final act of Star Wars - Episode IV: A New Hope. The game is composed of 3D color vector graphics.

The player assumes the role of Luke Skywalker ("Red Five"), as he pilots an X-wing fighter from a first-person perspective. Unlike other arcade games of similar nature, the player does not have to destroy every enemy in order to advance through the game; he must simply survive as his fighter flies through the level, which most often means he must avoid or destroy the shots that enemies fire. Each hit on his craft takes away one shield (of the six he started out with), and if he runs out of shields and takes another hit, the game ends.
 
The player's ultimate goal is to destroy the Death Star through three attack phases.

- In the first phase of the game, the player begins in outer space above the Death Star. He must engage in a dog fight with Darth Vader and enemy TIE fighters.

- In the second phase (occurring beginning with the second wave), the player reaches the Death Star's surface as laser turrets on towers rise to confront the player. If the player manages to destroy all of the towers, he will receive a sizeable point bonus.

- In the final scenario, the player finds himself speeding through the trench of the Death Star, avoiding obstacles and blasting gun turrets until, finally firing a proton torpedo at the correct time for a direct hit on the exhaust port target. What follows, if the player is successful, is the Death Star exploding in a multitude of different colors, plus the awarding of one bonus shield (on factory settings). If the player manages to destroy the Death Star without firing at anything but the exhaust port, he will receive a sizeable point bonus for "using the force." Then it is on to do battle again.
 
Each successive Death Star run greatly increases the difficulty; TIE Fighters shoot more often, there are more Laser towers and batteries in the second round, and there are many more obstacles and laser fire during the trench run. Unlike the movie, where the units shoot beams similar to lasers, the enemy units in this game shoot projectiles resembling fireballs, in order to give the player a chance to destroy the fired shots.

The game features several digitized samples of voices from the movie, including Mark Hamill as Luke Skywalker, Alec Guinness as Obi-Wan Kenobi, James Earl Jones as Darth Vader, Harrison Ford as Han Solo, the mechanized beeps of R2-D2, and the growls of Chewbacca.
 
The game is available as a standard upright or a sit-down cockpit version, both of which are elaborately decorated. The controls consist of a yoke control (similar to a steering wheel — twisting left and right gives combined roll and yaw; twisting forwards and backwards with the side control gives pitch) with four buttons — two trigger style and two in position to be pressed by the thumbs — each of which fired a laser positioned on the four leading edges of the X-Wings.

Pak's Thoughts: The sit-down version of Star Wars was one of those arcade games you had to wait for. You could try to play a game and come back later, but there was always someone else hogging the machine. Somewhere in this game is the seed that would blossom about a decade later into the X-Wing and Tie Fighter games. It was fun in the '80s, it was fun in the '90s, and it would be fun today if they'd just bring back the Space Sim. But I digress. How cool are vector graphics? And soundbytes too. This game had everything going on.
Title: Re: LoC 50 - Top Video Games of the '80s (And before!) - Today's High Scores
Post by: Pak-Man on July 26, 2011, 09:34:03 AM
#16 – Galaga

(78 Points) 6 of 18 Lists - Highest Ranking - #2 - Monty
(http://i212.photobucket.com/albums/cc83/pakgor/20797-Galaga.gif)

That is Galactic Dancing!

Advertisement:

(http://i212.photobucket.com/albums/cc83/pakgor/GalagaAd.jpg)

Release Date:  1981

Just the facts/Stuff I wiki'd:

Galaga is a fixed shooter arcade game developed and published by Namco in Japan and published by Midway in North America in 1981. It is the sequel to Galaxian, released in 1979. The gameplay of Galaga puts the player in control of a space ship which is situated on the bottom of the screen. At the beginning of each stage, the area is empty, but over time, enemy aliens fly in formation, and once all of the enemies arrive on screen, they will come down at the player's ship in formations of one or more and may either shoot it or collide with it. During the entire stage, the player may fire upon the enemies, and once all enemies are vanquished, the player moves onto the next stage.
 
Galaga has proven very successful. The arcade version of it has been ported to many consoles, and it has had several sequels, most recently Galaga Legions for the Xbox Live Arcade service.

The objective of Galaga is to score as many points as possible by destroying insect-like enemies. The player controls a starfighter that can move left and right along the bottom of the playfield. Enemies swarm in groups into into a formation near the top of the screen, and then begin flying down toward the player, firing bombs at and seemingly attempting to collide with the fighter.
 
Occasionally a "boss Galaga", who takes two shots to kill, attempts to capture the player's fighter using a tractor beam. If successful, the fighter joins the enemy formation, tethered to the boss that captured it. The player can recapture their ship by killing that boss while it is diving. The recaptured ship is then joined to the player's current ship, doubling the player's firepower but also making themselves twice as big a target. Once joined, each of the two ships can be destroyed independently. If a boss with a captured fighter is killed while still in formation (not diving), the fighter will disappear after leaving formation and will then appear again on the next level attached to another boss Galaga. If the fighter is accidentally shot by the player, it is destroyed and does not return. The game is over when the player's last ship is destroyed or captured.
 
Galaga introduces a number of new features over its predecessor, Galaxian. Among these is the ability to fire more than one bullet at a time, a count of the player's "hit/miss ratio" at the end of the game, and a bonus "Challenging Stage" that occurs at level three, and from then onwards every four levels, in which a series of enemies fly onto and out of the screen in set patterns without firing at the player's ship or trying to crash into it. These stages award a large point bonus if the player manages to destroy every enemy.
 
Galaga has an exploitable bug that can cause the attackers to stop firing bullets at the player, due to a coding error. In addition, similar to the famous "Split-Screen bug" in Pac-Man, a bug exists in Galaga in which the game "rolls over" from Level 255 to Level 0. Depending on the difficulty setting of the machine, this can cause the game to stall, requiring that the machine be reset or power-cycled in order to start a new game.

Pak's Thoughts: I always got greedy and let my guy get captured to go for the double-ship. I'd die a lot sooner that way, but it was worth it for the HONOR of wielding dual-ships. :^) It had awesome graphics for its day, too. It had the same limitations as the other games of its day, but it did so much with them. The enemies are all brightly colored and the character designs never looked TOO pixel-ey. It's a good example of doing more with less.
Title: Re: LoC 50 - Top Video Games of the '80s (And before!) - Today's High Scores
Post by: RVR II on July 26, 2011, 09:35:44 AM
#20 – Dig Dug

(71 Points) 6 of 18 Lists - Highest Ranking - 2 - RVR II
(http://i212.photobucket.com/albums/cc83/pakgor/DigDug.jpg)


Commercial:

http://www.youtube.com/v/WmFZnpnur4U?version=3&hl=en_US
Do the Dig Dug Dance!

Release Date:  1982

Just the facts/Stuff I wiki'd:

Dig Dug is an arcade game developed and published by Namco in Japan in 1982 for Namco Galaga hardware. It was later published outside of Japan by Atari. A popular game based on a simple concept, it was also released as a video game on many consoles.

The objective of Dig Dug is to eliminate underground-dwelling monsters by inflating them until they pop, or by dropping rocks on them. There are two kinds of enemies in the game: Pookas, round red monsters (said to be modeled after tomatoes) who wear yellow goggles, and Fygars, green dragons who can breathe fire. The player's character is Dig Dug, dressed in white and blue, and able to dig tunnels through destructible environments. Dig Dug is killed if he is caught by either Pooka or Fygar, burned by a Fygar's fire, or crushed by a rock.
 
If left partially inflated, the monster will deflate and recover after a few seconds, and the player can also pass through the enemy while it is deflating.
 
The monsters normally crawl through the tunnels in the dirt but can turn into ghostly eyes and travel slowly through the dirt. The last enemy on a level will try to escape off the top left of the screen.
 
More points are awarded for eliminating an enemy further down in the dirt (the levels are color coded), and the Fygar is worth more points if it is inflated horizontally facing the player rather than inflated horizontally opposing the player or inflated vertically (because it only breathes fire horizontally). More points are also awarded for dropping rocks on enemies in order to eliminate them rather than inflating them. If one enemy is killed by the rock, it is worth 1000 points. The next two add 1500 points each and any after that they add 2000. The act of digging is itself worth points, giving ten points for each block dug, so some players do as much of it as possible in situations where the threat from the remaining monsters is minimal.
 
After the player drops two rocks, fruits and vegetables (and other edible bonus items, such as Galaxian flagships) appear in the center of the play field, and can be collected for points if the player is able to reach them before they disappear. These edible bonus items will appear even if the rocks fail to hit any enemies. In some versions of the game, the most points attainable from a single bonus fruit is 8,000 from the pineapple.
 
If the player drops a rock on a foe at the same time he pumps it to death, a glitch will occur whereupon all enemies will promptly disappear, but the game will not progress and the player will be free to dig through all dirt. Attaining the next level of play will then remain impossible, but the glitch can be resolved by forcing a rock to drop.
 
Level numbers are represented by flowers in the top right of the screen and each new level is noted at the beginning of each stage on the bottom right (as seen in this article's screenshot graphic). In successive levels more monsters appear on each screen and they move quicker. A level is completed successfully when the last monster is dispatched or succeeds in fleeing.
 
In the coin-operated version the game ends on round 256 (round 0), since this board is essentially an unplayable kill screen. At the start of the level a Pooka is placed directly on top of where the player starts, with no way to kill it.

Although Namco has officially given the character of the original Dig Dug the name Dig Dug, in other games where he makes an appearance, the protagonist goes by the name Taizo Hori (in Japanese order, HORI Taizo), and is the father of Susumu Hori, the main character in the Mr. Driller series. He is also the ex-husband of Toby "Kissy" Masuyo, the heroine of Baraduke. His name is a pun on the Japanese phrase "Horitai zo" or "I want to dig!"  a similar pun might be rendered in English as "Will Dig" or "Wanda [Wanna] Dig". Many American gamers learned of his real name via the Nintendo DS game Mr. Driller Drill Spirits, where he is also a playable character. He is additionally featured in an unlockable gallery of Mr. Driller items in Mr. Driller 2. In the Mr. Driller series, Hori is known as the "Hero of the Dig Dug Incident". In Japan, he is also the Hero of the South Island incident and is the honorary chairman of the Driller Council to whom most of the characters answer. This contrasts greatly with the PC remake Dig Dug Deeper, where the hero is simply named Dig Dug.

Pak's Thoughts: Of all the '80s arcade games to come out in the '80s, Dig Dug had the most unique form of defense. While other game heroes were hiding behind guns and power-ups, Dig Dug was inflating his enemies 'til they popped. It was satisfying 30 years ago, and it's satisfying today. I also found it completely liberating to play a game where you weren't bound by any kind of maze walls. Dig Dug could just dig his way in any direction he wanted at any time and shape his own maze. Dig Dug has aged very well and it's still a blast any time I decide to play it.

Love this game Even to This Day!! 8)

... Don't remember the Dig Dug Dance though.. :-\
Title: Re: LoC 50 - Top Video Games of the '80s (And before!) - Today's High Scores
Post by: sarcasm_made_Easy on July 26, 2011, 10:28:12 AM
WOOT missle command.  Heh again anything with a track ball is cooler. 
Title: Re: LoC 50 - Top Video Games of the '80s (And before!) - Today's High Scores
Post by: Rattrap007 on July 26, 2011, 12:17:35 PM
Dig Dug and Missile Command this time...
Title: Re: LoC 50 - Top Video Games of the '80s (And before!) - Today's High Scores
Post by: Johnny Unusual on July 26, 2011, 02:05:56 PM
Never played the Star Wars game.  Dig Dug, Galaga and Missle Command are good.  The Turtles game was amazing at the time.  I loved those old Beat-Em Up games.  Anyone else who did would do well to check out Castle Crashers and the Scott Pilgrim video game (with soundtrack by Anamanaguchi), which is also pretty awesome.
Title: Re: LoC 50 - Top Video Games of the '80s (And before!) - Today's High Scores
Post by: gojikranz on July 26, 2011, 06:26:15 PM
cant belvie i forgot TMNT. 

i put galaga 90 on my list rather than galaga cause its just way better (i had it for turbo-grafx).  forget about the double ship in that you could get a triple ship which was just incredible.
Title: Re: LoC 50 - Top Video Games of the '80s (And before!) - Today's High Scores
Post by: Pak-Man on July 27, 2011, 08:30:30 AM
#15 – Gauntlet

(81 Points) 6 of 18 Lists - Highest Ranking – 3 #8s – ColeStratton, sarcasm made Easy, Asbestos Bill
(http://i212.photobucket.com/albums/cc83/pakgor/gauntlet-game.jpg)

Red Wizard needs food badly.

Advertisement:

(http://i212.photobucket.com/albums/cc83/pakgor/atari_arcade_ad_gauntlet.jpg)

Release Date:  1985

Just the facts/Stuff I wiki'd:

Gauntlet is a fantasy-themed hack and slash 1985 arcade game by Atari Games. It is noted as the first class-based multiplayer game. Released during the emergence of popularity of other role-playing games like Dungeons & Dragons, the game was a sensation, being one of the first true dungeon crawl arcade games.

The players, up to four at once in the arcade version, select among four playable fantasy-based characters; Thor the Warrior, Merlin the Wizard, Thyra the Valkyrie or Questor the Elf. Each character has his or her own unique strength and weaknesses. For example, the Warrior is strongest in hand-to-hand combat, the Wizard has the strongest magic, the Valkyrie has the greatest armour and the Elf is the fastest in movement.
 
Upon selecting a playable character, the gameplay is set within a series of top-down, third-person perspective mazes where the object is to locate and touch the designated exit in every level. An assortment of special items can be located in each level that increase player's character's health, unlock doors, gain more points and magical potions that can destroy all of the enemies on screen.
 
The enemies are a vast assortment of fantasy based monsters, including ghosts, grunts, demons, lobbers, sorcerers and thieves. Each enters the level through specific generators, which can be destroyed. While there are no bosses in the game, the most dangerous enemy is "Death", who can not only drain your character's health, but is difficult to destroy.
 
As the game progresses, higher levels of skill are needed to reach the exit, with success often depending on the willingness of the players to cooperate by sharing food and luring monsters into places where they can be engaged and slaughtered more conveniently. While contact with enemies reduces the player's health, it also slowly drains on its own, thus creating a time limit.
 
Aside from the ability to have up to four players at once, the game is also noted for the narrator's voice, which was produced by a Texas Instruments TMS5220C speech chip. The narrator would frequently make statements repeating the game's rules, including: "Shots do not hurt other players (yet)," "Remember, don't shoot food!", "Elf — shot the food!", and "Warrior needs food — badly!" Occasionally, the narrator would encourage (or mock) the players in the thick of battle by saying, "I've not seen such bravery!" or "Let's see you get out of here!" A memorable statement of the game occurred when a player's "life force" points fell below 200: "Your life force is running out", "Elf needs food" or "Valkyrie...is about to die!"
 
To accommodate up to four players, the cabinet is wider than other standard uprights. Each player had a joystick and two buttons, one for "Fire" (ranged attack) and one for "Magic". The Magic button also started the game. After Gauntlet's release, other games started using this design, so it was a popular conversion target for newer games after it had its run.
 
There were some skilled players that could play an unlimited amount of time on one credit, especially with the Warrior and Wizard, and thus causing the arcades to lose money. A ROM update was released, reducing the "extra shot power" and "Extra shot speed" powerup bonus for Warrior and Wizard, and adding a new points-based difficulty counter to the game. The difficulty counter caused the game to become more difficult, in 16,384 point steps, which removed more designated food from the levels, and made the monsters respawn faster. Unfortunately, this was not well thought out, as on the default game difficulty of "4", it was almost impossible to pass levels 1-7 without dying, and level 4 was designed so that some of the food drops would block the monsters from swarming the player. This was because the game removed some of the "default" food for playing solo; on difficulty level 0, at least one food placement was removed from every single level (at low scores), and on difficulty 4, two or three food drops were removed. This made the game too difficult, even for the best players, unless they could find a machine set to difficulty 0. Instead, the game gave bonus food for three or four players playing together. (Three players gave all of the default food, while four gave extra food in random locations).

Pak's Thoughts: Gauntlet was always my favorite game to play with my brother. He liked playing as the warrior and I was always the wizard and we made quite a team. The theme song for the NES version is forever etched in my brain, and often when I'm reading a medieval-themed book and i need a soundtrack (Other people put soundtracks in their heads while they're reading, right?) the Gauntlet theme is my go-to generic medieval song. :^)
Title: Re: LoC 50 - Top Video Games of the '80s (And before!) - Today's High Scores
Post by: Pak-Man on July 27, 2011, 08:30:50 AM
#14 – Mega Man 2

(86 Points) 4 of 18 Lists - Highest Ranking - #1 - Gunflyer
(http://i212.photobucket.com/albums/cc83/pakgor/megaman2-1.gif)

In the year of 200X, A Super Robot named Megaman was created...

Commercial:
http://www.youtube.com/v/sj8ncXOejo4?version=3&hl=en_US



Release Date:  1988

Just the facts/Stuff I wiki'd:

Mega Man 2, known in Japan as Rockman 2: Dr. Wily no Nazo ("Rockman 2: The Mystery of Dr. Wily"), is a platform game developed and published by Capcom for the Nintendo Entertainment System. It is the second installment in the original Mega Man series. The game was released in Japan in 1988, and in North America and PAL regions the following years. Mega Man 2 continues the titular protagonist's battle against the evil Dr. Wily and his rogue robots. The game features graphical and gameplay changes from the first Mega Man game, many of which have remained throughout the series.
 
Although sales for Mega Man were unimpressive, Capcom allowed the Rockman team to create a sequel. They worked concurrently on other Capcom projects, using their free time to develop the game. Unused content from the previous title was integrated into Mega Man 2. Takashi Tateishi composed the soundtrack, with Yoshihiro Sakaguchi serving as a sound programmer.
 
With more than 1.5 million copies sold, the game is the best-selling Mega Man title. Critics praised its audio, visuals and gameplay as an improvement over the first game. Many publications rank Mega Man 2 as the best title in the series, and as one of the greatest video games of all time. The game has been re-released on several consoles and mobile phones.

Mega Man 2 is a platform and action game like its predecessor, Mega Man. The player controls Mega Man as he traverses eight stages to defeat the bosses, Dr. Wily's Robot Masters: Metal Man, Air Man, Bubble Man, Quick Man, Crash Man, Flash Man, Heat Man, and Wood Man. Each Robot Master features a unique weapon and a stage related to their weapon's power. For example, Air Man shoots small tornadoes and is fought in a sky-themed level, while Wood Man can use a shield of leaves and is found in a forest-themed stage. After defeating a boss, their signature weapon becomes available to the player. The Robot Masters have weaknesses to the weapons of certain other Robot Masters; therefore, choosing the order in which the levels are played is a vital component of the gameplay. After completing certain stages, Mega Man receives a special item. These items create platforms that allow Mega Man to access areas that he otherwise could not.
 
After defeating the eight Robot Masters, the player proceeds to Dr. Wily's fortress, which consists of six levels that are played linearly. As in the first title, the player is required to fight each Robot Master a second time in Dr. Wily's fortress. However, these battles take place in a single room rather than a series of linearly connected rooms. The room contains teleportation devices that lead to each Robot Master. The devices can be entered in any order, but are not labeled. Once the bosses are defeated again, the player must fight Dr. Wily.
 
Mega Man 2 features several gameplay changes from the original Mega Man. A new item, the Energy Tank, allows a player to refill Mega Man’s health at any time. Also introduced is a password system. After defeating each Robot Master a password is displayed, allowing the player to return to that particular point in the game after restarting the system. The password stores the particular list of completed Robot Masters, as well as the number of accumulated Energy Tanks. Unlike the first game, Mega Man 2 does not feature a score counter, and the player is unable to return to Robot Master levels once completed.

Pak's Thoughts: Look through any box of old papers and stuff from my childhood and you won't have to look too long before you find a sloppily-drawn grid with red and blue dots drawn in crayon. Mega Man 2 is just flat-out one of the best games ever made. It's challenging, but not as insanely challenging as its sequels and prequels. The music is some of the best ever composed in 8 bits, and the levels are the very peak of 8-bit level design. Every gamer should take the journey through Wily's castle at least once.
Title: Re: LoC 50 - Top Video Games of the '80s (And before!) - Today's High Scores
Post by: Pak-Man on July 27, 2011, 08:31:26 AM
#13 – Rampage

(86 Points) 5 of 18 Lists - Highest Ranking - #2 - gojikranz
(http://i212.photobucket.com/albums/cc83/pakgor/Rampage.png)

EX-MUTANT IS ARRESTED FOR STREAKING!

Advertisement:
(http://i212.photobucket.com/albums/cc83/pakgor/rampageAd.png)

Release Date:  1986

Just the facts/Stuff I wiki'd:

Rampage is a 1986 arcade game by Bally Midway. Players take control of gigantic monsters trying to survive against onslaughts of military forces. Each round is completed when a particular city is completely reduced to rubble.

Up to three simultaneous players control the monsters George (a King Kong-like gorilla), Lizzie (a Godzilla-like dinosaur/lizard), or Ralph (a giant werewolf), created from mutated humans. When they were humans, George was a normal middle aged man, Lizzie was a young woman, and Ralph was an elderly man. They were experimented on at Scumlabs. As monsters, they need to raze all buildings in a high-rise city to advance to the next level, eating people and destroying helicopters, tanks, taxis, police cars, boats, and trolleys along the way.

Monsters can jump and climb buildings, and punch enemies and buildings. Buildings also take damage when jumped on by a monster. The player's monster receives damage from enemy bullets, grenades, shells and so forth, and from falls. Damage is recovered by eating appropriate food such as fruit, roast chicken, or soldiers. If a monster takes too much damage, it reverts back into a naked human and starts walking off the screen sideways, covering its genitals with its hands. While in this state, the player can be eaten by another player. If the player continues, the human mutates back into the monster, or flies in on a blimp if off-screen, with a full life bar.
 
Smashing open windows generally reveals an item or person of interest, which may be helpful or harmful. Helpful items include food or money. Dangerous ones include bombs, electrical appliances, and cigarettes. Some items can be both; for example, a toaster is dangerous until the toast pops up, and a photographer must be eaten quickly before he dazzles the player's monster with his flash, causing it to fall. When a civilian is present waving their hands out a window signaling for help, a player's points meter rapidly increments when the civilian is grabbed. Each player can hold only one type of person: George can hold women, Lizzy can hold men, and Ralph can hold businessmen.
 
Rampage is set over the course of 128 days in cities across North America. The game starts in Peoria, Illinois and ends in Plano, Illinois. In Plano, players receive a "mega vitamin bonus" which heals all the monsters and provides a large point bonus. After this, the cycle of cities repeats five times. After 768 days, the game resets back to Day 1.
 
Some of the home port versions of the game start in San Jose, California and end in Los Angeles, California after going all around North America. The rampage travels through two Canadian provinces and forty-three U.S. states. Only Connecticut, Delaware, Mississippi, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, South Carolina, and Vermont are spared.

Pak's Thoughts: This game got SO many things right. First and foremost, they put you in control of the monster. It was mind-blowing back in the day. THEN your goal is to DESTROY THE CITY. And not just generic video game cities, but cities that were named after real places! I played for hours trying to get to my hometown (Denver at the time, and Albuquerque later on). My monster of choice was always Lizzy. I dig Godzilla-style monsters.
Title: Re: LoC 50 - Top Video Games of the '80s (And before!) - Today's High Scores
Post by: Pak-Man on July 27, 2011, 08:32:06 AM
#12 – Contra

(91 Points) 6 of 18 Lists - Highest Ranking - #1 - sarcasm made Easy
(http://i212.photobucket.com/albums/cc83/pakgor/Contra.jpg)


Advertisement:
(http://i212.photobucket.com/albums/cc83/pakgor/contra_usa_1987_1297376173.jpg)

Release Date:  1987

Just the facts/Stuff I wiki'd:

Contra, known as Gryzor in Europe and Oceania, is a 1987 run and gun action game developed and published by Konami originally released as a coin-operated arcade game on February 20, 1987. A home version was released for the Nintendo Entertainment System in 1988, along with ports for various computer formats, including the MSX2. The home versions were localized in the PAL region as Gryzor on the various computer formats and as Probotector on the NES, released long later. Several Contra sequels were produced following the original game.

In Contra, the player controls one of two armed military commandos named Bill and Lance, who are sent on a mission to neutralize a terrorist group called the Red Falcon Organization that is planning to take over the Earth. Details of the game's setting varies between supplementary materials: the Japanese versions sets the game in a fictional Galuga archipelago near New Zealand in the futuristic year of 2633, whereas the manual for the American NES version sets the game during the present in an unnamed South American island. The American storyline also changes the identity of "Red Falcon" from being the name of a terrorist organization to the name of an alien entity.

The main character is equipped with a rifle with an unlimited amount of ammunition. The player can also jump, move and fire in eight directions, as well as move or jump simultaneously while firing. A single hit from any enemy, bullet, or other hazard will instantly kill the player character and discard the current weapon. There are a total of four weapons the player can retrieve from flying weapon capsules, pill-box sensors, or red guards during 3D mazes: a Machine Gun, a Laser Gun, a Fire Gun, and a Spread Gun. There are also two additional supplemental power-ups: a Rapid Fire power-up which increases the player's firing speed, as well as a Barrier that will grant the player temporary invincibility for many seconds. All the power-ups in the arcade version are represented by Eagle-shaped letter icons with the exception of the Machine Gun and Laser. In the arcade version, the flying weapon capsules only appear if the player is not wielding any special weapons.
 
There are a total of over 10 areas in the game. There are two types of stages in Contra. In addition to the standard side view stages, Contra also features stages in which the player character is seen from behind and must move towards the background in order to proceed. Each of these "3D maze" stages are set inside the corridor of an enemy base in which the player must fight through the base's defenses in order to reach the core of the base. During the 3D maze stages, the upper screen will display a map of the base along with a time limit. Each maze stage is followed by a "3D fixed" stage set at the core of the base, in which the player must destroy a series of flashing sensors to expose an even larger sensor and destroy it.
 
Contra also features a two-player cooperative mode. Both players occupy the same screen and must coordinate their actions. One player lagging behind can cause problems for his partner, as the screen will not scroll onward, and a slow player can be fatal to his partner. The European release, Gryzor, does not feature a simultaneous 2-Players mode. Instead, both players take turns: whenever one player dies, the other gets his turn.

Pak's Thoughts: OK. Say it with me. Up, Up, Down, Down, Left, Right, Left,. Right, B, A, Start!

I didn't really discover Contra until waaay after its prime. I'd heard of it,  but it never caught my eye. It wasn't until the Super NES sequel years later that I would discover how awesome this game is. This game (And a lot of games that made the list) is notorious for its insane challenge level. If you can make it past the first stage without using the aforementioned code, you're a better Contra player than I.
Title: Re: LoC 50 - Top Video Games of the '80s (And before!) - Today's High Scores
Post by: Pak-Man on July 27, 2011, 08:32:27 AM
#11 – Castlevania

(93 Points) 7 of 18 Lists - Highest Ranking - #3 - Gunflyer
(http://i212.photobucket.com/albums/cc83/pakgor/Castlevania.jpg)


Advertisement:
(http://i212.photobucket.com/albums/cc83/pakgor/CastlevaniaAd.jpg)

Release Date:  1986

Just the facts/Stuff I wiki'd:

Castlevania, known as Akumajō Dracula (Devil's Castle Dracula) in Japan, is a console video game developed and published by Konami for the Family Computer Disk System in Japan in September 1986. A year later, in May 1987 it was ported to cartridge format and released in North America for the Nintendo Entertainment System (NES) followed by a European release in 1988. It was re-released for the Family Computer (FC) in cartridge format in Japan in 1993. It is the first game in Konami's Castlevania video game series.
 
The player takes control of Simon Belmont in the year 1691, who must defeat the vampire Dracula. A sequel, Simon's Quest, was released for the NES a few years later.

Castlevania is a typical platform game of the 8-bit era: the game is composed of six levels, which are played in a strictly linear progression. The player controls Simon Belmont throughout the game. The A Button allows Simon Belmont to jump just like other platformer games, such as Super Mario Bros., however he can only jump straight up, left, or right; there is no midair control. There are many stairs located throughout the levels, however rather than simply pressing left or right to step up them, you must hold up on the directional pad. His primary mode of attack is via his whip by pressing the B Button, which can be upgraded twice by obtaining special items throughout the course of the game which extend its length. In addition, various "sub-weapons" can be obtained which provide different means of attack. By breaking candelabra and certain other items located throughout the castle, Simon collects hearts, which are then used as ammunition for the sub-weapon that he possesses. Simon can only carry one sub-weapon at a time. The player can use a sub-weapon by simultaneously pressing "up" and B on the controller. Whenever Simon receives damage, he is knocked back a distance, increasing the challenge as this may lead to him falling down into a pit below. He is not knocked back when on stairs.
 
Each of Castlevania's six levels conclude with a boss fight: these bosses are generally taken from horror literature or legend, and include a giant bat, Medusa, a pair of mummies, Frankenstein's Monster and Igor, the Grim Reaper (this boss in particular is also infamous for being very difficult) and finally Dracula (who transforms into a second and more powerful monster form after his first form is defeated).

Pak's Thoughts: We have some notoriously hard games in this section of the countdown. I could never make it past the Grim Reaper and I can only rarely make it TO him. This game is absolutely diabolical. It kills me again and again and again, but I can never quit. Me and my brothers would spend WEEKENDS- leaving the TV on overnight, passing the controller back and forth- trying to slay this beast of a game, and we never could. The music is awesome, though, and the series went in some awesome directions from these humble beginnings.

And that's it for today. The top ten starts tomorrow. I won't give anything away, but I'll tell you right now these games are all well-deserving of their place on the list. What are the ten best video games made in the '80s? The countdown begins tomorrow!
Title: Re: LoC 50 - Top Video Games of the '80s (And before!) - Today's High Scores
Post by: sarcasm_made_Easy on July 27, 2011, 09:18:27 AM
Damn i REALLY wanted contra in the top spot, or at least top 10.  And pak i can make it to level five (snow level) without the code, and used to be able to do it without dying. 
Title: Re: LoC 50 - Top Video Games of the '80s (And before!) - Today's High Scores
Post by: goflyblind on July 27, 2011, 10:07:51 AM
i finally went looking for a c64 emulator and some games. i am now very worried about my ability to research over the next few weeks.
Title: Re: LoC 50 - Top Video Games of the '80s (And before!) - Today's High Scores
Post by: Rattrap007 on July 27, 2011, 01:37:16 PM
Gauntlet, Castlevania, Contra, and Rampage were all on my list..
Title: Re: LoC 50 - Top Video Games of the '80s (And before!) - Today's High Scores
Post by: Johnny Unusual on July 27, 2011, 01:49:06 PM
Gauntlet is great, but I didn't play a lot of it, in all honesty.  There's a very good homage to it in the recent Simpsons video game that came out a year ago "No one asks me if I need food."

I completely forgot Megaman 2.  That would have been in my top ten for sure.

Rampage is insanely fun.

Contra and Castlevania were also completely awesome games.  I beat Castlevania for the first time recently on the Wii. Helps when you don't have to reset the game just because supper is ready.
Title: Re: LoC 50 - Top Video Games of the '80s (And before!) - Today's High Scores
Post by: sarcasm_made_Easy on July 27, 2011, 03:23:19 PM
Its funny i think all of todays entries were on my list, im really curious to see what the top 10 are. 
Title: Re: LoC 50 - Top Video Games of the '80s (And before!) - Today's High Scores
Post by: Russell on July 27, 2011, 05:02:22 PM
in Terms of sheer replay value, I dare say Mega Man 2 is easily the best game of the 80's.
Title: Re: LoC 50 - Top Video Games of the '80s (And before!) - Today's High Scores
Post by: RoninFox on July 27, 2011, 05:32:30 PM
#20 – Dig Dug

(71 Points) 6 of 18 Lists - Highest Ranking - 2 - RVR II
(http://i212.photobucket.com/albums/cc83/pakgor/DigDug.jpg)


Here's the Dig Dug commercial we might have seen

(caution, swearing)

http://www.youtube.com/v/RKG9cW0SvNs

Probably would have been better than Cop Out.
Title: Re: LoC 50 - Top Video Games of the '80s (And before!) - Today's High Scores
Post by: D.B. Barnes on July 28, 2011, 12:27:12 AM
Dig Dug
That's some really good analysis there, Pak. It was indeed a free-for-all. Something that bucked the 'down-the-hall, alley, space corridor, etc.' trend. Dig-Dug was liberating. Gloria Steinham was even known to order a slice and throw down a few quarters.

http://www.youtube.com/v/nAjY1leC4WQ?version=3&hl=en_US

Star Wars
I think I slept in this machine a few times. Gimme' a decent buzz and a handful of quarters and I'll be good for quite a while.
Title: Re: LoC 50 - Top Video Games of the '80s (And before!) - Today's High Scores
Post by: Russell on July 28, 2011, 08:20:59 AM
Star Wars
I think I slept in this machine a few times. Gimme' a decent buzz and a handful of quarters and I'll be good for quite a while.
It's better than a hotel room actually.
Title: Re: LoC 50 - Top Video Games of the '80s (And before!) - Today's High Scores
Post by: Pak-Man on July 28, 2011, 09:03:16 AM
#10 – Super Mario Bros. 2

(94 Points) 7 of 18 Lists - Highest Ranking - #2 - Johnny Unusual
(http://i212.photobucket.com/albums/cc83/pakgor/SuperMario2.jpg)


Commercial:
http://www.youtube.com/v/mMFdeYwPEQQ?version=3&hl=en_US

Release Date:  1986

Just the facts/Stuff I wiki'd:

Super Mario Bros. 2, often abbreviated SMB2 and also known as Super Mario 2, is a platform game developed and published by Nintendo for the Nintendo Entertainment System as a sequel to the 1985 game Super Mario Bros. The game was also remade as part of the Super Mario All-Stars collection for the Super Nintendo Entertainment System (SNES), released on August 1, 1993 in North America and December 16, 1993 in Europe. It was rereleased on the Wii's Virtual Console in Europe, Australia and New Zealand on May 25, 2007 and the U.S. on July 2, 2007.
 
Unlike the majority of other Mario titles, Super Mario Bros. 2 was not developed from the ground up. Rather, it is a redesign of the Japanese Family Computer Disk System game "Yume Kōjō: Doki Doki Panikku" (Dream Factory: Heart-Pounding Panic). Nintendo's original sequel to Super Mario Bros. was released in Japan as Super Mario Bros. 2 in 1986; however, because of that game's difficulty and its close similarities to the original game, Nintendo decided not to release it in the West at that time. Because Super Mario Bros. 2 is a redesign of a non-Mario game, the game differs greatly from the original Super Mario Bros., though many elements from the game have since become part of the Mario series canon. The redesigned Western version of Super Mario Bros. 2 was released in Japan in 1992 under the title Super Mario USA, and in 1993 a 16-bit remake of the original Japanese version was released to the rest of the world as Super Mario Bros.: The Lost Levels as part of Super Mario All-Stars.

Super Mario Bros. 2 is set in the dream-land known as Subcon. Mario's task is to free Subcon from Wart, the game's final boss.
 
The game is a side-scrolling platform game. At the beginning of each stage, the player is given a choice of four protagonists to control: Mario, Luigi, Toad, and Princess Peach. Each character has different strengths; Mario is a well-rounded character; Luigi can jump the highest of the four; Toad can run and pluck vegetables the fastest but can't jump well; and Peach can jump the farthest, due to her ability to hover for a short time, though she is the slowest runner and slowest at plucking items from the ground. All characters have the ability to increase the height of their jump by ducking briefly before they jump.
 
Unlike the previous and following Mario games, no enemies can be defeated by jumping on them. Instead, the player character must throw objects at enemies, such as vegetables plucked from the ground. Certain opponents can be picked up and thrown as well, and several levels feature blocks marked with the word "POW", which when picked up and thrown kill all the enemies on screen at impact, similar to the one in Mario Bros.
 
The game features a life meter, a then-unusual feature in the series. The player begins each stage with two points of health, represented by red hexagons (in remakes, they are shaped like hearts), and can increase the number of health points in the meter by collecting mushrooms. Health can be replenished by floating hearts, which appear after a certain number of opponents have been defeated. The invincibility star from the previous game appears, with a player needing to collect five pairs of cherries to acquire it.
 
Each stage contains one or more hidden flasks of potion. When plucked and thrown, a potion creates a door to Sub-Space, an alternate world in which coins are collected instead of vegetables when plucked. The mushrooms used to increase the health meter can also be found here. The player automatically leaves Sub-Space after a short time. The coins collected are used in a slot machine mini-game played between stages. This mini-game is the chief means of obtaining additional lives. In addition to the mushrooms and slot machine coins, several Sub-Spaces are also used as warp zones; these involve the use of vases as pipes.

Pak's Thoughts: And Mario makes his debut at the bottom of the top 10! (I don't think I'm spoiling much by saying we haven't seen the last of him). Super Mario 2 is an odd beast. It wasn't originally a Mario game, but it does feel like it BELONGS with the Mario games. It didn't back then. When Super Mario 2 came out it didn't seem right. I don't think there was any game at the time that had a sequel that so radically departed from the base formula. This was to spare us the heaping bowls of gamer-pain that the Japanese Super Mario 2 would have dished out, of course, but I think most of us were expecting more goomba-squishing. What we got, though, was a gem that would have been overlooked if the Mario sprites hadn't been spliced in. There's nothing else like it at all.
Title: Re: LoC 50 - Top Video Games of the '80s (And before!) - Today's High Scores
Post by: Pak-Man on July 28, 2011, 09:03:40 AM
#9 – Space Invaders

(96 Points) 7 of 18 Lists - Highest Ranking - #1 - Monty
(http://i212.photobucket.com/albums/cc83/pakgor/space-invaders_s3.png)


Advertisement:
(http://i212.photobucket.com/albums/cc83/pakgor/SpaInDxC.jpg)

Release Date:  1978

Just the facts/Stuff I wiki'd:

Space Invaders is an arcade video game designed by Tomohiro Nishikado, and released in 1978. It was originally manufactured and sold by Taito in Japan, and was later licensed for production in the United States by the Midway division of Bally. Space Invaders is one of the earliest shooting games and the aim is to defeat waves of aliens with a laser cannon to earn as many points as possible. In designing the game, Nishikado drew inspiration from popular media: Breakout, The War of the Worlds, and Star Wars. To complete it, he had to design custom hardware and development tools.
 
It was one of the forerunners of modern video gaming and helped expand the video game industry from a novelty to a global industry. When first released, Space Invaders was very successful and popular. Following its release, the game caused a temporary shortage of 100-yen coins in Japan, grossed US$2 billion in quarters by 1982, and by 2007 had earned Taito over $500 million in profits. Guinness World Records ranks it the top arcade game.
 
The game has been the inspiration for other video games, re-released on numerous platforms, and led to several sequels. The 1980 Atari 2600 version quadrupled the system's sales and became the first "killer app" for video game consoles. Space Invaders has been referenced and parodied in multiple television shows, and been a part of several video game and cultural exhibitions. The pixelated enemy alien has become a pop culture icon, often used as a synecdoche representing video games as a whole.

Space Invaders is a two-dimensional fixed shooter game in which the player controls a laser cannon by moving it horizontally across the bottom of the screen and firing at descending aliens. The aim is to defeat five rows of eleven aliens—some versions feature different numbers—that move horizontally back and forth across the screen as they advance towards the bottom of the screen. The player defeats an alien, and earns points, by shooting it with the laser cannon. As more aliens are defeated, the aliens' movement and the game's music both speed up. Defeating the aliens brings another wave that is more difficult, a loop which can continue indefinitely.
 
The aliens attempt to destroy the cannon by firing at it while they approach the bottom of the screen. If they reach the bottom, the alien invasion is successful and the game ends. A special "mystery ship" will occasionally move across the top of the screen and award bonus points if destroyed. The laser cannon is partially protected by several stationary defense bunkers—the number varies by version—that are gradually destroyed by projectiles from the aliens and player.

Because microcomputers in Japan were not powerful enough at the time to perform the complex tasks involved in designing and programming Space Invaders, Nishikado had to design his own custom hardware and development tools for the game. He created the arcade board using new microprocessors from the United States. The game uses an Intel 8080 central processing unit, and features raster graphics on a CRT monitor and monaural sound generated by analogue circuitry. Despite the specially developed hardware, Nishikado was unable to program the game as he wanted—the Control Program board was not powerful enough to display the graphics in color or move the enemies faster—and he considered the development of the hardware the most difficult part of the whole process. While programming the game, Nishikado discovered that the processor was able to render the alien graphics faster the fewer were on screen. Rather than design the game to compensate for the speed increase, he decided to keep it as a challenging gameplay mechanic.

Space Invaders was first released in a cocktail-table format with black and white graphics, while the Western release by Midway was in an upright cabinet format. The upright cabinet uses strips of orange and green cellophane over the screen to simulate color graphics. The graphics are reflected onto a painted backdrop of a moon against a space background. Later Japanese releases also used colored cellophane. The cabinet artwork features large, humanoid monsters not present in the game. Nishikado attributes this to the artist basing the designs on the original title, Space Monsters, rather than referring to the in-game graphics.

Pak's Thoughts: 33 years old and still rocking the top-game lists. It's hard to deny the legacy. Like the wiki says, just one glance at one of those digital aliens conjurs up the very essence of gaming. I never rocked the high score list, but I could routinely clear out the first wave or two of invaders back in the day. It's still a pretty fun game today. Here's a fun fact: Mario creator and all-around-gaming-legend Shigeru Miyamoto says he never cared much for video games until he tried Space Invaders. If it hadn't been for this invasion, the face of gaming as we know it could have been forever changed. Thanks, Space Invaders!
Title: Re: LoC 50 - Top Video Games of the '80s (And before!) - Today's High Scores
Post by: Pak-Man on July 28, 2011, 09:05:14 AM
#8 – Donkey Kong

(109 Points) 12 of 18 Lists - Highest Ranking - #7 – RVR II
(http://i212.photobucket.com/albums/cc83/pakgor/DonkeyKong.png)


Advertisement:
(http://i212.photobucket.com/albums/cc83/pakgor/DonkeyKongAd.jpg)

Release Date:  1981

Just the facts/Stuff I wiki'd:

Donkey Kong is an arcade game released by Nintendo in 1981. It is an early example of the platform game genre, as the gameplay focuses on maneuvering the main character across a series of platforms while dodging and jumping over obstacles. In it, Jumpman (now known as Mario) must rescue a damsel in distress, Lady (now known as Pauline), from a giant ape named Donkey Kong. The hero and ape later became two of Nintendo's most popular characters.
 
The game was the latest in a series of efforts by Nintendo to break into the North American market. Hiroshi Yamauchi, Nintendo's president at the time, assigned the project to a first-time game designer named Shigeru Miyamoto. Drawing from a wide range of inspirations, including Popeye and King Kong, Miyamoto developed the scenario and designed the game alongside Nintendo's chief engineer, Gunpei Yokoi. The two men broke new ground by using graphics as a means of characterization, including cut scenes to advance the game's plot, and integrating multiple stages into the gameplay.
 
Despite initial misgivings on the part of Nintendo's American staff, Donkey Kong proved a success in North America and Japan. Nintendo licensed the game to Coleco, who developed home console versions for numerous platforms. Other companies cloned Nintendo's hit and avoided royalties altogether. Miyamoto's characters appeared on cereal boxes, television cartoons, and dozens of other places. A court suit brought on by Universal City Studios, alleging Donkey Kong violated their trademark of King Kong, ultimately failed. The success of Donkey Kong and Nintendo's win in the courtroom helped position the company to dominate the video game market in the 1980s and early 1990s.

Donkey Kong is one of the earliest examples of the platform game genre; it is sometimes said to be the first platform game, although it was preceded by Space Panic. In contrast to Space Panic, however, Donkey Kong was the first platform game to feature jumping, introducing the need to jump between gaps and over obstacles or approaching enemies, setting the template for the platform genre. Competitive video gamers and referees stress the game's high level of difficulty compared to other classic arcade games. Winning the game requires patience and the ability to accurately time Jumpman's ascent. In addition to presenting the goal of saving the Lady, the game also gives the player a score. Points are awarded for finishing screens; leaping over obstacles; destroying objects with a hammer power-up; collecting items such as hats, parasols, and purses (presumably belonging to the Lady/Pauline); and completing other tasks. The player typically receives three lives with a bonus awarded for the first 10,000 points, although this can be modified via the game's built in DIP switches.
 
The game is divided into four different one-screen stages. Each represents 25 meters of the structure Donkey Kong has climbed, one stage being 25 meters higher than the previous. The final screen occurs at 100 m. Later ports of the game omit or change the sequence of the screens. The original arcade version includes:
- Screen 1 (25 m), Jumpman must scale a seven-story construction site made of crooked girders and ladders while jumping over or hammering barrels and oil barrels tossed by Donkey Kong. The hero must also avoid flaming balls, which generate when an oil barrel collides with an oil drum. Players routinely call this screen "Barrels".
- Screen 2 (50 m), Jumpman must climb a five-story structure of conveyor belts, each of which transports cement pans. The fireballs also make another appearance. This screen is sometimes referred to as the "Factory" or "Pie Factory" due to the resemblance of the cement pans to pies.
- Screen 3 (75 m), Jumpman rides up and down elevators while avoiding fireballs and bouncing objects, presumably spring weights. The bouncing weights (the hero's greatest danger in this screen) emerge on the top level and drop near the rightmost elevator. The screen's common name is "Elevators". This screen appears as an unlockable stage in Super Smash Bros. Brawl.
- Screen 4 (100 m), Jumpman must remove the eight rivets which support Donkey Kong. The fireballs remain the primary obstacle. Removing the final rivet causes Donkey Kong to fall and the hero to be reunited with the Lady. This is the final screen of each level. Players refer to this screen as "Rivets".
 
The player loses a life if:
- Jumpman runs into a barrel, fireball, flaming oil barrel, spring weight, cement pan, or Donkey Kong;
- Jumpman falls off the structure or through open rivet holes;
- The bonus timer reaches 0.
 
These screens combine to form levels, which become progressively tougher. For example, Donkey Kong begins to hurl barrels faster and sometimes diagonally, and fireballs get speedier. The victory music alternates between levels 1 and 2. The 22nd level is unofficially known as the kill screen, due to an error in the game's programming that kills Jumpman after a few seconds, effectively ending the game. With its four unique levels, Donkey Kong was the most complex arcade game at the time of its release, and only the second game to feature multiple levels (the first was Gorf by Midway Games).

Pak's Thoughts: Even before we got to know Mario, Donkey Kong was an incredible game. The graphics were eye-grabbing, the gameplay was completely new, and the sound effects are infectious. I always tried to target a different game whenever I hit the arcade, but I always saved a token or two for Donkey Kong. It just wasn't a trip to the arcade until I jumped over a couple barrels.

If you want an insanely complete write-up on the history of Donkey Kong, check this out: http://www.gamasutra.com/view/feature/6422/the_secret_history_of_donkey_kong.php
Title: Re: LoC 50 - Top Video Games of the '80s (And before!) - Today's High Scores
Post by: Pak-Man on July 28, 2011, 09:05:36 AM
#7 – Pac-Man

(119 Points) 10 of 18 Lists - Highest Ranking - #4 - RVR II
(http://i212.photobucket.com/albums/cc83/pakgor/Pac-Man.jpg)


Advertisement:
(http://i212.photobucket.com/albums/cc83/pakgor/pacmanAd.png)

Release Date:  1980

Just the facts/Stuff I wiki'd:

Pac-Man is an arcade game developed by Namco and licensed for distribution in the United States by Midway, first released in Japan on May 22, 1980. Immensely popular from its original release to the present day, Pac-Man is considered one of the classics of the medium, virtually synonymous with video games, and an icon of 1980s popular culture. Upon its release, the game—and, subsequently, Pac-Man derivatives—became a social phenomenon that sold a bevy of merchandise and also inspired, among other things, an animated television series and a top-ten hit single.
 
When Pac-Man was released, the most popular arcade video games were space shooters, in particular Space Invaders and Asteroids. The most visible minority were sports games that were mostly derivative of Pong. Pac-Man succeeded by creating a new genre and appealing to both genders. Pac-Man is often credited with being a landmark in video game history, and is among the most famous arcade games of all time. It is also the highest-grossing video game of all time, having generated more than $2.5 billion in quarters by the 1990s.
 
The character has appeared in more than 30 officially licensed game spin-offs, as well as in numerous unauthorized clones and bootlegs. According to the Davie-Brown Index, Pac-Man has the highest brand awareness of any video game character among American consumers, recognized by 94 percent of them. Pac-Man is one of the longest running video game franchises from the golden age of video arcade games, and one of only three video games that are on display at the Smithsonian in Washington D.C. (along with Pong and Dragon's Lair).

The player controls Pac-Man through a maze, eating pac-dots. When all dots are eaten, Pac-Man is taken to the next stage, between some stages one of three intermission animations plays. Four enemies (Blinky, Pinky, Inky and Clyde) roam the maze, trying to catch Pac-Man. If an enemy touches Pac-Man, a life is lost. When all lives have been lost, the game ends. Pac-Man is awarded a single bonus life at 10,000 points by default—DIP switches inside the machine can change the required points or disable the bonus life altogether. Near the corners of the maze are four larger, flashing dots known as power pellets that provide Pac-Man with the temporary ability to eat the enemies. The enemies turn deep blue, reverse direction and usually move more slowly. When an enemy is eaten, its eyes remain and return to the center box where it is regenerated in its normal color. Blue enemies flash white before they become dangerous again and the length of time for which the enemies remain vulnerable varies from one stage to the next, generally becoming shorter as the game progresses. In later stages, the enemies don't change colors at all, but still reverse direction when a power pellet is eaten.

The enemies in Pac-Man are known variously as "ghosts" and "monsters". Despite the seemingly random nature of the enemies, their movements are strictly deterministic, which players have used to their advantage. In an interview, creator Toru Iwatani stated that he had designed each enemy with its own distinct personality in order to keep the game from becoming impossibly difficult or boring to play. More recently, Iwatani described the enemy behaviors in more detail at the 2011 Game Developers Conference. He stated that the red enemy chases Pac-Man, and the pink and blue enemies try to position themselves in front of Pac-Man's mouth. While he claimed that the orange enemy's behavior is random, a careful analysis of the game's code reveals that it actually chases Pac-Man most of the time, but also moves toward the lower-left corner of the maze when Pac-Man is facing a certain direction.

Pac-Man was designed to have no ending – as long as the player keeps at least one life, he or she should be able to play the game indefinitely. However, a bug keeps this from happening: Normally, no more than seven fruits are displayed at the bottom of the screen at any one time. But when the internal level counter, which is stored in a single byte, reaches 255, the subroutine that draws the fruits erroneously "rolls over" this number to zero, causing it to try to draw 256 fruits instead of the usual seven. This corrupts the bottom of the screen and the entire right half of the maze with seemingly random symbols, making it impossible to eat enough dots to beat the level. Because this effectively ends the game, this "split-screen" level is often referred to as the "kill screen". Emulators and code analysis have revealed what would happen should this 255th level be cleared: The fruits and intermissions would restart at level 1 conditions, but the enemies would retain their higher speed and invulnerability to power pellets from the higher stages.

A perfect Pac-Man game occurs when the player achieves the maximum possible score on the first 255 levels (by eating every possible dot, power pellet, fruit, and enemy) without losing a single life, and then scoring as many points as possible in the last level. As verified by the Twin Galaxies International Scoreboard on July 3, 1999, the first person to achieve this maximum possible score (3,333,360 points) was Billy Mitchell of Hollywood, Florida, who performed the feat in about six hours.
 
In September 2009, David Race of Beavercreek, Ohio, became the sixth person to achieve a perfect score. His time of 3 hours, 41 minutes, and 22 seconds set a new record for the fastest time to obtain a perfect score.
 
In December 1982, an 8-year-old boy, Jeffrey R. Yee, supposedly received a letter from U.S. President Ronald Reagan congratulating him on a worldwide record of 6,131,940 points, a score only possible if he had passed the Split-Screen Level. Whether or not this event happened as described has remained in heated debate among video-game circles since its supposed occurrence. In September 1983, Walter Day, chief scorekeeper at Twin Galaxies, took the US National Video Game Team on a tour of the East Coast to visit video game players who claimed they could get through the Split-Screen Level. No video game player could demonstrate this ability. In 1999, Billy Mitchell offered $100,000 to anyone who could pass through the Split-Screen Level before January 1, 2000. The prize went unclaimed.


Pak's Thoughts: Eh. Never heard of it...





OK, so I still recall Pac-Man fever with great fondness. For the kiddies out there too young to remember it, there hasn't been anything like it since. Think back to when Star Wars: Episode 1 hit theaters. Remember how every other item in every store in the world had Star Wars emblazoned on it somewhere? It was that, but with Pac-Man. Pac-Man watches, board games, plushies, silverware, trading cards, bed sheets, cartoons, records, T-Shirts, stickers, folders... It was glorious.

So why wasn't Pac-Man my number one? Well I didn't pick the username of Pak-Man all those years ago (I entered the web back in '95. I used a text-based browser on my dad's computer) because Pac-Man was my favorite game. Although I have tremendous respect for the game and I'm still a HUGE fan. I picked it as a bit of word play on the term "Game Pak". Game Pak + Pac-Man = Pak-Man, or a man who enjoys a good Game Pak. There were better games lurking around the '80s, and I gave them credit where it was due.

That said, Pak-Man is an incredible game. When you get in the zone and you're dodging ghosts left and right and clearing out the board-- there's nothing like it.

Title: Re: LoC 50 - Top Video Games of the '80s (And before!) - Today's High Scores
Post by: Pak-Man on July 28, 2011, 09:10:00 AM
#6 – The Legend of Zelda

(127 Points) 8 of 18 Lists - Highest Ranking - #1 - Rattrap007
(http://i212.photobucket.com/albums/cc83/pakgor/The-Legend-of-Zelda.jpg)

It's a secret to everyone!

Advertisement:
http://www.youtube.com/v/-ApypJw-JAI?version=3&hl=en_US
It's the Legend of Zelda and it's really rad...

Release Date:  1980

Just the facts/Stuff I wiki'd:
The Legend of Zelda, originally released as The Hyrule Fantasy: Legend of Zelda in Japan, is a video game developed and published by Nintendo, and designed by Shigeru Miyamoto and Takashi Tezuka. Set in the fantasy land of Hyrule, the plot centers on a boy named Link, the playable protagonist, who aims to collect the eight fragments of the Triforce of Wisdom in order to rescue Princess Zelda from the antagonist, Ganon. During the course of the game, the player sees Link from a top-down perspective and has to navigate him through the overworld and several dungeons, defeating enemies and solving puzzles on the way.
 
The inaugural game of the Legend of Zelda series, it was first released in Japan as a launch title for the Family Computer Disk System peripheral. More than a year later, North America and Europe received releases on the Nintendo Entertainment System in cartridge form, making the game the first home console title to include an internal battery for saving data. A Japanese cartridge version for the Family Computer was released in 1994, and was followed by reissued ports for the GameCube, Game Boy Advance and the Virtual Console.
 
As of 2011, Nintendo plans to celebrate the game's 25th anniversary in a similar vein to the Super Mario Bros. 25th anniversary celebration the previous year, but is promised to be "different." This celebration has so far included a free mailout Club Nintendo offer of the Ocarina of Time soundtrack to owners of the 3DS version of that particular game, as well as a special stage inspired by the original Legend of Zelda in the upcoming Super Mario game for the 3DS.

The Legend of Zelda incorporates elements of action, adventure, role-playing, and puzzle games. The player controls Link from a flip-screen overhead perspective as he travels in the overworld, a large outdoor map with varied environments. Link begins the game armed with a small shield, but a sword becomes available to Link after he ventures into a cave that is accessible from the game's first map screen. Throughout the game, merchants, fairies, townspeople, and others guide Link with cryptic clues. These people are scattered across the overworld and hidden in caves, shrubbery, or behind walls or waterfalls.
 
Barring Link's progress are creatures he must battle to locate the entrances to nine underground dungeons. Each dungeon is a unique, maze-like collection of rooms connected by doors and secret passages, and guarded by monsters different from those found on the surface. Dungeons also hide useful tools which Link can add to his arsenal, such as a boomerang for retrieving distant items and stunning enemies, and a recorder with magical properties. Link must successfully navigate through each of the first eight dungeons to obtain all eight pieces of the Triforce of Wisdom. Once he has completed the artifact, he can enter the ninth dungeon to rescue Zelda. Apart from this exception, the order of completing dungeons is somewhat left to the player, although they steadily increase in difficulty and some of them can only be reached or completed using items gained in a previous one. Link can freely wander the overworld, finding and buying items at any point. This flexibility enables unusual ways of playing the game. For example, it is possible to reach the final boss of the game without ever receiving the sword.
 
After completing the game, the player has access to a more difficult quest, officially referred to as the Second Quest where dungeons and the placement of items are different and enemies are stronger. Although this more difficult "replay" was not unique to Zelda, few games offered entirely different levels to complete on the second playthrough. The Second Quest can be replayed each time the game is completed and can also be accessed at any time by starting a new file with the name "ZELDA".

Pak's Thoughts: It took me almost a decade to finally defeat Gannon and claim the Triforce. The journey through Hyrule is an incredible experience and should be a must-play on any gamer's list.

I remember when this game hit the virtual console a few years back, I popped my head in on the then-active official Nintendo forums. There were kids who were completely perplexed by the game. "Nobody tells me where to go or what to do and the map doesn't tell me where to go next. There's not even a tutorial." It's funny how much we took for granted back then, really. A lot of really complex video games would just kjnd of push you into the swimming pool and expect you to swim. And yet we learned. Back then you didn't have gamefaqs. You had Nintendo Power coverage if you were lucky. That was it.

And that's it for today's entries. Who will take home the #1 spot? You may begin your speculation!


ALSO, keep an eye out later today for 3 bonus entries. A couple of you are probably starting to give up hope on your number 1 making the list. Well with a 35 point buy-in, there were a couple #1s that didn't make the cut. I'll be giving them full BONUS ENTRY write-ups in just a bit!
Title: Re: LoC 50 - Top Video Games of the '80s (And before!) - Today's High Scores
Post by: RVR II on July 28, 2011, 09:18:12 AM
Sweet!
Another couple of my Highest Rankings! :o :o
Title: Re: LoC 50 - Top Video Games of the '80s (And before!) - Today's High Scores
Post by: Pak-Man on July 28, 2011, 09:26:47 AM
BONUS ENTRY #1  – California Games

(25 Points) 1 of 18 Lists - Highest Ranking - #1 - goflyblind
(http://i212.photobucket.com/albums/cc83/pakgor/california-games_1.png)


Advertisement:
Spoiler (click to show/hide)

Release Date:  1987

Just the facts/Stuff I wiki'd:
California Games is a 1987 Epyx sports video game for many home computers and video game consoles. Branching from their popular Summer Games and Winter Games series, this game consisted of some sports purportedly popular in California including skateboarding, freestyle footbag, surfing, roller skating, flying disc (frisbee) and BMX.
 
The game sold very well, topping game selling charts for winter months. It also got very positive reaction from reviewers, many of whom consider California Games to be the last classic Epyx sports game, due to staff changes not long after its release.
 
The game was followed in 1991 by California Games 2, but the sequel failed to match the original's success.

Several members of the development team moved on to other projects. Chuck Sommerville, the designer of the half-pipe game in California Games later developed the game Chip's Challenge, while Ken Nicholson the designer of the footbag game was the inventor of the technology used in Microsoft's DirectX. Kevin Norman, the designer of the BMX game went on to found the educational science software company Norman & Globus, makers of the ElectroWiz series of products.
 
The sound design for the original version of California Games was done by Chris Grigg, member of the band Negativland.

California Games contains a number of easter eggs:
- On some random occasions, there is an earthquake during the skateboarding event, causing the H of the Hollywood sign to fall down (The remaining "OLLYWOOD" might also be a reference to the ollie skateboarding trick.)
- Players can hit the seagull (named 'George') in Footbag. Hitting the gull grants more points.
- A shark or a dolphin or a seagull occasionally appears in Surfing after a player falls off the board. If the shark comes the iconic theme from Jaws plays briefly.
- When practicing Flying Disc, if the player repeatedly fails in his attempts to throw the disc, a UFO appears and abducts the catcher.


Pak's Thoughts: California games was an awesome game as long as you didn't try to "Pick up and play". The controls for every event were different and took some getting used to. I always failed miserably at Hacky Sack. Never could get the hang of it.
Title: Re: LoC 50 - Top Video Games of the '80s (And before!) - Today's High Scores
Post by: Pak-Man on July 28, 2011, 09:46:40 AM
BONUS ENTRY #2  – Wizardry

(25 Points) 1 of 18 Lists - Highest Ranking - #1 - Compound
(http://i212.photobucket.com/albums/cc83/pakgor/wiz1title.gif)


Advertisement:
Spoiler (click to show/hide)

Release Date:  1981

Just the facts/Stuff I wiki'd:
Wizardry: Proving Grounds of the Mad Overlord is the first game in the Wizardry series of computer role-playing games. It was developed by Andy Greenberg and Robert Woodhead, and launched at a Boston computer convention in 1980. In 1979, Robert Sirotek and Fred Norman created Sir-tech Software, Inc. to distribute the game, and it was released in 1981.
 
The game was one of the first Dungeons & Dragons-style role-playing games to be written for computer play, and the first such game to offer color graphics. It was also the first true party-based role-playing computer game.
 
The game eventually ended up as the first of a trilogy that also included Wizardry II: The Knight of Diamonds and Wizardry III: Legacy of Llylgamyn. Proving Grounds needs to be completed in order to create a party that could play in the remainder of the trilogy.

Starting in the town, the player creates a party of up to six characters from an assortment of five possible races (Humans, Elves, Dwarves, Gnomes, Hobbits), three alignments (Good, Neutral, Evil), and four basic classes (Fighter, Priest, Mage, Thief). There are also four elite classes (Bishop: priest and mage spells; Samurai: fighter with mage spells; Lord: fighter with priest spells, and Ninja: fighter with thief abilities). Characters can be changed to an elite class after meeting the stat requirements. Priests typically cast healing spells, while Mages cast damage spells. Bishops, being a combination of the two, learn both sets of spells but at a reduced rate.
 
After equipping the characters with basic armor and weaponry, the party then descends into the dungeon below Trebor's castle. This consists of a maze of ten levels, each progressively more challenging than the last.
 
The style of play employed in this game has come to be termed a dungeon crawl. The goal, as in most subsequent computer role-playing games, is to find treasure including ever more potent items, gain levels of experience by killing monsters, then face the evil arch-wizard Werdna on the bottom level and retrieve a powerful amulet. The goal of most levels is to find the elevator or stairs going down to the next level (without being killed in the process).
 
The graphics are extremely simple by today's standards; most of the screen is occupied by text, with about 10% devoted to a first-person view of the dungeon maze using high-resolution line graphics. By the standards of the day, however, the graphics were a step forward from the text-only games that had been far more common. When monsters are encountered, the dungeon maze disappears, replaced by a picture of one of the monsters. Combat is against from 1 to 4 groups of monsters. The game's lack of an automap feature, which had not been invented at the time of its release, practically forces the player to draw the map for each level on a piece of graph paper as he walks through the dungeon maze, step by step - failing to do this often results in becoming permanently lost, as there are many locations in the maze that have a permanent "Darkness" spell upon the square (making the player walk blindly) or a "Teleport" spell sending the player to a new location. A magic spell can be used to determine the current location of the party, and at higher levels there is a teleport spell that can be used to quickly transition between the maze levels.
 
The game is unforgiving of mistakes or bad luck, requiring the player to start over if the party was killed in combat or accidentally teleported into solid stone. The challenge ultimately became part of the appeal, however, and the game still holds nostalgic appeal for many old-time computer gamers. The game can also require hundreds of hours to complete.

Pak's Thoughts: OK, Wikipedia. If there's one phrase I never want to hear again it's "Old-time computer gamers." I feel like I should be wearing a straw hat and chewing on a piece of straw while rocking in a chair. (I am rocking in a chair, but it's a computer chair so... I guess I AM something of an old-time computer gamer.)

Actually, I was a little too young to appreciate Wizardry when it came out, but I did enjoy Wizardry 7 when it hit the Super Nintendo. I can see the appeal and I've played many of it spiritual successors. I never made it to far, but I bet there were many, many hours spent by the more-determined trudging through the dungeons.

BTW, if you lament that they don't make them like this anymore, try some of Atlus' DS games. The Dark Spire is a direct homage to Wizardry (You can even change the graphics and music to an old-school setting) and the Etrian Odyssey games even have you keeping track of your own map on in-game graph paper on the touch screen.
Title: Re: LoC 50 - Top Video Games of the '80s (And before!) - Today's High Scores
Post by: Pak-Man on July 28, 2011, 10:07:57 AM
BONUS ENTRY #3  – Space Quest

(25 Points) 1 of 18 Lists - Highest Ranking - #1 - Pak-Man
(http://i212.photobucket.com/albums/cc83/pakgor/SpaceQuestI.gif)

To boldly go where no man has swept the floor!

Advertisement:
Spoiler (click to show/hide)

Release Date:  1986

Just the facts/Stuff I wiki'd:
Space Quest or more formally Space Quest: The Sarien Encounter was a video game released in October of 1986 and quickly became a hit, selling in excess of 100,000 copies (sales are believed to be around 200,000 to date, not including the many compilations it has been included in).

Players of the original game are never told the hero's name, but are instead asked to enter their own. The default name of "Roger Wilco" — a reference to the abbreviated radio communication, "Roger, Will Comply" — became the de facto name of the hero in the later games of the series.
 
Roger is a member of the cleaning crew onboard the scientific spaceship Arcada, which holds a powerful experimental device called the "Star Generator" (a thinly-veiled reference to the Genesis Device from Star Trek II). Roger emerges from an on-duty nap in a broom closet to find that the ship has been boarded and seized by the sinister Sariens. Using a keycard that he found from the body of a dead crew member, he finds his way to an escape pod and escapes the Arcada.
 
The game was programmed using Sierra's AGI engine and featured a pseudo-3D environment, allowing the character to move in front of and behind background objects. The primary means of input in Space Quest, as in many other AGI games, was through the use of a text parser for entering commands and use of the keypad or arrow keys for moving Roger Wilco around the screen. The Amiga, Apple IIGS, Atari ST and Mac versions of the game offered basic mouse support for movement as well. The game had a 160×200 resolution displaying 16 colours. Sound cards were not available in 1986, so sound was played through the PC's internal speaker; owners of Tandy 1000, PCjr and Amiga computers would hear a three-voice soundtrack, while Apple IIGS owners were treated to a fifteen-voice soundtrack with notably richer sound.
 
A precursor of this game is the interactive fiction game Planetfall, created by Infocom, whose player-character is a lowly "Ensign Seventh Class" who does the lowest form of labor aboard a spaceship and who appears on the cover with a mop. Just as King's Quest adapted the text-adventure puzzle games set in a medieval world to a visual display, Space Quest did the same for the space puzzle game.

Pak's Thoughts: Yup, my #1 choice got snubbed on my own list, reducing it to bonus-entry status. This game was just about my favorite thing ever as a kid and it remains one of my favorite games. The sense of humor is snappy, the puzzles are tricky (To the point of being unfair at times. I'm looking at you, piece of windshield on the floor of the ship that isn't even shown!) and in parodying sci-fi it actually becomes pretty good sci-fi on its own. The entire series is a real gem, and if you've never given it a whirl and aren't averse to text parsers, give the original a try. If you ARE averse to text parsers, try the remake! Just remember to save, save, save. You die a LOT. :^)
Title: Re: LoC 50 - Top Video Games of the '80s (And before!) - Today's High Scores
Post by: Pak-Man on July 28, 2011, 10:08:44 AM
OK. That's it for the bonus entries. This list will be finished tomorrow!
Title: Re: LoC 50 - Top Video Games of the '80s (And before!) - Today's High Scores
Post by: Rattrap007 on July 28, 2011, 11:54:14 AM
Got Zelda, pac-man, and Space invaders on my list..

Got all but 6 of my list items thus far. 2 I'm VERY certain are on the list, 1 I am pretty sure, the other 2 are long long shots..
Title: Re: LoC 50 - Top Video Games of the '80s (And before!) - Today's High Scores
Post by: Johnny Unusual on July 28, 2011, 04:04:16 PM
I loves me some Mario Bros 2.  It was the first game I ever played and it's colourfulness and strangeness enchanted me.  And in those days the boss battles felt tense and it was actually scary to try to get the key away from the Masks.

Surprised Zelda is so low.  Eager to see what, aside from the obvious, was regarded as the best.
Title: Re: LoC 50 - Top Video Games of the '80s (And before!) - Today's High Scores
Post by: Russell on July 28, 2011, 08:03:21 PM
I'm going to be very... puzzled if Super Mario bros is number 1. I mean it's
a great game, but it's nothing compared to its sequel, and of course the
glorious 3rd entry in the series.
Title: Re: LoC 50 - Top Video Games of the '80s (And before!) - Today's High Scores
Post by: Pak-Man on July 29, 2011, 09:39:21 AM
TOP 5 TIME!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!1


#5 – Mike Tyson's Punch-Out!!

(146 Points) 9 of 18 Lists - Highest Ranking - #3 - Invader Quirk
(http://i212.photobucket.com/albums/cc83/pakgor/mike_tysons_punchout_profilelarge.jpg)

Join the Nintendo Fun Club, Mac!

Advertisement:
http://www.youtube.com/v/B5BZ4Uz3f7I?version=3&hl=en_US

Release Date:  1987

Just the facts/Stuff I wiki'd:
Punch-Out!!, originally known as Mike Tyson's Punch-Out!! and later re-released as Punch-Out!! Featuring Mr. Dream, is a boxing video game for the Nintendo Entertainment System (NES) developed and published by Nintendo in 1987. It is a port of both the Punch-Out!! and Super Punch-Out!! arcade games (mostly the latter) with some variations. It has consistently been ranked among the best games released for the NES platform.

Genyo Takeda, who produced the Punch-Out!! arcade games, directed the NES versions. Because the NES was not as powerful as the arcade hardware, Takeda and his crew realized that it would be impossible for the NES port to faithfully emulate the arcade graphics. Instead of making the playable boxer wire-framed or transparent to see an opponent, they decided to shrink the playable boxer, so that players could easily see opponents over his head. Though the arcade's playable boxer didn't have an official name, he was referred to as "Little Mac", because of his small stature and the "Mac" part being a play on the popular McDonald's hamburger, the Big Mac. Other things added to the NES version that the arcade versions lacked were a rough plot, a background music track played during fights, animated cutscenes and a password system for saving progress.
 
Around the time the Gold Version was released, Nintendo of America's founder and former president Minoru Arakawa attended a boxing match featuring Mike Tyson. While watching the boxer fight, Arakawa became so astonished with the athlete's "power and skill", he was inspired to use the athlete's name and likeness in the upcoming port of the Punch-Out!! series to help the game sell well. Tyson was rumoured to have been paid 50,000 dollars for his likeness.

Punch-Out!! features a boxer named Little Mac working his way up the professional boxing circuits, facing a series of colorful, fictional boxers, leading to a final fight with real-life boxer, the then-World Heavyweight Champion, which is Mike Tyson in the original version and Mr. Dream in the later version.
 
Little Mac has a limited repertoire compared to most of his opponents. His punches are limited to left and right jabs, left and right body blows, and a powerful uppercut. The uppercut can only be used once the player earns a star, which is typically accomplished by counter-punching the opponent directly before or after certain attacks are launched. The player can acquire up to three stars. To perform the powerful uppercut the player needs to simply press the start button once a star is received. For defensive techniques, Mac can dodge left or right, duck, and block attacks.
 
Little Mac also has a heart meter, which decreases by three upon being struck by an opponent and one upon blocking an attack or an opponent blocking/dodging the player's attack. When the heart meter decreases to zero, Little Mac temporarily turns pink and appears exhausted, leaving the player unable to attack, but still able to defend. At this point, Mac can regain some hearts (and his normal color palette) only by avoiding the opponent's punches.
 
A bout can end by knockout (KO), if a fighter is unable to get up within 10 seconds after being knocked down; by technical knockout (TKO), if a fighter is knocked down three times in one round; or by decision, if the bout lasts three full rounds without a clear winner. In order to win by decision, the player must accumulate a high enough point total by punching the opponent and/or knocking him down. However, some bouts cannot be won in this manner and will automatically result in a loss for the player if the opponent is not knocked out.
 
When Little Mac loses his first bout to a ranked opponent, he will have a chance to fight a rematch. However if he loses a Title Bout, he will fall one or more places in the rankings. Losing a rematch causes him to fall one place (unless he is already at the bottom of his circuit), forcing him to fight his way back up. A third loss (not necessarily a consecutive one) ends the game. The exception is the final fight against Mike Tyson/Mr. Dream; a loss to them automatically results in a game over.

Pak's Thoughts: This game was my first "all-nighter". I had a friend sleeping over, and we had rented Mike Tyson's Punch-Out!! I didn't have super high-hopes for it, since I'm not really a fan of boxing. Fortunately, this isn't really a boxing game. I don't know what you'd call it. It's some strange combination of face recognition, rhythm game and fighting game. It hooked me and before we knew it we were stuck on "Soda Popinski" and it was 5 AM. I’ve been stuck on him ever since. :^)

I find it interesting that of everyone who listed this game, nearly all of them specified "Mike Tyson". The only difference between the two, of course, is a sprite swap on the last fight, but somehow, Tyson's name stayed etched into the title in all of our minds.
Title: Re: LoC 50 - Top Video Games of the '80s (And before!) - Today's High Scores
Post by: Pak-Man on July 29, 2011, 09:40:21 AM
#4 – Metroid

(146 Points) 9 of 18 Lists - Highest Ranking - #3 - Tyrant, Asbestos Bill
(http://i212.photobucket.com/albums/cc83/pakgor/Metroid.jpg)


Advertisement:
http://www.youtube.com/v/xe29rfCoSJE?version=3&hl=en_US

Release Date:  August 6, 1986

Just the facts/Stuff I wiki'd:
Metroid is an action-adventure video game, and the first entry in the Metroid series. It was co-developed by Nintendo's Research and Development 1 division and the external company Intelligent Systems, and was released in Japan in August 1986, in North America in August 1987, and in Europe in January 1988. The game was re-released for the Game Boy Advance in October 2004, and for the Wii Virtual Console in Europe in July 2007, in North America in August 2007, and in Japan in March 2008. Metroid was produced by Gunpei Yokoi and directed by Satoru Okada, with music composed by Hirokazu Tanaka.
 
Set on the planet Zebes, the story follows Samus Aran as she attempts to retrieve Metroid creatures that were stolen by Space Pirates, who plan to replicate the Metroids by exposing them to beta rays and then use them as biological weapons to destroy Samus and all who oppose them. The game's style, focusing on exploration and the search for power-ups that are used to reach previously inaccessible areas, influenced other video games. Its varied endings for fast completion times made it a popular game for speedrunning. Metroid was lauded for being one of the first video games to feature a female protagonist. Nintendo Power ranked Metroid 11th on their list of the best video games made on a Nintendo video game console. On Top 100 Games lists, Metroid was ranked 7th by Game Informer and 69th by Electronic Gaming Monthly.

Metroid is an action-adventure game in which the player controls Samus Aran in sprite-rendered two-dimensional landscapes. The game takes place on the planet Zebes, a large, open-ended world with areas connected by doors and elevators. The player controls Samus Aran as she travels through the planet's caverns and hunts Space Pirates. She begins with a weak gun as her only weapon, and with only the ability to jump. The player explores more areas and collects power-ups that grant Samus special abilities and enhance her armor and weaponry, granting access to areas that were previously inaccessible. Among the power-ups that are included in the game are the Morph Ball, which allows Samus to curl into a ball to roll into tunnels and use the Bomb weapon, and the Screw Attack, a somersaulting move that destroys enemies in its path. In addition to common enemies, Samus encounters bosses whom she needs to defeat to progress. Defeating an ordinary enemy typically yields additional energy or ammunition, while defeating a boss expands Samus's capacity to carry ammunition and opens the door to the final area.

Chronologically, Metroid takes place first in the fictional Metroid universe. Space Pirates attack a Galactic Federation-owned space research vessel and seize samples of Metroid creatures. Dangerous floating organisms, Metroids can latch on to any organism and drain its life energy to kill it. The Space Pirates plan to replicate Metroids by exposing them to beta rays and then using them as biological weapons to destroy all living beings that oppose them. While searching for the stolen Metroids, the Galactic Federation locates the Space Pirates' base of operations on the planet Zebes. The Federation assaults the planet, but the Pirates resist, forcing the Federation to retreat. As a last resort, the Federation decides to send a lone bounty hunter to penetrate the Pirates' base and destroy Mother Brain, the mechanical life-form that controls the Space Pirates' fortress and its defenses. Considered the greatest of all bounty hunters, Samus Aran is chosen for the mission. Samus lands on the surface of Zebes and explores the planet, traveling through the planet's caverns. She eventually comes across Kraid, an ally of the Space Pirates, and Ridley, the Space Pirates' commander, and defeats them both. Eventually, Samus finds and destroys Mother Brain, triggering a self-destruct mechanism and forcing Samus to escape the collapsing lair.

Nintendo attempted to set Metroid apart from other games by making it a nonlinear adventure-based game, in which exploration was a crucial part of the experience. The game often requires that players retrace their steps to progress, forcing the player to scroll the screen left in addition to moving it right, as was the case in most contemporary games. This element, called backtracking, was a new concept at the time. Metroid was also considered one of the first to impress a feeling of desperation and solitude on the player. Following The Legend of Zelda, Metroid helped pioneer the idea of acquiring tools to strengthen characters and help progress through the game. Up until that point, most ability-enhancing power-ups like the Power Shot in Gauntlet (1985) and the Starman in Super Mario Bros. offered only temporary boosts to characters, and they were not required to complete the game. In Metroid, however, items were permanent fixtures that lasted until the end. In particular, missiles were mandatory to finish the game.

Pak's Thoughts: Metroid is insanely fun. Also very challenging, but fun all the while. I could never beat Kraid, but I beat the game once using the Justin Bailey code. Someday, I'll beat the game legit. The formula is intoxicating. It encourages you to bomb every wall and fall down every pit until you've seen every nook and cranny in the game. This game was also terrifying to me and my brothers. We loved playing it, but the strangely ambient 8-bit music always left us with goosebumps. They don't get much better than this.
Title: Re: LoC 50 - Top Video Games of the '80s (And before!) - Today's High Scores
Post by: Pak-Man on July 29, 2011, 09:41:12 AM
#3 – Super Mario Bros. 3

(161 Points) 9 of 18 Lists - Highest Ranking - 4  #1s - Tyrant, Asbestos Bill, Johnny Unusual, Invader Quirk
(http://i212.photobucket.com/albums/cc83/pakgor/SMB3-Title-Screen.jpg)


Advertisement:
http://www.youtube.com/v/pQO2VtV1PNg?version=3&hl=en_US

Release Date:  October 23, 1988

Just the facts/Stuff I wiki'd:
Super Mario Bros. 3, also referred to as Super Mario 3 and SMB3, is a platform video game developed and published by Nintendo for the Nintendo Entertainment System (NES), and is the third game in the Super Mario series. The game was released in Japan in 1988, in the United States in 1990, and in Europe in 1991. Development was handled by Nintendo Entertainment Analysis and Development, led by Shigeru Miyamoto, who directed the game along with Takashi Tezuka.
 
The game centers on the quest of Mario and Luigi to save the rulers of seven kingdoms from Bowser, the series' antagonist. The two brothers must travel across eight worlds to restore order to the Mushroom World. It built on the game play of previous Mario games by introducing new power-ups that augment character abilities, and established conventions that were carried over to future games in the series.
 
Prior to its private consumer North American release, game play footage from Super Mario Bros. 3 appeared in the Universal Studios film The Wizard, which helped fuel the game's anticipation among fans. Upon its release, the game was commercially successful and has since become one of the best-selling video games in the industry. Super Mario Bros. 3 was well received by critics and has been included in numerous lists of top 100 video games. The success of the game resulted in an animated television show based on its elements, and in the game's re-release on later Nintendo consoles.

Super Mario Bros. 3 is a two-dimensional platform game in which the player controls the on-screen protagonist (either Mario or Luigi) from a third-person perspective. The game shares similar game mechanics with previous titles in the series—Super Mario Bros., Super Mario Bros.: The Lost Levels, and Super Mario Bros. 2—but introduces several new elements. In addition to the running and jumping moves found in past games, the player can fly and float with the aid of special items, slide down slopes, and execute new types of jumps. Super Mario Bros. 3 is set after the events of previous games. Mario and Luigi embark on a mission on behalf of Princess Toadstool to stop Bowser and his children—the Koopalings—from terrorizing the kings of seven regions in the Mushroom World. The Koopalings stole the kings' magic wands and transformed them into animals. Each region serves as a game world that is divided into stage levels, and an eighth region is included as the final world, Dark Land. The eight worlds feature distinct visual themes; for example, the second world, "Desert Land", contains sand-covered levels with pyramids, while the levels in the fourth world, "Giant Land", are populated with obstacles and enemies four times as large as other worlds.

The player navigates through the game via two game screens: an overworld map and a level playfield. The overworld map displays an overhead representation of the current world and has several paths leading from the world's entrance to a castle. Paths connect to action panels, fortresses and other map icons, and allow players to take different routes to reach the world's goal. Moving the on-screen character to an action panel or fortress will allow access to that level's playfield, a linear stage populated with obstacles and enemies. The majority of the game takes place in these levels, with the player traversing the stage by running, jumping, and dodging or defeating enemies.
 
Completing stages allows the player to progress through the overworld map and to succeeding worlds. Each world features a final stage with a boss to defeat; the first seven worlds feature an airship controlled by one of the Koopalings, while the player battles Bowser in his castle in the eighth world. Other map icons include large boulders and locked doors that impede paths, and special minigames that provide the player a chance to obtain special power-ups. A new feature is the player's option to save power-up items obtained in minigames for later use via a menu accessible at the overworld screen.
 
In addition to special items from previous games like the "Super Mushroom" and "Fire Flower", new power-ups are introduced that provide the player with new options. Items vary in scarcity; for example, 1-up mushrooms, which give the player an extra attempt to play after the character dies, are abundant, while the "magic whistle", which enables the player to bypass certain worlds, only appears three times in the game. The "Super Leaf" and "Tanooki Suit" give Mario raccoon and tanuki appearances respectively and allow him to fly for a short period of time. Other suits include the "Frog Suit," which increases the character's underwater speed and agility and improves jumping height on land, and the "Hammer Suit," which gives Mario the appearance of the Hammer Bros. enemy and allows him to throw hammers at enemies and resist fire attacks. Some abilities provided by the suits are intended to give the player more navigation options in stages. For example, the Frog Suit allows the player to access underwater pipes, and the Tanooki Suit can temporarily transform Mario into an invincible statue, reducing the threat of damage. During the game, Mario can find a Warp Whistle, which will take him to a new area of the game. When using the Whistle, the tune played is the exact melody used from the Whistle in The Legend of Zelda.
 
Super Mario Bros. 3 includes a multiplayer option which allows two players to cooperatively play the game by taking turns at navigating the overworld map and accessing stage levels; the first player controls Mario, while the other controls Luigi. Through this mode, players can also access several minigames, including a remake of the original Mario Bros. arcade game.

Pak's Thoughts: I have to admit, I had this one pegged at #1. It would sure deserve the honor. Maybe its performance was hampered by the fact that it didn't come out in the US 'til 1990. Should I decide to host a list of the games of the '90s (Much, much, later...) we'll have to deliberate on whether to qualify Mario 3 a second time.

I dug the Koopa Kids. Every one of them had a nice little bit of personality that showed through their animations and character designs. This is also the first game I remember playing where, from level to level, instead of just a matter of "Do what you did in the last level, but harder" there were elements that would change the whole way you played. One level might be automatically scrolling, the next might be a maze of pipes, then you might have to explore a castle with some sort of puzzle-solving required to get out. Then on top of THAT, there were themes in every set of levels that gave them even more personality. Giant Land was always my favorite. The game was always fresh from start to finish. You weren't spending hours playing the same game over and over. You were spending hours simply playing it once.
Title: Re: LoC 50 - Top Video Games of the '80s (And before!) - Today's High Scores
Post by: Pak-Man on July 29, 2011, 09:41:41 AM
#2 – Tetris

(163 Points) 11 of 18 Lists - Highest Ranking - #1 - Doctor Who?
(http://i212.photobucket.com/albums/cc83/pakgor/Tetris_World-1-thumb.png)


Advertisement:
http://www.youtube.com/v/3Pk7unUQQ1o?version=3&hl=en_US
All the time, is Tetris, Tetris, Tetris, they vant to play.

Release Date:  August 6, 1984

Just the facts/Stuff I wiki'd:
Tetris is a puzzle video game originally designed and programmed by Alexey Pajitnov in the Soviet Union. It was released on June 6, 1984, while he was working for the Dorodnicyn Computing Centre of the Academy of Science of the USSR in Moscow, Russian Soviet Federative Socialist Republic. He derived its name from the Greek numerical prefix tetra- (all of the game's pieces, known as Tetrominoes, contain four segments) and tennis, Pajitnov's favorite sport.
 
The Tetris game is a popular use of tetrominoes, the four element special case of polyominoes. Polyominoes have been used in popular puzzles since at least 1907, and the name was given by the mathematician Solomon W. Golomb in 1953. However, even the enumeration of pentominoes is dated to antiquity.
 
The game (or one of its many variants) is available for nearly every video game console and computer operating system, as well as on devices such as graphing calculators, mobile phones, portable media players, PDAs, Network music players and even as an Easter egg on non-media products like oscilloscopes. It has even inspired Tetris serving dishes and been played on the sides of various buildings, with the record holder for the world's largest fully functional game of Tetris being an effort by Dutch students in 1995 that lit up 15 floors of the Electrical Engineering department at Delft University of Technology.
 
While versions of Tetris were sold for a range of 1980s home computer platforms, it was the hugely successful handheld version for the Game Boy launched in 1989 that established the game as one of the most popular ever. Electronic Gaming Monthly's 100th issue had Tetris in first place as "Greatest Game of All Time". In 2007, Tetris came in second place in IGN's "100 Greatest Video Games of All Time" (2007). (What a coincidence!!! - Pak)  It has sold more than 70 million copies. In January 2010, it was announced that Tetris has sold more than 100 million copies for cell phones alone since 2005.

A random sequence of tetrominoes (sometimes called "tetrads" in older versions)—shapes composed of four square blocks each—fall down the playing field (a rectangular vertical shaft, called the "well" or "matrix"). The objective of the game is to manipulate these tetrominoes, by moving each one sideways and rotating it by 90 degree units, with the aim of creating a horizontal line of ten blocks without gaps. When such a line is created, it disappears, and any block above the deleted line will fall. When a certain number of lines are cleared, the game enters a new level. As the game progresses, each level causes the tetrominoes to fall faster, and the game ends when the stack of tetrominoes reaches the top of the playing field and no new tetrominoes are able to enter. Some games also end after a finite number of levels or lines.
 
All of the tetrominoes are capable of single and double clears. I, J, and L are able to clear triples. Only the I tetromino has the capacity to clear four lines simultaneously, and this is referred to as a "tetris". (This may vary depending on the rotation and compensation rules of each specific Tetris implementation. For instance, in the Super Rotation System used in most recent implementations, certain situations allow T, S, and Z to 'snap' into tight spots and clear triples.)

Pak's Thoughts: Hands up if you could make the large space shuttle launch in the original Gameboy version! *Raises hand*

Another surprise! I knew Tetris would make the list, but I didn't expect to see it waaay up in the #2 slot. Can't say it doesn't belong here, though. I'd wager that Tetris has passed more time in more people's lives than even the longest and most popular of RPGs. There's something soothing about it. It gets you in a nice Zen state. Studies show it might even make our brains healthier and ward off mental disorders later in life if played regularly. The formula hasn't really grown all that stale, either. There have been tweaks and competitive modes and such, but it always comes back down to the simple joy of seeing how long you can last against an endless avalanche of blocks.
Title: Re: LoC 50 - Top Video Games of the '80s (And before!) - Today's High Scores
Post by: Pak-Man on July 29, 2011, 09:42:19 AM
Mandatory and now probably expected FAKE #1 – Princess Tomato in the Salad Kingdom

(1337 Points) 18 of 18 Lists - Highest Topping - #1 - Bleu Cheese Crumbles
(http://i212.photobucket.com/albums/cc83/pakgor/princesstomato.png)

"Many growing seasons ago, there was a place where vegetables lived happily, and in perfect harmony. One day, Minister Pumpkin betrayed King Broccoli. He kidnapped Princess Tomato and stole the Turnip Emblem. He took them to his castle in the Zucchini Mountains. He sent his cruel Farmies out to terrorize all the vegetables in the Salad Kingdom. Shortly thereafter, the poor King died from the loss of his beautiful daughter. But he promised you, brave Sir Cucumber, the Princess' hand and the kingdom if you bring them back safely. God speed Sir Cucumber! Hurry! Saladoria is down this path. The Zucchini Mountains are over yonder."

Box Art:

(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/f/f6/Princesstomato.jpg)

Release Date:  May 27, 1988

Just the facts/Stuff I wiki'd:
Princess Tomato in the Salad Kingdom is a video game by Hudson Soft originally released in 1984 for the NEC PC-8801, NEC PC-6001, FM-7 and MSX Japanese home computers.
 
It was ported on May 27, 1988 to the Famicom, and February 8, 1991 for the Nintendo Entertainment System in North America. It was also released on the Wii's Virtual Console in Japan on January 19, 2010 and in North America on February 8, 2010.
 
The characters are primarily cartoon-like anthropomorphic fruit & vegetables. In recent years the game has developed a small cult following through the use of NES emulators. The game cartridge is increasingly difficult to find, and has been sold on sites such as eBay for as much as $30 U.S. but can be found at short prices such as $2.50.

Taking the role of Sir Cucumber, a knight, the player is assigned by King Broccoli (now deceased) to defeat the evil Minister Pumpkin who has kidnapped Princess Tomato. Early on, Sir Cucumber gains a sidekick, Percy the baby persimmon, who offers advice and helps throughout the quest (and always calls Sir Cucumber "Boss").

Princess Tomato in the Salad Kingdom plays similarly to a text adventure, though due to the NES's lack of a keyboard accessory, the possible commands are represented by buttons which line both sides of the screen. The commands are fixed and do not change during gameplay. Primarily, the game consists of still screens with the exception of the "finger wars", mazes and occasional animated character, such as the octoberry and fern birds.
 
Commands within the game are: MOVE, LOOK, CHECK (used to examine things), TALK, TAKE, USE, GIVE, BUY, HIT, FIGHT (also called "finger wars", challenges enemies to rock, paper, scissors), PRAISE (for flattery), DUMP (for getting rid of inventory items, since you can only carry a limited number), ITEM and PERCY (to get help from the sidekick character).
 
The game is merciful to polite on the standard interactive fiction cruelty scale- the only way to "lose" is by not being able to determine which action is required to advance forward (i.e.: there is no way for the player, Sir Cucumber, to "die" except for in one specific "finger wars" battle).

Pak's Thoughts: Wow. The really real #1 entry is really Princess Tomato in the Salad Kingdom for Reals!


OK, I put it up as a joke, but have any of you played this thing? It's actually pretty awesome, if you're into the whole point and click adventure scene, and you can get past the dialogue that's loaded with more bad fruit puns than an episode of Strawberry Shortcake. Why not give it a try? http://www.virtualnes.com/play/?id=NES-RT&s=9

THE REAL #1...

Has not been written yet. There will be a pause while I finish the last entry of this list and to build suspense! Have you figured it out? (Probably, but try to act surprised. ;^) )
Title: Re: LoC 50 - Top Video Games of the '80s (And before!) - Today's High Scores
Post by: Russell on July 29, 2011, 09:53:57 AM
CUT CUT CUT!!!! WTF?! I was VERY careful to make sure that none of the games on my list were from 1990 or after!
SO WTH is with this Super Mario 3 shit?! I'm sorry, normally I wouldn't make such a big deal out of this, but when somebody
asks me to make a list of top songs from the 1960's, I guarantee you my list isn't going to include any songs by Queen!
Title: Re: LoC 50 - Top Video Games of the '80s (And before!) - Today's High Scores
Post by: Pak-Man on July 29, 2011, 10:09:22 AM
Super Mario 3 was released in Japan on October 23, 1988. We discussed this back in the original topic thread, and I mandated that as long as it was released somewhere in the world in the '80s, it was an '80s game.
Title: Re: LoC 50 - Top Video Games of the '80s (And before!) - Today's High Scores
Post by: Pak-Man on July 29, 2011, 10:14:08 AM
REAL #1 – Super Mario Bros. (In the Mushroom Kingdom)

(227 Points) 12 of 18 Lists - Highest Ranking - #1 - D.B. Barnes
(http://i212.photobucket.com/albums/cc83/pakgor/super_mario_bros-_nes_screenshot1.jpg)

Our Princess is in another castle.

INSIDE EDITION - Super Mario Bros.:
http://www.youtube.com/v/aMyYRy5SgIM?version=3&hl=en_US

Release Date:  September 13, 1985

Just the facts/Stuff I wiki'd:
Super Mario Bros. is a 1985 platform video game developed by Nintendo, published for the Nintendo Entertainment System as a sequel to the 1983 game Mario Bros. In Super Mario Bros., the player controls Mario (and in a two-player game, a second player acts as Mario's brother Luigi) as he travels through the Mushroom Kingdom in order to rescue Princess Toadstool from the antagonist Bowser.
 
For over two decades, Super Mario Bros. was the best-selling video game of all time (before being outsold by Nintendo's own Wii Sports in 2009), and has sold more than 40 million copies worldwide. It was largely responsible for the initial success of the Nintendo Entertainment System, as well as ending the two-year slump of console game sales in the United States after the video game crash of 1983. As one of Shigeru Miyamoto and Takashi Tezuka's most influential early successes, it has inspired many clones, sequels, and spin-offs. The game's theme music by Koji Kondo is recognized worldwide, even by those who have not played the game, and has been considered a representation for video game music in general.
 
The success of Super Mario Bros. has caused it to be ported to almost every one of Nintendo's major gaming consoles. In late 2010, as part of the 25th anniversary of the game's release, Nintendo released special red variants of the Wii and Nintendo DSi XL consoles in differently re-packaged, Mario-themed, and limited edition bundles in all regions.

Super Mario Bros. is the successor to the 1983 arcade title Mario Bros., and was designed by Shigeru Miyamoto and Takashi Tezuka, both of whom belonged to Nintendo's former Creative Department at the time. The game's development was motivated by a desire to give Famicom (i.e., Nintendo Entertainment System game cartridges) a swan song in light of the forthcoming Famicom Disk System, and to further progress Nintendo's work on "Athletic games". Originally, the game was based around a shooting mechanic with very different controls. This may have made the final product as a special level, but a desire to focus on jumping and the mapping of the mechanic to the A button resulted in its being dropped. Unlike in Mario Bros., where Mario would be hurt by stomping on turtles without first flipping them on their backs, Mario could defeat turtles by stomping on their shells, as the developers decided the previous method had been illogical. The ability to have Mario change size was a result of basing level design around a smaller Mario, then intending to make his size bigger in the final version. They later decided it would be fun to have Mario become bigger as a Power-up. Early level design was focused on teaching players that Mushrooms were distinct from Goombas and would be beneficial to them: In World 1, level 1, the first Mushroom is difficult to avoid if it is released. Using Mushrooms to change size was influenced by folk tales in which people wander into forests and eat magical Mushrooms; this also resulted in the game world getting the name "Mushroom Kingdom". The "Infinite 1-Up" trick was by design, but the developers did not expect players to be able to master it as well as they did. Development was aimed at keeping things simple, in order to have a new game available for the end-of-year shopping season. Originally an idea for a shoot-'em-up stage in which Mario would jump onto a cloud and fire at enemies was to be included; however, this was dropped to maintain the game's focus on jumping action, but the sky-based bonus stages still remained.

The Minus Cave is a glitch in Super Mario Bros. By passing through a solid wall near the World 1-7 exit, it is possible to travel to "World -1", also known as the "Minus World" or "World Negative One". This stage's map is identical to Worlds 2-2 and 7-2, but upon entering the warp pipe at the end, the player is taken back to the start of the level, thus trapping him/her in the level until losing all of his/her lives. The same glitch in the Japanese Famicom Disk System version takes the player to a world that is considerably different and has seven levels. World " -1" is a version of World 1-6 that has a glitched black colour palette, underwater game physics, and contains Bowser, Hammer Bros., and multiple copies of Princess Toadstool. World " -2" is an identical copy of World 7-3. World " -3" is a copy of World 4-4, but with altered colors, flying Bloopers, no Bowser, and water instead of lava. After completing these levels, the player returns to the title screen as if he/she had completed the game. This glitch was fixed in Super Mario All-Stars and subsequent remakes; however, the Virtual Console release of Super Mario Bros. is an exact copy of the original, allowing players to perform the glitch.
 
Although the level name is shown as " -1" (note the leading space) on the HUD, it is actually World 36-1; the game displays tile #36, which is a blank space, to the left of the hyphen.

Pak's Thoughts: Whew. At last we come to the end of our journey. Super Mario Bros. is certainly a worthy game. I still remember playing it for the first time in an arcade. The growth-mechanic and the ability to smash blocks when grown tickled me pink back then. We didn't get very far, and me and my friend discussed on the way home how cool it would be if you just kept getting bigger and bigger with every mushroom. I've played the game many times since, and it's still a blast.

And that wraps up our top 50 '80s games list. Thanks to everyone who tossed in their Top 25, and be sure to vote on the next topic if you haven't already
Here:
http://forum.rifftrax.com/index.php/topic,22389.0.html
And Here:
http://forum.rifftrax.com/index.php/topic,22390.0.html
(We all get 2 votes because the forum is still broken)

GAME OVER!
Title: Re: LoC 50 - Top Video Games of the '80s (And before!) - Today's High Scores
Post by: sarcasm_made_Easy on July 29, 2011, 10:21:43 AM
Heh i remember when i was a kid i had a babysitter who could get nearly unlimited lives by bouncing a shell against a wall, and would go until the lives went high enough that it had to use symbols instead of numbers.  When you are 6 and 7 it sure seemed cool. 
Title: Re: LoC 50 - Top Video Games of the '80s (And before!) - Today's High Scores
Post by: Pak-Man on July 29, 2011, 11:20:51 AM
Here's my Top 25 (I don't feel like typing out the bold code for all the entries, so I'll just mark the ones that made it with an asterisk:

1. Space Quest
2. Quest for Glory
3. Super Mario Bros. 3*
4. Ghostbusters*
5. Q*Bert*
6. Donkey Kong Jr.
7. Jumpman
8. Maniac Mansion*
9. Metroid*
10. Pac-Man*
11. Mega Man 2*
12. Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles (Arcade)*
13. The Legend of Zelda*
14. Dragon's Lair*
15. Rampage*
16. Castlevania*
17. King's Quest
18. Donkey Kong*
19. Punch Out!*
20. Sid Meier's Pirates!
21. Joust*
22. Sim City*
23. Duck Tales*
24. Zork
25. Choplifter
Title: Re: LoC 50 - Top Video Games of the '80s (And before!) - Today's High Scores
Post by: D.B. Barnes on July 29, 2011, 11:56:19 AM
#2 – Tetris

(163 Points) 11 of 18 Lists - Highest Ranking - #1 - Doctor Who?

I still play this on my phone from time to time, many years after I stopped playing video games.

REAL #1 – Super Mario Bros. (In the Mushroom Kingdom)

(227 Points) 12 of 18 Lists - Highest Ranking - #1 - D.B. Barnes

Countless hours. If I wasn't playing it a the pizza joint, I was playing it at home. First game I ever beat.

1. Super Mario Bros.
2. Arkanoid
3. Shinobi
4. Tetris
5. Golf (NES)
6. Dig Dug
7. Final Fantasy
8. Spy Hunter
9. Super Off Road
10. Pole Position
11. Pac-Man
12. Baseball (NES)
13. The Legend of Zelda
14. Frogger
15. Donkey Kong
16. Burgertime
17. Paperboy
18. Tennis (NES)
19. Metal Gear
20. Prince of Persia
21. Star Wars
22. Balloon Fight 
23. Leisure Suit Larry in the Land of the Lounge Lizards
24. Metroid
25. Joust

I'm surprised Final Fantasy didn't make the list.


Thanks for crunching the numbers, Pak!
Title: Re: LoC 50 - Top Video Games of the '80s (And before!) - Today's High Scores
Post by: sarcasm_made_Easy on July 29, 2011, 12:51:07 PM
my list (i dont know how to bold and the buttons dont work)

1.  contra
2.  missle command
3.  mega man 2
4.  godzilla monster of monsters
5.  castlevania
6.  millipede
7.  Bad Dudes Vs. DragonNinja
8.  guantlet
9.  zelda
10.. karate champ
11.  marble madness
12.  millions secret castle
13.  faxanadu
14.  joust
15.  rampage
16.  super mario bros/duckhunt
17.  super mario bros 2
18.  adventure island
19.  dig dug
20.  excitebike
21.  festers quest
22.  bubble bobble
23.  pacman
24.  pitfall
25.  gyromite
Title: Re: LoC 50 - Top Video Games of the '80s (And before!) - Today's High Scores
Post by: Asbestos Bill on July 29, 2011, 01:04:01 PM
Not surprised at all at the #1. I thought it would be SMB3, but I guess it lost some votes due to confusion about the release date.

#1 Super Mario Bros. 3
Kirby's Adventure (should've checked the date on this one)
Tennis for Two
Metroid
Psychic 5
Lode Runner
Punch-Out!!
Super Mario Bros.
Gauntlet
Qix (this game had the most awesome sound effects)
Spoiler (click to show/hide)
Mega Man
To The Earth
Super Mario Bros.: The Lost Levels
Super Mario Bros. 2
Computer Space
Spacewar!
Battlezone
Joust
Frogger
Yoshi
Tetris
Hogan's Alley
Donkey Kong
Gumshoe
Duck Hunt
Star Wars



Tennis for Two was the pre-Pong game I thought would show up. It used an oscilloscope for a screen, which is the most awesome thing there has ever been.

(http://images.wikia.com/gamecodelegend/images/c/cc/Tennis_for_two.jpg)

When I made that post that was flagged, I was trying to share a link to a Psychic 5 ROM, but you can just search for it. Go to MAMEdev.org to get the emulator.
Title: Re: LoC 50 - Top Video Games of the '80s (And before!) - Today's High Scores
Post by: Johnny Unusual on July 29, 2011, 01:17:21 PM
Bill O'Reilly and Mario.  So... yeah.  Great list.  While I knew Super Mario Bros would win, part of me was hoping it would be Tetris.  Shocked that Final Fantasy didn't make it.

1. Super Mario Bros. 3
2. Super Mario Bros. 2
3. Tetris
4. Super Mario Bros.
5. The Legend of Zelda
6. Metroid
7. Pac-Man
8. Ninja Gaiden
9. Contra
10. Prince of Persia

11. Final Fantasy
12. Maniac Mansion
13. Mike Tyson’s Punch Out

14. The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy
15. Castlevania
16. Donkey Kong
17. Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles (Arcade Game)

18. Final Fight
19. Space Ace
20. Double Dragon
21. Dig Dug
22. Major Havoc
23. 1942
24. Dragon’s Lair

25. Decathlon

Quite a few of mine made the list.  Anyone remember Decathlon?  That might be my first computer game, before anything else.  The version I had was all green and even simpler graphics than for the Atari version, shown below.

http://www.youtube.com/v/w7g1Oqrid8c

Title: Re: LoC 50 - Top Video Games of the '80s (And before!) - Today's High Scores
Post by: goflyblind on July 29, 2011, 02:12:57 PM
no one else had vette!? for shame. >:

01. California Games (C64)
02. Vette! (Mac)
3. SimCity (Mac)
04. Hot Wheels (C64)
05. Dream House (C64)
06. Ghostbusters (C64)
07. Pole Position (C64)
08. 4x4 Off-Road Racing (C64)
09. Dinosaur Dig (C64)
10. Oregon Trail (Mac)
11. Grand Prix Circuit (C64)
12. Leaderboard Golf (C64)
13. Rags to Riches (C64)
14. Tetris (NES)
15. Odell Lake (C64)
16. Excitebike (NES)
17. Zaxxon (C64)
18. Beach Head II: The Dictator Strikes Back (C64)
19. Super Mario 3 (NES)
20. Pac-Man (Arcade)
21. Donkey Kong (NES)
22. Skate or Die! (C64)
23. Mini Golf (C64)
24. Winter Games (C64)
25. The Dolphin's Pearl (C64)
Title: Re: LoC 50 - Top Video Games of the '80s (And before!) - Today's High Scores
Post by: Asbestos Bill on July 29, 2011, 02:21:32 PM
24. Zork

I should have remembered Zork. It wouldn't have made the list either way, but still.
Title: Re: LoC 50 - Top Video Games of the '80s (And before!) - Today's High Scores
Post by: RVR II on July 29, 2011, 03:27:53 PM
And mine 8)

1- Spy Hunter
2- Dig Dug
3- asteroids
4- pac man
5- defender
6-space invaders
7- donkey kong
8- moon patrol
9- tron
10- q bert
11- 1942
12- paperboy
13- pole position
14- frogger
15- centipede
16- dungeons and dragons
17- missile command
18- galaga
19- galaxian
20- battle chess
21- star trek
22- star wars
23- wwf wrestling
24- mad max
25- street fighter
Title: Re: LoC 50 - Top Video Games of the '80s (And before!) - Today's High Scores
Post by: Russell on July 29, 2011, 04:30:31 PM
Super Mario 3 was released in Japan on October 23, 1988. We discussed this back in the original topic thread, and I mandated that as long as it was released somewhere in the world in the '80s, it was an '80s game.
Dah but the release date in the US wasn't until the 1990's, therefore in my humble opinion
Pak-man, it doesn't count. :)

Here's my super-awesome list

1.   Megaman 2
2.   Ninja Gaiden
3.   Castlevania
4.   Contra
5.   Mike Tyson’s Punch out!
6.   Adventure Island
7.   Bionic Commando
8.   Ghosts ‘n Goblins
9.   Duck Tales
10.   Mega Man
11.   Tetris
12.   RC Pro-am
13.   Double Dragon
14.   Tecmo Bowl
15.   Metroid
16.   Super Mario bros 2
17.   Gauntlet
18.   The Legend of Zelda
19.   Adventures of Lolo
20.   1942
21.   Bomberman
22.   Bubble Bobble
23.   Donkey Kong (Classic)
24.   Centipede
25.   Pac-man
Title: Re: LoC 50 - Top Video Games of the '80s (And before!) - Today's High Scores
Post by: D.B. Barnes on July 29, 2011, 04:39:58 PM
Super Mario 3 was released in Japan on October 23, 1988. We discussed this back in the original topic thread, and I mandated that as long as it was released somewhere in the world in the '80s, it was an '80s game.
Dah but the release date in the US wasn't until the 1990's, therefore in my humble opinion
Pak-man, it doesn't count. :)

Yeah. Fuck anywhere that's not the United States!

9/11!!!

C'mon, get in the truck. Lee Greenwood's playin' the state fair!

(http://www.sceniclasvegas.com/usa_1a_bf32.gif)
Title: Re: LoC 50 - Top Video Games of the '80s (And before!) - Today's High Scores
Post by: Russell on July 29, 2011, 04:56:41 PM
Super Mario 3 was released in Japan on October 23, 1988. We discussed this back in the original topic thread, and I mandated that as long as it was released somewhere in the world in the '80s, it was an '80s game.
Dah but the release date in the US wasn't until the 1990's, therefore in my humble opinion
Pak-man, it doesn't count. :)
Yeah. Fuck anywhere that's not the United States!
9/11!!!
C'mon, get in the truck. Lee Greenwood's playin' the state fair!
(http://www.sceniclasvegas.com/usa_1a_bf32.gif)
Now come on, I wouldn't say fuck Japan(except here), especially not now because that's really insensitive.
HOWEVER, I was under the impression we were playing by US rules because... quite a few of
us are in the USA, and I guess if a person in Japan voted Super mario 3 as their favorite game,
then and ONLY then would it count. ;) . I admit it's not a big deal, I just wish I knew the list wasn't
going to be too nit-picky.

Why does everybody act as though I am taking this seriously and not just recognizing what I am
doing as obvious mock seriousness? It seems like every time I express an opinion on this forum
everybody acts as though I'm taking this too seriously, but then that arguably evidences that they
are in turn taking me and my opinions too seriously.

Speaking of, doesn't anybody else think it should have been called the Commode 64?
Title: Re: LoC 50 - Top Video Games of the '80s (And before!) - Today's High Scores
Post by: goflyblind on July 29, 2011, 05:42:14 PM
Speaking of, doesn't anybody else think it should have been called the Commode 64?

you, sir, have no honour. >:(
Title: Re: LoC 50 - Top Video Games of the '80s (And before!) - Today's High Scores
Post by: Russell on July 29, 2011, 05:45:00 PM
Speaking of, doesn't anybody else think it should have been called the Commode 64?
you, sir, have no honour. >:(
Maybe you're right, but I gotta call it like I see it. Anything with graphics WORSE than the
NES that has 2+ minute load times doesn't impress me in any way, shape or form,
especially when you must have code books just to load up a damn game.
Title: Re: LoC 50 - Top Video Games of the '80s (And before!) - Today's High Scores
Post by: Compound on July 29, 2011, 06:42:12 PM
Hey! Someone else had a computer in the 80s! Woo!

Anyway, my list looked different than everyone else's for a pretty simple reason- by the time the NES came out, I had a PC. My friends had C64s or Apple IIs. A couple even had TRS-80s. Those poor bastards. In 85 while some folks were playing Mario, I had Ultima IV, Where in the World Is Carmen San Diego?, Oregon Trail, Summer Games II, Choplifter II, F-15 Strike Eagle, Silent Service, Bard's Tale and a lot more to choose from. Frankly, you folks got the raw end of the stick. Yeah, if the list was arcade games or console games, it'd look different. But video games? To me those are computer games.  So, get off my lawn.  Darn kids.

Anyway, my list.
1) Wizardry
2) Zork
3) Empire (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Classic_Empire_%28video_game%29 )
4) Wasteland
5) Starflight
6) Pool of Radiance
7) Colonial Conquest
8 ) Ultima V
9) Sim City
10) Balance of Power
11) Missile Command
12) Space Invaders

13) Might and Magic
14) Adventure (PC text adventure, not 2600)
15) Warlords
16) Hitchiker's Guide to the Galaxy
17) Earl Weaver Baseball
18) Archon:The Light and the Dark
19) Seven Cities of Gold
20) Venture
21) John Madden Football
22) Minesweeper
23) Pirates!
24) Star Fleet I: The War Begins
25) Mail Order Monsters (This probably should have been Crush, Crumble & Chomp instead as I played a lot more of that, but it slipped my memory until just a few seconds ago.)
Title: Re: LoC 50 - Top Video Games of the '80s (And before!) - Today's High Scores
Post by: Rattrap007 on July 29, 2011, 06:45:40 PM
1   Legend of Zelda (NES)
2   Super Mario Bros (NES)
3   Rampage (arcade)
4   Metroid (NES)
5   Castlevania (NES)
6   Tron (Arcade)
7   Oregon Trail (PC)
8   Duck Hunt (NES)
9   Pac Man (arcade)
10   Contra (NES)
11   Excitebike (NES)
12   Gauntlet (Arcade)
13   Mike Tyson's Punch out (NES)
14   Paperboy (Arcade)
15   Galaga (Arcade)
16   Pitfall (Atari)
17   Q-Bert (arcade) *#@&!

18   Smash TV (Arcade)
19   Space Invaders (Arcade)
20   Dig dug (arcade)
21   Centipede (Arcade) [the non human variety]

22   Leisure Suit Larry (PC)
23   Asteroids (Arcade)
24   SimCity (PC)
25   Tetris (any)

Title: Re: LoC 50 - Top Video Games of the '80s (And before!) - Today's High Scores
Post by: D.B. Barnes on July 29, 2011, 06:49:14 PM
1   Legend of Zelda (NES)
2   Super Mario Bros (NES)
3   Rampage (arcade)
4   Metroid (NES)
5   Castlevania (NES)
6   Tron (Arcade)
7   Oregon Trail (PC)
8   Duck Hunt (NES)
9   Pac Man (arcade)
10   Contra (NES)
11   Excitebike (NES)
12   Gauntlet (Arcade)
13   Mike Tyson's Punch out (NES)
14   Paperboy (Arcade)
15   Galaga (Arcade)
16   Pitfall (Atari)
17   Q-Bert (arcade) *#@&!

18   Smash TV (Arcade)
19   Space Invaders (Arcade)
20   Dig dug (arcade)
21   Centipede (Arcade) [the non human variety]

22   Leisure Suit Larry (PC)
23   Asteroids (Arcade)
24   SimCity (PC)
25   Tetris (any)


Damn! I've never seen anybody get that many. Almost perfect. That's what I call being in tune with topic!

Leisure Suit Larry! (http://forum.rifftrax.com/Smileys/default/hi5.gif)
Title: Re: LoC 50 - Top Video Games of the '80s (And before!) - Today's High Scores
Post by: Rattrap007 on July 29, 2011, 07:24:22 PM
1   Legend of Zelda (NES)
2   Super Mario Bros (NES)
3   Rampage (arcade)
4   Metroid (NES)
5   Castlevania (NES)
6   Tron (Arcade)
7   Oregon Trail (PC)
8   Duck Hunt (NES)
9   Pac Man (arcade)
10   Contra (NES)
11   Excitebike (NES)
12   Gauntlet (Arcade)
13   Mike Tyson's Punch out (NES)
14   Paperboy (Arcade)
15   Galaga (Arcade)
16   Pitfall (Atari)
17   Q-Bert (arcade) *#@&!

18   Smash TV (Arcade)
19   Space Invaders (Arcade)
20   Dig dug (arcade)
21   Centipede (Arcade) [the non human variety]

22   Leisure Suit Larry (PC)
23   Asteroids (Arcade)
24   SimCity (PC)
25   Tetris (any)


Damn! I've never seen anybody get that many. Almost perfect. That's what I call being in tune with topic!

Leisure Suit Larry! (http://forum.rifftrax.com/Smileys/default/hi5.gif)

I think I had one perfect list and that was with superpowers..

With this one, I went for not only what I loved but what is deservedly iconic. Do I remember it off the top of my head easily? Is it something that i i say "hey remember X?" people will say Oh yeah!. Stuff like Gauntlet I remember for gameplay and the the "Wizard needs food badly.." stuff. Tetris is well.. everyone knows that one.. Basically I was stuff I loved to play, or what deserved to be on the list. I played Metroid a bit back in the day, and I know of Oregon Trail from the 'death by Dysentery' jokes. But both are so well know and well made, i felt they deserved a place.

Title: Re: LoC 50 - Top Video Games of the '80s (And before!) - Today's High Scores
Post by: Asbestos Bill on July 29, 2011, 07:33:07 PM
18   Smash TV (Arcade)

There was an arcade version I could have put on there?? Dammit!


I played Ultima V, but I got stuck in the underworld. That blue door is so tempting... And I've read great things about Ultima IV, but unfortunately they applied only to the PC version, so I couldn't play it on an NES emulator.


And this may have been post-80s, but did anybody have an Amiga and happen to play Extreme Violence? That was an awesome game.
Title: Re: LoC 50 - Top Video Games of the '80s (And before!) - Today's High Scores
Post by: MontyServo on July 29, 2011, 08:04:26 PM
1 - Space Invaders - Atari 2600
2 - Galaga - Arcade
3 - Super Mario Brothers - NES
4 - Pitfall - Atari 2600
5 - Pong
6 - Adventure - Atari 2600
7 - Star Wars - Arcade
8 - Tron - Arcade
9 - Dragon's Lair - Arcade
10 - Breakout - Atari 2600
11 - 1942 - Arcade
12 - Arkanoid - Arcade
13 - Battlezone - Arcade
14 - Defender - Arcade
15 - Return Of The Jedi - Arcade
16 - Major Havoc - Arcade
17 - Bubble Bobble - Arcade
18 - Choplifter - C64
19 - Duck Hunt - NES
20 - Pole Position - Arcade
21 - Zork - C64
22 - Shinobi - Arcade
23 - Time Pilot - Arcade
24 - Bubbles - Arcade
25 - Burgertime - Arcade

Adventure FTW!
(http://img51.imageshack.us/img51/8128/adventure.gif)
Title: Re: LoC 50 - Top Video Games of the '80s (And before!) - Today's High Scores
Post by: Russell on July 29, 2011, 08:26:44 PM
I heard Crazy Balloon was pretty awesome too.
Title: Re: LoC 50 - Top Video Games of the '80s (And before!) - Today's High Scores
Post by: Doctor Who? on July 29, 2011, 09:01:34 PM
Pretty good list.

Here is what I voted for.

1)Tetris
2)Super Mario Brothers(NES)
3)Super Mario Bros. 3
4)Star Trek the Motion Picture The Game(Vectrex)
5)Galaga
6)Ms.Pac Man
7)Scramble(arcade)
8)Duck Hunt(NES)
9)Pong
10)Pole Pesition 2
11)Robotron 2084
12)Asteroids
13)Missile command
14)Centapede
15)Super Mario Brothers 2
16)Bomberman
17)Phantasy Star
18)Star Wars(arcade)
19)Donkey Kong
20)MegaMan
21)Froger
22)Combat(atari 2600)
23)Battlezone(arcade)
24)Space Invaders
25)Root Beer Tapper(arcade)
Title: Re: LoC 50 - Top Video Games of the '80s (And before!) - Today's High Scores
Post by: Rattrap007 on July 30, 2011, 02:50:16 AM
18   Smash TV (Arcade)

There was an arcade version I could have put on there?? Dammit!

Whoops. looks like it may have been 1990 as the release..
Title: Re: LoC 50 - Top Video Games of the '80s (And before!) - Today's High Scores
Post by: Russell on July 30, 2011, 08:40:57 AM
4)Star Trek the Motion Picture The Game(Vectrex)
A.... A VECTREX game?! Oh come on, the 80's did so much better. , I saw the AVGN
play that game and it looked terrible, sounded terrible and the game play didn't strike me as the
least bit fun. Give me Tempest anytime.

Gah, I just did another double take... Duck hunt? Really?
Title: Re: LoC 50 - Top Video Games of the '80s (And before!) - Today's High Scores
Post by: Doctor Who? on July 30, 2011, 08:47:42 AM
4)Star Trek the Motion Picture The Game(Vectrex)
A.... A VECTREX game?! Oh come on, the 80's did so much better. , I saw the AVGN
play that game and it looked terrible, sounded terrible and the game play didn't strike me as the
least bit fun. Give me Tempest anytime.

Hey that was my first gaming system and it was great.  I could play it while my parents were watching Tv and The Star Trek game was a really good space shooter.  It was closer to wing commander then Tempest.
Title: Re: LoC 50 - Top Video Games of the '80s (And before!) - Today's High Scores
Post by: Russell on July 30, 2011, 08:53:15 AM
Hey that was my first gaming system and it was great.  I could play it while my parents were watching Tv and The Star Trek game was a really good space shooter.  It was closer to wing commander then Tempest.
I suppose it might have been wonderful back then, but when i made my list, I could only
conceive of composing it with 20/20 hindsight. What I mean is I couldn't judge games by
how I looked at them when I was a kid, but how I see them all now. I mean if I viewed games
how you do, then I would have loved that portable Galaxian arcade thing I had when I was a kid,
unfortunately it was terrible. There was another mock arcade cabinet miniature I had when I was
a kid called Cosmic Clash, and looking back then, it was pretty awesome and it's still fun to play
to this day, but it's still nothing, absolutely nothing compared to a lot of the NES titles of the 80's in terms
of music, game play, and immersion.
Title: Re: LoC 50 - Top Video Games of the '80s (And before!) - Today's High Scores
Post by: Doctor Who? on July 30, 2011, 08:57:47 AM
Hey that was my first gaming system and it was great.  I could play it while my parents were watching Tv and The Star Trek game was a really good space shooter.  It was closer to wing commander then Tempest.
I suppose it might have been wonderful back then, but when i made my list, I could only
conceive of composing it with 20/20 hindsight. What I mean is I couldn't judge games by
how I looked at them when I was a kid, but how I see them all now. I mean if I viewed games
how you do, then I would have loved that portable Galaxian arcade thing I had when I was a kid,
unfortunately it was terrible. There was another mock arcade cabinet miniature I had when I was
a kid called Cosmic Clash, and looking back then, it was pretty awesome and it's still fun to play
to this day, but it's still nothing, absolutely nothing compared to the NES titles of the 80's in terms
of music, game play, and immersion.

Well the fact is the star trek game was very ahead of it's time.  You could fly anywhere,go to warp to reach new areas,and you had to earn points to refuel your ship.  Alot of things that turned up in the game play of 90s flight games were in that game.
Title: Re: LoC 50 - Top Video Games of the '80s (And before!) - Today's High Scores
Post by: Russell on July 30, 2011, 09:02:47 AM
Hey that was my first gaming system and it was great.  I could play it while my parents were watching Tv and The Star Trek game was a really good space shooter.  It was closer to wing commander then Tempest.
I suppose it might have been wonderful back then, but when i made my list, I could only
conceive of composing it with 20/20 hindsight. What I mean is I couldn't judge games by
how I looked at them when I was a kid, but how I see them all now. I mean if I viewed games
how you do, then I would have loved that portable Galaxian arcade thing I had when I was a kid,
unfortunately it was terrible. There was another mock arcade cabinet miniature I had when I was
a kid called Cosmic Clash, and looking back then, it was pretty awesome and it's still fun to play
to this day, but it's still nothing, absolutely nothing compared to some of the NES titles of the 80's in terms
of music, game play, and immersion.
Well the fact is the star trek game was very ahead of it's time.  You could fly anywhere,go to warp to reach new areas,and you had to earn points to refuel your ship.  Alot of things that turned up in the game play of 90s flight games were in that game.
I suppose so. Still though, when I think about what makes games like Wing Commander and the
follow up Starlancer so fun, I think about shooting down my wingman without consequences(except
of course in Starlancer you'd instantly face a scolding and a firing squad) and having my butt kissed
for shooting down so many kilrathi while my (dead) wingman scored zero. :D
Title: Re: LoC 50 - Top Video Games of the '80s (And before!) - Today's High Scores
Post by: Pak-Man on July 30, 2011, 01:11:22 PM
It's hard to describe, but there's a charm to the nuts and bolts games that the '80s produced. There weren't any huge video game production companies trying to get everyone to repeat themselves. It was all about cobbling together a game and putting it out there. Long load-times, clunky sprites. They all encouraged creativity. Some weren't up to the challenge, but a lot of great stuff emerged from that situation.

I saw a Vectrex in action for the first time at the Classic Gaming Expo last year. Now I want one bad. :^)
Title: Re: LoC 50 - Top Video Games of the '80s (And before!) - Today's High Scores
Post by: Russell on July 30, 2011, 03:03:00 PM
It's hard to describe, but there's a charm to the nuts and bolts games that the '80s produced. There weren't any huge video game production companies trying to get everyone to repeat themselves. It was all about cobbling together a game and putting it out there. Long load-times, clunky sprites. They all encouraged creativity. Some weren't up to the challenge, but a lot of great stuff emerged from that situation.

I saw a Vectrex in action for the first time at the Classic Gaming Expo last year. Now I want one bad. :^)
Yannow Pak... a Neo Geo would be such a better investment :D a pricey one to be sure, but a good
investment. :)
Title: Re: LoC 50 - Top Video Games of the '80s (And before!) - Today's High Scores
Post by: Johnny Unusual on July 30, 2011, 03:04:35 PM
I'm glad I'm not the only one to put in Hitchhiker's Guide.  Man, the first part of the game is frustrating enough.
Title: Re: LoC 50 - Top Video Games of the '80s (And before!) - Today's High Scores
Post by: Russell on July 30, 2011, 03:29:41 PM
I'm glad I'm not the only one to put in Hitchhiker's Guide.  Man, the first part of the game is frustrating enough.
Here's the thing, when I think frustrating, I think that should be a word not at all associated with video games.
That's why I frickin' HATE BATTLETOADS!!!! I mean DAMN! Even the version on the Genesis was a horrible
Bitch Goddess.
Title: Re: LoC 50 - Top Video Games of the '80s (And before!) - Today's High Scores
Post by: Invader_quirk on July 30, 2011, 03:43:05 PM
1) Kirby's Adventure [Not from the 80's, so everything below it was bumped up one]
[bold]2) Super Mario Bros 3
3) Mega Man 2
4) Punch-Out!!! (NES)
5) Psychic 5 (Arcade)
6) Super Mario Bros
7) Super Mario Bros 2
8 ) Metroid
9) Star Wars (vector arcade game)[/bold]
10) River City Ransom (NES)
[bold]11) Bad Dudes (NES)
12) The Legend of Zelda [/bold]
13) Qix (Arcade)
[bold]14) Donkey Kong (Arcade)
15) Joust (Arcade)[/bold]
16) Flicky (Arcade)
[bold]17) Duck Hunt
18) Dig Dug[/bold]
19) Mr Do
20) Mr Do's Wild Ride
21) Lode Runner (Arcade)
22) Tennis for Two
[bold]23) Gauntlet (Arcade)[/bold]
24) Donkey Kong Jr. (Arcade)
25) 005

Title: Re: LoC 50 - Top Video Games of the '80s (And before!) - Today's High Scores
Post by: Doctor Who? on July 30, 2011, 04:46:16 PM
It's hard to describe, but there's a charm to the nuts and bolts games that the '80s produced. There weren't any huge video game production companies trying to get everyone to repeat themselves. It was all about cobbling together a game and putting it out there. Long load-times, clunky sprites. They all encouraged creativity. Some weren't up to the challenge, but a lot of great stuff emerged from that situation.

I saw a Vectrex in action for the first time at the Classic Gaming Expo last year. Now I want one bad. :^)

Yeah I am still sad my Vectrex died back in 99.
Title: Re: LoC 50 - Top Video Games of the '80s (And before!) - Today's High Scores
Post by: Russell on July 30, 2011, 06:42:11 PM
It's hard to describe, but there's a charm to the nuts and bolts games that the '80s produced. There weren't any huge video game production companies trying to get everyone to repeat themselves. It was all about cobbling together a game and putting it out there. Long load-times, clunky sprites. They all encouraged creativity. Some weren't up to the challenge, but a lot of great stuff emerged from that situation.

I saw a Vectrex in action for the first time at the Classic Gaming Expo last year. Now I want one bad. :^)

Yeah I am still sad my Vectrex died back in 99.
Cough Cough *Neo Geo*
Title: Re: LoC 50 - Top Video Games of the '80s (And before!) - Today's High Scores
Post by: ColeStratton on July 31, 2011, 11:16:46 AM
Pretty nice list, a lot of my picks made it...where's the love for King's Quest? And Time Soldiers was awesome. It was one of those joysticks that could be turned 360 degrees so you could move your solider's weapon around while you moved. You battled through several time periods. My list (I'd bold them, but the bold button doesn't seem to work anymore):

1. Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles II: The Arcade Game (Arcade)
2. Time Soldiers (Arcade)
3. Super Mario Brothers 3 (Nintendo)
4. King’s Quest (PC)
5. The Oregon Trail (PC)
6. Mike Tyson’s Punch-Out! (Nintendo)
7. Super Mario Brothers (Nintendo)
8. Gauntlet (Arcade)
9. Rampage (Arcade)
10. DuckTales (Nintendo)
11. The Legend of Zelda (Nintendo)
12. Dragon’s Lair (Arcade)
13. Tetris (Nintendo)
14. Defender (Atari)
15. Ms. Pac-Man (Arcade)
16. Shinobi (Arcade)
17. Metroid (Nintendo)
18. Kid Icarus (Nintendo)
19. Super Mario Brothers 2 (Nintendo)
20. Pitfall (Atari)
21. Strider (Nintendo)
22. Lode Runner (Commodore 64)
23. Ninja Gaiden (Nintendo)
24. Castlevania (Nintendo)
25. Double Dragon (Arcade)
Title: Re: LoC 50 - Top Video Games of the '80s (And before!) - Today's High Scores
Post by: Johnny Unusual on July 31, 2011, 11:26:54 AM
Sweet list Cole.  I'm pretty out of the loop on Oregon Trail though.  Sounds pretty unique.
Title: Re: LoC 50 - Top Video Games of the '80s (And before!) - Today's High Scores
Post by: Asbestos Bill on July 31, 2011, 01:23:14 PM
Sweet list Cole.  I'm pretty out of the loop on Oregon Trail though.  Sounds pretty unique.

The hell? You've seriously never encountered one of Oregon Trail's 50* incarnations?

*(complete BS, but there are ten, according to Wikipedia)
Title: Re: LoC 50 - Top Video Games of the '80s (And before!) - Today's High Scores
Post by: Rattrap007 on July 31, 2011, 01:24:51 PM
Sweet list Cole.  I'm pretty out of the loop on Oregon Trail though.  Sounds pretty unique.

I thought it was mandatory in grade school to play the game. Either you  are way over 30s or really really young..
Title: Re: LoC 50 - Top Video Games of the '80s (And before!) - Today's High Scores
Post by: Johnny Unusual on July 31, 2011, 04:33:57 PM
Plus Canadian.  We never had a game about the glory and dangers of western expansion.  Nor have they made a game in Canada about some of our settlers: no game about how much it sucked to immigrate from Ukraine to find the land you bought nearly unfarmable and had to quickly build a shelter out of grass and mud to survive the winter so you COULD TILL THE HARD STONE STREWN LAND IN SPRING!  I had ancestors who lived in caves by the river in the early 1900's!   Sorry, sorry, lost my train of thought there.

Oh, wait, I guess some schools did have it.  Just not ours.  And I guess there was a game about the hardships of Canadian history in a game called the Yukon trail.  There's also an amazon trail game, which I really hope ends like Aguire: the Wraith of God.
Title: Re: LoC 50 - Top Video Games of the '80s (And before!) - Today's High Scores
Post by: Asbestos Bill on July 31, 2011, 06:03:15 PM
There's also an amazon trail game, which I really hope ends like Aguire: the Wraith of God.

Yeah, I had that one too. It wasn't about settling and surviving, though. More about cataloging wildlife.
Title: Re: LoC 50 - Top Video Games of the '80s (And before!) - Today's High Scores
Post by: Russell on July 31, 2011, 09:49:43 PM
I must say i am shocked at the lack of love for Mega Man 2.
Title: Re: LoC 50 - Top Video Games of the '80s (And before!) - Today's High Scores
Post by: Asbestos Bill on August 01, 2011, 05:38:39 AM
I just picked Mega Man as a representative for the whole series since I've only played #9.
Title: Re: LoC 50 - Top Video Games of the '80s (And before!) - Today's High Scores
Post by: Invader_quirk on August 01, 2011, 06:40:45 AM
I must say i am shocked at the lack of love for Mega Man 2.

Quote
#14 – Mega Man 2

???
Title: Re: LoC 50 - Top Video Games of the '80s (And before!) - Today's High Scores
Post by: RVR II on August 01, 2011, 06:56:27 AM
I must say i am shocked at the lack of love for Mega Man 2.
It never really appealed to me back in the day.. :-\
Title: Re: LoC 50 - Top Video Games of the '80s (And before!) - Today's High Scores
Post by: Rattrap007 on August 01, 2011, 07:28:03 AM
Plus Canadian.

Ahh. Well we never had any games about beavers and lumberjacks, so guess you get a pass.
Title: Re: LoC 50 - Top Video Games of the '80s (And before!) - Today's High Scores
Post by: Russell on August 01, 2011, 11:47:22 AM
I must say i am shocked at the lack of love for Mega Man 2.

Quote
#14 – Mega Man 2

???
Shoulda been NUMBER 1!!!! :D

I must say i am shocked at the lack of love for Mega Man 2.
It never really appealed to me back in the day.. :-\
*jaw drops to floor*
Title: Re: LoC 50 - Top Video Games of the '80s (And before!) - Today's High Scores
Post by: D.B. Barnes on August 01, 2011, 11:49:44 AM
I must say i am shocked at the lack of love for Mega Man 2.

Quote
#14 – Mega Man 2

???
Shoulda been NUMBER 1!!!! :D

I must say i am shocked at the lack of love for Mega Man 2.
It never really appealed to me back in the day.. :-\
*jaw drops to floor*

Fucking people and their opinions on stuff.
Title: Re: LoC 50 - Top Video Games of the '80s (And before!) - Today's High Scores
Post by: Russell on August 01, 2011, 12:02:36 PM
Fucking people and their opinions on stuff.
Oh come on Barnes, I'm just saying most other gamers not including myself consider it to be
the best game of the 8 bit era of the 1980's. And I'm certainly not saying others aren't entitled
to their opinion. I mean damn where did everybody get this idea that I'm a fascist?
Title: Re: LoC 50 - Top Video Games of the '80s (And before!) - Today's High Scores
Post by: sarcasm_made_Easy on August 01, 2011, 12:52:46 PM
It was all those posters of mr Hitler we saw you putting up.
Title: Re: LoC 50 - Top Video Games of the '80s (And before!) - Today's High Scores
Post by: Russell on August 01, 2011, 01:42:38 PM
It was all those posters of mr Hitler we saw you putting up.
No no no, those were posters of Katekyo HITMAN reborn! ;)

http://www.youtube.com/v/D1ZP553LQD8?version=3&hl=en_US&rel=0